Skip navigation.

World Civilizations, 4th Quarter

00.0 Start Here - Introduction to this Class (World Civilizations)

Course Description

The study of World Civilizations emphasizes the increasing interrelationships over time of the world’s peoples. These interrelationships have developed in two major arenas.

First, the relationships have developed among major regions of the world: East Asia, South Asia, Southwest Asia (Middle East), Africa, Europe, North America and Latin America.

Second, they have developed within all aspects of human activity: political, economic, social, philosophical and religious, scientific and technological, and artistic.

Class Overview

The World Civilizations course is a full 1.0 credit but is broken into four quarter classes. You may enroll for one, two, three or all four quarters, BUT you can enroll in only one quarter at a time!

Each quarter of World Civilizations generates a .25 credit. If you do not turn in any work within the first week after you register, you may be dropped from this course.

You have up to 10 weeks to finish each quarter after you are enrolled. Please following the pacing recommendations for each assignment. Once you have completed a quarter (including all work and tests), you can request to be enrolled in the next quarter.

About the Curriculum

The class works like this. . . First you read the lessons (if you've done it right you started with Module 1, are now reading Module 2, move to Module 3, and finally Module 4).  The lessons have a little chain link next to them.  This is where you'll find the assignments.  Follow the instructions then you can either click next OR go back to the home page and click on the assignment submission page.  The assignment submission links have a paper with an "A" in it. The last link you'll see is the quiz link.  It has a "Q" next to it.  

Each Module will be locked until you have completed the prior Module.  To keep track of what you've done look along the left side of the home page.  There are check marks there.  Completed links have green checks.  Incomplete links have yellow checks. 

When you have finished Module 3, which is the class work, please move to Module 4 and submit the "Ready" assignment.

Required Readings

The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators, and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study. You need to be accessing the readings from a home computer--NOT a school computer lab.(Some school computer labs may work, but it depends on how the network is set up.) Accessing the readings is bit tricky. To access the readings you must do the following:

1) Open "a new Tab" on your internet browser and paste in the Utah Online Library (Pioneer Library) URL. The log-in page will appear. On the right-hand side, type the information in the boxes as shown below: Utah Student Log-in Enter the log-in name and password found on your dashboard--the main class page when you are logged in to your EHS class.

Log-in Name: online
Password: [Check the dashboard page or contact your EHS teacher or school librarian for the current password]

Click the LOG-IN graphic The Utah Online Library page will appear. Click on the last link in the first column titled: World Book Encyclopedia. The page will open in a new window or a new tab. Close or minimize the new World Book window/tab, but DO NOT close the original Utah Online Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings (you can minimize the window to get it out of the way). Now you are ready to access the readings.

2) The readings are divided by Chapters. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information on the second pages.

3) In many cases you will not be reading entire articles. The subsection/subsections of each article to be read is/are indicated below the name of the "Required Reading". Read only the subsections indicated. If there is no indication, you should read the entire article.

4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor by e-mail.

How work is graded

Most assignments have a corresponding rubric and a minimum score requirement. A general rule to understanding the score received is to check the rubric to see where points were lost. Assignments may be resubmitted for more credit. Work should be checked for errors before it is submitted. All work is graded as in the order it is turned in and in a timely manner. 

Proctored Final

The final is worth 26% of the class points. You must earn 60% on the final to receive a grade and credit for the class.

Grading Scale

You can check your progress and grade at any time on the "grades" page.

Final grades are based on this grading scale:

  • 94-100% A
  • 90-93% A-
  • 87-89% B+
  • 83-86% B
  • 80-82% B-
  • 77-79% C+
  • 73-76% C
  • 70-72% C-
  • 67-69% D+
  • 63-66% D
  • 60-62% D-
  • 0-59% no credit

00.00 *Student supplies for World Civilizations

The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators, and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study. The "Required Readings" are accessed through the Utah Online Library. The Utah Online Library is password protected. The Utah Online Library log-in name and password may be obtained from your EHS World Civilizations teacher or your school librarian.

00.00 About Me (World Civilizations)

teacher-scored 8 points possible 15 minutes

In an online class it is more challenging to get to know our students. We want you to be a person and not just a name on an email. Although this introduction will never take the place of being in class with you every day or two, it helps you tell your teacher what's important to you.

For this assignment, I'd like you to write a paragraph about you.  In the paragraph please include all of the following:

  1. Your name and the name you prefer to be called (if they are different).  
  2. Your current age and grade in school.
  3. Contact information for you and your parents. (Emails or phone numbers are fine.)
  4. The school you attend and the name and email address for your school counselor
  5. Some information that describes you such as your interests, family, school goals, etc.
  6. An acknowledgement and agreement to abide by the EHS honor code.
  7. An acknowledgement of the 10 week time limit.
  8. A statement letting me know you have watched the "how to review your assignments" video clip

"As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers and staff with respect." (EHS Honor Code)

This assignment will be graded using a rubric. You must get an 8/8 to move on to the next module, so pay attention and do it right the first time so you only have to submit it once.  (To submit click the NEXT BUTTON at the bottom of the page.  OR go back to the class home page and click on the "About Me" assignment submission link.  It has a paper with an 'A' in it next to it.)

 

  Meets Expectations (2) Meets Partial Expectations (1) Below Expectations (0)
Prompt Information is given in paragraph form and contains relevant information.  Assignment has been spell checked and there are no significant mechanincs or usage errors. Information not given in paragraph form or doesn't give relevant information about student's interests. Important information not included and significant mechanincs, spelling, or usage errors.
Contact Info Contact information (email or phone) for both STUDENT and PARENT is included. Only one contact is included. This element is missing.
School Info Current school and grade included as well as counselor's email address. Doesn't include all of the required elements This element is missing.
Acknowledgements Includes the student's acknowledgement of the EHS Honor Code, the 10-week time frame for the class, and viewing video clip. Missing one of the three requrements Missing two or more of the required acknowledgements.
       

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


00.01

00.01.01 Student Software Needs

 

Students need access to a robust internet connection and a modern web browser.

This class may also require the Apple QuickTime plug-in to view media.

For students using a school-issued Chromebook, ask your technical support folks to download the QuickTime plug-in and enable the plug-in for your Chromebook.

$0.00

23.00 World War I Introduction (WorldCiv4)

European alliances at the beginning of WWI (Central Powers red; Allied Powers green; neutral yellow): Wikimedia Commons, Carnildo, public domainEuropean alliances at the beginning of WWI (Central Powers red; Allied Powers green; neutral yellow): Wikimedia Commons, Carnildo, public domainWorld War I

Unit 23: World War I

Time Period: (1914-1917)

Geographic Areas: Europe

Unit 23 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the modern history of Europe. General assignment information is as follows:

Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on information taken from articles that contain the required readings for the course. The articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

Timeline: Students create a timeline listing important events in chronological order.

Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the unit. Points are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information, or any other topic,

feel free to contact your instructor.

Objectives:
Analyze the political and economic global issues in the first half of the 20th century

Investigate the impact of totalitarianism on Europe, i.e., Stalinism, Italian fascism, German National Socialism.
Examine the connections among WWI, the Great Depression, and WWII.

23.00.1 Photo in Learn

teacher-scored 0 points possible 10 minutes

This is an extra credit opportunity. I will give you an extra point if you add a photo of yourself into the class. This will show up when you comment, chat or post an assignment. Avatars don't count.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


23.01 World War I Journal Assignment(WorldCiv4)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

World military alliances, 2009 (gray is unallied): Wikimedia Commons, NuclearVacuum, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedWorld military alliances, 2009 (gray is unallied): Wikimedia Commons, NuclearVacuum, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Assignment 23.01

Journal Entry: What advantages and disadvantages are there for society as a whole when businesses merge or countries form alliances? What guidelines would you suggest to keep alliances from overtaking rules of fair play? Submit your journal entry to your instructor.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


23.02 World War I Reading Challenge (WorldCiv4)

Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links.

From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings.

The Pioneer Library log-in name and password are available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

teacher-scored 44 points possible 40 minutes

Victorious French troops clearing German trenches, WWI, 1916: WIkimedia Commons, public domainVictorious French troops clearing German trenches, WWI, 1916: WIkimedia Commons, public domainChapter 23.02 World War I Reading Challenge

To submit this assignment:
1. Copy and paste the questions between the two lines of asterisks below into a word processing document. (You will want to save this assignment onto your computer to study from later. You will also want the questions to help you study!) SAVE YOUR WORK!
2. When you have finished, click “next” at the bottom of the screen. On the following screen you will find a submit this assignment tab.
3. Copy and paste the assignment into the text box and click [Save changes].
---
Assignment instructions:

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings."

Instructions for Required Reading Access

The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study.

Accessing the readings is a bit tricky but it is possible. To access the readings you must do the following:

1) Open 'a new Tab' on your internet browser and paste the web address for Pioneer Library Online found at the bottom of the assignment page.

The log-in page will appear. The user name and password are available from your local school librarian or from your EHS teacher.

The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: "World Book Encyclopedia." The page will open in a new window or a new tab. You can close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings, as this exits you from the Pioneer Library.
Now you are ready to access the readings.

2) Links to the Required Readings topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. You can either copy and paste the link into your browser, or just click on it and it should open up to the location needed for the current assignment. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links, you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information.

3) In many cases you will not be reading entire articles. The subsection/subsections of each article to be read is/are indicated below the name of the "Required Reading." Read only the subsections indicated. If there is no indication, you should read the entire article.

4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor by email.

Each question is worth 2 points. Partial credit will be given for incomplete answers.
**************************************************************************************************************************************

 

Required Reading: World War I:
Read the following subsections: World War I through and including The fighting ends

1. What was World War I originally called?

 

2. What event on June 28, 1914 sparked the war?

 

3. What is nationalism? How did it contribute to the war?

 

4. What area was known as the Powder Keg of Europe? Why was it called this?

 

5. How was a build-up of military might a factor in the war? What was the Dreadnought, and who built it in 1906?

 

6. How did the competition for colonies affect the relations between European nations?

 

7. How did a system of military alliances contribute to the war?

 

8. Who were the Triple Alliance?

 

9. Who were the Triple Entente?

 

10. Why was the First Battle of the Marne important?

 

11. What was the Western Front? Where was it located?

 

12. What is trench warfare?

 

13. What was the Eastern Front? Where was it located?

 

14. In which battle did the German forces first use poison gas?

 

15. What did the Battle of Verdun become a symbol of?

 

16. What technology was introduced at the Battle of the Somme?

 

17. What is a U-boat? What is the name of the passenger liner that was attacked on May 7, 1915?

 

18. What is a dogfight? What is a zeppelin? Who was the Red Baron?

 

19. What led to the French mutinies in 1917? What was the result?

 

20. Who assisted Lenin's return to Russia? What did this lead to in 1917?

 

21. When did the United States enter the war? What was the "Zimmermann note," and how did it contribute to the declaration of war?

 

22. When did World War I end?

 

******************************************************************************************************************************

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


23.03 World War 1 Technology Assignment(WorldCiv4)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 45 minutes

Chapter 23.03 World War 1 Technology Assignment instructions: 

There were a lot of amazing technological advances made in or around the time of WWI.  Some of them affected life on the battlefield, and some affected life everywhere else.  For this assignment you need to pick one of these new technologies.  Write about when it was developed, why it was developed and what part it played in World War I. 

Please include at least 3 MLA citations as well as in-text citations in your paper.  The paper should be at least 2 written pages long (3 including the Works Cited page).  

WWI French fighter plane: Wikimedia Commons, US Army Air Service, public domainWWI French fighter plane: Wikimedia Commons, US Army Air Service, public domain You can find some of the technologies in the reading.  Others you will need to look online to find.  You only need to choose one technology for your report.  Remember that Wikipedia is not a valid source for school projects. 

Submit your assignment to your instructor. The following rubric will be used for grading:

  5 4 3 2 1

Ideas

The major idea is clear and easily identified. All important ideas and terms are well defined.

Major ideas are decipherable. Most ideas and terms are defined.

Major ideas are decipherable. Most ideas and terms are defined.

 

One or two major ideas are identified.
 

No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. There is no central theme or purpose.

Organization

The essay is plainly divided into at least 5 major paragraphs. It is easy to see that the student can organize a 5 paragraph essay.

The essay is divided into paragraphs that can be deciphered.  Some paragraphs lead the reader through the paper.  Paragraphs are missing, but it does follow the assignment. 

Introduction or conclusion is missing. Paragraphing is disorganized. Does not follow paper assignment.

Presentation

The Works Cited page is adequate and documented accurately, without the use of wikipedia. In-text citations are used throughout the paper.

The Works Cited page is mostly adequate and many of the citations are correct.

All sources are correctly cited but some are from Wikipedia.

All sources are incorrectly cited and many are from Wikipedia.

There is no Works Cited page.

Flow 

The major idea is backed up by the supporting information and that information is accurate. Information is supported with in-text citations.  Transitional sentences lead the reader through the paragraphs. 

The major idea has some supporting information that is either weak or inaccurate.  Transitions are not always located, but there are some.

The major idea has some back up information but is mostly left on its own, or is incorrect.

Awkward insertion of wording that does not help the information to flow.  

There is no major idea. Supporting information does not exist.

Conventions

The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of punctuation, grammar, usage, and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message. There are no spelling mistakes or punctuation errors present.

Less than 3 spelling, punctuation or other convention errors are present.

Three to six spelling errors or other conventions present.

 

Six to 10 spelling errors or other conventions present.

Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage and grammar and/or paragraphing distract the reader from the text and make it difficult to read. 16 or more spelling errors present.

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


23.04 WWI Recommended Books

Book recommendations based upon the subject matter.

If you happen to be someone who enjoys reading, the following books can usually be found at your local school or public library. They may interest you if you like learning about this time period. If you have any books that you have read that would fit this section, feel free to message me about them.

All Quiet on the Western Front Erich Remarque
This book chronicles the journey of 19-year-old Paul during WWI. He expresses his concerns and feelings regarding what has happened to him and his friends. It does contain profanity, violence and death, but is commonly found on high school reading lists as it is a profound read.

Anastasia: The Last Grand Duchess, Russia, 1914. Carolyn Meyer
This is the one book on this list that I haven’t read. It may be geared for younger audiences, but it takes a look at the Romanov family before the Bolshevik revolution of 1917. Anastasia for many years was believed to have survived, but her body was DNA tested and confirmed in 2008 by Russian forensic scientists.

Forgotten Fire Adam Bagdasarian
This book contains information about the Armenian genocide. It caught my attention as Hitler used the Armenian genocide to explain why no one would remember the death of the Jews during WWII. It was a National Book Award finalist. It does contain some adult issues of rape, molestation and violence.

24.00 The Aftermath of War Introduction (WorldCiv4)

Members of the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps tending the graves of fallen British soldiers, 1918: Wikimedia Commons, UK govt image, public domainMembers of the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps tending the graves of fallen British soldiers, 1918: Wikimedia Commons, UK govt image, public domain

Unit 24: Aftermath of War

Time Period: (1919-1922)

Geographic Areas: Europe

Unit 24 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the modern history of Europe. General assignment information is as follows:

Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on information taken from articles that contain the required readings for the course. The articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

Geospatial Map: Students are provided with the tools to research information and create an animated map that depicts visual information on a selected topic. Questions are included that students will research and answer.

Chart/Summary: Students research, analyze, and discuss information for each country discussed in the unit. The information is summarized.

Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the unit. Points are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information or any other topic,

feel free to contact your instructor.

Objective:
Analyze the political and economic global issues in the first half of the 20th century.

a. Investigate the impact of totalitarianism on Europe, i.e., Stalinism, Italian fascism, German National Socialism.
Examine the connections among WWI, the Great Depression, and WWII.
Assess the consequences of global war on the world

24.01 Aftermath Journal Assignment(WorldCiv4)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

Wikimedia Commons, Kristaps B., CC Attribution 2.0 GenericWikimedia Commons, Kristaps B., CC Attribution 2.0 Generic

Assignment 24.01:

Journal Topic: What is your deepest fear?  Why do you fear that thing? Have you ever had to deal with it face to face? Are your fears legitimate? What do you think the people of the world feared at the conclusion of World War 1?  Submit your journal entry to your instructor.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


24.02 The Aftermath of War Reading Challenge (WorldCiv4)

Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links.

From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings.

The Pioneer Library log-in name and password are available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

teacher-scored 20 points possible 25 minutes

24.02 The Aftermath of War Reading ChallengeThe Signing of Peace in the Hall of Mirrors, Versailles, 28th June 1919: Wikimedia Commons, William Orpen, public domainThe Signing of Peace in the Hall of Mirrors, Versailles, 28th June 1919: Wikimedia Commons, William Orpen, public domain

To submit this assignment:
1. Copy and paste the questions between the two lines of asterisks below into a word processing document. (You will want to save this assignment onto your computer to study from later. You will also want the questions to help you study!) SAVE YOUR WORK!
2. When you have finished, click “next” at the bottom of the screen. On the following screen you will find a submit this assignment tab.
3. Copy and paste the assignment into the text box and click [Save changes].
---
Assignment instructions:

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings."

Instructions for Required Reading Access

The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study.

Accessing the readings is a bit tricky, but it is possible. To access the readings you must do the following.

1) Open 'a new Tab' on your internet browser and paste the web address for Pioneer Library Online found at the bottom of the assignment page.

The log-in page will appear. The user name and password is available from your local school librarian or from your EHS teacher.

The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: World Book Encyclopedia. The page will open in a new window or a new tab. You can close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings, as this exits you from the Pioneer Library.
Now you are ready to access the readings.

2) Links to the Required Readings topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. You can either copy and paste the link into your browser, or just click on it and it should open up to the location needed for the current assignment. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links, you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information.

3) In many cases you will not be reading entire articles. The subsection/subsections of each article to be read is/are indicated below the name of the "Required Reading." Read only the subsections indicated. If there is no indication, you should read the entire article.

4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor by email.

Each question is worth 2 points. Partial credit will be given for incomplete answers.
*************************************************************************************************************************

 

Required Reading: The Aftermath of War: Consequences of the war and The peace settlement
Read the following subsections: Destruction and casualties through and including The postwar world

1. How many soldiers died in World War I?

 

2. What are reparations? Which member of the Central Powers was required to pay the greatest amount?

 

3. Which four monarchies fell as a consequence of the war?

 

4. How did the war impact social class distinction? What were other social impacts of the war?

 

5. What were the Fourteen Points and who proposed them (leader and country)?

 

6. What was the Paris Peace Conference? What was the Treaty of Versailles?

 

7. What were the problems in creating new borders and countries?

 

8. Under the Treaty of Versailles, what were the terms imposed on Germany?

 

9. What German movement gained power in Germany in the 1930's because of the terms of the Treaty of Versailles?

 

****************************************************************************************************************************

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


24.03.01 Cost of War Google Map (WorldCiv4)

teacher-scored 75 points possible 60 minutes

Let's become a map maker!

You will use Google Maps to build your Cost of World War 1 map. The map will include Placemarkers for 16 countries and a set of three stats for each country. Remember to refer to the website called "The First World War Statistics".

Statistics: 
Total troops mobilized: __________
Cost of War 1914-1918: _____________
Total Casualities: ______________
 

You will be doing the countries Russia, United States, France, Japan, Britain, Romania, Italy, Serbia, Belgium, Germany, Greece, Austria-Hungary, Portugal, Turkey, Montenegro and Bulgaria.  

See detailed instructions for this assignment in the PDF file listed above. The file name is Cost-of-War_GoogleMaps-WorldCivQ4.pdf.

View an example Google map template of the Cost of World War 1 at the link below: (g.co/maps/nsuw7)

Once your map is completed, submit its 'short URL' to your teacher. DO NOT email short URL to your teacher.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


24.03.02 Cost of War Google Map (WorldCiv4)

*Note:  The financial cost data for Portugal and Montenegro aren't available

24.04 Economic Problems

24.04 Economic Problems Assignment(WorldCiv4)

teacher-scored 75 points possible 40 minutes

Chapter 24.04 Economic Problems

Depositors rush the Savings Bank of Berlin after learning of the collapse of the Darmstadt and National Bank, 1931: Wikimedia Commons, Pahl, Georg, Deutsches Bundesarchiv, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 GermanyDepositors rush the Savings Bank of Berlin after learning of the collapse of the Darmstadt and National Bank, 1931: Wikimedia Commons, Pahl, Georg, Deutsches Bundesarchiv, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Germany

After WWI there were tough times around the world.  It is important that you are familiar with what caused the major problems, in hopes that in our world today we can prevent something like this from happening again. 

Though historians and economists debate which causes were more significant, most agree on 7 potential causes of the Global Depression.  The first link will give you an overview of these causes. Choose one to research.  You will need to write an essay discussing the cause you choose.  In your essay you should answer the following following questions thoroughly: 

1.  What is the Great Depression?  
2.  What is a cause of the Great Depression?  
3.  What happened as a result of this cause of the Great Depression?
4.  What countries besides the U.S. were affected by the Great Depression and how they were affected?  (You must provide at least 2.)
 

You will want to use complete sentences and each question should have at least one paragraph (at least 5 sentences)response to it. You may use the sources provided, but also feel free to use any websites that help you to answer the questions.  (Except Wikipedia!  It is not appropriate for scholarly works!)   You will also need to include a Works Cited page to show where you got your information.  

 

 
15
10
7
5
1
Ideas The major idea is clear and easily identified. All important ideas and terms are well defined. Major ideas are decipherable. Most ideas and terms are defined. Some major ideas are identified. One or two major ideas are identified. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. There is no central theme or purpose.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of punctuation, grammar, usage, and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message. There are no spelling mistakes or punctuation errors present. Less than three spelling, punctuation or other convention errors are present. Three to six spelling errors or other conventions present. Six to ten spelling errors or other conventions present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage and grammar and/or paragraphing distract the reader from the text and make it difficult to read. 16 or more spelling errors present.
Presentation The works cited page is adequate and documented accurately, without the use of wikipedia. The works cited page is mostly adequate and many of the citations are correct. All sources are correctly cited but from Wikipedia. All sources are incorrectly cited and many are from Wikipedia. There is no works cited page.
Organization Each of the questions are answered and have adequate examples.   Most of the questions are answered adequately.    Some of the questions are answered, and the answers contained explain most of the information.

A few of the questions are answered, but there is much information
lacking.  

Does not follow assignment.
Length The assignment is answered with an appropriate (one paragraph per question) length that leaves no question unanswered and complete sentences to help with understanding.   The assignment is in paragraph form, but some of the paragraphs don't provide adequate answers and leave questions unanswered. Some paragraphs but much information is lacking.   A few sentences but not enough for understanding
to
be
complete. 
Does not follow assignment.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


24.05 Review Quiz Unit 23 and Unit 24

computer-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

Assessment 24.05 Review Quiz Unit 23 and Unit 24

Complete

23 and 24 Review Quiz
World War I and the Aftermath

This assignment is found under Review Quiz Unit 23 and Unit 24 on the course website. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do and provides immediate feedback.

Complete this assignment after you finish reading lesson 23 and lesson 24 coursework..

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


25.00 Totalitarian States Introduction (WorldCiv4)

Italian Fascist propaganda poster, 1924, showing the benefits of Fascism (right: grain harvest) and the chaos of Bolshevism (left): Wikimedia Commons, public domainItalian Fascist propaganda poster, 1924, showing the benefits of Fascism (right: grain harvest) and the chaos of Bolshevism (left): Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Unit 25: The Rise of Totalitarian States

Time Period: (1922-1936)

Geographic Area: Europe

Unit 25 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the modern history
of Europe. General assignment information follows.

1. Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that
connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

2. Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on
information taken from articles that contain the required readings for the course.
The articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

3. Obits: Students create obituaries for national leaders discussed in the unit.

4. Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who
may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the unit. Points are
not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information or any other topic,
feel free to contact your instructor.

Objective:
Analyze the political and economic global issues in the first half of the 20th century.

Investigate the impact of totalitarianism on Europe, i.e., Stalinism, Italian fascism, German National Socialism.

25.01 Totalitarian Journal Assignment(WorldCiv4)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

Benito Mussolini during an official visit to occupied Yugoslavia, circa 1942: WIkimedia Commons, USHMM, courtesy of Revolucije Narodnosti Jugoslavije, Public DomainBenito Mussolini during an official visit to occupied Yugoslavia, circa 1942: WIkimedia Commons, USHMM, courtesy of Revolucije Narodnosti Jugoslavije, Public Domain

Assignment 25.01:

Journal Topic: Identify some individuals you know that have dominating and controlling personalities. How do these individuals control others to get what they want? When have you used similar tactics to get what you want? When are such actions justifiable? Submit the journal entry to your instructor.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


25.02 Totalitarian States Reading Challenge (WorldCiv4)

Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links. From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings. The Pioneer Library log-in name and password are available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

teacher-scored 58 points possible 40 minutes

Vladimir Lenin and Joseph Stalin, March 1919: Wikimedia Commons, public domainVladimir Lenin and Joseph Stalin, March 1919: Wikimedia Commons, public domain

Assignment 25.2 Totalitarian States Reading Challenge: To submit this assignment:

1. Copy and paste the questions between the two lines of asterisks below into a word-processing document. (You will want to save this assignment to your computer to study from later. You will also want the questions to help you study!) SAVE YOUR WORK!

2. When you have finished, click “next” at the bottom of the screen. On the following screen you will find a submit this assignment tab.

3. Copy and paste the assignment into the text box and click [Save changes]. --- Assignment instructions: Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings." Instructions for Required Reading Access The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study.

Accessing the readings is a bit tricky, but it is possible. To access the readings you must do the following:

1) Open 'a new Tab' on your internet browser and paste the web address for Pioneer Library Online found at the bottom of the assignment page. The log-in page will appear. The user name and password is available from your local school librarian or from your EHS teacher. The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: World Book Encyclopedia. The page will open in a new window or a new tab. You can close the new World Book window/tab but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab or you will NOT be able to access the readings, as this exits you from the Pioneer Library. Now you are ready to access the readings.

2) Links to the Required Readings topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. You can either copy and paste the link into your browser, or just click on it and it should open up to the location needed for the current assignment. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter, INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links, you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information.

3) In many cases you will not be reading entire articles. The subsection/subsections of each article to be read is/are indicated below the name of the "Required Reading." Read only the subsections indicated. If there is no indication you should read the entire article. 4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor by email. Each question is worth 2 points. Partial credit will be given for incomplete answers. ************************************************************************************************************************************************* Required Reading: Totalitarianism:

1. What is Totalitarianism?

Required Reading: Russian Revolution of 1917:

2. What was the Soviet Revolution?  3. Who were the proletariat? Who were the Bolsheviks? Who was the leader of the Bolsheviks? 4. What was the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk? What were the results for Russia and Germany? 5. Who were the "White Russians" ? What did they attempt to do?

Required Reading: Communism:

6. Define Communism? Who developed Communism in Russia from the writings of Karl Marx? 

 Required Reading: Communism versus Socialism

7. What is the difference between Communism and Socialism?

Required Reading: Karl Marx:

8. What are the four basic elements of Karl Marx's philosophy? 9. What was the Communist Manifesto? What was Das Kapital?

Required Reading: V.I. Lenin:

10. Who was V.I. Lenin? What did he do? 11. What was the pattern established by V.I. Lenin? 12. What were the Cheka? What was the Gulag? 13. What was the U.S.S.R.? When was it established? 14. Where is the Lenin Mausoleum?

Required Reading: Joseph Stalin:

15. Who was Joseph Stalin? 16. Explain collective agriculture. Was it supported by the people? 17. What was the Politburo? How many members did it have? 18. Explain the purge of Stalin: 19. What was Stalinism? What countries practiced it?

Required Reading: Capitalism: Read the following subsections: Capitalism through and including Changing attitudes toward capitalism

20. What is capitalism? What is central planning? 21. What is laissez faire and what does it mean?

Required Reading: Fascism:

22. What is fascism? What two governments were examples of fascism? 23. Who and what was "Il Duce"? What does "Il Duce" mean? What changes did he make in Italy? 24. What was the other name of the National Socialist German Workers' Party? Briefly explain its rise to power: 25. Who and what was "der Fuhrer"? What does "der Fuhrer" mean?

Required Reading: Italy: Benito Mussolini:

26. Who were the Black Shirts?

Required Reading: Germany: Read the following two subsections: World War I and The Weimar Republic.

27. What was the Weimar Republic? When was it established? What group ended it?

Required Reading: Nazism:

28. What problems in Germany brought about Nazism? What changes were made in German society as a result of the Nazis coming to power?

Required Reading: Adolf Hitler:

29. What did Adolf Hitler do? What group did he persecute?

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


25.03 Obits Assignment(WorldCiv4)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 30 minutes

Crowd outside Lenin's mausoleum, 1928: Wikimedia Commons, Getty Images, public domainCrowd outside Lenin's mausoleum, 1928: Wikimedia Commons, Getty Images, public domain

Assignment 25.03:

Assignment instructions:

Locate a picture of each of the following four leaders--Lenin, Stalin, Mussolini and Hitler. Create an original obituary for one of them using information found in the "Obits Links" that follow this assignment. Write in your own words.

The Obituary should be at least 200 words.  Information about the dictators birth, family, career or interests, death, character, etc. should be included.  Be detailed in the information you use.  Remember Obituaries are written by those who loved the person.  Keep that in mind as you write the obituary.  Attach the document with the pictures of all of the men and the obituary that you wrote and submit the assignment to your instructor.

If you are not familiar with what an obituary looks like, there are links at the bottom of this lesson where you can go read current obituaries and get a better idea of how they should appear.

 
5
4
3
2
1
Ideas Main themes of the obituary are present: birth, family, career/interests, character, etc. Main themes are not all present.  Missing 1. Some major themes are identified. One or two major ideas are identified. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. There is no central theme or purpose.
Organization The obituary is plainly divided into at least 3 paragraphs. And is at least 200 words in length. The obituary is divided into paragraphs that can be deciphered. Some paragraphs lead the reader through the paper. Paragraphs are missing, but it does follow the assignment. Introduction or conclusion is missing. Paragraphing is disorganized. Does not follow paper assignment.
Presentation The bibliography is adequate and documented accurately, without the use of wikipedia. The bibliography is mostly adequate and many of the citations are correct. All sources are correctly cited but from Wikipedia. All sources are incorrectly cited and many are from Wikipedia. There is no bibliography.
Flow The major ideas are separated and the paragraphs have continuity of subject matter.  The major idea has some supporting information that is either weak or inaccurate. The major idea has some back up information but is mostly left on its own, or is incorrect. Awkward insertion of wording that does not help the information to flow. There is no major idea. Supporting information does not exist.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of punctuation, grammar, usage, and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message. There are no spelling mistakes or punctuation errors present. Less than three spelling, punctuation or other convention errors are present. Three to six spelling errors or other conventions present. Six to ten spelling errors or other conventions present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage and grammar and/or paragraphing distract the reader from the text and make it difficult to read. 16 or more spelling errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


25.03 Obits Links(WorldCiv4)

Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links.

From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings.

The Pioneer Library log-in name and password are available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

26.00 World War II Introduction (WorldCiv4)

The Battle of Crete, 20 - 31 May 1941. German paratroopers jumping over Crete.: Wikimedia Commons, UK govt photo, public domainThe Battle of Crete, 20 - 31 May 1941. German paratroopers jumping over Crete.: Wikimedia Commons, UK govt photo, public domain

Unit 26: World War II

Time Period: (1936-1945)

Geographic Area: Europe

Unit 26 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the modern history
of Europe. General assignment information is below.

1. Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that
connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

2. Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on
information taken from articles that contain the required readings for the course.
The articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

3. Data: Students collect information and create a method for presentation.

4. Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who
may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the unit. Points are
not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information or any other topic,
feel free to contact your instructor.

Objective:
Analyze the political and economic global issues in the first half of the 20th century.

Investigate the impact of totalitarianism on Europe, i.e., Stalinism, Italian fascism, German National Socialism.
Examine the connections among WWI, the Great Depression, and WWII.
Assess the consequences of global war on the world

26.01 World at War Journal Assignment (WorldCiv4)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

Siege: Wikimedia Commons, Rpanjwani3, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedSiege: Wikimedia Commons, Rpanjwani3, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Assignment 26.01:

Journal Topic:  How is victory determined in armed conflict? How important is territory? Do you have territory of your own that you feel is worth defending? When is it acceptable to invade another's territory?

Submit your journal entry to your instructor.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


26.02 World War II Reading Challenge (WorldCiv4)

Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links.

From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings.

The Pioneer Library log-in name and password are available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

teacher-scored 74 points possible 40 minutes

Assignment 26.02: World War II Reading Challenge

Assignment instructions: British ships and fishing boats rescuing Allied troops under German Stuka fire at Dunkirk (France, 1940): Wikimedia Commons, US govt image, public domainBritish ships and fishing boats rescuing Allied troops under German Stuka fire at Dunkirk (France, 1940): Wikimedia Commons, US govt image, public domain

To submit this assignment:
1. Copy and paste the questions between the two lines of asterisks below into a word processing document. (You will want to save this assignment onto your computer to study from later. You will also want the questions to help you study!) SAVE YOUR WORK!
2. When you have finished, click “next” at the bottom of the screen. On the following screen you will find a submit this assignment tab.
3. Copy and paste the assignment into the text box and click [Save changes].
---
Assignment instructions:

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings."

Instructions for Required Reading Access

The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study.

Accessing the readings is a bit tricky, but it is possible. To access the readings you must do the following:

1) Open 'a new Tab' on your internet browser and paste the web address for Pioneer Library Online found at the bottom of the assignment page.

The log-in page will appear. The user name and password are available from your local school librarian or from your EHS teacher.

The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: "World Book Encyclopedia." The page will open in a new window or a new tab. You can close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings, as this exits you from the Pioneer Library.
Now you are ready to access the readings.

2) Links to the Required Readings topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. You can either copy and paste the link into your browser, or just click on it and it should open up to the location needed for the current assignment. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter, INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information.

3) In many cases you will not be reading entire articles. The subsection/subsections of each article to be read is/are indicated below the name of the "Required Reading". Read only the subsections indicated. If there is no indication, you should read the entire article.

4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor by email.

Each question is worth 2 points. Partial credit will be given for incomplete answers.

***********************************************************************************************************************************************

Required Reading: World War II:

1. When did World War II begin?

 

 

2. What caused World War II?

 

3. How was nationalism a factor in causing World War II?

 

4. What was appeasement? Was it successful?

 

5. What was the blitzkrieg, and who used it?

 

6. What was the evacuation of Dunkerque, and what made it necessary?

 

7. Who was "The Desert Fox" and where did he fight?

 

8. When did German troops enter Paris? Who organized the Free French forces?

 

9. What was the Battle of Britain? Who and what were the RAF? What was the blitz?

 

10. What was Operation Barbarossa? How did the weather affect the ultimate outcome?

 

11. What were U-boats? What is sonar? How did it help in the war?

 

12. What were interventionists and what did they urge? What were isolationists and what did they want?

 

13. What event occurred on Dec 7, 1941 that brought the United States into the war?

 

14. Who were the Big Three?

 

15. Why was the Battle of Stalingrad important?

 

16. Name one commander of the Allied forces at the Battle El Alamein? Why was this battle important?

 

17. What happened June 6, 1944 and why is it important?

 

18. What was area bombing? saturation bombing? precision bombing? Who used these tactics?

 

19. Where and what was the Battle of the Bulge and how did the battle get its name?

 

20. What is V-E Day? When was it (date)?

 

21. Explain the Bataan Death March?

 

22. How was the Battle of the Coral Sea different than all earlier naval battles?

 

23. What was the significance of the Battle of Midway?

 

24. What were the kamikaze and what did they do?

 

25. What was the Enola Gay? What did it do?

 

26. What is V-J Day? When did it take place?

 

27. What was the Ultra secret and how did it help the United Kingdom?

 

 

Required Reading: The Holocaust:

28. What does "The Holocaust" mean? What was it? What four groups were targeted? What was done to these peoples?

 

 

29. What is Anti-Semitism? What are ghettos? What were pogroms?

 

30. According to the Nuremberg laws of 1935, what was a Mischling?

 

31. Define the term "Judenrein"? How was it to be accomplished?

 

32. What was Kristallnacht? When did it occur?

 

33. Explain "The Final Solution of the Jewish Question" by the Nazis?

 

34. Why did Nazi leaders believe that more impersonal and efficient methods of genocide were needed?

 

35. What was deportation? How were prisoners separated at the camp? What happened to prisoners who were not young and able-bodied? What were the names of the six death camps?

 

36. What is Zionism? When did the state of Israel come into existence?

 

37. What were the Nuremberg Trials? Why were trials held in Nuremberg?

 

************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


26.03 Battle Data Assignment(WorldCiv4)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 60 minutes

Assignment 26.03: "Battle Data":
The Soviet infantry marching through Kiev November 1943, liberating the city from the Nazis: Wikimedia Commons, Ukrainian SSR work, public domainThe Soviet infantry marching through Kiev November 1943, liberating the city from the Nazis: Wikimedia Commons, Ukrainian SSR work, public domain
Directions:

1. Review the "Required Readings" from 26.02 and take notes on the events and battles of World War II.

 

2. Gather information about the most significant battles (at least ten) from the "Required Readings" or other internet sources and put it into categories.

Categories should include:
(a) Location of the battle
(b) Number of casualties (deaths) on each side
(c) Participants (countries) involved in the battle
(d) Victor
(e) Significance of the battle

Put your data into a computer database or spreadsheet. Make a chart or table displaying your results.

Draft a report that highlights significant results. Summarize the results in a few paragraphs at the bottom of the report.

Attach and submit all information to your instructor.

 

Your grade will be based upon the completion of all five categories, proper grammar, spelling and the overall neatness of your work.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


26.04 Recommended Books

Book recommendations based upon the subject matter.

If you happen to be someone who enjoys reading, the following books can usually be found at your local school or public library. Not all of them are long, and some would be a quick read. They may interest you if you like learning about this time period. If you have any books that you have read that would fit this section, feel free to message me about them.

The Nightmare Years William Shirer
This book is reporter William Shirer’s experiences in Germany during Hitler’s rise to power. It contains information about the Nazi party and how they climbed to complete control in Germany in the late 1930’s. It is a longer book, but at 654 pages, it will be interesting to anyone who may be looking for a career in journalism, or is curious as to how Adolf Hitler captured so many people’s hearts.

Stalin: Court of the Red Tsar Simon Eastland
This biography of one of the greatest dictators in the history of the world is an interesting look into the everyday life of a man who once trained to become a priest. If Stalin and what he did interests you, this would be a great book to pick up. It is longer than some at 848 pages, but it isn’t a hard read.

Code Talkers: A Novel About the Navajo Marines of World War Two Joseph Bruchac
This book is a U.S. History book, but I did not feel that this list would be complete without it. It chronicles the experience of a Navajo code talker (Ned Begay) during WWII. It is a smaller book, and most students find it a quick read. (231 pages)

When the Emperor was Divine Julie Otsuka
This is also a U.S. History book that can help a reader understand the tensions in the United States during WWII. It follows a Japanese-American family through the arrest of father, and the relocation of mom, brother and sister to Utah. It is only 160 pages, and a great read!

Number the Stars Lois Lowry
This short, youth fiction book is great for those who may struggle a bit with reading. It outlines the experience of Annemarie, a 10-year-old girl in Denmark. Her best friend is Jewish and with the occupation of Denmark by the Nazi's. Annemarie and the Danish resistance struggle to keep her best friend out of harms way. (156 pages)

The Diary of a Young Girl Anne Frank
This book has been the subject of many classroom discussions. It has inspired millions to learn about her life as she hid away from the Nazi’s in occupied Amsterdam. It is not a happy book, but it will help you to understand what life was like for teenagers during World War II. At 320 pages, it will be worth the read.

26.05 Review Quiz Unit 25 and Unit 26

computer-scored 14 points possible 15 minutes

Assessment 26.04 Review Quiz Unit 25 and Unit 26

Complete

25 and 26 Review Quiz
Totalitarianism and the World at War

This assignment is found under Review Quiz Unit 25 and Unit 26 on the course website. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do and provides immediate feedback.

Complete this assignment after you finish reading lesson 25 and lesson 26 coursework..

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


27.00 Cold War Introduction (WorldCiv4)

Unit 27: The Cold War and European Recovery

Time Period: (1945-1968)

Geographic Area: Europe and the United States

Unit 27 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the modern history
of Europe and the United States. General assignment information is as follows:

1. Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that
connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

2. Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on
information taken from articles that contain the required readings for the course.
The articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

3. Chart: Students collect information and present it in chart format.

4. Agenda: Students create a method to resolve a conflict.

5. Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who
may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the unit. Points are
not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information or any other topic,
feel free to contact your instructor.

Objectives:
Investigate the impact of the Cold War on global integration.
Investigate the creation of international organizations and global integration.

Explain the key elements of the Cold War.
Examine the independence movements in the African and Asian colonial world.1959 Cold War map: reds are countries allied with communist USSR; blues are countries allied or receiving aid from US/NATO; green are European colonies: Wikimedia Commons, Clevelander, CC Attribution ShareAlike 3.01959 Cold War map: reds are countries allied with communist USSR; blues are countries allied or receiving aid from US/NATO; green are European colonies: Wikimedia Commons, Clevelander, CC Attribution ShareAlike 3.0
Determine the causes and effects of the collapse of the Soviet sphere.
Assess the impact of economic and political organizations on global relations, e.g., World Trade Organization, United Nations, Olympics.
Examine the impact of advancements in worldwide communication/transportation, e.g., satellite communications, information technology/internet, mass transportation.
Analyze the impact of military alliances, e.g., North Atlantic Treaty Organization, Warsaw Pact, United Nations Geneva Convention.

27.01 Cold War Journal Assignment(WorldCiv4)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

Lindos, Rhodes defensive wall: Wikimedia Commons, Piotrus, CC-BY-SA-2.5Lindos, Rhodes defensive wall: Wikimedia Commons, Piotrus, CC-BY-SA-2.5

Assignment 27.01:

Journal Topic: When nations distrust one another and build up defenses to ward off their perceived enemies, they often engage in what has become known as a "cold war." Do individuals do the same thing? What kinds of defenses do you build up to keep others at a distance and keep from trusting them? Are there some good reasons for your behavior? What could you do to eliminate 'cold war' from your own personal life? Submit your journal entry to your instructor.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


27.02 Cold War Reading Challenge (WorldCiv4)

Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links. From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings. The Pioneer Library log-in name and password are available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

teacher-scored 30 points possible 35 minutes

Assignment 27.02 Cold War Reading Challenge

Unidentified Vietnamese bodies on road after My Lai massacre, 1968: Wikimedia Commons, Ronald L. Haeberle, US govt image, public domainUnidentified Vietnamese bodies on road after My Lai massacre, 1968: Wikimedia Commons, Ronald L. Haeberle, US govt image, public domain

Assignment instructions: Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings" for Chapter 27.

1. Copy and paste the questions between the two lines of asterisks below into a word-processing document. (You will want to save this assignment onto your computer to study from later. You will also want the questions to help you study!) SAVE YOUR WORK!

2. When you have finished, click “next” at the bottom of the screen. On the following screen you will find a "submit this assignment" tab.

3. Copy and paste the assignment into the text box and click [Save changes]. Submit the assignment to your instructor. Each question is worth 2 points. Partial credit will be given for incomplete answers.

******************************************************************************************************************Required Reading: The Cold War Begins: Read the following subsections: Cold War through and including The Vietnam War

1. What was the Cold War?
2. Who were the members Eastern bloc? Who were the members of the Western bloc?
3. Who warned that "an iron curtain has descended across the Continent" of Europe? What did he mean by this statement?
4. What was the Truman Doctrine? What was Containment Policy? What was the Marshall Plan?
5. Which world leader called for peaceful coexistence? What was the campaign of destalinization?
6. What was the Bay of Pigs? Why is it important?
7. When was the Berlin Wall constructed? Briefly explain the Wall's construction and purpose:
8. What was the Cuban Missile Crisis?

Required Reading: United States Read the following subsections: Postwar prosperity through and including The Vietnam War (above reading for #9, 10, 11, 12, 14, and 15. Number 11 and 13 have its own separate reading as shown below.)

9. What was the Great Depression? What drew the United States out of the Great Depression? When was the period of the greatest economic growth in United States history?
10. What was the significance of Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka?
11.  How did the Soviet Union feel about the Civil Rights movement in the United States?  

[Required Reading #11 only: The Civil Rights Movement, subsection Cold War Civil Rights] 
12. What was the cause of the Korean War? When did it end?
[ Required Reading (#13 only): The growing movement: ]
13. What was held on Aug 28, 1963 in Washington, D.C.? Who was the leader and main speaker for the event? 14. When was the Vietnam War? Was there public support for the war?
15. What was significant about the length of the Vietnam War? Did the nation achieve its objectives?

******************************************************************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


27.03 Cold War Chart Assignment(WorldCiv4)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 45 minutes

Ground-Based Midcourse Defense (GMD) interceptor being loaded into silo: Wikimedia Commons, US govt image, public domainGround-Based Midcourse Defense (GMD) interceptor being loaded into silo: Wikimedia Commons, US govt image, public domainAssignment 27.03: Cold War Chart: Assignment instructions: Cold War Chart

Identify at least 5 nations involved in the Cold War. Identify actions the nations took that built up defenses and caused an extension of the Cold War. Indicate proposed actions that you think would have lessened the Cold War. Create a chart that displays the information you have gathered. Please include a bibliography of sources that you used to create your chart.

Submit your chart to your instructor.

 
10-Excellent
5-Developing
1-Needs Improvement
Nations All major nations involved in the Cold War are identified and recorded. Some of the major nations involved in the Cold War are identified and recorded. Very few of the major countries involved in the Cold War are identified and recorded.
Actions All major actions taken by the nations to build up defenses and extend the Cold War are recorded. Some of the major actions taken by the nations to build up defenses and extend the Cold War are recorded. None of the major actions taken by the nations to build up defenses and extend the Cold War are recorded.
Proposed Actions Proposed actions are indicated that could have potentially lessoned the Cold War. There are a few proposed actions that could have potentially lessoned the Cold War. The actions proposed are severely lacking.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of punctuation, grammar, usage, and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message. There are no spelling mistakes or punctuation errors present. Three to six spelling errors or other conventions present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage and grammar and/or paragraphing distract the reader from the text and make it difficult to read. 16 or more spelling errors present.
Bibliography The bibliography is adequate and documented accurately, without the use of wikipedia. All sources are correctly cited but from Wikipedia, or all the URLs are present, but no complete citations. There is no bibliography.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


27.04 Investigating the Berlin Wall (WorldCiv4)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 90 minutes

Assignment 27.04: Investigating the Berlin Wall
President Carter (center) hosts a 1978 meeting between long-time enemies Begin and Sadat at Camp David: Wikimedia Commons, NARA, public domainPresident Carter (center) hosts a 1978 meeting between long-time enemies Begin and Sadat at Camp David: Wikimedia Commons, NARA, public domain
Assignment instructions:

The Cold War was filled with many close calls. The Berlin Wall was one of those close calls. Many people felt that the war could have easily escalated to WWIII in a matter of minutes.

This lesson has 2 visual parts to it. Go to the links below and click "The Stones Have Memories" link. You will first be viewing photography from the exhibit “The Stones Have Memories” by photographer Kelly Gorham.

These will set the scene, as then you will be watching a movie entitled “Escape from Berlin”. It has six 10-minute sections. (It will take you about an hour, but you can break it up if you need to.) You will need to answer the questions from each section and submit them to your instructor. Copy and paste the questions between the two lines of asterisks below into a word-processing document.

Each movie question is worth 1 point, whereas the essay questions are worth 8 points each.

******************************************************************************
Escape from Berlin movie questions

Part 1
1. When was the wall built?
2. What did the wall separate?
3. How many guard towers were there?
4. How many parts were Germany divided into?

Part 2
5. Why did the East German government decide to start firing on their own people?
6. Who was the first person to be shot crossing the wall?
7. What happened to Peter Fechter? Why did this occur?

Part 3
8. What other types of things were built into the walls so that they wouldn’t have to shoot? Describe them.
9. What is Checkpoint Charlie?
10. How were tunnels used? What were some of the challenges faced by those who tried to tunnel?

Part 4
11. Why did tunneling stop?
12. What lucrative method did East Germany start to do with their political prisoners?

Part 5
13. What made things especially tense along the wall as far as the soldiers were concerned?
14. How did tourism help East Germans escape?
15. How did the Bethke brothers escape East Berlin? (Hint: There is more than one creative escape between the three brothers.)

Part 6
16. How did the wall end up being destroyed?
17. Once the wall was down, how long did the East German government survive?
18. How many people died trying to escape?

Essay Questions
These questions are not from a particular part of the video, but the overarching ideas that you were watching. Make sure that you answer the question completely with examples.

19. Describe an incident you saw in the video that could have led us into WWIII. Please be descriptive.

20. Do you think that the wall was a good idea? What other ways could East Germany have protected itself and its people besides a wall?

21. What would cause people to escape over the wall? Why did people not want to stay in East Germany?

22. The Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, just 2 years after the Berlin Wall. What might have contributed to the Soviet Union’s collapse? Was there anything in the incident of the Berlin Wall that could have hastened that collapse?

************************************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


27.05 Recommended Books

These are book recommendations based upon the subject matter.

If you happen to be someone who enjoys reading, the following books can usually be found at your local school or public library. They may interest you if you like learning about this time period. If you have any books that you have read that would fit this section, feel free to message me about them.

Animal Farm George Orwell
Animal Farm is a book about a group of animals who decide to kick the farmer out and take over the farm. It is also an allegory for what occurred in Russia and led to the creation of the Soviet Union. It is an easy read that has permeated our society with quotes that you might have heard before. (252 pages)

1984 George Orwell
George Orwell’s classic book has been scaring free civilizations since the 1950’s. In it, Winston lives in a totalitarianistic society and the government regulates anything that he does. Even though this is a fiction book about the future, many people still can make ties to what is happening in our society from this book. It definitely deserves a read. (267 pages)

28.00 Africa The Middle East Asia and Latin America Introduction (WorldCiv4)

Chairman Mao Zedong (of China) and his third wife, 1937: Wikimedia Commons, public domainChairman Mao Zedong (of China) and his third wife, 1937: Wikimedia Commons, public domain Africa, The Middle East, Asia, and Latin America

Unit 28: Africa, Middle East, Asia and Latin America

Time Period: (1945-Present)

Geographic Areas: Africa, Middle East, Asia and Latin America

Unit 28 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the modern history
of Africa, Middle East, Asia and Latin America. General assignment information
is as follows:

1. Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that
connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

2. Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on
information taken from articles that contain the required readings for the course.
The articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

3. Internet Blitz: Students search the Internet for information on the crisis in
Darfur. Students use the information as the content for the Product of Choice
presentation.

4. Product of Choice: Students choose a method to present the information collected
during the Internet Blitz. Possible methods include PowerPoint, Report, etc.

5. Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who
may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the unit. Points are
not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information, or any other topic,
feel free to contact your instructor.

Objectives:

Evaluate the impact of Western imperialism in Africa, Asia, and the Pacific.
Investigate the role of revolution in the establishment of governmental systems.
Investigate the impact of the Cold War on global integration.
Investigate the creation of international organizations and global integration.
Evaluate the impact of terrorism on the world’s political, economic, and social systems.

Explain the political, economic, and social philosophies that lead to revolution.
Compare and contrast major world revolutions
Compare and contrast capitalism and socialism.
Explain the significance of the agricultural revolution.
Examine the independence movements in the African and Asian colonial world.
Determine the causes and effects of the collapse of the Soviet sphere.
Assess the impact of economic and political organizations on global relations, e.g., World Trade Organization, United Nations, Olympics.
Examine the impact of advancements in worldwide communication/transportation, e.g., satellite communications, information technology/internet, mass transportation.
Assess the base of terrorist networks and activities.
Examine the impact of terrorism on the lives of people.
Analyze the responses of political and economic institutions to terrorism.

28.01 Bias Journal Assignment(WorldCiv4)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

"al-Arabiya" reporter Rima Mustafa in Jerusalem, 2008: Wikimedia Commons, Oren Rosenfeld, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic"al-Arabiya" reporter Rima Mustafa in Jerusalem, 2008: Wikimedia Commons, Oren Rosenfeld, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic

Assignment 28.01:

Journal Topic:

Is it possible to write journal entries or newspaper articles that are completely unbiased? How do you record things so as not to color them with your point of view? Is it always desirable to keep your opinion neutral?

Submit your journal entry to your instructor.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


28.02 Africa, ME, Asia, LA Reading Challenge (WorldCiv4)

Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links.

From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings.

The Pioneer Library log-in name and password are available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

teacher-scored 34 points possible 35 minutes

Distribution of Islam, 2011 (gray: less than 1%, light blue up to 5%... black over 90%): Wikimedia Commons, Maplab, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedDistribution of Islam, 2011 (gray: less than 1%, light blue up to 5%... black over 90%): Wikimedia Commons, Maplab, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedAssignment 28.02: Africa, ME, Asia, LA Reading Challenge

Assignment instructions:

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings" for Chapter 28.

1. Copy and paste the questions between the two lines of asterisks below into a word processing document. (You will want to save this assignment onto your computer to study from later. You will also want the questions to help you study!) SAVE YOUR WORK!
2. When you have finished, click “next” at the bottom of the screen. On the following screen you will find a submit this assignment tab.
3. Copy and paste the assignment into the text box and click [Save changes].

Submit the assignment to your instructor.

Each question is worth 2 points. Partial credit will be given for incomplete answers.
***************************************************************************************************************************************************************

Required Reading: Africa Part I: Read the following two subsections: Struggles for independence. through and including Africa since independence.

1. Which African country was the first to gain independence in 1951 with the aid of the United Nations?

 

 

2. When did Rhodesia become independent? What is its new name? What is apartheid and where was it practiced?

 

3. What are the two biggest challenges to African stability?

 

 

 

Required Reading: Africa Part II:
Read the following subsections: Africa through and including Foreign aid, debt, and investment.

4. What are staple food crops? Why are they grown? What are export crops? Why are they grown?

 

 

5. What country is the world's largest gold producer? Which country is a leading producer of diamonds? Which country has a large copper industry? What are blood diamonds?

 

6. What are the helpful and harmful effects of foreign aid?

 

 

 

Required Reading: The Middle East Part I:
Read the following subsections: Struggles for independence through and including The early 2000's.

7. What is Islamism? How did the colonial presence in the Middle East affect this movement?

 

 

8. What were the Camp David Accords? Which countries and leaders signed the agreement?

 

9. Who are the mujahideen and why are they significant?

 

 

 

Required Reading: The Middle East Part II:
Read the following subsections: Middle East, through and including International trade.

10. What are the two branches of Islam?

 

 

11. Which country had over 1/4 of the world's oil reserve?

 

 

 

Required Reading: India:
Read the following subsections: Rise of Indian nationalism through and including Recent developments.

12. According to Mohammad Ali Jinnah, which country was to be for Hindus, and which was for Muslims? Why were two countries formed?

 

 

13. What happened on Aug 15, 1947? What happened on Jan 30, 1948?

 

14. Who was Jawaharlal Nehru ? Who was Indira Gandhi?

 

 

Required Reading: China:
Read the following subsections: The warlord period through and including Recent developments.

15. What happened on Oct 1, 1949? Who became the new leader of the nation involved?

 

 

16. What was the Great Leap Forward? Was it effective?

 

17. What was the Cultural Revolution and when did it occur?

 

********************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


28.03 Internet Blitz Assignment(WorldCiv4)

teacher-scored 60 points possible 40 minutes

Makeshift shelters at refugee camp in South Darfur, circa 2005: Wikimedia Commons, USAID image, public domainMakeshift shelters at refugee camp in South Darfur, circa 2005: Wikimedia Commons, USAID image, public domain

Assignment 28.03 Modern Genocide INTERNET BLITZ

Complete a quick survey of available Internet resources on the given topic. The Holocaust was not the last incident of genocide in modern times. Genocide continues to plague peoples of the world today. The genocide in the Darfur region of western Sudan is an example of such a situation. You will be investigating the genocide in Darfur with plans to prepare a Product of Choice on the topic. Directions:

1) Using any internet search engine (such as "Google" or "Bing" etc.) select enough articles concerning Darfur to obtain the necessary background information. Be sure that your information contains the requisite number of points as explained in the "INTERNET BLITZ" to receive full credit for your effort;

2) Using your word processor, create an outline of each URL and one piece of information you acquired from that site on each line. An example of such an outline is below.

********************************************************************************** INTERNET BLITZ TOPIC: Crisis in Darfur

NAME:

Instructions: Create your list or outline, filling in the information as you go. Total your points at the bottom of the sheet (Total should equal at least 60 points).

Outline: 1) Site citation: Author. Book or “Article." Website title. Publisher/Sponsor of site, date of publication. Type of citation (book, web, magazine, etc.). date you went to the site. www.example.com/page.html.

One line of information found on the site.

2) Site citation: Author. Book or “Article". Website title. Publisher/Sponsor of site, date of publication. Type of citation (book, web, magazine, etc.). date you went to the site. www.example.com/page.html.

One line of information found on the site.

(continue to repeat the above format as often as necessary until 60pts. is obtained or you have the information you need to prepare an exceptional Product of Choice. Don't forget about the great resource of www.easybib.com to help with citations as well!)

Total Points: * each complete citation: 2 points * relevant information from that citation: 2 points * plus two bonus points if you find a 'primary source' (written by an eyewitness or participant in the event)

********************************************************************************** Grading Criteria: How many references did you find? Are any of them primary sources? Does your tally at the bottom of the page equal at least 60 points? Is the data easily read? Is the source clearly identified for later use in the Works Cited page?

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


28.04: Product of Choice Assignment(WorldCiv4)

teacher-scored 60 points possible 60 minutes

Darfur mother with malnourished child in refugee camp, circa 2005: Wikimedia Commons, USAID, public domainDarfur mother with malnourished child in refugee camp, circa 2005: Wikimedia Commons, USAID, public domain

Assignment 28.4: Product of Choice Assignment instructions:

Create a Product of Choice (Advertisement) on the crisis in Darfur that contains information found in your Internet Blitz. Show how the issues in Darfur are related to the region's history and culture, as well as other topics from earlier in this class. Select one of the following forms to present your report: PowerPoint, web page, news report (presented as a video or audio file), or other product with pre-approval from your instructor.

Grading criteria: Darfur's issues are related and explained. All sources are recorded on a Works Cited page. In-text citations are in your product of choice. No spelling or grammatical errors. There is no plagiarism. The student has maintained an individuality and originality in their work. The project runs without errors and is a high quality product.

 
Excellent - 12
Good - 8
Satisfactory - 5
Needs Improvement - 1
Subject Knowledge Subject knowledge is evident throughout the project. All information is clear, appropriate, and correct. Subject knowledge is evident in much of the project. Most information is clear, appropriate, and correct. Some subject knowledge is evident. Some Information is confusing, incorrect, or flawed. Subject knowledge is not evident. Information is confusing, incorrect, or flawed.
Citing Sources All sources are properly cited. Pictures or other items taken from a source have appropriate citation. Most sources are properly cited. There is some citations on pictures taken from other places. Few sources are properly cited. Citations are lacking completeness. No sources are properly cited. There are no citations at all.
Organization The sequence of information is logical and intuitive. Menus and paths to all information are clear and direct. There are no spelling mistakes leading to confusion. The sequence of information is logical. Menus and paths to most information are clear and direct. Most of the words are spelled correctly. The sequence of information is somewhat logical. Menus and paths are confusing and flawed. Spelling and conventions make it hard to follow. The sequence of information is not logical. Menus and paths to information are not evident. 16 or more spelling errors.
Originality The project shows significant evidence of originality and inventiveness. The majority of the content and many of the ideas are fresh, original, and inventive. The project shows some evidence of originality and inventiveness. The work is an extensive collection and rehash of other people's ideas, products, and images. There is little evidence of new thought or inventiveness. The work is a minimal collection or rehash of other people's ideas, products, and images. There is no evidence of new thought.
Technical Project runs perfectly with no technical problems. For example, there are no error messages, all sound, video, or other files are found. Project runs adequately with minor technical problems. Project runs minimally. There are many technical problems when viewing the project. Project does not run satisfactorily. There are too many technical problems to view the project.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


28.05 Book Recommendations

These are book recommendations based upon the subject matter.

If you happen to be someone who enjoys reading, the following books can usually be found at your local school or public library. They may interest you if you like learning about this time period. If you have any books that you have read that would fit this section, feel free to message me about them.

Cry, the Beloved Country Alan Paton
This book is about South Africa and the apartheid. Reverend Stephen Kumalo travels from his town to Johannesburg to look for his son. Written in 1948, it beautifully explains what it is like to be in a black country with white laws. It will make you think and is still relevant as racism has not yet been eradicated from world society. (320 pages)

28.06 Review Quiz Unit 27 and Unit 28

computer-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

Assessment 28.05 Review Quiz Unit 27 and Unit 28

Complete

27 and 28 Review Quiz
Cold War around the World

This assignment is found under Review Quiz Unit 27 and Unit 28 on the course website. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do and provides immediate feedback.

Complete this assignment after you finish reading lesson 27 and lesson 28 coursework..

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


29.00 Europe/United States Introduction (WorldCiv4)

United Nations building in New York City: Wikimedia Commons, Stefan Schulze, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedUnited Nations building in New York City: Wikimedia Commons, Stefan Schulze, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedObjectives:

Investigate the creation of international organizations and global integration.
Evaluate the impact of terrorism on the world’s political, economic and social systems.

Compare and contrast capitalism and socialism.
Determine the causes and effects of the collapse of the Soviet sphere.
Assess the impact of economic and political organizations on global relations, e.g., World Trade Organization, United Nations, Olympics.
Examine the impact of advancements in worldwide communication or transportation, e.g., satellite communications, information technology, internet, mass transportation.
Assess the base of terrorist networks and activities.
Examine the impact of terrorism on the lives of people.
Analyze the responses of political and economic institutions to terrorism.

29.01 Present Journal Assignment (WorldCiv4)

teacher-scored 75 points possible 45 minutes

Assignment 29.01:

Please make sure you read ALL the instructions, as this journal entry is a bit different from the ones earlier in the class. 

Wikimedia Commons, Manath Magesinger, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedWikimedia Commons, Manath Magesinger, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Journal Topic:

What are the most significant historical events that have occurred during your lifetime?

Choose three historical events that have occurred during your lifetime. Write about those events and include evidence and examples to justify why you selected these events as most important. What do you think historians will record about these event 50 years from now? Why?

What future events would you predict based on current trends?

Make at least three predictions (about countries, civilization or culture) of what will happen during your likely lifetime. Include evidence and examples of past and current events that will cause your predictions to come true.

Write at least 500 words. This assignment will be scored on how well you support your choices and predictions with logic, evidence and examples. Make sure that you are backing up your ideas with citations as well. Make sure any sites that you look at to determine your top three events are also recorded on a Works Cited page. Submit the journal entry to your instructor.

 
15
10
7
5
1
Ideas The major three events are clear and easily identified. All important ideas and terms are well defined. A few of the major events are decipherable. Most ideas and terms are defined. Some major events are identified. One or two major events are identified. No real events. Content is murky or unsupported. There is no central theme or purpose.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of punctuation, grammar, usage, and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message. There are no spelling mistakes or punctuation errors present. Less than three spelling, punctuation or other convention errors are present. Three to six spelling errors or other conventions present. Six to ten spelling errors or other conventions present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage and grammar and/or paragraphing distract the reader from the text and make it difficult to read. 16 or more spelling errors present.
Presentation The bibliography is adequate and documented accurately, without the use of wikipedia. The bibliography is mostly adequate and many of the citations are correct. All sources are correctly cited but from Wikipedia. All sources are incorrectly cited and many are from Wikipedia. There is no bibliography.
Predictions Three predictions are found about what will happen in your lifetime with proper evidence (past and current events). Three predictions are found about what will happen in your lifetime with some evidence to back up the idea. Some predictions are found about what will happen in your lifetime with proper evidence. Some predictions are found about what will happen in your lifetime but no evidence is given as to why. There are no predictions.
Originality The project shows significant evidence of originality and inventiveness. The majority of the content and many of the ideas are fresh, original, and inventive. The project shows some evidence of originality and inventiveness. The work shows some potential for creativity but just seems to rewrite what has already been stated. The work is an extensive collection and rehash of other people's ideas, products and images. There is little evidence of new thought or inventiveness. The work is a minimal collection or rehash of other people's ideas, products and images. There is no evidence of new thought.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


29.02 Europe/United States Reading Challenge (WorldCiv4)

Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links.

From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings.

The Pioneer Library log-in name and password are available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

teacher-scored 70 points possible 45 minutes

Oil prices from 1950-2010 (solid line adjusted for inflation; dotted line historical prices): Wikimedia Commons, Alexeykob, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedOil prices from 1950-2010 (solid line adjusted for inflation; dotted line historical prices): Wikimedia Commons, Alexeykob, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

To submit this assignment:

1. Copy and paste the questions between the two lines of asterisks below into a word-processing document. (You will want to save this assignment onto your computer to study from later. You will also want the questions to help you study!) SAVE YOUR WORK!

2. When you have finished, click “next” at the bottom of the screen. On the following screen you will find a "submit this assignment" tab.

3. Copy and paste the assignment into the text box and click [Save changes]. Assignment instructions: Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings" for unit 29. Instructions for Required Reading Access The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study.

Each question is worth 2 points, but partial credit will be given for incomplete answers. ********************************************************************************************************************************************************************* Required Reading: Europe Part I: Read the following subsections: Toward European unity through and including Recent developments

1. What was the EEC? When was it formed? What is the Maastricht Treaty? When did it go into effect?

2. What is perestroika? what is glasnost? Who proposed these reforms?

3. When was Germany united? What was torn down in 1989 that facilitated the union?

4. In 1993, Czechoslovakia was divided into which two countries?

5. What is ethnic cleansing? Where did this begin in 1991 and 1992? Where is Kosovo?

6. What is the Euro? When was the Euro adopted?

7. What countries have accepted emergency loans from the countries that use the euro and the IMF?

8. What group of immigrants is causing tensions to rise in Europe? What are the fears of many Europeans about these people?

Required Reading: Europe Part II: Read the following subsections: The early 1900’s through and including Communication.

9. List several benefits to the common market system for the members of the European Union.

10. What is EFTA? What has it agreed to do with the EU? Who are the EU's major trading partners?

11. Where is Nokia headquartered? What service do they provide? What is Eurovision?

Required Reading: United States Part I: Read the following subsections: Political scandals through and including Death of bin Laden.

12. In 1979 the United States had citizens that took place (unwillingly!) in a revolution in Iran. What happened there? What happened to the people?

13. What are high-technology industries? What did they manufacture? What forms of employment were displaced? What is NAFTA?

14. What caused the Persian Gulf War of 1991?

15. The Balkan peninsula has long be known as the "powder keg of Europe" What occurred there in the 1990's? Who took part in air strikes and sent in troops?

16. What occurred on Sept 11, 2001? What building was destroyed? What is the Patriot Act? Why did the United States declare war on Afghanistan?

17. Why did the US declare war on Iraq? What are "weapons of mass destruction"? Were they ever found in Iraq?

18. Why did the economy take a sharp downturn in 2008? What was the “bailout”? Why was it instituted?

19. Why was the presidential election of 2008 considered historic? Who was elected president? What challenges and steps to conquer them did the new president and Congress face/take?

20. Briefly name and explain the environmental disaster that took place in April 2010:

21. Who was Osama bin Laden? Who killed him? Where was he killed?

Required Reading: Space Exploration:

22. What occurred on Oct 4, 1957? What was said to have begun on this day?

23. What occurred on April 12, 1981? What happened on Jan 28, 1986? What happened on Feb 1, 2003?

24. What is interplanetary space? What is interstellar space?

25. What is zero gravity and where does it occur? What effect does it have on human bodies? How can such problems be addressed?

26. What are freeze dried foods, and where are they used? How are they consumed?

27. What is mission control?

28. What is a space probe and what is it used for?

29. What other countries besides the United Stats and Russia have developed rocket and space programs? What are their concentrations?

Required Reading: Energy Resources:

30. What are the fossil fuels currently in use worldwide?

31. What is hydropower, and how does it work?

32. How is nuclear energy currently produced? What is the process that is being developed? What makes that process attractive?

33. What is solar energy, and what is needed to use it? What are the problems?

34. What are other types of energy that could be developed? Why haven't they been developed yet on a large scale?

35. What are the three challenges presented by the Earth's diminishing energy supply?

****************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


29.03 Interview Assignment (WorldCiv4)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 120 minutes

Assignment 29.03: "Interview": David Frost (left) interviewing Donald Rumsfeld, 2005: Wikimedia Commons, Robert D Ward, public domainDavid Frost (left) interviewing Donald Rumsfeld, 2005: Wikimedia Commons, Robert D Ward, public domain

Choose a topic from the list below.

  • Student Protest 

  • The Soviet Bloc - Its rise and decline

  • Dissent in Eastern Europe

  • Vietnam War

  • Political Corruption

  • Economic boom and bust

  • The Women's Movement

  • Space Exploration

  • The Computer Revolution

  • Medical Miracles

  • World Population Growth

  • Ecology

  • Energy Challenges

  • Mass Communication

  • The Entertainment Industry

  • The Information Society

  • Terrorism

  • Iraq War

  • Afghanistan War

Use the internet to search for information on your topic so as to be familiar with it. Locate someone living who has first hand knowledge of your topic and can serve as a primary source. Use the following information to construct your interview:

  1. What is the purpose of the interview? (What do you want to find out? How does it relate to World Civilizations?)
  2. Identify and list 15 to 20 appropriate questions to ask that are directly related to the purpose. Make sure the questions require elaborate responses (don't ask "yes-or-no" questions unless you follow up with "why?").
  3. Identify a key individual to interview. Contact that person and ask whether you may interview him/her. Set up a convenient interview time and place that will be free of distractions.
  4. Dress appropriately, and make the circumstances surrounding the interview comfortable.
  5. Record the interview on paper, audio tape, or video tape. (Audio or video will be much easier than trying to take good notes while you listen)
  6. Edit unnecessary/irrelevant items from the interview.
  7. Produce a written account (expository essay) about your interview. This should include an introduction, summary of the main and most interesting points, two or three direct quotes, and a conclusion in which you discuss what you learned and/or how this relates to the class and your life.
  8. Submit all information (purpose, questions, complete transcript or audio/video file, and written account) to your instructor.
 
Excellent - 10
Good - 8
Satisfactory - 6
Needs Improvement - 1
Technical Project runs perfectly with no technical problems. For example, there are no error messages, all sound, video, or other files are found. Project runs adequately with minor technical problems. Project runs minimally. There are many technical problems when viewing the project. Project does not run satisfactorily. There are too many technical problems to view the project.
Subject Knowledge Subject knowledge is evident throughout the project. All information is clear, appropriate, and correct. Subject knowledge is evident in much of the project. Most information is clear, appropriate, and correct. Some subject knowledge is evident. Some Information is confusing, incorrect, or flawed. Subject knowledge is not evident. Information is confusing, incorrect, or flawed.
Organization The sequence of information is logical and intuitive. Menus and paths to all information are clear and direct. The sequence of information is logical. Menus and paths to most information are clear and direct. The sequence of information is somewhat logical. Menus and paths are confusing and flawed. The sequence of information is not logical. Menus and paths to information are not evident.
Originality The project shows significant evidence of originality and inventiveness. The majority of the content and many of the ideas are fresh, original, and inventive. The project shows some evidence of originality and inventiveness. The work is an extensive collection and rehash of other people's ideas, products, and images. There is little evidence of new thought or inventiveness. The work is a minimal collection or rehash of other people's ideas, products, and images. There is no evidence of new thought.
Purpose The purpose and questions are related to World History and create a logical flow to the purpose of the interview. The purpose and questions are somewhat related to World History and the flow is mostly clear and direct. The purpose and questions are mostly related to World History. The purpose and questions are not related to World History and it does not create a logical flow.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


29.04 Current Event Editorial

29.04 Current Event Editorial (WorldCiv4) The links are to be used as resources to help you find out what an editorial is, how they are written today and give you a better understanding of what you should do for your own editorial.

29.04 Current Event Editorial (WorldCiv4)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 30 minutes

Newsstand: Wikimedia Commons, Melbeans, public domainNewsstand: Wikimedia Commons, Melbeans, public domain

Assignment 29.04:

Current Event Editorial: Compose an editorial ( an editorial is an article stating your opinion on facts gained through study of a specific topic ) of at least 300 words for a recent event found on either the Deseret News or the Salt Lake Tribune websites shown below, OR feel free to use another online news source of your choice. Be sure to send a link to the article with your editorial. The event to which you respond should be something that has happened in the past two months.

In your editorial, relate this event to other historical event(s); you might want to use a cause/effect, problem/solution or comparison/contrast approach. Include an analysis of how this event may affect people like you, or how you could do something about it. This assignment will be scored on how well you support your opinion with evidence, facts, examples and logic. If you need more information regarding editorials, click on the "Optional Reading: Editorial" link which is available through the World Book Encyclopedia via the Pioneer website. Access is obtained the same way as is done for the "Required Readings."

 
10
8
6
4
2
Ideas The major idea is clear and easily identified. All important ideas and terms are well defined. Major ideas are decipherable. Most ideas and terms are defined. Some major ideas are identified. One or two major ideas are identified. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. There is no central theme or purpose.
Organization The essay is plainly divided into at least 5 major paragraphs. It is easy to see that the student can organize a 5 paragraph essay. Essay is divided into paragraphs that can be deciphered. Some paragraphs lead the reader through the paper. Paragraphs are missing, but it does follow the assignment. Introduction or conclusion is missing. Paragraphing is disorganized. Does not follow paper assignment.
Presentation The bibliography is adequate and documented accurately, without the use of wikipedia. The bibliography is mostly adequate and many of the citations are correct. All sources are correctly cited but from Wikipedia. All sources are incorrectly cited and many are from Wikipedia. There is no bibliography.
Flow The major idea is backed up by the supporting information and that information is accurate. The major idea has some supporting information that is either weak or inaccurate. The major idea has some back up information but is mostly left on its own, or is incorrect. Awkward insertion of wording that does not help the information to flow. There is no major idea. Supporting information does not exist.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of punctuation, grammar, usage, and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message. There are no spelling mistakes or punctuation errors present. Less than three spelling, punctuation or other convention errors are present. Three to six spelling errors or other conventions present. Six to ten spelling errors or other conventions present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage and grammar and/or paragraphing distract the reader from the text and make it difficult to read. 16 or more spelling errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


29.05 Book Recommendations

The following are book recommendations based upon the subject matter.

If you happen to be someone who enjoys reading, the following books can usually be found at your local school or public library. They may interest you if you like learning about this time period. If you have any books that you have read that would fit this section, feel free to message me about them.

Inside the Kingdom: My Life in Saudi Arabia Carmen Bin Laden
With the War on Terror still in full swing, and US troops and Muslim terrorists facing off across the globe, this book offers a new view. Carmen Bin Laden is the ex-wife of Osama Bin Laden’s brother. It explains her horror during September 11th and how she had to fight for her children. She offers a scary prediction about what will happen after the death of Osama Bin Laden as well.

29.06 and Quarter 4 Review Quiz

computer-scored 27 points possible 15 minutes

Assessment 29.05 and Quarter 4 Review Quiz

Complete

29 and Quarter 4 Review Quiz
Europe and United States and Current Events

This assignment is found under Review Quiz Unit 29 and Quarter 4 on the course website. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do and provides immediate feedback.

Complete this assignment after you finish reading lesson 29 and all of quarter 4 coursework..

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.