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U. S. Government and Citizenship, 2nd Quarter

00.0 Welcome (Citizenship)

Course Description

The goal of this course is to foster informed, responsible participation in public life. Knowing how to be a good citizen is essential to the preservation and improvement of United States democracy.

Upon completion of this course the student will understand the major ideas, protections, privileges, structures, and economic systems that affect the life of a citizen in the United States political system.

This course is recommended for seniors due to their proximity to voting and draft age.

Class Overview

Welcome to Government and Citizenship! Before starting any assignment, please read the following:

  • Most assignments include links to the US Government HippoCampus website. These videos help you understand the main ideas in this class.  If you can't get the video to play, you can also read the material instead.
     
  • If you have a problem or question, inform the teacher immediately; don't wait. The teacher's contact information is under the link Teacher Contact Information.
     
  • You must have an active email address with the same address you registered with at the Electronic High School. You must answer all inquiries by the instructor. Failure to comply results in a lower grade.
     
  • When you write an essay, it must be long enough to cover all aspects of the question.
     
  • Keep copies of all the work you submit. This protects your work in an emergency. You may need to resubmit the work.
     
  • Every assignment must be completed in the order that they appear in the course syllabus. You must complete each assignment with 60% or better in order to pass the class.  You can redo assignments for a higher score if you would like.
  • You must finish the course within ten weeks.  There are pacing suggestions at the end of each assignment, to help you stay on track to finish in the ten weeks or less.
     
  • Please use a word document to create your assignments so you can copy and paste your finished work into the assignment submission form, always saving a copy for yourself. If you have specific concerns, e-mail the instructor. Never share your copy with another student.

Assignment Format and Rules

Top of the page:

  • the name of student
  • the unit number
  • the name of the assignment
  • the number and question written out with the answer

Body of the assignment:

  • questions written out (properly numbered and ordered)
  • answers in complete sentences listed with questions (properly numbered and ordered)
  • proper writing mechanics

Plagiarism:

  • do your own work
  • document your information sources
  • you signed up as an individual, do your work as an individual
  • plagiarism is against the law and the honor code at EHS

Scoring Procedures and Grading:

  • The teacher will leave feedback for each assignment in the comments section or on the rubric.  Check these comments to make sure you are doing the assignment correctly.
  • The first essay assignment for each unit is a "Warm Up" activity for that unit. Use facts to back up your opinion. Use the internet or a high school government textbook to help you research and write the answer to the essay questions.
  • Make sure that you put research you have found on the internet in your own words.  If you copy and paste answers from the internet, you will receive a zero.
  • You are required to complete a quiz as you complete each unit. As soon as you have completed that quiz, you get immediate feedback showing you which questions you answered correctly. This score is automatically recorded in the grade book. Retaking each quiz until you have scored at least 85% will ensure you are ready for the final test.
     
  • When you complete the final assignment for the course, submit the "Ready" assignment to let your teacher know you think you have finished. When the teacher marks that assignment with a score of "1", you may set up your final test. Then follow the procedure outlined by EHS for that proctored exam. Your final is graded automatically and you can check your score when you finish. Your teacher will let you know your final grade for the course.
     
  • You must finish the class, including taking the final, in ten weeks or less.  At the end of ten weeks, you will be dropped from the class.
  • Your assignments and quizzes count for 75% of your grade. The final test counts for 25%.  The final is made up of questions from the quizzes and exams in that quarter.  The final has fifty multiple-choice questions and each question is worth eight points.

Grading Scale: 
95-100 A
94-90 A-
89-87 B+
86-83 B
82-80 B-
79-77 C+
76-73 C
72-70 C-
69-67 D+
66-63 D
62-60 D-
No credit - below 60

I look forward to working with you. This will be a terrific quarter!

00.00 *Student supplies for U.S. Government and Citizenship

Needed Materials

  • Internet: You must have access to the internet in order to take this course. The answers to all questions can be found on the internet or in a high school government textbook. Each lesson or assignment will list suggested links. We suggest you read or view the material found on the provided links. As you work through your assignment, feel free to choose other links on your own to find needed information.
  • Powerpoint: Microsoft Powerpoint Viewer - download If you don't have Powerpoint on your computer, you can download a free viewer from Microsoft.
  • Online Textbook: A free online textbook, American Government and Politics is available online (see link below) If you would like a print textbook to help you, we suggest this following.

Optional Print Textbook: American Government: a Complete Coursebook, by Ethel Wood and Stephen C. Sansone. Great Source Education Group Houghton Mifflin Copyright: 2000. ISBN #0-669-46795-2. May be purchased directly from the sites listed below or from the Mountain State Schoolbook Depository in Clearfield, Utah by calling 1-800-995-1444 and use reference #046795 or Depository Reference #GRS-10116 or call "Great Source" directly at 1-800-289-4490 and use reference #046795 to order book. You could also get the book from Walmart.com, Valorebooks.com, Booksamillion.com or from a local bookstore. Approximate price is $33.10 and price may vary and may or may not include tax or handling fee.

00.00 Welcome (Citizenship)

00.00.01 About Me (Citizenship)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

This assignment will make sure I have all the contact information I need to stay in touch with you throughout the course. Also, It will give me an opportunity to get to know you a little better before you begin. Please submit the following information for your About Me assignment:

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  • Name of high school where you take most of your classes,
  • Your year in school,
  • Date you enrolled in this class,
  • The reason you enrolled in this class (make-up credit, free up room for elective, graduate early, etc.),
  • Your email address,
  • Parent or counselor e-mail address.

Next, write two short paragraphs to the teacher. In the first paragraph introduce yourself to me. Tell me about any hobbies or activities you are involved in.

In the second paragraph discuss plagiarism. What is it, and why is it unfair to everyone involved in its use?

Lastly, the EHS Honor Code states:  "As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers, and staff with respect."

Please type up and include the following sentence with your assignment:

“I have read the EHS Honor Code and agree to abide by its principles.  I understand the ten week timeline to finish this class and commit to finish it in ten weeks or less in order to earn credit.”

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


00.01.01 Student Software Needs

 

Students need access to a robust internet connection and a modern web browser.

This class may also require the Apple QuickTime plug-in to view media.

For students using a school-issued Chromebook, ask your technical support folks to download the QuickTime plug-in and enable the plug-in for your Chromebook.

$0.00

04.00 Unit 4 (Citizenship2)

The Constitution set up three main branches of our government: legislative, executive and judicial.
In unit three, we studied the legislative branch and began a study on the executive branch with a look at the Presidency. In this unit, we will be looking more at the executive branch and the bureaucracy as well as the judicial branch.

04.00 Warm-Up Activity (Citizenship2)

04.00.01 Warm-Up Activity (Citizenship2)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 15 minutes

Warm-Up #4 Activity:

After reading the information at the website above, write a thorough, two-paragraph answer for this question. Do not just copy and paste what you see or read. That is plagiarism. Answer the question in your own words and be sure to document your sources.

Is the bureaucracy considered a branch of government when it is not even mentioned in the Constitution? Why are our perceptions about the bureaucracy negative when they should be positive  What part of the bureaucracy affects you?

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.01 Executive Branch and Bureaucracy (Citizenship2)

The President does not run the executive branch of government all alone, or even with just the help of the Vice-President. Even George Washington quickly found he needed advisers and other help; our country has only gotten bigger and more complicated since then. Each President chooses members of his cabinet, each to head up a different department and act as an expert adviser in that area, and appoints many 'bureaucrats' to manage the paperwork and daily details of running the executive branch.
Go to the websites below to read the information on the Executive Branch and Bureaucracy; there will be several URLs for you to study. Be prepared to answer study questions on the material.
Topics and vocabulary you will need to understand for this lesson include the following, below, information. Keep your work as your own information to help understand this lesson better.

bureaucracy public policy
EOP OMB
NSC NEC
Cabinet post Department of State
Department of Defense Department of Justice
Chief of Staff ambassador
Treasury Interior
Commerce Labor
independent regulatory commission government corporation
independent executive agency bureaucrats
civil service Pendleton Act
OPM Hatch Act
injunction Iron Triangle
red tape

04.01 Executive Branch and Bureaucracy (Citizenship2)

04.01.01 Study Questions - Bureaucracy and the Current Cabinet (Citizenship2)

teacher-scored 60 points possible 30 minutes

President Obama meets with his CabinetPresident Obama meets with his Cabinet To help you with this assignment, go to the websites above and read the information to help you answer the questions. Copy and paste the following section between the rows of asterisks below into a word-processing document. Complete your work and save a copy for yourself on your computer. Submit your work by pasting it into the assignment submission window. **************************************************************************************************************

Bureaucracy

1. What is bureaucracy?

2. The purpose of the bureaucracy is to carry out public policy. What does that mean?

EOP/White House

3. What is the EOP? 

4. When was the EOP created?  Which president created it?

OMB

5. What is the OMB? What do they do?

NSC

6. What is the NSC? When and why was it created?

NEC

7. What is the NEC? When and why was it created?

Cabinet

8. How many members are in the President's cabinet today?

9. What were George Washington's first three Cabinet posts? 

10. Why are there so many more Cabinet posts now? 

Cabinet

11-25. List the 15 Cabinet Positions, and who currently serves in each position.

Appointments

26. Who selects the heads of the Cabinet departments?

27. Who has to approve the heads of these departments?

28. What five factors does the President use to select the people who work in these departments?

Cabinet Duties

29-30. Name the President's top two cabinet positions (not including the Vice-President). Why are they considered most important?

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.01.02 Current Cabinet Exam (Citizenship2)

computer-scored 50 points possible 20 minutes

Current Cabinet This test will assess your understanding of the concepts presented in this section of Unit 4. You may take this quiz multiple times, but you must score at least 85% as your final score.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.01.03 Study Questions - The Historical Cabinet and Bureaucracy (Citizenship2)

teacher-scored 60 points possible 30 minutes

President Reagan meets with his Cabinet: NARA image, public domainPresident Reagan meets with his Cabinet: NARA image, public domain

The links above will help you answer these questions. Copy and paste the section between the rows of asterisks below into a word-processing document on your computer. Complete your work and save a copy for yourself. Submit your work by pasting it into the assignment submission window. ****************************************************************************************************************

Historical Cabinet

1. In George Washington's cabinet, what three members were created first?

2. What did these first cabinet appointees argue about?

Government Agencies

3. The government created independent agencies. Why?

4. What is an independent regulatory commission? Give an example.

5. What is a government corporation? Give an example.

6. What is an independent executive agency? Give an example.

7.Which government agency deals with regulations for clean air and water?

Bureaucrats

8. Who are bureaucrats?

9. Which government agency has the largest number of employees? For what department do these employees work?

Power/Bureaucracy

10. Why do we need to have a bureaucracy?

11. What four groups influence the bureaucracy?

12. What can Congress do to influence the bureaucracy?

13. What can the President do to influence the bureaucracy?

14. What can the Courts do to influence the bureaucracy?

Civil Service

15. What is civil service?

16.  In 1883 10% of federal employees were members of the civil service.  What is the percentage today?

Appointments

17. What criteria did President Washington use to appoint members to cabinet positions?

18. However, Thomas Jefferson changed the criteria; how?

Jackson

19. Andrew Jackson added more people to government positions than all the presidents before him combined; why?

20. What did Jackson call his system?

1881

21. That all changed in 1881 when what happened to President Garfield? Why?

Pendleton Act

22. In 1883 the Congress created the Pendleton Act. What is that?

OPM

23. What is the OPM? What does it do?

Hatch Act

24. Definition: What is the Hatch Act that was passed in 1939?

25. Amendment: The government waited until 1993 to remedy the Hatch Act by doing what?

Injunction

26. What is an injunction?

Iron Triangle Iron Triangle: (image from Wikimedia Commons, public domain)Iron Triangle: (image from Wikimedia Commons, public domain)

27-28. What is the iron triangle? Using the websites in 04.1 and this chart, explain in paragraph form in your own words: What is the iron triangle and how does it work?

Red Tape

29. What is red tape? Why is that associated with the bureaucracy?

30. From the chart below (or on the BLS website): What cabinet or agency of the bureaucracy probably affects you the most? Explain your answer. [Note that the numbers are in thousands; that is, "100" means 100,000.]

**************************************************************************************************************** Bureau of Labor Statistics chart: (US government chart, public domain)Bureau of Labor Statistics chart: (US government chart, public domain)

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.01.04 The Historical Cabinet Exam (Citizenship2)

computer-scored 50 points possible 30 minutes

The Historical Cabinet This test will assess your understanding of the concepts presented in this section of Unit 4. You may take this quiz multiple times, but you must score at least 85% as your final score.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.02 Courts and the Judicial Branch (Citizenship2)

See the links below to read the information on the courts and judicial branch; there will be several URLs for you to study. Be prepared to answer study questions on the material.
The Supreme Court building: image from Wikimedia Commons, Noclip, public domainThe Supreme Court building: image from Wikimedia Commons, Noclip, public domain
A couple of important concepts that apply to all branches of government, but come up most often in the federal courts or Supreme Court, are 'strict constructionism' and 'loose constructionism.'

Strict constructionism, in the days of the Founding Fathers, meant the belief that anything not covered in the Constitution should be preserved as rights of the states, and the federal government shouldn't pass any laws about it. As Thomas Jefferson said, "I consider the foundation of the Constitution as laid on this ground: That 'all powers not delegated to the United States, by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States or to the people.' [10th amendment.] To take a single step beyond the boundaries thus specially drawn around the powers of Congress, is to take possession of a boundless field of power, no longer susceptible of any definition." At the time, Jefferson was arguing against the formation of a federal bank. However, a few years later, Jefferson authorized the Louisiana Purchase (buying land from France--what is now most of the western United States), which certainly went beyond any power mentioned explicitly in the Constitution.

Loose constructionism, in the days of the Founding Fathers, meant the belief that anything not FORBIDDEN in the Constitution was allowed, and the federal government could pass laws about it. As Alexander Hamilton said, "That every power vested in a government is in its nature sovereign, and includes, by force of the term, a right to employ all the means requisite and fairly applicable to the attainment of the ends of such power, and which are not precluded by restrictions and exceptions specified in the Constitution, or not immoral, or not contrary to the essential ends of political society." At the time, he was arguing in favor of establishing a federal bank, which was done (in spite of Jefferson's opposition).

In modern times, most conservatives are in favor of strict constructionism, and what they mean by that is that federal or Supreme Court judges should not go beyond a literal interpretation of the Constitution. Most liberals are in favor of loose constructionism, and what they mean by that is that judges should be able to try to figure out how the Constitution should be applied to modern life and circumstances the Founding Fathers could not foresee, even if the issues are not specifically mentioned in the Constitution.

An example of a modern issue in question is whether the use of wiretapping and GPS tracking violate the Constitution's prohibition against 'unreasonable search and seizure.'

Topics and vocabulary you will need to understand for this lesson include the following:

Federal court jurisdiction
federal judge civil (or tort) law
criminal law original jurisdiction
appellate jurisdiction defendant
prosecutor Roe v. Wade
judicial review strict constructionist
loose constructionist writ of mandamus
Court of Appeals District Court
senatorial courtesy nominee
Supreme Court justice Chief Justice
precedent stare decisis
judicial activism judicial restraint

04.02 Study Questions - Federal Courts (Citizenship2)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 35 minutes

View the Supreme Court presentation, from the American Government section of the HippoCampus website, to help you with these questions. Copy and paste the section between the rows of asterisks below into a word-processing document on your computer. Complete your work and save a copy for yourself. Submit your work by pasting it into the assignment submission window. *****************************************************************************************************************

Constitution

1. What Article in the Constitution created the Federal Court?

Jurisdiction

2. What does jurisdiction mean?

Federal Judges

3. What are the qualifications to become a federal judge?

Types of Laws

4. How is tort (civil) law different from criminal law?

5. Which (civil or criminal) is used the most in our justice system? Why?

Original Jurisdiction

6. What is original jurisdiction?

Appelate Jurisdiction

7. What is appellate jurisdiction?

Civil Law/Criminal Law

8. How is a civil case initiated (who starts the process, and why)? How is a criminal case initiated?

Defendant

9. What is a defendant?

Roe v. Wade

10. Roe v. Wade is probably the most controversial Supreme Court case in history - When? Who? Why? What happened? Explain in your own words.

Judicial Review

11. What is judicial review?

Strict vs Loose

12. Judges are either strict or loose constructionists when they interpret the Constitution. What does that mean?

Mandamus

13. What is a writ of mandamus?

Courts

14. What is the highest court in the land? Where is it located? Can any other court be higher than it?

15. The Federal Court System has 13 Courts of Appeals. What do they do, and where is the nearest one to you?

16. There are approximately 94-96 Federal District Courts. What do they do? Where is the nearest one to you?

Judges

17. Who appoints federal judges? How long do they serve?

18. How do you get rid of a bad federal judge?

19. What are the five/six criteria that are used to pick federal judges?

Courtesy

20. What is senatorial courtesy?

Nominees

21. Who also have to approve federal or Supreme Court justices?

Supreme Court

22. How many justices sit on the Supreme Court? Were there always that number? Why?

23. Who is the current Chief Justice of the Supreme Court?

24. How many members of the Supreme Court have to decide to take a case, and why would they take that case?

Stare decisis

25. What are "precedent" and "stare decisis"? What do judicial activism and judicial restraint, as used by the Federal Court system, mean?

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


Other presentations at the first link that you are likely to find useful for this assignment include "Constitutional and Legislative Courts," "Judicial Activism and Restraint," "Judicial Review and Construction," "The Selection Process" and "The Confirmation Process."

04.02.02 Federal Courts Exam (Citizenship2)

computer-scored 50 points possible 30 minutes

Federal Courts This quiz will assess your understanding of the concepts introduced in this section of Unit 4. You may take this quiz multiple times, but you must score at least 85%.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.03 Unit 4 test (Citizenship2)

computer-scored 50 points possible 30 minutes

Unit Test 4 You may take this quiz multiple times, but you must score at least 85% as your final score.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.00 Unit 5 (Citizenship2)

Civil rights demonstrators in 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial: NARA image, public domainCivil rights demonstrators in 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial: NARA image, public domain
In the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson wrote of "certain inalienable rights." The Bill of Rights (the first ten amendments to our Constitution) lays out many basic rights we have as US citizens. As Americans living in the 21st century, we take for granted that we have rights the government is not allowed to take away or infringe upon. However, in other places and times, common citizens had (in some places, still have) no expectations that the government would respect their "rights." On the contrary, it was commonplace for a king, dictator, and his representatives to do whatever they liked--even if that meant taking the lives or property of other citizens.

What rights do you have as a citizen of the United States? Not unlimited rights--the government DOES have authority to make some decisions or take some actions that you may not agree with. In this unit, we will be looking at civil rights and civil liberties.

05.00 Warm-Up Activity (Citizenship2)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 20 minutes

Warm-Up Activity

Many students across America say the Pledge of Allegiance on a regular basis in their schools. For this assignment you will write two paragraphs. In the first, you will take the Pledge line by line, and tell what it means to you. "I Pledge Allegiance" "to the flag" "of the United States of America" "and to the Republic" "for which it stands" "one nation" "under God" "indivisible" "with liberty and justice for all." The most controversial part of the Pledge is the phrase "under God." Has it always been in the Pledge? When was it added? Explain in the second paragraph.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.01 Civil Liberties (Citizenship2)

Doug Kerr image, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 GenericDoug Kerr image, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic

Civil Liberties

The Bill of Rights lists certain civil liberties that our government may not restrict. The idea of civil rights was not new when our Constitution was written--you can see some of the same ideas in the Magna Carta and other, earlier documents. However, it was unusual for a country to have written protections of civil liberties then. Now it has become much more common.

Civil liberties are the inherent ('natural' or 'inalienable') rights of all human beings. The Bill of Rights was intended to prevent our government from infringing upon those rights. No laws may restrict our civil liberties, which are enumerated in the Bill of Rights. For example, any person in the United States has the civil liberty to practice his or her chosen religion (or not to practice any religion at all).Civil liberties limit the government's power and prevent the government from intervening in the lives of its citizens. Civil liberties, which are inherent freedoms upheld, not granted, by the government, are distinct from civil rights. Civil rights differ primarily from civil liberties in that civil rights aim to guarantee equal treatment while civil liberties are those rights and freedoms that the government may not impede upon and are protected by the Constitution.

Go to the links below to read the information on civil liberties; there will be several URLs for you to study. Be prepared to answer study questions on the material.

Topics and vocabulary you will need to understand for this lesson include the following (This is not part of the assignment you turn in to me, but keep for your own information to help understand this lesson better):

Bill of Rights freedoms
incorporated amendment
establishment clause free exercise clause
freedom of religion freedom of the Press
freedom of speech slander
libel treason
sedition censorship
commercial speech vs. political speech due process
procedural due process substantive due process
citizen citizenship
immigrant alien
resident alien illegal alien
refugee INS
writ of habeas corpus ex post facto law
bill of attainder probable cause
search warrant exclusionary rule
fifth amendment indictment
double jeopardy Miranda warning

Dane Hillard image, CC Attribution 2.0 GenericDane Hillard image, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic

05.01 Civil Liberties (Citizenship2)

05.01 Study Questions - Civil Liberties (Citizenship2)

teacher-scored 90 points possible 60 minutes

Copy and paste the section between the rows of asterisks into a word-processing document on your computer. Complete your work and save a copy for yourself. Submit your work by pasting it into the assignment submission window. ***********************************************************************************************************

Constitution

1. What is the Bill of Rights?  Where do we find it in the Constitution?

2. Why were the Bill of Rights included with the Constitution?

3. These rights are called freedoms. Most deal with what?

4. But these first ten rights only protected the American people from who?

5. In order for the Bill of Rights to mean anything, they must be incorporated. What does that mean?

Civil Liberties/Civil Rights

6. We have two protections with the Bill of Rights: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights. What do these two phrases mean?

1st Amendment

7. What are the five freedoms guaranteed by the 1st Amendment?

8. Which of the five freedoms in the 1st Amendment actually is divided into two parts?  What are the two parts of the freedom?

Freedom of Religion

9. Why are there so many cases about freedom of religion?  Name one freedom of religion Supreme Court case.

Freedom of Press and Speech

10. Do we have complete Freedom of Speech and the Press? Why?

11. In 1942, the Supreme Court defined two types of speech. Describe them.

12. Can the government regulate speech? How?

13. What is slander?

14. What is libel?

15. What are treason and sedition?

16. What does freedom of the press mean?

17. Does freedom of the press mean that high school newspapers can print anything they want? Why?

18. What is censorship?

Due Process

19. What is due process?

20. What is procedural due process?

21. What is substantive due process?

22. Where do we find due process in the Bill of Rights?

Bill of Rights

23. Who wrote most of the Bill of Rights in the first place? Why did they write them, when they had rights already mentioned in the Constitution?

Citizenship

24. What are the three ways to become a citizen of the United States?

25. What are the ways you can lose your citizenship?

26. If immigrants and aliens come here and do not have citizenship, are they still protected by the rights that protect all of us? Why?

27. What does immigrant mean? Then what is an alien?

28. Name the largest group of immigrants in America.

29. What is a resident alien?  What is an illegal alien?

30. What is a refugee?

31. What and who is the INS?

32. If you are not a citizen, what are you called?

Habeas Corpus

33. What is a writ of habeas corpus?

Ex Post Facto

35. What is an ex post facto law? What does our Constitution say about such laws?

Attainder

36. What are bills of attainder?  Where would you find these three guarantees (that is, habeas corpus, ex post facto, and bills of attainder)?

4th Amendment

37. How does the 4th Amendment apply to good people and bad?

Search Warrants

38. What is a search warrant?

39. What is probable cause?

40. Name five situations the police do not have to have a search warrant.

41. What is the exclusionary rule?

5th Amendment

42. Who does the fifth amendment protect, and how?

Indictment

43. What is an indictment?

Double Jeopardy

44. What is double jeopardy? Is there ever a time that you could be tried for the same crime twice? How?

Miranda

45. What is the Miranda Warning?

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.01.02 Civil Liberties Exam (Citizenship2)

computer-scored 50 points possible 30 minutes

Civil Liberties This quiz will assess your understanding of the materials covered in this section of Unit 5. You may take this quiz multiple times, but you must score at least 85% as your final score.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.02 Civil Rights (Citizenship2)

Civil rights march on Washington DC, 1963: NARA image, public domainCivil rights march on Washington DC, 1963: NARA image, public domain

What Are Your Civil Rights?

Beyond your basic civil liberties, what civil rights do you have as a citizen?
Civil rights are the rights of all citizens to be treated equally under the law. The Civil War amendments and later laws (such as the Voting Rights act, Title IX, and the Civil Rights act) help define our civil rights. For example, every citizen who is at least 18 years old, registered to vote and not a convicted felon has the right to vote in an election. However, if you are not a citizen, you do not have the right to vote.
Go to the links below to read the information on the civil rights; there will be several URLs for you to study. Be prepared to answer study questions on the material.

Topics and vocabulary you will need to understand for this lesson include the following:

6th amendment rights 8th amendment rights
2nd amendment rights eminent domain
privacy rights discrimination
Civil War amendments segregation
Jim Crow laws de jure segregation
de facto segregation Brown vs. the Board of Education
Civil Rights Act of 1964 Voting Rights Act of 1965
Civil Rights movement feminist
Title IX comparable worth
ADA affirmative action
quota reverse discrimination
conscientious objector prior restraint
Shield laws gag order
wiretapping bail
grand jury NAACP
NOW minority group
ethnic group ERA
AARP equal protection under the law

05.02 Civil Rights (Citizenship2)

05.02 Study Questions - Civil Rights (Citizenship2)

teacher-scored 90 points possible 60 minutes

Copy and paste the section between the rows of asterisks below into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work and save a copy for yourself. Submit your work by pasting it into the assignment submission window for this assignment. *******************************************************************************************************

The Amendments

1. In the Sixth Amendment we have two rights; what are they?

2. The Eighth Amendment deals with what?

3. What does the Second Amendment apply to?

4. What is eminent domain?

5. What are privacy rights? What case, that deals with privacy rights is the most famous in history?

6. What is discrimination? Does the Constitution say anything about it? Why?

7. What are the three Civil War Amendments?

Segregation

8. What is segregation?

9. What are Jim Crow laws?

Civil Rights Movement

10. What is de jure segregation?

11. What is de facto segregation?

12. In 2014, we celebrated the 60th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education Court case. Describe the case. Why is that case so important?

13. What is the Civil Rights Act of 1964?

14. What is the Voting Rights Act of 1965?

15. What and when was the Civil Rights Movement?

Women's rights

16. Why are there Civil Rights laws just for women?

17. What is a feminist?

18. What is Title IX?

19. What is comparable worth?

20. What do we mean by equality for older Americans?

ADA

21. What rights do disabled Americans have?

22. What does the American Disabilities Act say?

23. Do Civil Rights apply to sexual orientation? Explain.

Affirmative Action

24. What is affirmative action?

25. Why was it created?

26. What is a quota, in regard to Affirmative Action? When and why did they use quotas?

27. What is reverse discrimination? What court case dealt with reverse discrimination?

28. Why can a conscientious objector legally avoid serving in the U.S. military?

29. What is prior restraint?

30. What are Shield Laws?

31. What are gag orders?

32. Is wiretapping or electronic surveillance permitted under the Constitution?

33. What is bail?

34. Bail is not fair to whom? Why?

35. Can a state legally censor books, movies, plays, etc. that it considers to be obscene? Explain.

36. What is the purpose of a grand jury? Do they determine the guilt or innocence of anyone?

Special groups

37. What is the NAACP?

38. What is NOW?

39. What was the ERA Amendment, and why did it not pass?

40. What is a minority group?

41. What is an ethnic group?

42. What is AARP?

43. What do all these groups want from our government?

44. What rights do you want our government to protect the most?

45. Which is more important: The right of a defendant to a fair trial, or the right of the public to know about that trial through the media? Justify your answer.

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.02.02 Civil Rights Exam (Citizenship2)

computer-scored 70 points possible 30 minutes

Civil Rights This quiz will assess your understanding of the concepts taught in this section of Unit 5. You may take this quiz multiple times, but you must score at least 85% as your final score.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.02.03 Argumentative essay (Citizenship2)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 45 minutes

For years, there has been controversy about whether "under God" was or was not an appropriate phrase to include in the Pledge, and whether people should even be required to say the Pledge. Since we can't go back in a time machine and ask them straight out, we can only look at what they 'said' in their letters, speeches, and other writings. Since "under God" was added after the original Pledge of Allegiance was written we sometimes wonder what the Founding Fathers would have thought of the controversy over it.

Choose one of the Founding Fathers, from the list below.  Would your chosen Founding Father agree with the addition of "under God" to the pledge? Learn their belief system and write 5 paragraph argumentative essay supporting your point. Your essay should contain an introduction, 2 body paragraphs with quites that support your ideas, 1 paragraph with a quote that may seem to differ but you can reason that it does support your idea. A conclusion paragraph followed by the sources of your quotes cited in MLA or APA format. Details in the rubric below.

  • Thomas Jefferson
  • James Madison
  • John Adams
  • Thomas Paine
  • George Washington
  • Benjamin Franklin

Use direct quotes, from the websites listed below, by the man you chose. You MAY read other, more recent opinions as background for writing your essay, but don't quote them (and definitely don't copy and paste them into your paper--that would be plagiarism). Here are some questions to ask yourself during your research. Consider both the exact words, and any implications. DON'T just write answers to these questions for your essay as a means to guide your learning. This paper should show what you have learned through your research.

  • Does this quote show whether or not he believed in God?
  • Does this quote express any opinion about religion, and/or the relationship between religion and government?
  • How do his stated beliefs compare to yours?

Regardless, you need to use quotes from his own words as evidence and document your sources in your essay.

Structure Content Points possible
Introduction (one paragraph) State the name of the Founding Father and their position (whether or not you think he agreed with 'under God' in the pledge). If you are going to argue that he did (or did not) agree with 'under God'. 5 points
Evidence (one paragraph) Explain one quote you find in your research that helps support your position. Consider both the exact words, and reasonable inferences you can make from these words. 5 points
Evidence or examples (one paragraph) Explain another quote that helps support your position. Consider both the exact words, and reasonable inferences you can make from these words. 5 points
Defend your position (one paragraph) Explain one piece of evidence (quote) or an example that seems to disprove your position, and why your position is still correct in spite of this. You must use evidence, not just opinion! 5 points
Conclusion (one paragraph) Sum up your argument, and suggest at least one way this is relevant to government issues today and/or how you feel about this issue. 5 points
Works cited List all books and web sites you used in researching this issue. Be sure to use the sites contained in the URL's. Be sure your sources are cited in MLA or APA format. 5 points

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.02.03 Argumentative essay (Citizenship2)

05.03 Unit 5 test (Citizenship2)

computer-scored 50 points possible 30 minutes

Unit 5 Test You may take this quiz multiple times, but you must score at least 85% as your final score.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.00 Unit 6 (Citizenship2)

Economy & Government

You might not think of our economic system as being part of government, but our form of government determines, to a large extent, the way our businesses and economy run. In the United States, anyone may buy or start a business, and most businesses are owned by individuals, partnerships or corporations--not the government. However, that's not the only government-economic construct. In some countries, economics and government merge: the government owns many or all of the businesses.

In this unit, we'll be looking at different economic systems, and also at state and local governments. Remember that the U.S. Constitution specifically reserves many powers for the states. The state government grants some powers to more local (county or city/town) governments. Thus, at least three levels of government affect your life and our country's economic system.

06.00 Unit 6 Warm-Up Activity (Citizenship2)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 20 minutes

Essay Writing

Write a comprehensive answer (one paragraph per question) to the three questions below:

1. Why do we have a government system for the nation, state, and local areas?

2. What are the roles of the governor, what state officials help the governor, and what are the qualifications for being the governor of Utah?

3. What is the name of our economic system, and why do we have such system for our nation?

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.01 Economics (Citizenship2)

Economics is a big topic; this will be a brief introduction to a few of the key ideas of economics.

Topics, people, and vocabulary you will need to understand for this lesson include the following (This is not part of the assignment you turn in to me, but keep for your own information to help understand this lesson better):

capitalism communism
socialism Karl Marx
supply and demand bank
credit union cost of living
labor union monopoly
cost of living blue collar
white collar inflation
recession depression
stock market stock
currency deflation

Go to the links below to read the information on economics; there will be several URLs for you to study. Be prepared to answer study questions on the material.

06.01 Economics (Citizenship2)

06.01 Study Questions - Economics (Citizenship2)

teacher-scored 40 points possible 30 minutes

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work by pasting it in to the assignment submission window for this assignment. **************************************************************************************************

Economics

1.What is economics?

2. What is capitalism?

3. What is communism?

4. What is socialism?

5. Who is Karl Marx, and what is his economic theory?

6. What are the laws of supply and demand?

7. How is the price of anything determined?

8. What do banks do? What do credit unions do?

9. What does it mean when we say "cost of living?"

10. What is the purpose of a labor union?

11. What is a monopoly?

12. Why are monopolies good and bad?

13. What is a blue collar worker?

14. What is a white collar worker?

Define (make sure you use the definition that relates to the economy):

15. Inflation

16. Recession

17. Depression

Stock Market

18. Why do TV news programs always tell you what the stock market is doing? Why would you or your family want to own stock?

19. What does owning stock mean?

Currency

20. Why do we use the currency we use? How does it impact our economy? Why is it important to know how our economy works?

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.01.02 Economics Exam (Citizenship2)

computer-scored 50 points possible 30 minutes

This quiz will assess your understanding of the material presented in this section of Unit 6. You may take this quiz multiple times, but you must score at least 85%.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.02 About state government, and more about economics (Citizenship2)

Utah state capitol building: Robert Cutts image, CC Attribution 2.0 GenericUtah state capitol building: Robert Cutts image, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic
Go to the links below to read the information for this lesson; there will be several URLs for you to study. Be prepared to answer study questions on the material.

Topics and vocabulary you will need to understand for this lesson include the information below (This is not part of the assignment you turn in to me, but keep for your own information to help understand this lesson better).

powers of the states Supremacy Clause
Full Faith and Credit clause initiative
referendum recall
governor ordinance (not to be confused with "ordnance"!)
mayor commission
sales tax income tax
property tax excise tax
Federal Reserve Board Keynesian economics
fiscal policy national debt
deficit spending progressive income tax
customs duties
tariffs entitlement programs
welfare public assistance
foreign aid corporation
cooperative economic system
political system public notice

06.02 About state government, and more about economics (Citizenship2)

06.02 Economics, State and Local Government Assignment(Citizenship2)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 60 minutes

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US Constitution

1. What are some things, according to the US Constitution, that a state cannot do?

2. What are powers only a state has, and what are some examples of them?

3. What does the Supremacy Clause do and where is it found?

4. What does the Full Faith and Credit clause do and where is it found?

5. What does the state do for primary and secondary education?

6. What is an initiative?

7. What is a referendum?

8. What is a recall?

Utah Constitution

9. What are the qualifications for being Governor of Utah?

10. How long does a Governor serve, and is there a limit to how long one can serve in Utah?

11. How is the Utah state legislature set up?

12. How many members are there, and when and where do they meet?

13. What is the term of a member of the Utah House of Representatives? Senator?

14. What are the qualifications for each house of the state legislature?

15. What are some ways that citizens of a state can get directly involved in the legislative process?

16. How are members of the Utah State Supreme Court selected?

17. Is it more powerful that the United States Supreme Court? Why?

18. What does the Utah State Supreme Court do?

19. How many judges are on it? How did they get appointed there?

20. What is the main purpose of state government?

21. Who is the Governor of your state? What party does she/he belong to?

22. What is an ordinance? Who passes these ordinances?

23. Name an ordinance in your given area.

24. Do we have county government? Why?

25. Do we have city government? Why?

26. Who usually runs a city government? How did they get in that position?

27. What does a City Commission do?

28. What does a City Council do?

Budget and taxes

29. Where do most states spend most of their money?

30. Name three other areas where states spend most of their money.

31. Where does a state get its money to spend on these services?

32. What is a sales tax?

33. What is an income tax? What is the difference between a flat income tax and a progressive income tax?

34. What is a property tax?

35. What is an excise tax? Name one.

Government role in economy

36. What is government's role in our economy?

37. What does the Federal Reserve Board do?

38. What is Keynesian economics?

39. What does fiscal policy mean?

40. When our government says we (as a country) are in debt, what does that mean?

41. Why did we get into so much debt?

42. Can you ignore our national debt? Why?

43. What is a deficit?

44. What is deficit spending?

45. What kind of national income tax do we have?

46. Do you pay more taxes the richer you become? Why? Do you pay a higher percentage of your income in taxes the richer you become? Is this different at the state and federal levels?

47. What are Customs, Duties or Tariffs?

48. How many days does the average worker work to pay his taxes for the year?

49. The largest amount of money the government spends is on what are called entitlement programs. What are these?

50. But 16% of the National Budget must be set aside every year to pay what?

51. Where does the national government get most of its money from? (be specific)

52. Where does the state get most of its money from? (be specific)

53. What is welfare? Then what is public assistance?

54. Do we give money to foreign countries? Why?

55. What is a corporation? What is good about a corporation? Anything bad about them? Name one corporation.

56. What is a cooperative? Do you have one near where you live? What does it do?

57. What is the name of our economic system?

58. Name another economic system, and a country that uses that system.

59. What do we call our government system in the United States?

60. Give me the name of a political system different from the United States, and a country that uses that system.

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.02.02 State Government Exam(Citizenship2)

computer-scored 75 points possible 30 minutes

This test will assess your understanding of the concepts presented in this section of Unit 6. You may take this quiz multiple times, but you must score at least 85%.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.02.03 Unit 6 test (Citizenship2)

computer-scored 50 points possible 30 minutes

You may take this quiz multiple times, but you must score at least 85%.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.02.04 US Government second quarter project (Citizenship)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 90 minutes

You may continue to work on later assignments before you finish this project. The instructions are included here so that you can begin work and have the project completed before you take your final test.

Second Term Project: Multimedia slide show For this quarter's term project (100 points) you will be using PhotoStory (if you have a Windows computer) or iMovie, iPhoto and/or Keynote (if you have a Mac) to create a multi-media slide show about one of the topics we have covered this quarter. Choose a topic you are interested in, and you will enjoy the project more. Here are some suggested topics:

Recent Supreme Court cases

First Amendment

Rights of the Accused

Civil Rights (general, or focus on a specific group you are interested in- an ethnic group, women, etc.)

Immigration

Gun Control

Homeland Security

Socialism vs. Capitalism

Economic Systems

If there is a topic that is not on the list, but that fits in with what we have studied this quarter, write me a message about it, and I can approve it.

DO NOT copy and paste information--write in your own words. About Photo Story:

Photo Story is a great product made by Microsoft that allows you to create colorful and exciting presentations with your own photos or photos you get off of the Internet. This program allows you to add text, music, and motion to your photos so that your story comes alive. Follow the instructions below to create yours! The best part--Photo Story is free and completely safe (it is a Microsoft download, so you don't need to worry about it damaging your computer). Before you use the program, you will need to collect the pictures for your slide show. Use Internet resources such as Google images. Be sure to look for pictures with the highest resolution possible. Save your pictures in a folder. Then you are ready to begin!

Steps to creating your Photo Story project:

1. Check to see if your computer has Photo Story already. Click on Start and All Programs. PhotoStory should be listed there. If not, go to the link below where you can download a free copy of the program. Now you're ready to get started!

2. Open Photo Story 3 for Windows.

3. Choose Begin a New Story. Click Next.

4. Click on Import Pictures. Browse to the folder you're using pictures from. Choose your pictures for your presentation. As you add pictures, they will pop up in the Film Strip at the bottom of the screen. You can rearrange your pictures by clicking and dragging.

5. Save your presentation by clicking on Save Project. Do this often so you won't lose your project and all your hard work!

6. You can add text (captions) to your photos if you like on the next screen. Choose your photo, then add the text in the text box on the right. You may experiment with your text format using the tools above the text box. Click Next.

7. The next screen allows you to add audio files to your project, such as narration. You can use the built-in microphone on your computer, or you can use a plug-in microphone to record your material. This is a requirement and narration should be added.

8. This screen also allows you to Customize Motion for each picture in your project. Experiment with the motions to get the look you want. You can click Preview to see how your project looks so far.

9. Save your project!

10. Click Next.

11. The next screen allows you to add background music to your project. You may use audio files you have saved on your computer or files from the Photo Story collection. To use your own files, click on Select Music. To use files from the Photo Story collection, click on Create Music. When you find a song you like, click OK. You'll see your music in an audio track above your pictures/slides. You can Preview your project as well from this screen.

12. Click Next.

13. If you are finished creating your project, and you believe it's perfect, you'll want to save it as a finished project. Click Browse under File Name and choose where you would like to save your project. Click Next and Photo Story will save your project as a Windows Media file. This will allow Windows users to open your project on any Windows computer.

For more detailed instructions, tips and tricks, go to the excellent tutorial video on Photostory, linked below. To see a sample Photo Story project on the Civil Rights Movement, see the link below. NOTE: If you are working on a Mac, and absolutely do not have access to a PC (Public library? School library? Friend's house?) you may use the program iPhoto, iMovie, Keynote or similar to create a project that meets the same requirements/specifications as the one described below. Depending on how much experience you have with multimedia, you may find it easier to do this assignment on a PC.

Here is how the project will be graded:

PhotoStory Rubric This project is worth 100 points, broken down as follows

  excellent good average unsatisfactory
Content 15 -30 pictures, appropriate music from resources folder, narration that is clear, articulate, accurate and based on research but written in the student's own words, title slide that is professional and clear, and a credit slide listing resources used. All work is done at a highly professional level and is consistent. (30 points) 15 -30 pictures, appropriate music from resources folder, narration that is clear, accurate and based on research but written in the student's own words, title slide that is professional and clear, and a credit slide listing resources used. (24 points) less than 15 pictures, music may not seem to go with presentation or not be consistent throughout, narration is not always clear and lacks facts and/or may not all be the student's own words, title slide and credits may not be not included or be incomplete. (18 points) less than 15 pictures, may lack other elements, such as title page, credits, and narration. Narration may be unclear, inaccurate, lack facts and/or may not all be the student's own words. Work is incomplete and is not clearly done. (6-12 points)
Audio The audio is clear and includes music in the background that is at appropriate levels to allow narration to be heard easily. Narration is clear, with smooth delivery. The music does not distract from the presentation, but complements it. (20 points) The audio is clear and includes music in the background that is at appropriate levels to hear narration. Narration is clear. The music may not be consistent throughout, and there may be 1 or 2 audio mistakes in slideshow. (16 points) The audio is mostly clear and includes music in the background that is generally at appropriate levels to hear narration. Narration may not always be clear. The music may distract from the presentation. (12 points) The audio and/or narration may not be clear and may include music mistakes with audio levels; or narration is absent or lacking. (4-8 points)
Pictures The slideshow contains 15-30 pictures. All pictures are clear and appropriate to the topic discussed, contributing to the viewer's understanding of the topic. (This means, for example, that air pollution slideshows contain pictures that are clearly related to air pollution.) Pictures, graphs, etc… are not pixilated, but are correct size to display correctly. (20 points) The slideshow contains 15-30 pictures. All pictures are clear and appropriate to the topic discussed, but may not contribute much to content. Pictures, graphs, etc… are not pixilated, but display adequately. (16 points) The slideshow may contain less than 15 pictures. Up to five pictures may not be clear and/or may be pixilated or unrelated to topic. (12 points) The slideshow may contain less than 15 pictures. Six or more pictures may not be clear, or are pixilated or unrelated to the topic. (4-8 points)
Technical/overall The slideshow lasts 2 ½ - 3 ½ minutes and covers a topic with facts stated and shown through pictures, graphs, and charts. The pictures are not pixilated, but clear and appropriate to topic. The story contains clear title slide and credit slide listing all resources used. The story is saved as a project and as wmv file. (30 points) The sources are cited in MLA or APA format. The slideshow lasts 2 ½ - 3 ½ minutes and covers a topic with facts stated and shown through pictures, graphs, and charts. One or two slides may have technical problems, but the remainder are clear and appropriate to topic. The story is saved as a project and as wmv file. (24 points) The slideshow may be less than 2 ½ minutes or does not cover the topic with facts and appropriate pictures. Up to five slides may have technical problems, and the remainders are clear and appropriate to topic. The story is saved as a project and as wmv file. (18 points) The slideshow may last less than two minutes. Topic is not covered with factual information. It lacks info and pictures that clearly explain topic. More than five slides may have technical problems or be inappropriate to the topic. The story may not be saved in two formats.(6-12 points)

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.02.05 Review Essays for Units 4, 5, and 6 (Citizenship)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 60 minutes

Final Essay

To finish Units 4-5-6 you must write an essay for each of the following questions. You may use whatever sources you would like. Each essay will be worth 10 points. You need to write 7-10 sentences to adequately complete each essay.  I am looking for both the QUALITY and QUANTITY of your answers. You may see some of these same questions on the proctor final so make sure you know the answers to all of them.

Current Cabinet

1. People either hate or love bureaucracy. Why?

Historical Cabinet

2. What is the significance of the Iron Triangle?

Courts and Judicial

3. What is the debate between judicial activism and judicial restraint?

Civil Liberties and Rights

4. The Supreme Court of the United States is studying a case that would put limits on the Miranda Rule. What do you think should be done to protect due process rights and still maintain law and order in a free society?

5. What is the difference between civil rights and civil liberties?

6. Find Martin Luther Kings "I Have A Dream" speech from 1963 when the civil rights movement marched on Washington. Are we closer to his dream of equality since he made that speech? Use examples.

Economics

7. Our economic system is called capitalism. What are the pros and cons of capitalism?

State and Local Government

8. Should the government break up big corporations and monopolies? Why?

9. The Federal Government makes states adhere to many government policies. Name and explain five policies that affect you where you are.

10. What did this government course teach you about your relationship between being a good citizen and knowing how our government works?

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.02.06 Second quarter extra credit (Citizenship)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 90 minutes

THIS EXTRA CREDIT ASSIGNMENT IS WORTH 25 POINTS

What does this Oath of Citizenship mean?

"I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by law; that I will perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of the United States when required by law; that I will perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by the law; and that I take this obligation freely without mental reservation or purpose of evasion; so help me God. In acknowledgement whereof I have hereunto affixed my signature."

As you explain it, note that the INS, in some cases, does leave out a part to this oath for new citizens. Which part would you think it is?

Answer the following 100 questions that are those required to be answered if you want to become a naturalized citizen of the United States.

1. What are the colors of our flag?

2. How many stars are there on the flag?

3. What color are the stars on our flag?

4. What do the stars on the flag mean?

5. How many stripes are there on the flag?

6. What color are the stripes?

7. What do the stripes on the flag mean?

8. How many states are there in the Union?

9. What is the 4th of July?

10. What is the date of Independence Day?

11. Independence from whom?

12. What country did we fight during the Revolutionary War?

13. Who was the first President of the United States?

14. Who is the President of the United States today?

15. Who is the Vice-President of the United States today?

16. Who elects the President of the United States?

17. Who becomes President of the United States if the President should die?

18. For how long do we elect the President?

19. What is the Constitution?

20. Can the Constitution be changed?

21. What do we call a change to the Constitution?

22. How many changes or amendments are there to the Constitution?

23. How many branches are there in our government?

24. What are the three branches of our government?

25. What is the legislative branch of our government?

26. Who makes the laws in the United States?

27. What is the Congress?

28. What are the duties of the Congress?

29. Who elects the Congress?

30. How many senators are there in Congress?

31. Can you name the two senators from your state?

32. For how long do we elect each senator?

33. How many representatives are there in Congress?

34. For how long do we elect the representatives?

35. What is the executive branch of our government?

36. What is the judiciary branch of our government?

37. What are the duties of the Supreme Court?

38. What is the Supreme Court law of the United States?

39. What is the Bill of Rights?

40. What is the capital of your state?

41. Who is the current governor of your state?

42. Who becomes President of the United States if the President and the Vice-President should die?

43. Who is the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court?

44. Name the thirteen original states.

45. Who said, "Give me liberty or give me death?"

46. Which countries were our enemies during World War II?

47. What are the 49th and 50th states of the Union?

48. How many terms can the President serve?

49. Who is the head of your local government?(Title)

50. According to the Constitution, a person must meet certain requirements in order to be eligible to be President. Name the requirements.

51. Who was Martin Luther King Jr.?

52. Why are there 100 Senators in the Senate?

53. Who selects the Supreme Court Justices?

54. How many Supreme Court Justices are there?

55. Why did the Pilgrims come to America?

56. What is the head executive of a state government called?

57. What is the head executive of a city government called?

58. What holiday was celebrated for the first time by the American colonists?

59. Who was the main writer of the Declaration of Independence?

60. When was the Declaration of Independence adopted?

61. What is the basic belief of the Declaration of Independence?

62. What is the national anthem of the United States?

63. Who wrote the Star-Spangled Banner?

64. Where does freedom of speech come from?

65. What is the minimum voting age in the United States?

66. Who signs bills into law?

67. What is the highest court in the United States?

68. Who was the President during the Civil War?

69. What did the Emancipation Proclamation do?

70. What special group advises the President?

71. Which President is called the Father of our country?

72. What Immigration and Naturalization Service form is used to apply to become a naturalized citizen? (The number or name)

73. Who helped the Pilgrims in America?

74. What is the name of the ship that brought the Pilgrims to America?

75. What are the 13 original states of the U.S. called?

76. Name three rights of freedom guaranteed by the Bill of Rights.

77. Who has the power to declare war?

78. What kind of government does the United States have?

79. Which President freed the slaves?

80. In what year was the Constitution written?

81. What are the first 10 Amendments to the Constitution called?

82. Name one purpose of the United Nations.

83. Where does Congress meet?

84. Whose rights are guaranteed by the Constitution and the Bill of Rights?

85. What is the introduction to the Constitution called?

86. Name one benefit of being citizen of the United States.

87. What is the most important right granted to U.S. citizens?

88. What is the United States Capitol?

89. What is the White House?

90. Where is the White House located?

91. What is the name of the Presidents official home?

92. Name the rights guaranteed by the first amendment.

93. Who is Commander-in-Chief of the U.S. military?

94. Which President was the first Commander-in-Chief of the U.S. military?

95. In what month do we vote for the President?

96. In what month is the new President inaugurated?

97. How many times may a Senator be re-elected?

98. How many times may a Congressman be re-elected?

99. What are the two major political parties in the U.S. today?

100. How many states are there in the United States today?

101. Who is the U.S. Congressman from your district?

102. Who is the mayor of your town?

103. Do all people over 18 have to vote?

104. What must you do in order to vote?

105. Do you have to obey the laws of your country and local area?

106. Do you need to know those laws?

107. Do you need to know some of the laws of states that you are visiting, especially driving laws?

108. All states, except one, allow you to cross into them by car without stopping. Which one stops you and asks what is in your car?

109. How did you become a citizen of the United States?

110. What happened on September 11, 2001? Why did it happen?

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


16.01.03 Topic Two: Squares, Cubes and Beyond