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U. S. History II, 1st Quarter

00.0 Start Here - Introduction to this Class (U.S. History)

Course Description

Understanding United States history is essential for the continuation of our democratic society. This course helps students make connections between their world and the rich heritage of United States history. The course is designed as a survey of American history with an emphasis on post-Reconstruction American (1876- Present), but also includes a review of the earlier period.

Class Overview 

The US History II course is a full 1.0 credit but is broken into four quarter classes. You may enroll for one, two, three or all four quarters, BUT you can enroll in only one quarter at a time!

Each quarter of World Civilizations generates a .25 credit. If you do not turn in any work within the first week after you register, you may be dropped from this course.

You have up to 10 weeks to finish each quarter after you are enrolled. Please following the pacing recommendations for each assignment. Once you have completed a quarter (including all work and tests), you can request to be enrolled in the next quarter.

*****Course Requirements*****

To take this class, you MUST have:

1.  A computer with internet access.

2.  Word processing software.  You MUST be able to submit documents in one of the following file formats: .doc/.docx (Microsoft Word), .ppt/.pptx (PowerPoint), or .pdf.   If you use another program such as Pages or Open Office, make sure that you save your documents in one of the above formats before you upload them.  If your word processing software doesn't allow you to save in one of the above fiile formats, you will need a .pdf converter. Several are available free online from sources such as adobe, nemopdf, cutepdf, etc. 

3.   Quicktime Reader, Acrobat Reader,and a PowerPoint reader (all available free online)

 

How to Begin the Class

If you are reading this description you have begun the class.  Be sure you have read through all the information in Module 1 before moving on to Module 2. Complete the following in order to unlock the course content, found in Module 3.

1. Read the Start Here information thoroughly. 

2. Click the link for the About Me assignment. Then click the "submit assignment" button and enter the required information.  When you are happy with your assignment, click the save button and it will submit the assignment to your instructor. Completing this and earning at least 3/5 points will unlock the course material(Module 3).

3. The course material found in Module 3 consists of the subject material and the corresponding assignments. You should work through the material by clicking each link, reading through the material and viewing the URLs. 

4. Completing assignments: The assignment instructions are found in the Lessons.  Some assignments need to be copied and pasted into a word document from astericks to astericks and then the questions answered. I suggest then saving the word document and be sure that your answers are bolded or italicized. 

5. Submitting assignments: To submit assignments go to the class homepage and click on the link with the A-page next to it that corresponds with the Lesson number where you found the assignment. You should then copy your saved assignment and paste it in the answer box.  Your answers should be bolded or italicized.  If you prefer you may upload the file with your answers. Then save your work and it will be submitted for grading.

6. Submitting Quizzes: The quiz link matches the lesson where the instructions for the quiz are found. Follow the instructions and answer the quiz questions. Then be sure to save the quiz for grading.  Quizzes may be re-taken.

7. You must follow the EHS HONOR CODE: "As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers and staff with respect."

8. You have ten weeks to complete the course.

Prerequisites:

There are no prerequisites for this course.

How Work is Graded:

Most assignments have a corresponding rubric and a minimum score requirement. A general rule to understanding the score received is to check the rubric to see where points were lost. Assignments may be resubmitted for more credit. Work should be checked for errors before it is submitted. All work is graded as in the order it is turned in and in a timely manner. 

Final Proctored Exam

The proctored exam must be monitored by a EHS proctor.  You must score 60% in order to pass the course. If you do not earn the required 60% inform your teacher immediately. After taking the test send your teacher a message stating your name and that you have completed the proctored exam for the quarter of the course in which you are enrolled.

You may use 2 pages, handwritten, single-sided notes during the exam.

There are 100 questions on the exam consisting of multiple choice, true false, and four essay questions. 

Final Grade

The grade for the course is based on nine or ten quizzes (worth 10 or 15 points each), video questions, written essay and the final exam (worth 100 points). The results for each quiz and a portion of the final exam will be available as soon they are completed. If you have questions or concerns about your score on any of the work for the course, please contact the teacher and we will decide how to proceed. Students must score at least 60% overall and 60% on the final exam in order to earn credit in this class. 

Grading Scale

A: 93-100%

A-: 90-92

B+:87-89

B: 83-86

B-: 80-82

C+: 77-79

C: 73-76

C-: 70-72

D+: 67-69

D: 63-66

D-: 60-62

 

00.00 *Student supplies for U.S. History II

Requirements: 

1.  A computer with internet access.  This course does not have a specific textbook, but uses many Internet links to help you learn about American history.

2.  Word processing software.  You MUST be able to submit documents in one of the following file formats: .doc/.docx (Microsoft Word), .ppt/.pptx (PowerPoint), or .pdf.   If you use another program such as Pages or Open Office, make sure that you save your documents in one of the above formats before you upload them.  If your word processing software doesn't allow you to save in one of the above fiile formats, you will need a .pdf converter. Several are available free online from sources such as adobe, nemopdf, cutepdf, etc. 

3.   Quicktime Reader, Acrobat Reader,and a PowerPoint reader (all available free online)

 

00.00 About Me (US HistoryII)

teacher-scored 5 points possible 15 minutes

With an online class it is more challenging to get to know our students. We want you to be a person and not just a name on an email. Although this introduction will never take the place of being in class with you every day or two, it helps you tell your teacher what's important to you.

1.  Write a paragraph (at least 5 sentences) to your teacher introducing yourself. Tell about your interests, family, school goals, or anything else that describes you.  Include any information that you think it might be important for me to know.

2.  Following the paragraph, include your personal information in any format.  Include:

  • The school you attend
  • Your counselor's name and email address
  • What grade you are in
  • contact information for you (please include at least an email address, but a phone would be great)
  • contact information for your parent/guardian
  • A statement letting me know that you have viewed the short clip "How to review your assignments" found at the link below
  • A statement letting me know you understand the 10-week time limit and that you agree to abide by the EHS honor code:

"As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers and staff with respect."

Make sure you've carefully reviewed all information in the "Start Here" section--especially the Course Requirements--and let's get to work.

This is a graded assignment, so use proper sentence structure including capitalization, punctuation and spelling. For details on the grading of this assignment please refer to the rubric below. 

ABOUT ME Rubric

                                                Indicators Points
Prompt: Prompt is complete with mention of goals, interests and other introductory information. 1
Sentence: A well written assignment will include; complete sentences using correct grammar and punctuation. Must be at least 5 sentences in length.  1
Contact: Contact information for parent & student are included.  1
School: Current school and grade included as well as counselor's email address. 1
Acknowledge: Includes the student's acknowledgement of the EHS Honor Code, the 10-week time frame for the class, and viewing video clip. 1

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


00.01

00.01 - Assignment Expectations (US Hsitory II)

To get you started, I want to review what I will expect as you begin your assignments for this class.  For the first assignment and several that follow, you will be required to access source information on-line, and then articulate what you learn in a brief summary.  This sounds straightforward, but there are two pitfalls I want you to avoid: 1)  including irrelevant information, and 2) plagiarizing.

1.  Including irrelevant information

Remember that this is U.S. history, so I'm looking for a response that includes how this person, event, or idea was important to U. S. history. 

For example, you'll be asked to investigate John Locke.  While multiple sources will explain his job as a physician or his theories on human development, those things, while interesting, aren't relevant to our topic of study here.  What I want to know is what did he say that shaped American thinking, inspired Thomas Jefferson to pen the Declaration of Independence, and influenced early colonists to resist British rule.

When formulating your responses, make sure you can sift through the information, evaluate what is relevant or valuable to the question you are asked, and include only those details in your summary.

2. Plagiarizing - taking wording directly from the source material.

We all know that copying an entire essay from 123help me.com and putting your name on it is plagiarizing—straight-up cheating, but can you copy just a sentence from a source?  What if you change or leave out some of the words?  Plagiarizing?  Yep. 

What if you copy the phrase “The Declaration of Independence was written in 1776” from a source?  Is that plagiarizing?  Probably not; you've stepped into the common knowledge arena here.  But if you take this phrase from a source--"The signing of the Declaration of Independence was the most important event in 1776”--that's definite plagiarism.  Kind of tricky, right? 

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

You've just read and agreed to the EHS honor code, but many students do not fully understand plagiarism and how to avoid it in their writing.   To help you see how to use source material and avoid plagiarism, I'd like you to access the plagiarism tutorial found at the link below.  Complete steps 2-7.  If you don't at least score 8/10 or higher on the quiz, reivew the material and re-take the quiz.  Then copy and paste your quiz to the assignment submission box.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


00.01.01

00.01.01 Student Software Needs

 

Students need access to a robust internet connection and a modern web browser.

This class may also require the Apple QuickTime plug-in to view media.

For students using a school-issued Chromebook, ask your technical support folks to download the QuickTime plug-in and enable the plug-in for your Chromebook.

$0.00

01.00 Pre-Reconstruction in America (US History)

Thomas Jefferson, author of the Declaration of Independence, and third President of the United States: Rembrandt Peale, Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsThomas Jefferson, author of the Declaration of Independence, and third President of the United States: Rembrandt Peale, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

This quarter is a review of the periods covered in the eighth grade US History class, from exploration and colonization of the Americas through the Civil War and reconstruction.

The information is broken up into units and each unit into smaller sections.  Each of the smaller sections includes lesson pages, a reading log assignment, and a quiz.

This is important: the information you need for each reading log and quiz can be found on any of the lessons before that quiz--even if the lesson comes after the reading log. For example, the section from quiz 1 to quiz 2 includes the following lessons: 1.06, 1.07, & 1.08. The reading log questions are found in 1.07, but the lesson on 1.08 is important for answering questions on that reading log. So if you turn in the reading log at 1.07 before you have read 1.08--you've missed part of what you need. Let me suggest the following order of operations:

1) Look at the reading log assignment first--to give you an idea of what you will be required to learn.

2) Read through each lesson page working on the reading log as you go. Each lesson provides you with links to various sites.  As an option for gathering information, you may also use the on-line text found at U.S. History.org (link below)

3) Read each lesson page up to the next quiz--even if that page comes after the reading log.

4) Complete any supplemental assignments in that section.

5) Finish the reading log and turn in before you take the quiz.

If you have any questions please contact your teacher for this class.

01.00.01

Two sites that you will find extremely helpful are ushistory.org and the World Book Encylopedia in Utah's Online Library.  Keep these links bookmarked for future use.

01.01 World Exploration Prior to Colonization (US History)

Students will gain a general understanding of early European Exploration which led to the colonization of the Americas.

Alexander Hamilton, one of the framers of the Constitution, and first Secretary of the Treasury: John Trumbull, Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsAlexander Hamilton, one of the framers of the Constitution, and first Secretary of the Treasury: John Trumbull, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

LESSON

Exploration:

The establishment of the colonies in the Americas didn’t actually begin with exploration in the Americas. It began with the exploration of Asia and Marco Polo. After Marco Polo explored Asia, many Europeans realized that there was a world beyond Europe with great spices that they could sell for money. Another thing they realized was that the overland route to the Asia was slow and costly. Their response was to figure out a new and quicker route to Asia--brilliant! Their best solution was by sea, and they began to improve sailing.
Three inventions that improved sailing;
1. Caravel: a triangular shaped sail that made it so that sailors didn’t have to wait for the wind from Africa to bring them back.
2. Compass: I hope this is obvious. What might a compass help with?
3. Astrolabe: Could determine the latitude of a ship.
The Portuguese opened a sailing school in hopes of finding a shorter route to the Spice Islands. Sailors from this country were the first to round the tip of South Africa.
 

Finding the Americas:

The two countries, Spain and Portugal were, at the time, the dominant naval countries in Europe. This desire for a new spice route initiated a huge competition between them. Out of this era emerged Christopher Columbus, who contrary to popular belief, was not Spanish but Italian. Unfortunately for Columbus, no one in Italy would fund his expedition to find a shorter route to Asia. So he went to Spain, where Ferdinand and Isabella agreed to fund his expedition. Now, you are thinking that he set out to prove the world was round--WRONG. The whole, the-world-is-flat thing is untrue. Europeans really just had no idea the size of the world. Columbus, for example, thought the world was about 1/3 the size it actually is. It is true, however, that while he was looking for a shorter route to Asia, he discovered the Americas (or the islands off their coast). He believed he had discovered that shorter route to the East Indies; therefore, he called the natives who greeted him, “Indians.”

Once new land was discovered there began to be conflict over which countries had rights to which places.  As was common the Catholic Church got involved, they were a huge political force.  The pope issued the Treaty of Tordesillas, this not only demonstrated that there needed to be some kind interference but also the political power that the Catholic Church had.

The Columbian Exchange:

European disease killed off about 90 % of the native population in the Americas. This was one trade-off that was, obviously, the most devastating part of the "Columbian Exchange" for the natives.  As you can see, here I’ve brought up a term that you need to know a little bit about, the "Columbian Exchange." No, it doesn’t have anything to do with the infamous kinds of exchange that go on in Columbia today.
The Columbian Exchange, basically, was the exchange of goods or new stuff between Europe and the Americas. I’ve hinted at one of those items exchanged in the preceding paragraph. Take a look at the website and the list of items exchanged.

Exploration:

At this point the Europeans had figured out that they had discovered a new way to make or find, money. So as they, they really at this point means the Spanish and the Portuguese, began to explore their motto was: God, Gold, Glory. Because Spain was a very "Catholic" country one of their main pushes was to convert these newly found barbaric peoples to Christianity. Really, many of the first Spaniards to go Exploring were missionaries. I think gold is an obvious motive, as every country wants more wealth, and it didn't work then like it does now, there was not 'credit.' So the conquistadores; Pizarro, Cortez, and went looking for not only their fortunes, but also for glory. They sought to be remembered not only for themselves but also for their country, for power and money came to those who could give their country a leg up. They, the conquistadores, went looking for gold and glory and slaughtered (both intentionally and unintentionally through disease)anyone who got in their way. Thus, we have the end of the Aztecs and Incas, and their gold went to Spain.

Now, Spain becomes this hugely powerful country in Europe and at this point, the late 15th and early 16th centuries, that also meant the world. All of the other countries look at them and say something along the lines of, "If the Spanish can sail there and take people's gold, then why can't we." The first British, Dutch and French expeditions were looking for gold and glory.

After the failure of the other countries to find real gold in the Americas, and since by 1588, the English had toppled Spain as the most powerful country, they begin to realize that there are other commodities to be found in the Americas, one of which is LAND.

 

01.01.01

 

01.02 Identifying the reasons for the establishment of colonies in America (US History)

These websites both have good information about the early colonies.  Either one is fine to use for reading. 

If you are using the World Book site please pay attention to the following instructions

1) Go to onlinelibrary.uen.org in a new window or tab in your internet application.

2) Use the username and password provided for you by your teacher in response to the About Me assignment. KEEP THIS PAGE OPEN.

3) Click the World Book link to open it in a new window or tab. 

4) Once you have done this, use the links in the instructions to get to the correct World Book Encyclopedia article.

01.02 The American Colonial Experience (US History)

Students will understand the reasons for colonization and the technologies which made it easier.

OVERVIEW: In this section you will:Native Americans fishing near the Virginia colony, 1585: Theodor de Bry, public domainNative Americans fishing near the Virginia colony, 1585: Theodor de Bry, public domain

  • Identify the reasons for the establishment of colonies in America.
  • Examine the rise of American culture in the New England, Middle and Southern colonies.
  • Learn about the lives of early colonial leaders and their role in the development of the American characteristics of a Protestant work ethic of: hard work, sacrifice, independence, self-reliance, austerity, perseverance and religious piety.
  • Analyze the dichotomy between religious observance and materialism as it led to the Great Awakening.
  • Understand the English concept of mercantilism and how the idea that a colony of English citizens existed for the primary benefit of the British king led to the American Revolution.
  • Appreciate the early differences between the North and the South in climate, economies, and the need for slaves. These early differences impacted the debate over the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution and which ultimately lead to Southern secession and the Civil War.

Lesson

Along with this lesson you'll need to view the URLs to help you to answer the assignment questions.

Though there were many specific reasons why each of the thirteen colonies was established, their main purpose was the good of the British.  The idea behind this is mercantilism. Mercantilism is basically the idea that the more gold you have and can keep as well as the more self-sufficient a country is the better off they are.  With this in mind the whole purpose of having colonies played into this idea. The colonies provided raw goods not available in Europe.

Because of the desire to have wealth and out-do other countries the British began to pass laws to help them to ensure that they will make as much money as possible.  The purpose of the Navigation Acts was to control trade.  Countries had to use colonial or British ships to trade with the colonies, the crew of the ship had to be ¾ British or colonial, there were certain goods the colonies could only ship to Britain, and most other goods to be traded had to go through an English port.  The great thing about this series of acts, though they seemed restrictive, they actually helped the colonial economy.

Once the Navigation Acts were in place the British just sat back and left things alone; it was called Salutory Neglect.  Salutory neglect ends up coming back to bite the British because when they try to gain more control, after 100 years of this ‘policy,’ the colonists don’t want to take it, and da, da, da we have the spark that ignites the Revolutionary War.

 

01.03 Examining the rise of slavery in the United States (US History)

Slavery:

Slavery was not a new institution, it had existed for a very long time.  The Vikings sold the Slavs to the people of the Justinian Empire, they were slaves. People around the world had used the people they defeated as slaves after wars.  

Tobacco became a cash crop but it was a labor intensive crop as well, they needed people to work the fields. In Virginia many people came to the colonies as indentured servants.  In order to get to America and have a place to live they agreed to a term of servitude, usually four to seven years. They were lower class people from English society who thought they could benefit from being in the new world. 

The Native Americans did not work out as slaves because they knew the land and could leave or would sabotage the fields and equiptment. The colonists were also taking land from the Natives which was causing contention, that along with the fact that they never treated the natives as well as the Spanish or French.

The First African Slaves:

Arrived in the United States via the Dutch in 1619, most of them received their freedom. It was not until the, 1700s when the  Plantation Economy emerged in south that they needed more labor. Slaves became the bottom rung of society, in 1690 there were 13,000 slaves working in the south.  By 1750 there were 200,000 slaves working plantations in the south. 

The slaves were shipped via the middle passage, the middle leg, of what is called triangular trade.  The conditions of the middle passage were extreme and awful. The Africans were crammed in the lower holds of the ship.  (The Triangular Trade webpage tells more about this subject.) Nearly 13% aboard each ship died during the voyage. 

Once the slaves reached the Americas, they had to deal with continued poor treatment as well as life as a slave and a language barrier.

01.03 Identifying the reasons for the establishment of colonies in America Reading Log

teacher-scored 25 points possible 40 minutes

You'll use Lessons 01.02 and 01.03 to complete this assignment. As long as you follow the directions you'll do fine.

Directions The ID Terms are similar to definitions EXCEPT they add the element of WHY? What I mean is this; after you have defined the word or told me who the person is you then need to tell me WHY they are important to this point in history. This means that you should have a couple of short sentences for each of the ID Terms. You will not get half points for this part of the assignment. If you don't have BOTH sentences you won't get credit. The other thing is; you MUST avoid broad generalizations like; "if they didn't do what they did the world would be different." So what you'll need to do think for a minute. Definitions are what I call basic regurgitation, you read something and then spit it back out in written form. By adding the WHY element I am hopefully training you to analyze what you've read a little bit. By asking yourself, "Why is this person or thing important or significant?" You are making a connection in your brain and analyzing, which is a higher brain function than regurgitation. To help you get started, I have added questions in italics to give you some direction. 

The Short Answer questions just need to be answered. Each one is a little bit different, some may only require a 1 sentence answer while others may need to be 3 or 5 sentences. You will receive credit on these as long as they are answered correctly, which demonstrates your understanding of the concept addressed in the question. Please copy from the * to the * and paste the questions into a word document. When answering the questions, please be sure to bold your answer.

If you are using the ushistory.org site concentrate on sections 2-9. Use the information and sites given in lessons 1.01 to 1.05 for any additional information you need.

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01.02 Reading Log ID Terms

1. Jamestown (Who founded Jamestown and why?)

2. Puritans (What did they believe and how were they treated?)

3. John Winthrop (What did he mean with his "City on the Hill" comment and what impact did this have on early America?)

4. House of Burgesses  (What "first" was this and what was the impact of this on the colonies?)

5. Separatists  (What did this term mean and why did they become a part of early colonization efforts?)

6. Plymouth Colony (Who founded this colony and why?)

7. Mayflower Compact  (Who signed this and what was the significance of this?)

8. Roger Williams  (What colony did he found and what were his "ideas"?)

9. Anne Hutchinson & the Antinomian Controversy (What was the controversy about and what was the result?)

10. William Penn (What colony did he found and why?)

11. Quakers (What were their beliefs? What promped them to colonize here?)

12. James Oglethorpe  (What colony did he found and why?)

13. Mercantilism  (What was the basic idea and how did this affect the colonies?)

14. Navigation Acts (What was restricted by these acts and what was the result for the colonies?)

15. Salutary Neglect  (What was it and how did it help initiate the Revolutionary War?)

16.  What was probably the most important "commodity" found in the new colonies? (Refer to lesson 1.01 for this answer.)

 

Short Answer Questions

17. What was the Treaty of Tordesillas? What did it say about the influence of the Catholic Church?

18. What was the impact of the Columbian Exchange on the Americas?

19. Describe each leg of the Triangular Trade. Why was the middle passage so treacherous?

20.  What was Bacon's Rebellion and why was it important?

21. How did the Enlightenment influence the American Colonies?

22. What was the Great Awakening? What was the basis for it and who was one of its main preachers?

23. What was the French and Indian War? Why was it fought?

24. What was the Proclamation of 1763 and what was the result of it?

25. How were the New England colonies, the Middle colonies and the Southern colonies different?  (Consider culture, settlers, economies, etc.)

 

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.03. Examining the rise of Slavery in the United States. (U.S.History)

These websites will help to inform you about slavery in the United States.

01.04 North vs. South in the Founding of the United States

Illustration from the British abolition movement in the 1700's: By Josiah Wedgwood (1730-1795) and either William Hackwood or Henry Webber, Public Domain via Wikimedia CommonsIllustration from the British abolition movement in the 1700's: By Josiah Wedgwood (1730-1795) and either William Hackwood or Henry Webber, Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

You will learn about the North vs South and the founding of the United States. You will understand the basic differences between the Northern and Southern Colonies that had a great impact on American political, economic, and social affairs for over one hundred years. [Video assignment]

01.04 North vs. South in the Founding of the United States Video Questions.

teacher-scored 24 points possible 45 minutes

You will need to view the video North vs. South in the Founding of the United States by clicking on the link below**, and answering the following questions. Please copy from the * to the * and paste the questions into a word document. When answering the questions, please bold your answer.

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North vs. South in the Founding of the United States Video Questions.Slavery in the thirteen colonies, 1770 (by percent and actual numbers): Wikimedia Commons, Stilfehler, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedSlavery in the thirteen colonies, 1770 (by percent and actual numbers): Wikimedia Commons, Stilfehler, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

 

1. What was signed in Independence Hall in 1776?

2. What was signed in Independence Hall in 1781?

3. What was signed in Independence Hall in 1787?

4. How many handwritten pages were there in the Constitution?

5. How many months did it take the leadership to write, then achieve agreement on the Constitution?

6. What was the name of the first American constitution?

7. According to James Madison, what was the greatest obstacle to unity within the U.S.?

8. Beginning with the First Continental Congress, how was the roll call of states taken? Why?

9. What was one of the main differences between the two regions? Why was there a difference?

10. According to the video, why was slavery so important to the South?

11. According to the video, why was slavery not nearly as important in the North?

12. What two topics divided these two regions? (hint: Do not put "slavery.")

13. Which state did not attend the Constitutional Convention?

14. When the issue of representation in the House of Representatives was debated, what issue did the framers face when it came to determining the population of the Southern states? What compromise was reached to resolve the debate?

15. Besides "representation," what was another issue associated with slavery that threatened acceptance of the Constitution?

16. What was the "compromise" reached concerning slavery discussed in question #15?

17. Why did the North accept this compromise?

18. Why did the South accept this compromise?

19. Were either of them right? Why (or why not)?

20. Your name and today's date.

21. "Compromise is the oil that lubricates the wheels of democracy." Based on what you've learned from this video, how does this quote apply to American politics TODAY? Give both examples you learned from the video as well as current examples to make your point. (5 pts)

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**To run the video you will need to click the picture or black box and use the same log in username and password that you use for pioneer library. Check on your EHS/Canvas dashboard page or my “welcome” letter to you (in the comments of your About Me assignment) if you have forgotten them. If you experience problems viewing the video read the troubleshooting steps below:

1) Your browser can be an issue. Use Safari, Firefox or Explorer. Chrome has been problematic.

2) If you are only seeing the Quick Time logo, you have to give Quick Time permission to run on this site. If you click on the picture and get a notification saying that you require Quick Time to be downloaded, make sure it has been downloaded and fully updated. To download, click the download Quick Time button at the top of the screen. To update (after you have downloaded it), go to your QuickTime folder and click on the file "QuickTimePlayer.exe". Click "Yes" on the dialogue box that opens. If Quick Time then opens normally, it is up-to-date. If not, you will be prompted to update. Once updated, refresh this page and then permanently allow Quick Time to run on this site.

3) Make sure your settings on your internet browser are set to allow pop-ups and plug-ins.

4) Some school districts and libraries don’t allow access to the port you need to view these videos. Try your home computer or even your phone because they should have access to this port.

5) If, after following the steps above, you can't access the video email me for help.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.05 The American Colonial Experience (US History)

Colonial kitchen: Public domain via Wikimedia CommonsColonial kitchen: Public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Quiz #1 Testing your knowledge on Colonial America.

01.05 The American Colonial Experience Quiz 1 (US History)

computer-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Quiz 1 instructions
This completes the first objective of this course. When you are done studying this section on colonial American history, take quiz 1. Remember that once you start the quiz, you must finish in one session. The quiz has ten questions with a 30-minute time limit. Please let me know if you have any questions. Good luck!

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06 The Road to the American Revolution. (US History)

World Book briefly goes over the development of the constitution.

When using the World Book site please pay attention to the following instructions

1) Go to pioneer.uen.org in a new window or tab in your internet application.

2) Use the username and password provided for you by your teacher in response to the About Me assignment. KEEP THIS PAGE OPEN.

3) Right click the World Book link and as it to open in a new window or tab. 

Once you have done this you should have access to the World Book Encyclopedia US History information.

The PBS site is a fun resourse that can help you to test your knowledge as well as introduce you to important people and events leading to the American Revolutionary War.

01.06 The Road to the American Revolutionary War (U.S. History)

Investigate the events leading to the Revolutionary War.

In this section you will:

President George Washington, first President of the United States: Gilbert Stuart, 1797, Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsPresident George Washington, first President of the United States: Gilbert Stuart, 1797, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

  • Identify the causes of tension between the colonists and the British Government that led to the American Revolutionary War.

Lesson

 

In history there often seems to be a series of unfortunate events that lead to a huge, explosive event.  The Revolutionary War is no different.  Let’s take a look at the unfortunate events;

  1. Colonization: this is really a more indirect event.  As many of the states were colonized there wasn’t really a long term plan to how they were going to interact with the British government.  This lack of planning is the unfortunate event. The colonists had years to grow and as they expanded and became more independent (the British government basically let them do their thing as long as money was coming in.)  This independence lead to a desire for more rights. You’ve read it before, but these years of independence are known in history as salutary neglect.
  2. Enlightenment: In the 1700s Europe was being enlightened.  Although the Enlightenment had its roots in France, the ideas spread like a worldwide wildfire.  The scientific discoveries of Copernicus, Galileo, and Newton made people begin to look at the world around them for change.  Then the ideas of men like John Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Thomas Hobbes, and even Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson; inspired the colonists as well as many others throughout the world to look around them and question their situation and government. You’ll read more about their ideas later, as we discuss the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.
  3. French and Indian War: Also known as the Seven Years’ War (outside of the US).  This war became a huge expense for the British as they battled for land both in Europe and in the Americas.  The French didn’t settle in Canada as rapidly as the British did in the American Colonies, but they did treat the Natives more hospitably than the British colonists did.  The major area of dispute in the colonies was the Ohio River valley. When the French built Fort Duquesne, the Virginians, who had promised that land to others, sent a militia to kick the French out. The French defeated the colonists at the first battle led by then 22 year old George Washington.  The British sent Edward Braddock to assist the colonists and he and Washington tried again but were ambushed by French soldiers and Native American combatants; the British fled. (An interesting side-note; Washington, startled by the weakness of the British attempted to rally the troops and defeat the French.  In the process two horses were shot from beneath him along with four bullets blowing through his coat.  He obviously survived.)  The king George II sent William Pitt to lead the armies.  Pitt began to win some battles and because of that the British were able to gain some Native American allies, the Iroquois. After a series of victories, including the defeat at Quebec, the British were victorious and at the Treaty of Paris in 1763, gained most of Canada along with all the land east of the Mississippi.  This costly war made the British look at the role the colonies played and decided that there were enough people benefitting from the protection and wealth of Britain that they needed to pay their dues.
  4. Proclamation of 1763: A document signed by the British representatives to the American Colonies, with Pontiac, the Native American leader. This document said that the colonists would not cross the Appalachian Mountains.  This angered the colonists because they wanted to expand and had planned to do so across the mountains.  It said to them that there was dis-connect between them and the British government.
  5. George Grenville:  King George III’s prime minister who, in his attempt to repay the debts of the British, began to crack down on trade first to Massachusetts and then to all of the colonies. His ideas and actions, which included searching ships suspected to contain smuggled goods, angered the colonists.
  6. Sugar Act:  1764, prompted by Grenville.  The act cut the duty (tax) on molasses made outside of the colonies, hoping they would pay the tax instead of smuggling. (They were smuggling because they weren’t allowed to buy goods from other countries unless they’d gone through Britain.) The act added duties on items that had not previously been taxed. Lastly this the court that would try those who had gone against the act, would be a British court instead of a colonial court.  It is after this act was passed that the term “No taxation without representation,” is first heard.
  7. Stamp Act: 1765, the tax was placed on many printed documents.  The verification the tax was paid came in the form of a stamp on the document, hence “Stamp Act”.  The Sons of Liberty was formed in reaction and protest to this law. Many merchants boycotted until the act was repealed, they were successful in 1766.
  8. Townshend Acts: 1767, taxed goods imported from Britain, including lead, glass, paper, paint and tea.  Again they boycotted the act hoping to get the act repealed.  The British were just looking to make money, while the colonists were looking to have a say in what was going on.
  9. Boston Massacre: Tensions between the colonists and the British soldiers grew and came to a head outside the Boston Customs House.  Colonists upset by the Townshend Acts began to taunt the soldiers and the soldiers opened fire and killed five colonists.
  10. Boston Tea Party: The event which is known as both famous and infamous.  It was a reaction to the Tea Act and the Tea Act was a result of the repeal of the Townshend Acts and an attempt to save the British East India Company.  The act made it so that only the East India Company could sell tea to the colonists, but it was at a cheaper price. On December 16, 1773 the “Indians” of the tea party dumped 18,000 pounds of tea into the harbor.
  11. Intolerable Acts: The King was furious and asked parliament to do something.  These acts; shut down Boston harbor, required the quartering of soldiers, and a general was appointed the governor of Massachusetts.  General Thomas Gage put Boston under martial law.
  12. First Continental Congress: In reaction to the Intolerable Acts, 56 delegates met in Philidelphia and drew up a declaration that said they had the rights to run their own affairs, and if the British used force against them they would fight back.

 

Our series of unfortunate events exploded with the first Battle of the Revolution; Lexington and Concord, which is the beginning of the Revolutionary war

 

01.07 Identify the philosophies which influenced the development of the Constitution, separation of powers, balance of power, and the elastic clause. (U.S. History)

In this section you will:

  • Identify the philosophies of The Enlightenment which influenced the development of the Constitution, separation of powers, balance of power and the elastic clause.
  • Analyze the Constitution's creation and impact on the new United States
  • Trace the development of American government and politics from the Federalist period through Jacksonian democracy.

The Enlightenment

  • John Locke: An Oxford educated thinker who also was a medical researcher. He became politically active and a government official and a political writer.  His most famous work The Second Treatise of Government, basically said that people have natural rights and those rights were; life, liberty, and property (The idea of happiness came into play in America because property wan't in short supply like it was in Europe.) He also talked about the idea of a social contract that exists between the people and the government.  The contract only exists if the people choose to follow the government and its laws, and the governments job is to protect the peoples rights.  If the government doesn't hold up their end of the bargain then the people have a right to overthrow the government.
  • Montesquieu: (Read the short World Book reading listed in the URLs.) The information is very concise and explanitory.
  • Jean-Jaques Rousseau: His most influential work was The Social Contract, talks about the general will (sovereign) of the people and although each individual has his own interests they act as a whole and aim for the common good for all. He talks about the sovereign and the government are almost always at odds. He said the people should practice their sovereign by meeting regularly in assemblies. Only by entering into this social contract can the sovereign become human.
  • Thomas Hobbes: Argued that people are motivated by selfishness and without a government their life would be "poor, nasty, brutish, and short."  Basically he said that people needed government.

Important Elements of the Constitution

  • separation of powers: a term coined by Montesquieu, he said there should be three brances of government legislative, executive and judicial.  The idea is that if these three branches work independently then liberty is best protected.
  • balance of power: basically the idea of checks and balances in the United States Government.  James Madison, the "father of the Constitution, said that if one branch of government had too much power it could result in tyrany.  But, if each branch could put the other in check so that it would not get out of control, the stability of the constitution and the government would be sound.
  • elastic clause: gives the legislature the power to pass any laws they deem "necessary and proper." This gives some flexibility to add to the constitution.
  • Federalism: The government is divided between the central (federal) government and the state government. Both governments effect the people.
  • Republicanism: A government in which the whole body works through elected officials who vote and make decisions on their behalf.

01.07 Identify the philosophies which influenced the development of the Constitution, separation of powers, balance of power, and the elastic clause. (U.S. History)

01.07 Identify the philosophies which influenced the development of the Constitution, separation of powers, balance of power, and the elastic clause. Reading Log

teacher-scored 15 points possible 40 minutes

This assignment is designed to help you study for the Quiz 2; 01.08. It covers all material in the lesssons from the 01.06 and 01.07. It is important to follow the instructions carefully in order to receive the most credit possible for this assignment. If you are using the ushistory.org site concentrate on sections 9-11. Use the information given in the lessons and sites given in lesson 1.09 for any additional information you need.

Directions: Please copy from the * to the * and paste the questions into a word document. When answering the questions, please be sure to bold your answer.

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01.07 Reading Log

1. Who is Samuel Adams? Why was his role important to the Revolutionary War?

2. Who is John Locke? What was he best known for? Why was he known for it?

3. Who is Thomas Paine? Why are his writings so well known?

4. Tell me about Thomas Jefferson. What did he do? Why is he so well known?

5. What role did the Marquis de Lafayette play in the American Revolution? Why was he involved?

6. Who is Charles Cornwallis? What was his role in the American Revolution?

7. Why was Shays’s Rebellion so eye opening to the framers of the constitution? 

8. What role did James Madison play in the framing of the constitution?

9. Why is Alexander Hamilton so well known? 

10. Who is John Adams? What is he famous for? 

11. What were the Articles of Confederation? What were its weaknesses?

12. Describe the events that led to the colonists rebellion. ( Think about the king as well as specific acts passed by the British Parliament that caused frustration.)

13. What happened at Lexington and Concord?

14. What was Common Sense? What role did it play in the Revolution?

15. Where did the authors of the Declaration of Independence get their inspiration?

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.08 Analyze the Constitution's creation and impact on the new United States (U.S. History)

Lesson NotesAn early draft of the Constitution, with handwritten revisionsAn early draft of the Constitution, with handwritten revisions The Constitution was ratified in June of 1788 by a ninth vote from the state of New Hampshire, but without the vote of the two largest States: New York and Virginia. The Constitution, however, was not the first attempt at a government for the new nation. During the Revolutionary War,the thirteen colonies attempted to create a government in which they were able to retain individual State sovereignty, yet band together for common defense. This resulted in the creation of the Articles of Confederation, America's 'first' constitution. It was a government system which was ratified in 1781 and lasted until the Constitution took effect in 1788. The Articles of Confederation had several weaknesses, however, which led to the calling of a Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in the summer of 1787. During the next four months, the Constitution was presented, debated, modified and finally signed on September 17, 1787. That was not the end, however, as it was sent to each of the States for ratification. Although only nine of the thirteen States were required for ratification, eventually ALL the States did accept the Constitution as the governing document for the United States of America.

 

Articles of Confederation:

Following the Revolution the colonists looked to a republic as an answer to their issues with the British government.  They feared a democracy, the direct governing of the people, because there were so many colonists who were uneducated. At the Second Constitutional Congress they set up a plan called the Articles of Confederation.

According to the Articles of Confederation, each state only had one vote in congress and the powers were divided between the states and the national government. The national governemnt had the power to declare war, peace, and sign treaties.  The national government could borrow money set standards for coins, weights, measurements, and established a postal service.  In March of 1781 the Articles went into effect after all thirteen colonies approved.

Events of the Articles of Confederation

Northwest Territory:  This was the first issue the new government faced and it was well handled. The Northwest Territory were all of the lands west of the Appalachians.  Many people had settled there following the war, the government was worried about how to govern the lands.  They set up the Land Ordinance of 1785 to survey the lands and make the land affordable by creating small parcels of land that people could afford.  The land was surveyed and divided it into townships of 36 square miles, it would then be divided again into 36 square mile sections.  A family could purchase a section and dived it into farms or smaller units, the minimum price per acre was one dollar.  This idea helped to provide order as the land was settled.  The process of surveying the land and dividing it up was repeated thousands of times.  The Northwest Ordinance of 1787, was passed to divide the territory into states, three but no more than five in the new lands.

The Land Ordinance and the Northwest Ordinances were the highlights of the Articles of Confederation and represent its successes. Unfortunately because of its many weaknesses this success was overlooked.

Shays's Rebellion: This rebellion marks the event that caused Congress to change the government. The rebellion was led by Daniel Shays, a farmer.  The rebellion was that of farmers, when taxes were increased in Massachusetts the farmers became a mob and marched on the arsenal in Springfield, Massachusetts.  In January of 1787 they marched on the armory and were met by the militia, who had been called out by the state,  four rebels were killed and the rest scattered.  This event caused panic through the nation.  Many decided it was time to fix the Articles and a convention was called.

Weaknessed of the Articles of Confederation
  • Congress couldn't enact or collect taxes.
  • Regardless of population, each state only had one vote in Congress.
  • Nine of thirteen states needed to agree to pass important laws.
  • All states had to approve an amendment to the Articles.
  • No executive brance existed to enforce laws.
  • No national court system to settle disputes.
  • The thirteen separate states lacked unity at the national level.

 

Constitutional Convention:

Major Issues:

  • Representation: The problem was (and still is) that some states have large populations and some have small populations.  James Madison presented the Virginia Plan.  This plan said there should be a bicameral legislature.  This two-house legislature would be base on population.  The problem with this was that the small states were mad because it meant that the large states would have more representation which meant more power.  The small states supported the New Jersey Plan, which meant a single-house legislature where each state had equal votes. The Great Compromise was the answer, it called for both.  A bicameral legislature where in one house the representation is based on population and the other where each state has equal representation.  Unfortunately this compromise lead to the next problem, how to count the slaves. in the south a large portion of the population were slaves and in the north there wasn't the large population of slaves. The solution was the Three-Fifths Compromise which basically means they would count three of every five slaves toward the states population.
  • Division of Powers: The members of the convention decided on a federalism as their form of government.  This basically means that the national and state governments would share the power. They also said there would be three branches of government, basically a whole new government.
  • Separation of Powers: After they created the three branches of government; the legislative branch to make laws, the executive branch to carry out the laws, and the judicial branch to interpret the laws.  Then the system of checks and balances were put into play.  This kept any one branch from being too powerful and dominating the others.  They also worried about putting the power of electing the president in the hands of the people so they created the electoral college.
  • Changing the Constitution:  The framers of the constitution made it a living, changing document.  They wanted it to have longevity and be in use for a long time to come.  It seems that they have been successful.

Ratification:

  • As they began the ratification process in September of 1787 two groups emerged.  The Federalists, who supported the Constitution and its balance of power between the states and national government. And the Antifederalists, this group were opposed to a strong central government and a Constitution. Three Federalists; Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay wrote a series of essays, supporting the Constitution, called The Federalist. They believed that there were defects in the Consttitution but supported the strong central government.
  • The Antifederalists' main problem with the Constitution was that it didn't guarantee the rights of people.  People like Patrick Henry, George Mason, and Richard Henry Lee wrote Letters from the Federal Farmer, which outlined the rights they thought the Constitution should protect.  The rights included freedom of press and religion, guarantees no unreasonable searches of people and homes, as well as the right to a trial by jury.  They, the Antifederalists, demanded a bill of rights which they thought would help to counter balance the strength of the central government.
  • Bill of Rights: The Bill of Rights was another compromise made to get the constitution in play. It helped to appease both sides.  Because of it the Constitution was Ratified.

01.08 Analyze the Constitution's creation and impact on the new United States (U.S. History)

01.08 Analyze the Constitution's creation and impact on the new United States Quiz 2 - Constitutional History (U.S. History)

computer-scored 15 points possible 40 minutes

Assignment - Quiz 2 - Constitutional History

After you have studied the course material about the influences and history of the Constitution you are ready to take Quiz 2. As with all of the quizzes, please review the vocabulary list to make sure that you know about each of the terms.
This quiz contains questions about what influenced the creation of the Constitution. It will also test your knowledge of some of the important components of this governing document.

You must complete the quiz once you have started. You must score 80 percent on the test and you will have 40 minutes to complete it. If you score below 80 percent you will need to wait 24 hours before you can take the test again.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.09 Trace the development of American government and politics from the Federalist period through Jacksonian democracy. (U.S. History)

Examine the development of the American government from the Federalist period through Jacksonian democracy.

Judicial System:

The first order of business after the Constitution was ratified was to make it work.  It didn't outline exactly how everything would work in practice.  George Washington and Congress got to work trying to make the Constitution work.  The first thing they did was to create Judiciary Act of 1789, which in turn created the Supreme Court, the federal circuit and the district courts. The act provided for the state decisions to be appealed at the federal level when constitutional issues were the problem.  Thus the beginning of our court system.

Executive Branch:

Congress and Washington decided that someone should help the president.  They created three departments; the Department of State, which deals with foreign affairs, the Department of War to take care of the military, and the Department of the Treasury to take care of money.  Washington chose Thomas Jefferson as his secretary of state, Alexander Hamilton as his secretary of the Treasury, and Henry Knox as the secretary of war.  They soon became known as his cabinet.

01.09 Trace the development of American government and politics from the Federalist period through Jacksonian democracy. (U.S. History)

George Washington's Presidency As the new nation began, George Washington became the first president under very difficult circumstances. Look at this timeline of his presidency and determine what some of the challenges of his presidency were. This site contains many interesting links to information about his life and legacy for the United States.

The Whiskey Rebellion This site contains information on the Whiskey Rebellion, one of the major confrontations during Washington's presidency. Determine why this uprising occurred, how it was stopped, and how this action defined the new country.

Hamilton and Jefferson Debate These two leaders in the revolutionary and post-revolutionary periods, displayed two very different views of how the federal government should operate. Read through this short summary of their debate and determine the differences between these two viewpoints. Do we still have conflicts like these today between the state and federal governments?

Jay's Treaty This site contains information on Jay's Treaty and the reaction that Americans had to this agreement with England. This treaty is significant because it was one of several reasons why George Washington did not seek a third term as President.

John Adams' Presidency This site contains a biography of John Adams, the second president of the United States.

Fears of France This site has information on the problematic relationship with France during this period. The XYZ Affair and the Alien and Sedition Acts came out of fears of French spies in America. The Alien and Sedition Acts increased the requirements for American citizenship from five years to 14 years and gave the president authority to deport or jail any alien that was considered a threat to the nation.

Thomas Jefferson's Presidency This site contains a biographical sketch for the presidency of one of the most influential men in American history, Thomas Jefferson.

The Louisiana Purchase This site has information relating to the largest land gain in American history - the Louisiana Purchase.

John Marshall's impact through the Supreme Court This site contains information on Chief Justice John Marshall, the very influential Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Appointed as one of the "midnight judges" in the final hours of John Adams' presidency, this judge shaped the power of the Court in relation to the president and Congress of the United States. The landmark Supreme Court case, Marbury v. Madison, established the Court's authority to review legislative decisions. This power is called judicial review, and gives the Court the authority to review Congress' decisions. James Madison, fourth president of the United States: By John Vanderlyn (1775–1852), Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsJames Madison, fourth president of the United States: By John Vanderlyn (1775–1852), Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

War of 1812 Look through this site to learn about the War of 1812. Note the reasons that the war began.

James Madison's Presidency This site contains information on James Madison and his term as the President of the United States.

James Monroe's Presidency This site contains information on President Monroe. During his administration, the Monroe Doctrine (the new American foreign affairs policy) came into existence. Read about this policy that lasted for many years and what events led to its formulation.

John Quincy Adams' Presidency Look through this site for information on our sixth president, John Quincy Adams.

Andrew Jackson's Presidency This site contains information on the presidency of Andrew Jackson. Jackson was considered the president of the common man. Find out what party he is considered the founder of and what the two major problems were during his presidency.

Jackson's attack on the Bank of the United States This site gives a brief explanation of why the Bank of the United States was viewed as a threat by many Americans.

Trail of Tears This link has information on the Indian Removal Act of 1830 and the "Trail of Tears" that happened as a result of this action. Please look through this information and think about the people that were cruelly moved because of this law.

Martin Van Buren's Presidency Go through this site to find out information about Martin Van Buren. Found out what the Panic of 1837 was and how he dealt with this crisis. Also note how he helped continue to shape the Democratic party.

01.09.01 Reading Log

teacher-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

This assignment is designed to help you study for the corresponding quiz. It covers all material in lesson 01.09. It is important to follow the instructions carefully in order to receive the most credit possible for this assignment.

The ID Terms are similar to definitions EXCEPT they add the element of WHY? What I mean is this; after you have defined the word or told me who the person is you then need to tell me WHY they are important to this point in history. This means that you should have 2 short sentences for each of the ID Terms. You will not get half points for this part of the assignment. If you don't have BOTH sentences you won't get credit. The other thing is; you MUST avoid broad generalizations like; "if they didn't do what they did the world would be different." So what you'll need to do think for a minute. Definitions are what I call basic regurgitation, you read something and then spit it back out in written form. By adding the WHY element I am hopefully training you to analyze what you've read a little bit. By asking yourself, "Why is this person or thing important or significant?" You are making a connection in your brain and analyzing, which is a higher brain function than regurgitation.

 The Short Answer questions just need to be answered. Each one is a little bit different, some may only require a 1 sentence answer while others may need to be 3 or 5 sentences. You will receive credit on these as long as they are answered correctly, which demonstrates your understanding of the concept addressed in the question.

If you are using the ushistory.org site concentrate on sections 19, 20, 31, 23, & 24. Use the sites given in lesson 1.09 for any additional information you need.

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01.09.01 Reading Log
ID Terms

 

1. John Marshall
2. James Monroe
3. Henry Clay
4. John C. Calhoun
5. Andrew Jackson
6. John Quincy Adams
7. John Tyler
8. Francis Scott Key
9. Alien & Sedition Acts
10. JJudicial Review

Short Answer Questions

11. What is the theory behind Jeffersonian Republicanism?
12. Describe the Marbury v. Madison court case.
13. Why is Marbury v. Madison an important supreme court decision?
14. What was the cause of the War of 1812? What were the effects?
15. Why was the Monroe Doctrine significant? What did it set the stage for?
16. What is the difference between the “American System” and Jacksonian Democracy?
17. What were the effects of the Indian Removal Act?
18. How were the Native Americans treated during their removal?
19. What was the issue with Jackson and the banks? What legacy did he leave?
20. What was the spoils system? Why was it controversial?

 

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.09.02 Trace the development of American government and politics from the Federalist period through Jacksonian democracy Quiz 3. (U.S. History)

computer-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Assignment - Quiz 3 - Federalist to Jackson
This is the quiz that tests your knowledge of the period from the Federalists through Jacksonian Democracy. Please take it after you have studied the course materials and the vocabulary list for this section.

You will have 30 minutes to take the test, and you must complete the test once you have started it.

(To take the quiz, go to section 3 on the class front page or click next)

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.10 Jefferson Decides to Purchase Louisiana (US History)

Lewis and Clark explore the Northwest: Charles Marion Russell, Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsLewis and Clark explore the Northwest: Charles Marion Russell, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

 

You will learn about President Thomas Jefferson's decision to try to purchase New Orleans and how America ended up with the entire Louisiana Territory. You will also learn about the Lewis and Clark expedition to the Pacific Ocean. [Video assignment]

01.10 Jefferson Decides to Purchase Louisiana (US History)

01.10. Jefferson Decides to Purchase Louisiana (US History)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 45 minutes

You will need to view the video, Jefferson Decides to Purchase Louisiana, by clicking on the link below, and answering the following questions.

If you have trouble accessing the video email me for help.

Please copy from the * to the * and paste the questions into a word document. When answering the questions, please bold your answer.

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(One point each - questions 1-12)The area of the Louisiana Purchase (bright green) superimposed on a modern map of the US: Wikipedia Commons, Benutzer:ErnstA, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedThe area of the Louisiana Purchase (bright green) superimposed on a modern map of the US: Wikipedia Commons, Benutzer:ErnstA, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

 

1. What is the geographic significance of the location of New Orleans?

2. Why was President Jefferson worried about the French taking control of New Orleans?

3. What was the population of the United States in 1800?

4. What was the western boundary of the United States in 1800?

5. What were the “super highways” of the early 1800s?

6. How fast could a person travel on one of these “super highways” in 1803?

7. What was Jefferson’s proposed solution to France’s impending control of New Orleans?

8. President Jefferson sent his negotiators to Paris to purchase New Orleans from Napoleon. What did Napoleon actually offer them and how much was he asking?

9. In 1803, according to the video, exploring the Louisiana Territory was like going where in our time?

10. Who did Jefferson choose to lead the “Corps of Discovery” (the expedition to explore the Louisiana Territory?)

11. With the purchase of New Orleans, however, Jefferson still was not in complete control of the mouth of the Mississippi River. Why not?

12. What was President Jefferson's 'covert operation' to control the entire Mississippi delta?

13. How did the "covert operation" affect American relations with Spain? [3 pts][1 paragraph]

14. The narrator says: “With time, the Louisiana Purchase was seen to be an event that had as much to do with the creation of modern America as the Declaration of Independence.” Why would he make such a statement? [1 paragraph] [5 points]

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.11 Analyze the growth and division of the U.S. from 1820 through 1877 (U.S. History)

Objective 3: Analyze the growth and division of the United States from 1820 through 1877.

In this section you will:Conestoga Wagon 1883: Newbold Hough Trotter, public domainConestoga Wagon 1883: Newbold Hough Trotter, public domain

  • Trace United States' expansion and growth from the Atlantic to the Pacific.
  • Recognize sectional differences that developed during the antebellum period.
  • Evaluate causes, course and consequences of the Civil War.
  • Analyze successes and failures of the Reconstruction period following the Civil War.
  • Examine United States' policies relating to the American Indians, or, as we call them today, the Native Americans.

01.11 Reading Log (US History)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 30 minutes

Slaves in chains: Image is in the public domain because its copyright has expiredSlaves in chains: Image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired

This assignment is designed to help you study for the corresponding quiz. It covers all material in the lesssons 01.10 through 01.12. It is important to follow the instructions carefully in order to receive the most credit possible for this assignment.

The ID Terms are similar to definitions EXCEPT they add the element of WHY? What I mean is this: after you have defined the word or told me who the person is you, then you need to tell me WHY they are important to this point in history. This means that you should have two short sentences for each of the ID Terms. You will not get half points for this part of the assignment. If you don't have BOTH sentences you won't get credit. The other thing is, you MUST avoid broad generalizations like "if they didn't do what they did the world would be different." So what you'll need to do is think for a minute. Definitions are what I call basic regurgitation: you read something and then spit it back out in written form. By adding the WHY element I am hopefully training you to analyze what you've read a little bit. By asking yourself, "Why is this person or thing important or significant?" you are making a connection in your brain and analyzing, which is a higher brain function than regurgitation.

The Short Answer questions just need to be answered. Each one is a little bit different; some may only require a one-sentence answer while others may need to be three or five sentences. You will receive credit on these as long as they are answered correctly, which demonstrates your understanding of the concept addressed in the question. 

If you are using the ushistory.org site concentrate on sections 27-32.  Then use the links below for any additional information you need.

Please copy from the * to the * and paste the questions into a word document. When answering the questions, please be sure to bold your answer.

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01.11 Reading Log

 

ID Terms

  1. 49ers
  2. Sam Houston
  3. William Lloyd Garrison
  4. Frederick Douglass
  5. Turners Rebellion
  6. Harriet Tubman
  7. Harpers Ferry
  8. Confederacy
  9. Jefferson Davis
  10. Homestead Act
  11. Exodusters

Short Answer Questions

12.  What were main provisions of the Compromise of 1850

13. What is Manifest Destiny?

14. Why is Manifest Destiny significant?

15. Explain the course of Texan Independence.

16. What is the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo? What did it represent?

17. What is abolition and who were the "abolitionists"?

18. How did the Underground Railroad work?

19. Was the Underground Railroad successful?

20. How did the American people respond to tensions over slavery?

21. Why did new political parties emerge during the antebellum period?

22. What is the Dred Scott decision and what role did it play in pre-Civil War tensions?

23. What are the Lincoln-Douglas debates? Why were they such a big deal?

24. Why did the southern states finally secede?

25. What differences in the end divided the north and south?

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.11 Trace the United States' expansion and growth from the Atlantic to the Pacific. (U.S. History)

Lewis and Clark Expedition Following the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, Thomas Jefferson wanted to have the new lands explored for the United States. Meriwether Lewis and William Clark were chosen to collect scientific information about unknown plants and animals, as well as chart a route to the Pacific. The Expedition that followed was one of the most notable in American westward expansion. Look through the following site to find out the route that the explorers took, as well as notable events that occurred. Also, find out who Sacajawea was.

The Erie Canal In order to move goods more quickly throughout the new nation, canals began to be built so that steamboats could move more directly to their destinations. In 1816 the U.S. only had 100 miles of canals, but only 25 years later that had grown to more than 3,300 miles of canals. The Erie Canal was the country's first major canal. Look through this site to find out why it was built and some of the history of canals in early America.

Railroads in early America While canals increased the speed that goods could be moved throughout the country, railroads quickly became the leading method of transportation because of their even greater speed and efficiency. Railroads could operate during winter and more quickly brought products to people who lived inland. Look through this site for a history of the railroads in early America.

Manifest Destiny Go through this site to find out what "Manifest Destiny" means and what it meant to early Americans. Also, study about what this meant to Native Americans who already lived in the regions that Americans began claiming.

The Oregon TrailCovered wagon in eastern Oregon: Gary Halvorson, Oregon State Archives, Creative Commons attribution, via Wikimedia CommonsCovered wagon in eastern Oregon: Gary Halvorson, Oregon State Archives, Creative Commons attribution, via Wikimedia CommonsYou'll need to log in to the Pioneer Library to access this link.  Open this link in a separate page as you'll need to keep the Pioneer Library one open for it to keep you logged in.

The Santa Fe Trail Find information and maps on the Sante Fe Trail through this link.

The Mormon Migration Look through this site to find information on the Mormon migration, and its unique qualities that were different than general migration westward.

William Harrison's Presidency Look through this site for a biographical sketch on the Presidency of William Harrison. Find out how long he served as President.

John Tyler's Presidency Look through this site for information about our 10th president, John Tyler.

James Polk's Presidency Look through this site for highlights of Polk's term in office. Note how many territories (which later became states) were gained during his term.

Texas Revolution Go through this site for information on the Texas Revolution and the conflict with Mexico. Find out who Sam Houston was and how this territory became a U.S. state.

The Alamo This site has information and tours of the Alamo, a major event during the Texas Revolution.

The War with Mexico This site contains a valuable timeline of events during, and leading up to the War with Mexico. Find out why this war occurred and what the outcome was for both nations.

Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo This site contains information on the treaty that ended the war with Mexico. See what America gained from this treaty.

Wilmot Proviso This site provides information on an important legislative debate that occurred because of the gain of land from Mexico. What was issue that began to split the nation?

Gadsden Purchase This site contains information on the agreement that finalized the Southern border of the United States.

Panning for gold: L. C. McClure, Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsPanning for gold: L. C. McClure, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

California Gold Rush This site has many stories about this colorful chapter in American history. It also has a timeline of the gold rush. Find out what people were attracted to California during this time. Also, what were they called?

Zachary Taylor's Presidency This link has information about Zachary Taylor's Presidency.

01.11.01 National Parks Service Map of National Historic Trails

teacher-scored 15 points possible 60 minutes

Instructions

You've read about the Oregon Trail, the Santa Fe Trail and the Mormon Trail. Now take a look at the National Parks Service Map of National Historic Trails and look at each of the trails on the map. (Make sure each of these three trails are checked, but remove the check marks for the other trails and you will get a clearer picture).  Take your time; look at the details of each trail. Then using the information you have learned about westward expansion on each of these trails, answer the questions about each of the three trails. (You will basically have three sets of the same questions.) 

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1. Who used the trail?
2. Why was the specific group migrating along the trail?
3. What obstacles did they each face?
4. Were they successful?
5. Which group would you prefer to be a part of? Why? ("None of them." is not an option)

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


Use this link to explore the overland route of many settlers.

01.12 Recognize the sectional differences that developed during the antebellum period. (U.S. History)

Slaves using a cotton gin: William L. Sheppard, public domainSlaves using a cotton gin: William L. Sheppard, public domainLesson Notes

This section explores the differences that arose in the North and the South in the antebellum period, or the period prior to the Civil War. This was the time of the Second Great Awakening, a period of religious revival in America. This religious fervor emphasized the importance of helping others as a condition of one's own salvation. Key areas addressed by this "awakening" included the abolition of slavery, equality for women and improvements in the workplace. Reform, however, was not limited to religious movements. Transcendentalists such as Emerson and Thoreau also worked to improve the dignity and equality of mankind. These antebellum political, economic and social differences produced tensions that continued to grow until the war erupted in 1861.

Economic differences between North and South This site has an excellent summary of the economic differences between the North and South. While the economic differences can be summarized as mostly agricultural in the South and industrial in the North, think about the differences in lifestyles this created for the two regions. The Missouri Compromise This compromise in 1819 shows the balance between slave and free states that existed prior to the Civil War. Until 1818, the United States had then free and ten slave states. Illinois was admitted as the 11th free state, and it was assumed that Missouri would then be admitted as a slave state to keep the balance equal. However, Missouri chose to gradually free its slaves, and this was seen as a threat to the power of the South. The Missouri Compromise released tensions by admitting Maine as a free state and Missouri as a slave state. Also, the Louisiana Territory was split into one area where slaveholding was permitted and one that would be free soil. Look at this website to see how close this decision was in the Senate. Slavery in the South While some slavery existed in the North, one of the big differences between the North and the South was the major practice of slavery that existed in the agricultural South. Look through this site to find narratives from the slaves and information on the Underground Railroad. Abolitionist Movement This site has many documents relating to the abolitionist movement to free enslaved people. Uncle Tom's Cabin Go to this site to find out the history behind the novel by Harriet Beecher Stowe that brought the abolitionist cause to the forefront of American thought.

01.12 Recognize the sectional differences that developed during the antebellum period. - Quiz 4 (U.S. History)

computer-scored 15 points possible 40 minutes

Quiz 4 - America's growth west and growing sectional differences
This quiz should be taken after you have studied the section that covers America's growth westward and the increasing differences and tensions between the North and the South.

You must complete the quiz once you have started. You must score 80 percent on the test and you will have 40 minutes to complete it. If you score below 80 percent you will need to wait 24 hours before you can take the test again.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.13 Evaluate the causes, course, and consequences of the Civil War (U.S. History)

Civil War graves, Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery: Wikimedia Commons, Robert Lawton, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 GenericCivil War graves, Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery: Wikimedia Commons, Robert Lawton, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic Lesson Notes

In 1869 Professor Ticknor of Harvard stated that since the Civil War, "it does not seem to me as if I were living in the country in which I was born." The Civil War changed almost everything in American life from politics to technology. The main causes of the Civil War were (1) the issue of the right of States to reject or "nullify" a law passed by Congress, (2) the issue of Slavery, and (3) the differences between the North and South. Although the South initially enjoyed a military advantage, over time the population and industrial strength of the North overwhelmed the South. As a consequence, there were significant political, economic, and social changes. These changes added to the catastrophic loss of human life (over 625,000 deaths--more than the loss of life in all other wars in which America has fought combined), resulted in an United States that was dramatically changed. The question of the preeminence of the National Government was settled. With the passage of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments, the "peculiar institution" of slavery was abolished. Finally, the country was reunited, though reluctantly, and Southern animosity toward the North and the Federal Government in Washington, D.C. would remain for over one hundred years.

01.13 Evaluate the causes, course, and consequences of the Civil War (U.S. History)

The Nation Divided: You need to be logged in to the Pioneer Website to access this reading. In one browser tab open and log in to the Pioneer Library, then in another tab open this site.  Sometimes after you've loggin in to the Pioneer site you need to select the World Book Encyclopedia in order to access this actual URL. Underground Railroad The Compromise of 1850 and especially the Fugitive Slave Act, created greater resistance to slavery in the form of the Underground Railroad and abolition movements. If you'd like to review the information on the Underground Railroad, check out this link to the previous section of the course. Millard Fillmore's Presidency Look at this site for the highlights of Millard Fillmore's presidency. Franklin Pierce's Presidency Find out about our 14th president through this site. Beginning of the Republican Party As the Whig Party began to split into smaller groups because of controversy over the Kansas-Nebraska Act, a new political party began to gain power. Look at this site for a brief description of why and how the Republican Party was formed. James Buchanan's Presidency Go to this site to find out about James Buchanan's presidency during this time period when tensions between the North and the South were rapidly coming towards the battles of the Civil War. Dred Scott Find out who this man was and why his case furthered the divide between the North and the South. Also, who was Roger B. Taney? Lincoln-Douglas Debates In the 1858 race for Illinois representative to the U.S. Senate, Abraham Lincoln gained national recognition in his debates with Steven Douglas. Go to this site to find out what the major issues of the debates were. This site also contains the transcripts of the debates. Also, who won the election? President Abraham Lincoln, 1864: Matthew Brady, (recolored by JMK), CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain DedicationPresident Abraham Lincoln, 1864: Matthew Brady, (recolored by JMK), CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication Abraham Lincoln's Presidency This site contains a biography of one of our most famous presidents, Abraham Lincoln. How did Lincoln win the 1860 election? Also, take the link to the Gettysburg Address to read the most famous of Lincoln's many great writings and speeches. The Civil War This site contains an excellent timeline of the Civil War. It also has links to more information on many of the battles and pictures of some of the destruction that this war caused. As you look through this site, find out the answers to the following questions:[img_assist|nid=17723|title=Dead soldiers at Gettysburg|desc=NARA, public domain|link=none|align=right|width=300|height=220

Ironclads Here is a site that explains the new warfare that started in the Civil War. It also links to another very informative overview of the War. Emancipation Proclamation Here is a link to the Emancipation Proclamation and a brief introduction that explains the importance of this document. Life during the Civil War This site contains some personal narratives and stories about life during the Civil War. Clara Barton Find out about Clara Barton through this site. Also, see what important organization she founded that is vital to Americans today. 

01.13.01 Civil War Map Activity

01.13.01 Civil War Map Activity (US History)

teacher-scored 36 points possible 60 minutes

President Abraham Lincoln: Public domain (copyright expired), via Wikimedia CommonsPresident Abraham Lincoln: Public domain (copyright expired), via Wikimedia Commons

Explore the websites which take you through battles and important events during the Civil War.

After you have looked the first two sites choose three battles, then go to the final site and answer the following questions about each of the battles you have chosen.

Copy and paste from * to * and submit the assignment on the assignment submission page. (You should have three sets of the questions.) *******************************************************************

1. Where was the battle fought?

2. When did the battle take place?

3. Who won the battle?  

4. What was the death toll for each side?

5. Which side had the advantage going into the battle? Why was this considered an advantage? 

6. Was it an important battle to one side or another for any reason?

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.14 Analyze the successes and failures of the Reconstruction period following the Civil War. (U.S. History)

You will learn about the failures and successes in America following the Civil War.

01.14. Analyze the successes and failures of the Reconstruction period following the Civil War. (U.S. History)

Reconstruction Amendments The Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the Constitution are called the "Reconstruction Amendments." Find out what these Amendments meant for Americans after the tragedies of the Civil War.

Reconstruction overview This site contains an excellent summary of the Reconstruction of the South after the Civil War. Find out how the North tried to change how the South functioned as well as how Southerners tried to change things back to the way the were before the war. What are the Radical Republicans, Freedman's Bureau and black codes? This site requires you to login to the Pioneer website in one window and then after you've logged in open this link in the a new window.  There is good information and it is very concise. 

John Wilkes Booth Go to this site to find out about John Wilkes Booth. Pictured below is Ford's Theater--find out what happened here.

Andrew Johnson's Presidency Go to this site to find out how this president played a crucial role during the Reconstruction period. Also, what did Congress do to Johnson because they believed that he was not fully enforcing the Reconstruction Acts?

Reconstruction Acts, failures, and legacy This site contains information about the Reconstruction Acts (how the rebel states were eventually readmitted to the Union), the failures of this process, and the legacy that it has left us today. Who were the carpetbaggers and scalawags? (The picture below is a cartoon depicting President Johnson as a tyrant king).

Hiram Revels This site contains information on Hiram Revels, the first African-American senator.

Life for African-Americans after the Civil War Even though they were freed by the Emancipation Proclamation and the new Amendments to the Constitution, African-Americans had a very difficult time gaining ground economically and socially in the South. This site has questions and answers regarding this problem. What is tenant farming and sharecropping?

Ku Klux Klan In addition to political attempts by Southern whites to keep the newly-freed black people in their impoverished state, the Ku Klux Klan was formed during Reconstruction to terrorize black people. This site contains a brief history of this violent and devastating group in America.

Panic of 1873 This site contains a history of the financial panic of 1873.

Ulysses S. Grant's Presidency Go to this site to find out about Grant's presidency after his successful time as the general to the Union forces.

Rutherford B. Hayes This site has a biography of Rutherford B. Hayes and his presidency. Find out how close the election was and the problems this presented during his term.

The Compromise of 1877 Find out what this compromise was, and why it ended the period we refer to as Reconstruction.

01.14. Reading Log

teacher-scored 20 points possible 40 minutes

Union soldiers at Fredericksburg Virgina: A. J. Russell, Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsUnion soldiers at Fredericksburg Virgina: A. J. Russell, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Use the information from Lessons 01.13 and 01.14 to complete the question set.

Please copy from the * to the * and paste the questions into a word document. When answering the questions, please be sure to bold your answer and answer in complete sentences. ***************************************************************

01.14 Reading Log ID Terms

1. What role did Stonewall Jackson play in the Civil War?

2. Who is Ulysses S. Grant?  Which side did he fight for? Why is he important to that side?

3. Which side did Robert E. Lee fight for?  Did he strengthen or weaken that side?

4. Who founded the Red Cross?  Why is that organization so important then and now?

5. Describe the Battle of Gettysburg.  Why was this battle so important to the Civil War?

6. Describe William Tecumseh Sherman's role in the Civil War.

7. Who is John Wilkes Booth? Why is he and his actions so significant to this time period?

9. What was the Emancipation Proclamation?

10. Why was the Emancipation Proclamation such a daring move?

11. What advantages did the North have during the war?

12. What were the advantages did the South have during the war?

13. Why was the Gettysburg Address so profound?

14. What is your favorite part of the Gettysburg Address? Why?

15. What was Reconstruction? What parts were successful?

16. What elements of Reconstruction were not successful?

17. Which are considered the Reconstruction Amendments? What did they do?

18. What role did Scalawags and carpetbagger in the re-build of the south?

19. What was life like for freed slaves in the south after the war?

20. Why were there vigilantes in the south? What were the prominent groups?

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.15 Examine the United States' policies relating to Native Americans. (U.S. History)

Chief Crazy Horse: Public domain via Wikimedia CommonsChief Crazy Horse: Public domain via Wikimedia Commons

You will learn about the policies that relate to how Native American tribes were treated in the United States.

01.15. Examine the United States' policies relating to American Indians. (U.S. History)

Black Hawk War Look through this site to find information regarding the Black Hawk War of 1832.General George Armstrong Custer: NARA, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsGeneral George Armstrong Custer: NARA, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

The Treaty of Fort Laramie Go to this site to find out what the Treaty of Fort Laramie meant for the Sioux Tribe. Who was George Armstrong Custer, and what did he have to do with reaching this treaty?

Sitting Bull This site contains information on Chief Sitting Bull.

Crazy Horse A biography of Crazy Horse is contained in this site.

American Indians' struggle in the Great Plains This site contains brief narratives from American Indian leaders and an overview of the destructive practices of the American government towards Native Americans during this time.

The Dawes Act Go to this site to find out about the Dawes Act and its consequences for American Indians.

Assimilation Behind many of the United State's actions of the time was the policy of "assimilation." Under this plan, the government wanted American Indians to give up their culture, religion, and way of life and "assimilate" to the predominant culture of the day. What problems do you see with this? Do you think that American Indians who did make these sacrifices were embraced by other Americans?

Shoshoni people gathered around tipis, circa 1890: Public domainShoshoni people gathered around tipis, circa 1890: Public domain

01.15. Quiz 5 - Civil War, Reconstruction, and U.S. policies with American Indians (U.S. History)

computer-scored 15 points possible 40 minutes

Quiz 5 - Civil War, Reconstruction, and U.S. policies with American Indians
This quiz tests your knowledge on the largest section of the course--that relating to the Civil War, Reconstruction and the United State's policies regarding American Indians.

Quiz 5 instructions
After you have studied the information about the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the United State's policies relating to American Indians, you are ready to take Quiz 5. There is a lot of information in this section, so please review the vocabulary list. (Don't get discouraged, this is the biggest section in the course--so it will get better.) Good luck and please let me know if you have any questions!

You must complete the quiz once you have started. You must score 80 percent on the test, and you will have 40 minutes to complete it. If you score below 80 percent you will need to wait 24 hours before you can take the test again.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.00 Unit 2 Inventions, industry, immigrants and other post-Civil War changes (US History)

The period from the mid-1800's to the early 1900's was an era of tremendous changes in the United States. 1912: A covered wagon meets an early automobile in Nebraska: Wikimedia Commons, NARA, A. L. Westgard, public domain1912: A covered wagon meets an early automobile in Nebraska: Wikimedia Commons, NARA, A. L. Westgard, public domain
In this unit you will study

  • Inventions, Communication and Transportation
  • Industrialism, Industrialists and Monopolies
  • Immigrants and Working Conditions
  • Architecture, Tenements and the Social Movements

02.01 Unit 2 Vocabulary to study for quizzes (US History)

Here are the vocabulary and terms to study before each quiz:

Quiz 6 - Inventions, Communication and Transportation post-Civil War vocabulary listFirst successful flight of the Wright Flyer, by the Wright brothers, 1903: Wikimedia Commons, John T. Daniels, public domainFirst successful flight of the Wright Flyer, by the Wright brothers, 1903: Wikimedia Commons, John T. Daniels, public domain Eli Whitney, cotton gin, I.M. Singer, sewing machine, Samuel Morse, telegraph, John Deere,
steel plow, Cyrus McCormick, reaper, Thomas Edison, lightbulb, electricity, motion picture projector, Alexander Graham Bell, telephone, Christopher Sholes, typewriter, "qwerty" keyboard, Wilbur and Orville Wright, airplane, George Eastman, Kodak camera, Henry Ford, automobile, Model T, assembly line, mass production, transcontinental railroad, Central Pacific, Union Pacific, Promontory Summit, George Pullman, sleeping car, Granger Laws, Federal Land Grant Program, Interstate Commerce Act, Interstate Commerce Commission, Panic of 1893

Quiz 7 - Industrialism, Industrialists, and Monopolies vocabulary list
Industrialism, trusts, monopolies, longhorns, Chisholm Trail, goods distribution, Andrew Carnegie, steel, vertical integration, horizontal integration, John D. Rockefeller, Standard Oil Company, J.P. Morgan, Cornelius Vanderbilt, Sherman Antitrust Act, Federal Trade Commission, Social Darwinism, Social Gospel Movement

Quiz 8 - Immigrants and working conditions vocabulary list
Homestead Act, exodusters, Frederick Jackson Turner, Frontier Thesis, Japanese immigration, Gentleman's Agreement, Chinese immigration, Chinese Exclusion Act, Angel Island, Ellis Island, European immigration, melting pot, nativism, Americanization movement, public schools, discrimination, working conditions, factories, coal mines, transportation (railroads)

Quiz 9 Architecture, Tenements, and the Social Movements vocabulary list
Fallingwater house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright: Wikimedia Commons, Serinde image, CC Attribution 2.5 GenericFallingwater house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright: Wikimedia Commons, Serinde image, CC Attribution 2.5 GenericArts and Crafts, Frank Lloyd Wright, mass transit, Wainwright Building, Louis Sullivan,
Frederick Law Olmstead, City Beautiful Movement, Central Park, urbanization, tenements, How the Other Half Lives, Jacob Riis, Tenement House Law, Social Darwinism, Social Gospel Movement, Herbert Spencer, Lewis Hine, Walter Rauschenbusch, Jane Addams, Hull House, settlement houses

02.02 Assess how transportation, communication, and marketing improvements and innovations transformed the American economy in the late 19th and early 20th centuries (U.S. History)

The material and links in this section will help you First Transcontinental Rail, train on its way to the Golden Spike ceremony, 1869: Wikimedia Commons, public domainFirst Transcontinental Rail, train on its way to the Golden Spike ceremony, 1869: Wikimedia Commons, public domain

  • Identify major American inventions and how they affected the United States.
  • Explain the expansion of transportation and communication in the United States following the Civil War.
  • Determine the impact of industrialization on the American economy and society.
  • Examine how the market revolution affected retail distribution of goods in the cities and in rural areas.

02.03 Identify major American inventions and how they affected the United States. (U.S. History)

02.03 Travel and Inventions Discovery Activity

teacher-scored 20 points possible 40 minutes
You'll be making 2 separate tables for this assignment. You are more than welcome to set the tables up however you'd like but in order to receive full credit you need to include all of the information listed under the Table title. You'll use the information you learned in Lessons 02.02-02.03 to complete the assignment.

Table 1: Inventions 

For each of the inventions/inventors, you need all of the following information.  Who the inventor is, what was invented, and what change it brought to society.                                                                

Samuel F. Morse, Thomas Edison, Christopher Sholes, Alexander Graham Bell, George Pullman, Henry Ford, George Eastman, Brownie Camera, Cotton Gin, Steel Plow, Mechanical Reaper, Flight, Bessemer Process, Sewing Machine                                                                                                                  

Table 2: Travel                                                                                                             

All of the terms are important elements of the new systems of travel in the late 1800s.  For each you need to tell what each is, what role it played in the railroad, why that role was important.

Granger Laws, Credit Mobilier Scandal, Sleeper Car, Promotory Point, Interstate Commerce Act, Chinese Immigrants, Irish Immigrants, African Americans               

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.03. Identify major American inventions and how they affected the United States. (U.S. History)

Lecture Notes As you look through each of these sites to find out about the new inventions of the time and their inventors, ask yourself how each of these products changed American life and society. The Cotton Gin Go to this site to find out about the cotton gin and its inventor, Eli Whitney. This invention revolutionized the textile industry and transformed the Southern economy. The Telegraph This site has the history of the Morse telegraph, Morse code, and how it impacted America. The Steel Plow This site has information on why a steel plow was so remarkable in its day. Also, you might recognize the inventor's name as still making products we have today. McCormick mechanical reaper This site shows why Cyrus McCormick's mechanical reaper was so much different from previous methods of harvesting crops. There are also links to McCormick's biography. Thomas Edison Please look through this site to find information on Thomas Edison and his many inventions that changed the world. Thomas Edison's papers This site has a search engine to go through Thomas Edison's papers. There are over 5 million pages of documents from this incredible inventor. Telephone This site has information on Alexander Graham Bell and his invention of the telephone. It also has a link to an extensive history of the telephone, and how it continues to transform through the years. Typewriter This site has a history of the early typewriter. While it mentions the contributions of a few inventors, focus on what made Christopher Sholes' typewriter unique and so influential. Airplane Look at this site for information on the Wright brothers, links to their papers describing their first airplane attempts, and images of the first airplanes. Kodak camera George Eastman made photography available to the public (not just professionals) by the invention of his Kodak camera. Go to this site to find information on him and the changes his camera made. Automobile This site has information on the history of Henry Ford and his automobile. Find out what major innovation he made in manufacturing.

02.04 Explain the expansion of transportation and communication in the United States following the Civil War. (U.S. History)

Learning about the new inventions in transportation and communication.

02.04 Explain the expansion of transportation and communication in the United States following the Civil War . (U.S. History)

Transcontinental Railroad
This site has a lot of information on the transcontinental railroad, and why this milestone was so important to the United States. Find out what two railroads were racing to complete this line, and where they finally met together.

George Pullman
Find out what Pullman invented to make railroad journeys more comfortable for passengers. Learn about the unique company he built to manufacture this new innovation.

The Granger Laws
With the new innovations in agriculture and the increased farming production that American farmers began to make, farmers became more reliant on railroads to transport their goods. Many railroad owners knew of the farmers' dependence and made rates that were unfairly high. (The main railroad leaders of this time are often referred to as "Robber Barons".) The Grange movement tried to address these problems. Look at this site to see what problems farmers faced, as well as what they did about them.

Interstate Commerce Commission
Go to this site to find out how the Interstate Commerce Commission, formed in 1887, affected the railroad industry.

Lecture Notes
Even though the ICC made headway in trying to regulate the booming railroad industry, many railways were mismanaged and were places of corrupt business practices. These problems led many railroads to the brink of bankruptcy. These financial problems played a major role in the financial panic of 1893, the worst economic depression in United States history to that point. During this depression, large investment firms purchased weak railway lines, and by the end of the panic, more than two-thirds of the railroads were controlled by seven powerful companies. This consolidation of power led to increased corruption and problems that we will address in future sections.

When you have studied these sections on inventions and transportation after the Civil War, you are ready to take Quiz 6.

02.04 Explain the expansion of transportation and communication in the United States following the Civil War. Quiz 6 - Inventions, Communication, and Transportation after the Civil War (U.S. History)

computer-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Quiz 6 - Inventions, Communication, and Transportation after the Civil War
This quiz will test your knowledge on the section that covers major inventions, communication, and transportation following the Civil War. Please take it after you have studied the links and vocabulary for this section.

You will have 30 minutes to complete this test, and you must finish it once the test has been started.

Go to Topic 3 on the class outline page to take your quiz.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.05 Determine the impact of industrialization on the American economy and society. (U.S History)

Learning how industrialization changed America's economic position in the world and how this growing need for workers and a new affluency affected society.

02.05. Determine the impact of industrialization on the American economy and society. (U.S History)

Industrialization This is a brief description of the process of industrialization, and why it transforms a society where it occurs. There is also more information on this site if you click the next button at the top of the page. Impact of Industrialization on American life This link is to an excellent website that has the history of the 1800's broken into decades. As you look through the 1890's page, please think about how industrialization changed America. Where were people moving and how were they living?

02.06 Examine how the market revolution affected retail distribution of goods in the cities and in rural areas.(U.S. History)

Learning about growth of the American economy, as markets were created for American products from Industrialization and livestock shipments.

02.06. Examine how the market revolution affected retail distribution of goods in the cities and in rural areas. (U.S. History)

Goods Distribution These two links to information regarding the cattle business of this period are supplemental to what we have already covered on goods distribution. The boom of the railroads in America is what significantly affected how products were distributed throughout the nation. Review the links in this folder to study how the railroads changed the distribution of goods within the country. Cattle roundup, southeastern Colorado, circa 1898: Wikimedia Commons, Library of Congress, public domainCattle roundup, southeastern Colorado, circa 1898: Wikimedia Commons, Library of Congress, public domain Texas longhorns During the 1800's there was an increased demand for beef. The longhorn breed of cattle was one answer to this growing demand. Chisholm Trail The Chisholm Trail also began to answer the call for the increased demand for beef after the Civil War. Look at this site for a map and information about this cattle trail.

02.07 Evaluate the prominent business leaders and the business organizations that influenced the growth of industrialization in the United States. (U.S. History)

  • Examine the roles of American industrialists.
  • Evaluate the growth and influences of monopolies and trusts on capitalism.

02.07 Industrialization Reading Log

teacher-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

These Short Answer questions just need to be answered. Each one is a little bit different, some may only require a 1 sentence answer while others may need to be 3 or 5 sentences. You will receive credit on these as long as they are answered correctly, which demonstrates your understanding of the concept addressed in the question.

Please copy from the * to the * and paste the questions into a word document. When answering the questions, please be sure to bold your answer.

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02.07 Reading Log
ID Terms

1. What is a political machine? What role did they play in major cities?

2. What is William “Boss” Tweed most well known for?  Why?

3. What was the spoils system and which presidents are infamous for using it?

4. Who did the Pendleton Civil Service Act benefit? Did it serve its purpose?

5. What is capitalism?

6. What is a monopoly? What companies were considered such?

7. What is horizontal integration? How does it apply to business?

8. What is vertical integration? How does it apply to business?

9. What is a trustbuster? Why were so many anti-trust laws passed?

10. What is the Sherman Antitrust Act?

11. Use the "Social Gospel vs. Social Darwinism" chart given at the link above to describe both philosophies and the contrast between them.

12. What is a Robber Baron? Who were some of the most influential of the group?

13. What were the motives of muckrackers?

14. Describe Teddy Roosevelt's contributions as president.

15. What is Urbanization? Why did it effect the Northeast and the Midwest?

16. What was a workday like for many factory workers? (Length? Conditions? Etc.?)

17. In a paragraph discuss the Progressive Movement.  Who were the Progressives? What were their basic beliefs/philosophies?  What were the  four goals of the Progressive Movement? What effect did the Progressive movement have on the country? (4 pts)
 

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.07 Prominent leaders and Practices that helped to grow the Industrial Revolution

This site is a great introduction to business.

02.08 Examine the roles of American industrialists. (U.S. History)

Lesson Notes

The Industrial Revolution began in England in the late 1700s and early 1800s. It spread to the U.S. in the late 1800s. Many people moved to America in search of freedom, to be sure, but also the opportunity to make a better life for themselves. Some of these immigrants were poor, but very intelligent. Men such as Andrew Carnegie and John D. Rockefeller by their own efforts rose from poverty to vast power and riches. In the late 1800s there were few laws controlling business dealings. Consequently, these "captains of industry," as they were called by their admirers, used many questionable business practices (which would be illegal today) to rise to the top and eliminate their competition. They began to monopolize areas of industry: Carnegie in steel, Rockefeller in oil, Vanderbilt in railroads, Armour in meat packing, etc.

The board game, Monopoloy, was patterned after these tycoons. What is the ultimate goal of Monopoly? It is NOT to amass the most money or properties. It is not to have "hotels" on each monopoly. The goal is, pure and simple, to bankrupt all the other players! If you do, you win! That's what these industrialists did. They eliminated the competion in their industry until they were the only ones left.

Some of the most prominent of these industrialst giants of the Gilded Age were:

  • Andrew Carnegie (steel)
  • J.P. Morgan (banking)
  • John D. Rockefeller (Sr.) (oil)
  • Cornelius Vanderbilt (railroads)
  • Jay Gould (Wall Street)

 

 

 

02.08.01

teacher-scored 50 points possible 30 minutes

For this assignment*, use the sources below to conduct some research on 3 of these individuals.  You will need to write a paragraph about each responding to the following questions:

  1. When and where was he was born?
  2. What did you learn about his work ethic and what he had to do to gain the financial power he did?
  3. Were his business choices fair to his employees and competitors?
  4. What was the role of government in his particular business?
  5. How did he industrialists embrace or illustrate the concept of "Social Darwinism?
  6. Would you consider him a "captain of industry" or a "robber baron?

 

* Note:  there is a change to this assignment.  The "google earth" portion is no longer required.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.08.2

Use any of these sites to research three industrialists of the Gilded Age.

02.09 Evaluate the growth and influences of monopolies and trusts on capitalism. (U.S. History)

This period of time saw rapid innovation, population booms, the rise of an American industrialist class.  But this era also grappled with increasing poverty, changing ideals, sharp rises in crime and the largest influx of immigrants to date.  These conditions would give rise to a movement - the progressive movement - with leaders dedicated to social change.

02.09. Evaluate the growth and influences of monopolies and trusts on capitalism. (U.S. History)

The Trusts This site explains the rise of trusts (and monopolies) during the Guilded Age. Think about what this consolidation of power meant for American consumers (would this generally mean better service and prices or not?).

Sherman Antitrust Act This site has an excellent summary of what the monopolies in the late 1900's were doing that was unfair. Also, find out which companies the Sherman Antitrust Act tried to break up

Clayton Antitrust Act Find out how this second antitrust law strengthened the Sherman Act.

Federal Trade Commission Find out how the Federal Trade Commission became the 'watchdog' for American industry. Does it still have a role today?

Progressive Movement See how the Progressives tackled the new social challenges and greated a lasting impact on our society.

Quiz 7 instructions Please take Quiz 7 after you have studied the sections on the impact of industrialization, American industrialists and the growth of monopolies and trusts. Review the vocabulary list before you begin the Quiz. Let me know if you have any questions and good luck!

02.09. Evaluate the growth and influences of monopolies and trusts on capitalism - Quiz 7 (U.S. History)

computer-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Quiz 7 - Industrialism, Industrialists and Monopolies
Please take this quiz after you have reviewed the course materials and vocabulary list for the related section.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.10 Assess how the growth of industry affected the movement of people into and within the United States (U.S. History)

Objective 6

Immigrants entering the United States through Ellis Island, 1902: Library of Congress image, public domainImmigrants entering the United States through Ellis Island, 1902: Library of Congress image, public domainIn this section you will

  • Determine the demographic changes in population from the 1890s and into the 1920s.
  • Investigate the influences that affected various immigrant groups entering the U.S.
  • Examine the working conditions of immigrant workers.
  • Analyze the living conditions immigrants faced as they tried to make their way in a new country.
  • Identify the primary ports-of-entry on the East and West coasts and barriers to immigration.

02.10 Migration and Immigration Reading Log

teacher-scored 15 points possible 60 minutes

This assignment is designed to help you study for the corresponding quiz. It covers all material in the lessons 02.10 through 02.13. It is important to follow the instructions carefully in order to receive the most credit possible for this assignment.

The ID Terms are similar to definitions EXCEPT they add the element of WHY? What I mean is this; after you have defined the word or told me who the person is you then need to tell me WHY they are important to this point in history. This means that you should have 2 short sentences for each of the ID Terms. You will not get half points for this part of the assignment. If you don't have BOTH sentences you won't get credit. The other thing is; you MUST avoid broad generalizations like; "if they didn't do what they did the world would be different." So what you'll need to do think for a minute. Definitions are what I call basic regurgitation, you read something and then spit it back out in written form. By adding the WHY element I am hopefully training you to analyze what you've read a little bit. By asking yourself, "Why is this person or thing important or significant?" You are making a connection in your brain and analyzing, which is a higher brain function than regurgitation.

The Short Answer questions just need to be answered. Each one is a little bit different; some may only require a 1-sentence answer while others may need to be 3 or 5 sentences. You will receive credit on these as long as correct answers are given in at least one complete sentence and in a way which demonstrates your understanding of the concept addressed in the question.

Please copy from the * to the * and paste the questions into a word document. When answering the questions, please be sure to bold your answer.

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02.10 Reading Log
ID Terms

 

1. Ellis Island
2. Angel Island
3. Gentlemen’s Agreement (between the U.S. and Japan)
4. Potato Famine

Short Answer Questions

5. What was the Chinese Exclusion Act?
6. Why were the Chinese targeted?
7. What is meant by the term melting pot?
8. Why were most immigrants after 1890 from southern and eastern Europe?
9. What is nativism?
10. Why was it a response to immigration?
11. How is diversity part of the national identity of the U.S.?
12. How did the Railroad spur immigration?
13. What was the trip to America like for most immigrants?
14. Why did people migrate from the country to the city?
15. Why did the U.S. represent a Golden Door to many immigrants?

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.11 Determine the demographic changes in population from the 1890's to the present. (U.S.History)

Ku Klux Klan in Virginia, 1922: National Photo Company Collection (Library of Congress), Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsKu Klux Klan in Virginia, 1922: National Photo Company Collection (Library of Congress), Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

02.11. Determine the demographic changes in population from the 1890's to the present. (U.S.History)

Homestead Act This Act was very important in encouraging people to settle the West. Through this link find information regarding the Act, maps and photos of the homesteaders.

Exodusters This site explains who the Exodusters were, and why they were drawn to move West.

Frontier Thesis Frederick Jackson Turner presented this influential theory in 1893. Find out how he believed the frontier shaped America.

Angel Island Find out what the U.S. government used this island for.

Immigration Overview This site gives a good summary of what circumstances prompted people to immigrate to the U.S.

Japanese Immigration This site has information on why Japanese people came to America and the conditions they faced upon their arrival. Find out where new immigrants worked, and what organizations became the focal point of their activities.

Chinese Immigration This site has information and narratives regarding the immigration of many Chinese people to the Western part of the country. Find out why they came, and how they were received.

Ellis Island Go to this site to find out information about Ellis Island.

European Immigration Who was coming through Ellis Island? This short article explains how the predominant European countries that immigrants were coming from changed during this period. What made people leave their countries? Who were the 'old' and 'new' immigrants?

 

02.12 Investigate the influences that affected various immigrant groups entering the United States. (U.S. History)

Learning about the American movement, public schools and immigration.

02.12. Investigate the influences that affected various immigrant groups entering the United States. (U.S. History)

Americanization movement The Americanization movement was a social campaign sponsored by the government, designed to assimilate people of diverse cultures into the dominant American culture. Immigrants were taught the skills they needed for citizenship (such as English literacy and American history) as well as social skill like cooking and etiquette. Schools and voluntary associations provided classes for immigrants to help them more easily make the transition to American life. These programs were trying to reach the American ideal of our nation being a 'melting pot' for people from diverse backgrounds. However, many immigrants did not want to abandon their traditional ways of living; immigrant communities became a vital survival tool for those wishing to continue speaking their own languages and living how they had before coming to America. Public Schools This site has a description of American public schools during this period and how they played a role in integrating immigrants. Find out what a typical education would consist of and how your family's position influenced how much school you would probably be able to complete. Nativism Because of the influx of immigrants to America, political movements began pushing for immigration restrictions. These anti-immigration policies stemmed from the nativism movement. Find out what this meant through this site. Chinese Exclusion Act Find out what this law meant for those wishing to immigrate from China. Why was it passed? Buggy used for smuggling Chinese aliens across Mexican border, circa 1921: NARA, public domainBuggy used for smuggling Chinese aliens across Mexican border, circa 1921: NARA, public domain Gentleman's Agreement This links to a site we have already studied in this course. Make sure that you read about the Gentleman's Agreement and what it meant for Japanese immigrants. Immigration Discrimination This site focuses on the discrimination that Chinese immigrants experienced, but each culture had many discriminatory obstacles in America. Find out how many immigrants tried to work within the system and use resources available to them to fight discrimination.

02.13 A Nation of Immigrants

02.14 Examine the working conditions of immigrant workers. (U.S. History)

Lesson Notes

Most of these sites are general overviews of working conditions for employees during this period. Immigrants often faced additional challenges because of cultural barriers and discriminatory practices. As you look through these sites, realize that this was at a time when there were very few, if any, protections for employees. Dangerous conditions, unfair hours and wages, and job instability were all ways of life for Americans and immigrants at the turn of the nineteenth century. Looking ahead you will realize the formation of labor unions was the only way of these workers, immigrant or native born, to counter the excesses of the industrialists.

02.14. Examine the working conditions of immigrant workers. (U.S. History)

America at Work This site has many links to different work sites and occupations during this period. Focus on the working conditions for factory workers. Coal Mining This site explains why mining is essential to the economy and also shows some of the hazards that are involved. Coal Mining This site shows pictures and explains more about the dangers that old coal miners had to face every workday. Chinese-American contribution to the Transcontinental Railroad This is an excellent summary of the major contribution that Chinese-American workers made to the transcontinental railroad. This is one example of immigrant contributions to transportation in this country. Quiz 8 instructions When you have studied the course materials about demographic changes, the reception of immigrants and the working conditions they encountered, you are ready to take Quiz 8. Please check that you learned the key elements of this section by looking through the vocabulary list. Good luck!

02.14. Examine the working conditions of immigrant workers. Quiz 8 (U.S. History)

computer-scored 15 points possible 40 minutes

Quiz 8 - Immigrants and working conditions
Please take this quiz when you have studied the material covering the changing demographics of America, how immigrants were received, and the working conditions of the time. Remember to check your knowledge on the vocabulary list before you begin the quiz.

You must complete the quiz once you have started. You must score 80 percent on the test and you will have 40 minutes to complete it. If you score below 80 percent you will need to wait 24 hours before you can take the test again.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.15 Investigate the challenges presented to urban inhabitants (U.S. History)

Objective 7 - Investigate the challenges presented to urban inhabitants.

Tenement building in New York City, built 1863, now restored as museum: Wikimedia Commons, Fletcher6, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedTenement building in New York City, built 1863, now restored as museum: Wikimedia Commons, Fletcher6, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedIn this section you will

  • Identify how American cities spawned American architecture.
  • Examine living conditions in tenements.
  • Compare the attitudes of Social Darwinism with those of the Social Gospel Movement.
  • Explain the growth of baser side of humanity in cities, such as alcohol abuse, violent crime, and gambling.

02.15 Urban Living Reading Log

teacher-scored 15 points possible 60 minutes

This assignment is designed to help you study for the corresponding quiz. It covers all material in the lessons 02.14 through 02.17. It is important to follow the instructions carefully in order to receive the most credit possible for this assignment.

The ID Terms are similar to definitions EXCEPT they add the element of WHY? What I mean is this; after you have defined the word or told me who the person is you then need to tell me WHY they are important to this point in history. This means that you should have 2 short sentences for each of the ID Terms. You will not get half points for this part of the assignment. If you don't have BOTH sentences you won't get credit. The other thing is; you MUST avoid broad generalizations like; "if they didn't do what they did the world would be different." So what you'll need to do think for a minute. Definitions are what I call basic regurgitation, you read something and then spit it back out in written form. By adding the WHY element I am hopefully training you to analyze what you've read a little bit. By asking yourself, "Why is this person or thing important or significant?" You are making a connection in your brain and analyzing, which is a higher brain function than regurgitation.

The Short Answer questions just need to be answered. Each one is a little bit different, some may only require a 1 sentence answer while others may need to be 3 or 5 sentences. You will receive credit on these as long as they are answered correctly, which demonstrates your understanding of the concept addressed in the question.

Please copy from the * to the * and paste the questions into a word document. When answering the questions, please be sure to bold your answer.

***************************************************************************************************************************************

02.15 Reading Log
ID Terms

 

1. Tenement
2. Hull House
3. Jane Addams
4. Mary Harris "Mother" Jones
 

 

Short Answer Questions

5. What was significant about the construction of the Wainwright and Chicago Home Insurance Building, and how did skyscrapers change the complexion of American cities?

6. What were conditions like in the cities?
7. How did the Great Chicago Fire and the San Francisco Earthquake of 1906 prove the poor state of living conditions?
8. What were the key elements of the Jacob Riis' work "How the other Half Lives"?
9. What were working conditions like for children?
10. What is the Arts and Crafts movement?
11. How did the philosophies of Social Gospel and Social Darwinism describe who should be responsible for addressing poverty?

 

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.16 Identify how American cities spawned American architecture. (U.S. History)

History of urbanization in America

02.16. Identify how American cities spawned American architecture. (U.S. History)

Urbanization At the bottom of this page find what is urbanization, and why did it happen so quickly in this country? Why American architecture is different This paper explains some of the reasons that American architecture differs from that of the Old World. Find out what makes American cities unique through this site. Mass Transit Find out why industrialization encourages the growth of mass transit through this site. Also learn about the fluxuation of mass transit use in American history. Frederick Law Olmstead Find out what this architect designed and the movement he created. Why was his work important to the developing cities? The Wainwright Building Who was the architect of the project, and why is it historically significant? Arts and Crafts Movement Find out why this architectural movement started, and what proponents of this style valued. Check out the biography of Frank Lloyd Wright, one of the most famous Arts and Crafts architects.

02.17 Examine living conditions in tenements.(U.S. History)

Tenements
This is a brief description of the mass housing that developed called tenements. Find out how many people were living in apartments and what their conditions were.

Tenement Conditions
This explains more about tenement housing and the horrible conditions of the overcrowded buildings. Find out about their sanitation systems, water, and ventilation. Also, what law was enacted to try and alleviate some of the problems of these living quarters?

Jacob A. Riis
Go to this site to find a brief description of this reformer, and the text to his famous work that showed Americans the shame of tenement housing, "How the Other Half Lives."

02.17. Examine living conditions in tenements.(U.S. History)

02.18 Compare the attitudes of Social Darwinism with those of Social Gospel believers. (U.S. History)

Social Darwinism and the Social Gospel

02.18. Compare the attitudes of Social Darwinism with those of Social Gospel believers. (U.S. History)

Lecture Notes As you look through these sites about Social Darwinism and the Social Gospel, compare their ideas and actions. Which do you think promotes a better and more just society? Why? Social Darwinism Please go to this site to find a description of Social Darwinism. Many of the leading industrialists that we have studied (like John D. Rockefeller and Andrew Carnegie) believed in these ideas. What was this movement and what did the believers think that it justified in society? Do you think that it is true? Herbert Spencer Find information on Herbert Spencer, the founder of Social Darwinism. Also, read an excerpt from his work. Social Gospel Movement Go to this site to find out why the Social Gospel movement started, and what its founding principles were. Who was the founder, and what impact did they have? Settlement Houses One of the connected movements of the Social Gospel was the spread of settlement houses. Find out what these places were and how they tried to help people. Also, read about Jane Addams and Hull House. Jane Addams and Hull House This site has many pictures and in-depth information on the history of Hull House and Jane Addams' work. Quiz 9 instructions After you have studied the information about American architecture, tenements and the social movements, you are ready to take Quiz 9. Please make sure you know the terms by checking the vocabulary list. Good luck!

02.18. Compare the attitudes of Social Darwinism with those of Social Gospel believers. Quiz 9 (U.S. History)

computer-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Assignment - Quiz 9 - Architecture, Tenements, and Social Movements
This quiz should be taken after you have reviewed the corresponding course material for this section. Please review the vocabulary list before starting to make sure you understand the concepts.

You will have 30 minutes to complete this test, and you must finish it once the test has been started.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.19 Writing Assignments (U.S. History)

Essays are a tricky beast, but they are doable. 

  1. The first thing you need to do is to come up with an answer, or a main idea.  This is what you discuss in your opening paragraph.  In addition to this you briefly mention three supporting facts which will make up the next three paragraphs.
  2. You need to support the idea you presented with the body of the essay.  So you need to take the three supporting facts, give them each a paragraph and write about that fact, with supporting facts. Be sure in each paragraph you use three other facts to tell why it supports the main idea.
  3. After you've written your 3 body paragraphs, you need to end your essay.  Wrap up without being too broad and saying that it changed the world. You also need to restate your thesis or main idea.

I hope that helps.

      • Rubric
        • Introduction: 8 points ___/2 Thesis answers the question. ___/2 All parts of the question have been addressed. ___/1 Alludes to why. . . (this is different with each question.) ___/1 Contains a point to be covered in one of the body paragraphs. (Body 1) ___/1 Contains a point to be covered in one of the body paragraphs. (Body 2) ___/1 Contains a point to be covered in one of the body paragraphs. (Body 3)
        • Body Paragraph 1: 8 points ___/2 Subject sentence clearly introduces the subject to be discussed in the paragraph. ___/1 Factual evidence #1. ___/1 Analytical tie evidence to the thesis, this is the WHY. (Why. . . does this fact support the thesis.) ___/1 Factual evidence #2. ___/1 Analytical tie evidence to the thesis, this is the WHY. (Why. . . does this fact support the thesis.) ___/1 Factual evidence #3. ___/1 Analytical tie evidence to the thesis, this is the WHY. (Why. . . does this fact support the thesis.)
        • Body Paragraph 2: 8 points ___/2 Subject sentence clearly introduces the subject to be discussed in the paragraph. ___/1 Factual evidence #1. ___/1 Analytical tie evidence to the thesis, this is the WHY. (Why. . . does this fact support the thesis.) ___/1 Factual evidence #2. ___/1 Analytical tie evidence to the thesis, this is the WHY. (Why. . . does this fact support the thesis.) ___/1 Factual evidence #3. ___/1 Analytical tie evidence to the thesis, this is the WHY. (Why. . . does this fact support the thesis.)
        • Body Paragraph 3: 8 points ___/2 Subject sentence clearly introduces the subject to be discussed in the paragraph. ___/1 Factual evidence #1. ___/1 Analytical tie evidence to the thesis, this is the WHY. (Why. . . does this fact support the thesis.) ___/1 Factual evidence #2. ___/1 Analytical tie evidence to the thesis, this is the WHY. (Why. . . does this fact support the thesis.) ___/1 Factual evidence #3. ___/1 Analytical tie evidence to the thesis, this is the WHY. (Why. . . does this fact support the thesis.)
        • Conclusion: 4 points ___/2 Some kind of wrap-up of the material is evident without the use of the phrase, "we wouldn't be here today if. . ." or any variation of that phrase. ___/2 Thesis is re-stated is some form. (The thesis is the answer to the question.)
        • Sources: 3 points ___/1 First source is cited. ___/1 Second source is cited. ___/1 Third source is cited.
        • Format: ___/1 Essay is written in 2 pages and is double spaced.

        Listed below are three essay questions about the Constitution, Civil War and immigration. One You are to select one question and write an answer in an essay of, at least, 500 words.

02.19. Writing Assignments (U.S. History)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 60 minutes

Writing Assignment Instructions
You select which one of the three questions you want to answer. Please answer the question thoughtfully in a persuasive essay that is 2-4 pages in length (double-spaced with 12 point font). The essay will be graded based on the completeness of the answer and the writing style used in the composition. Include an introduction, body, and conclusion in your essay along with a bibliography or citation of your sources. You must have a minimum of three sources and you cannot use Wikipedia, Yahoo, Ask Jeeves or similiar sites. Your essay is worth a maximum of 30 points.

Writing Assignment Option 1
The Constitution was ratified over 200 years ago. How can it still be an effective governing document today? Which two Amendments in the Bill of Rights are currently the most important in America? Why?

Writing Assignment Option 2
The Civil War has been described as the major turning point in United States history. Why was this event so pivotal and what consequences are we still living with today?

Writing Assignment Option 3
Explain some of the difficulties that immigrants encountered when they came to America in the 1800s and early 1900s. Are any of these problems still happening today? If so, to whom?

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.20 Preparing for Final Exam (U.S. History)

Final Exam

This is your final step after you've reviewed the course material, taken all of the quizzes for the class, and completed all the other assignments.

THE EXAM:

  • Comprehensive final exam for this quarter of U.S. History only. Please make sure before you begin that you have reviewed the material thoroughly.
  • There is an hour-and-a-half time limit and this test consists of objective questions and essays that will test your knowledge of the themes in this class. Because this is a final test and I want to see what you have learned in this course.
  • This test consists of over thirty questions which are a combination of multiple choice and true/false. These will be machine-graded automatically by the computer.
  • There are also four essay questions covering general themes from this quarter and will be submitted to me for grading. These essay questions are worth ten points apiece and will require a comprehensive answer of, at least, five sentences including an Introduction where you state your position (thesis statement) on the question. In your essay you will need to give specifics to support your position. If, for example, you are asked to explain the causes of World War Two, you would need to discuss (not simply list) causes like nationalism, militarism, economic instability, rise of totalitarian governments, appeasement, or discontent with the Treaty of Versailles. To earn all points you must have a minimum of three main points to support your position. Your score will also depend on how well you explain your three main points. Fewer than three main points or little or no support for your main points will result in a lower score. I will return your grade for the final after I have graded your essays.
  • You are NOT expected to memorize all you have learned, but you must be able to demonstrate mastery of the material. Consequently, you are allowed to use two (2) pages of handwritten notes - one-side only. You may NOT use any xeroxed copies or typed pages on the Final. You may NOT use the typed Reading Log assignment, although you are free to handwrite any of those items you submitted for the Reading Log assignment.
  • Set up an appointment to take the Proctored Test once you have fulfilled all of the requirements to do so and feel confident that you can pass.
  • You must pass the final test at 60 percent to earn credit in this class.