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World Civilizations, 3rd Quarter

00.0 Start Here - Introduction to this Class (World Civilizations)

Course Description

The study of World Civilizations emphasizes the increasing interrelationships over time of the world’s peoples. These interrelationships have developed in two major arenas.

First, the relationships have developed among major regions of the world: East Asia, South Asia, Southwest Asia (Middle East), Africa, Europe, North America and Latin America.

Second, they have developed within all aspects of human activity: political, economic, social, philosophical and religious, scientific and technological, and artistic.

Class Overview

The World Civilizations course is a full 1.0 credit but is broken into four quarter classes. You may enroll for one, two, three or all four quarters, BUT you can enroll in only one quarter at a time!

Each quarter of World Civilizations generates a .25 credit. If you do not turn in any work within the first week after you register, you may be dropped from this course.

You have up to 10 weeks to finish each quarter after you are enrolled. Please following the pacing recommendations for each assignment. Once you have completed a quarter (including all work and tests), you can request to be enrolled in the next quarter.

About the Curriculum

The class works like this. . . First you read the lessons (if you've done it right you started with Module 1, are now reading Module 2, move to Module 3, and finally Module 4).  The lessons have a little chain link next to them.  This is where you'll find the assignments.  Follow the instructions then you can either click next OR go back to the home page and click on the assignment submission page.  The assignment submission links have a paper with an "A" in it. The last link you'll see is the quiz link.  It has a "Q" next to it.  

Each Module will be locked until you have completed the prior Module.  To keep track of what you've done look along the left side of the home page.  There are check marks there.  Completed links have green checks.  Incomplete links have yellow checks. 

When you have finished Module 3, which is the class work, please move to Module 4 and submit the "Ready" assignment.

Required Readings

The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators, and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study. You need to be accessing the readings from a home computer--NOT a school computer lab.(Some school computer labs may work, but it depends on how the network is set up.) Accessing the readings is bit tricky. To access the readings you must do the following:

1) Open "a new Tab" on your internet browser and paste in the Utah Online Library (Pioneer Library) URL. The log-in page will appear. On the right-hand side, type the information in the boxes as shown below: Utah Student Log-in Enter the log-in name and password found on your dashboard--the main class page when you are logged in to your EHS class.

Log-in Name: online
Password: [Check the dashboard page or contact your EHS teacher or school librarian for the current password]

Click the LOG-IN graphic The Utah Online Library page will appear. Click on the last link in the first column titled: World Book Encyclopedia. The page will open in a new window or a new tab. Close or minimize the new World Book window/tab, but DO NOT close the original Utah Online Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings (you can minimize the window to get it out of the way). Now you are ready to access the readings.

2) The readings are divided by Chapters. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information on the second pages.

3) In many cases you will not be reading entire articles. The subsection/subsections of each article to be read is/are indicated below the name of the "Required Reading". Read only the subsections indicated. If there is no indication, you should read the entire article.

4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor by e-mail.

How work is graded

Most assignments have a corresponding rubric and a minimum score requirement. A general rule to understanding the score received is to check the rubric to see where points were lost. Assignments may be resubmitted for more credit. Work should be checked for errors before it is submitted. All work is graded as in the order it is turned in and in a timely manner. 

Proctored Final

The final is worth 26% of the class points. You must earn 60% on the final to receive a grade and credit for the class.

Grading Scale

You can check your progress and grade at any time on the "grades" page.

Final grades are based on this grading scale:

  • 94-100% A
  • 90-93% A-
  • 87-89% B+
  • 83-86% B
  • 80-82% B-
  • 77-79% C+
  • 73-76% C
  • 70-72% C-
  • 67-69% D+
  • 63-66% D
  • 60-62% D-
  • 0-59% no credit

00.00 *Student supplies for World Civilizations

The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators, and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study. The "Required Readings" are accessed through the Utah Online Library. The Utah Online Library is password protected. The Utah Online Library log-in name and password may be obtained from your EHS World Civilizations teacher or your school librarian.

00.00 About Me (World Civilizations)

teacher-scored 8 points possible 15 minutes

In an online class it is more challenging to get to know our students. We want you to be a person and not just a name on an email. Although this introduction will never take the place of being in class with you every day or two, it helps you tell your teacher what's important to you.

For this assignment, I'd like you to write a paragraph about you.  In the paragraph please include all of the following:

  1. Your name and the name you prefer to be called (if they are different).  
  2. Your current age and grade in school.
  3. Contact information for you and your parents. (Emails or phone numbers are fine.)
  4. The school you attend and the name and email address for your school counselor
  5. Some information that describes you such as your interests, family, school goals, etc.
  6. An acknowledgement and agreement to abide by the EHS honor code.
  7. An acknowledgement of the 10 week time limit.
  8. A statement letting me know you have watched the "how to review your assignments" video clip

"As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers and staff with respect." (EHS Honor Code)

This assignment will be graded using a rubric. You must get an 8/8 to move on to the next module, so pay attention and do it right the first time so you only have to submit it once.  (To submit click the NEXT BUTTON at the bottom of the page.  OR go back to the class home page and click on the "About Me" assignment submission link.  It has a paper with an 'A' in it next to it.)

 

  Meets Expectations (2) Meets Partial Expectations (1) Below Expectations (0)
Prompt Information is given in paragraph form and contains relevant information.  Assignment has been spell checked and there are no significant mechanincs or usage errors. Information not given in paragraph form or doesn't give relevant information about student's interests. Important information not included and significant mechanincs, spelling, or usage errors.
Contact Info Contact information (email or phone) for both STUDENT and PARENT is included. Only one contact is included. This element is missing.
School Info Current school and grade included as well as counselor's email address. Doesn't include all of the required elements This element is missing.
Acknowledgements Includes the student's acknowledgement of the EHS Honor Code, the 10-week time frame for the class, and viewing video clip. Missing one of the three requrements Missing two or more of the required acknowledgements.
       

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


00.01

00.01.01 Student Software Needs

 

Students need access to a robust internet connection and a modern web browser.

This class may also require the Apple QuickTime plug-in to view media.

For students using a school-issued Chromebook, ask your technical support folks to download the QuickTime plug-in and enable the plug-in for your Chromebook.

$0.00

15.00 Scientific Revolution & Enlightenment Introduction (WorldCiv3)

The Scientific Revolution & Enlightenment (1500 - 1800)

Galileo, early scientist, ca. 1635: Wikimedia Commons, Justus Sustermans, public domainGalileo, early scientist, ca. 1635: Wikimedia Commons, Justus Sustermans, public domain
From the late Renaissance period, through the Age of Exploration, and continuing right up through the present time, the world has experienced rapid growth in new ideas. It began slowly, as explorers brought back stories, goods, inventions, plants and animals from other cultures and ecosystems. Each new improvement in transportation and communication made it possible for ideas to spread further and more quickly. Developments like the printing press, microscope and telescope helped people get excited about the world around them, and raised questions about traditional beliefs. People began to systematically study the natural world, and set up experiments to test ideas about how things work for themselves, instead of depending on finding answers for everything in classical writings or religion. What we now call science developed from these studies.

At the same time, people began to question whether government could be improved--whether a king should really have absolute power, and whether common people should have rights and protections from their government. As more people learned to read, and more Bibles were printed in English, French, Spanish, German and other languages (instead of hand copied in Latin or Greek), the Pope and the Catholic church institutions had less authority than in the Middle Ages. Men like Martin Luther spread the idea that each individual was precious to God, and could study the Bible, pray, and receive forgiveness or blessings directly, without the intervention of a priest. The foundations were being laid for progress and conflicts that are still underway today.

Unit 15: Scientific Revolution & Enlightenment

Time Period: (1500-1800)

Geographic Areas: Europe

Unit 15 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of European history. General assignment information is as follows:

1. Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

2. Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on information taken from articles that contain the required readings for the course. The articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

3. Internet Blitz: Students select a topic, such as a person or invention, and search the Internet for information. Students use the information collected as the content for the Product of Choice presentation.

4. Product of Choice: Students choose a method to present the information collected during the Internet Blitz. Possible methods include PowerPoint, Report, etc.

5. Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the unit. Points are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information, or any other topic,
feel free to contact your instructor.

Objectives:
Assess the importance of intellectual and cultural change on early modern society.

Analyze the significant ideas and philosophies of the scientific revolution and the Enlightenment.

15.00.1 Photo in Learn

teacher-scored 0 points possible 10 minutes

This is an extra credit opportunity. I will give you an extra point if you add a photo of yourself into the class. This will show up when you comment, chat or post an assignment. Avatars don't count.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


15.01 Scientific Revolution & Enlightenment Journal Assignment(WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

Galileo's drawings of phases of the moon, as seen through his telescope: Wikimedia Commons, public domainGalileo's drawings of phases of the moon, as seen through his telescope: Wikimedia Commons, public domain "Science is the great antidote to the poison of enthusiasm and superstition." (Smith) Smith, Adam. An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. Chicago: Encyclopædia Britannica, 1955. Print.

Assignment 15.01:

Journal Entry: How much do we rely on science? Do we ever rely too much on it? How exact is science? How has science benefitted you personally? Submit your journal entry to your instructor.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


15.02 Scientific Revolution & Enlightenment Reading Challenge (WorldCiv3)

15.02 Scientific Revolution & Enlightenment Reading Challenge Assignment(WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 32 points possible 30 minutes

15.02 Scientific Revolution & Enlightenment Reading Challenge

To submit this assignment:
1. Create the assignment in a word processing document--copy and paste in the questions between the two lines of asterisks, below. You will want to save this to study for the final.
2. When you have finished, click “next” at the bottom of the screen. On the following screen you will find a submit this assignment tab.
3. Copy and paste the assignment from your word processor into the text box and click [Save changes].
---
Assignment instructions:

 

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings."

Instructions for Required Reading Access

The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators, and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study.

Accessing the readings is a bit tricky, so follow the steps below.

1) Open 'a new Tab' on your internet browser and paste the web address for Utah Online Library found at the bottom of the assignment page.

The log-in page will appear. The user name and password is available from your local school librarian or from your EHS teacher.

The Utah Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: World Book Encyclopedia. The page will open in a new window or a new tab. You can close the new World Book window/tab but DO NOT close the original Utah Online Library tab or you will NOT be able to access the readings, as this exits you from the Utah Online Library.
Now you are ready to access the readings.

2) Links to the Required Readings topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. You can either copy and paste the link into your browser, or just click on it and it should open up to the location needed for the current assignment. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information.

3) In many cases you will not be reading entire articles. The subsection/subsections of each article to be read is/are indicated below the name of the "Required Reading". Read only the subsections indicated. If there is no indication you should read the entire article.

4) If you have any further questions feel free to contact your instructor by email.

Each question is worth 2 points. Partial credit will be given for incomplete answers.

*****************************************************************************************

 

Required Reading: The Scientific Revolution:
Read the following subsections: The rebirth of science through and including The Enlightenment,

 

1. What is the heliocentric theory? What is the name of the scientist who proposed it?

2. Who were Tycho Brahe and Johannes Kepler and what did they do?

3. Which Italian scientist stressed the need for carefully controlled experiments? What instrument did he develop which helped find evidence to support the heliocentric theory?

4. Who formulated a law of universal gravitation and laid the foundation for optics?

5. What did William Harvey discover? What instrument did Robert Hooke use?

6. What did Rene Descartes believe was the model all other sciences should follow?

7. Who believed that by collecting all the observable facts of nature, a person could discover the laws which govern the universe?

 

Benjamin Franklin, 1767: Wikimedia Commons, David Martin, public domainBenjamin Franklin, 1767: Wikimedia Commons, David Martin, public domain
Required Reading: The Enlightenment:

 

 

 

8. Why is the Enlightenment also called the Age of Reason?

9. Who studied combustion and developed the law of the conservation of matter?

10. What system did Carolus Linnaeus devise?

11. Who wrote the Wealth of Nations?

12. Who proved in 1752 that lightning is electricity?

13. What is the difference between contingent truth and universal truth?

14. What did the philosophers of the Enlightenment believe that each person possesses that makes humans different than animals?

15. What is Deism?

16. What was some criticism of the Enlightenment? What are tautologies?

******************************************************************************************

 

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


15.03 Scientific Revolution & Enlightenment Internet Blitz Assignment(WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 20 minutes

15.03 Scientific Revolution & Enlightenment Internet Blitz Robert Hooke and other scientists (called natural philosophers then) often met to talk in coffee houses: Wikimedia Commons, Rita Greer painting, Free Art LicenseRobert Hooke and other scientists (called natural philosophers then) often met to talk in coffee houses: Wikimedia Commons, Rita Greer painting, Free Art License Assignment instructions: Choose one of the individuals listed in the Required Readings for Unit 15 - The Scientific Revolution and The Enlightenment. (These will come from the assignment you just completed in 15.02.)

Spend one hour on the internet searching for information on that individual. Keep a list of the citations of the sites you find that actually contain information on this person, as well as a short paragraph about what you found on that site.

Using your word-processor, create a chart or outline listing the citations (the easiest way is to use www.easybib.com to create complete citations) and one piece of information you acquired from that site about your chosen subject.

Citation (example: "Electronic High School." Electronic High School. Utah Electronic High School, 2 Aug. 2012. Web. 06 Aug. 2012. http://www.schools.utah.gov/ehs/.)--2pts 

         A paragraph of information from the site, summarized in your own words--3pts

 You will be graded on the following criteria. 

How many references did you find? Does your tally at the bottom of the page equal at least 30 points? Is the data easily read? Is the source clearly identified so as to be available for a Works Cited page?

. Total your points at the bottom of the sheet (Total should equal at least 30 points).

Total Points: Use the following point system for your findings.

-2 points for a citation and 3 points for a short paragraph about the website -

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


15.04 Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment Advertisement (WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 60 minutes

15.04 Product of Choice The solar system according to Copernicus: Wikimedia Commons, public domainThe solar system according to Copernicus: Wikimedia Commons, public domain

Assignment instructions:

Create a product (an advertisement) communicating, in your own words and/or images, information you found for the Internet Blitz. Try to get someone to believe in an idea from the information you found. OR create an advertisement selling one of their inventions. If you choose to summarize the information, do so by using short direct quotes (in quotation marks and with the source clearly identified through in-text citations), copy pictures if you write captions/explanations/narrative in your own words, or copy pictures to modify or use in creating a collage, cartoon or parody.

Select one of the following forms to present your report:

  • PowerPoint
  • newspaper
  • webpage
  • collage (in .jpg or .pdf format)
  • video
  • audio file or other product with pre-approval from your teacher.

 

Excellent - 5

 

Good - 4

 

Satisfactory - 3

 

Needs Improvement - 1

 

Subject Knowledge

 

Subject knowledge is evident throughout the project. All information is clear, appropriate, and correct.

 

Subject knowledge is evident in much of the project. Most information is clear, appropriate, and correct.

 

Some subject knowledge is evident. Some Information is confusing, incorrect, or flawed.

 

Subject knowledge is not evident. Information is confusing, incorrect, or flawed.

 

Citing Sources

 

All sources are properly cited. Pictures or other items taken from a source have appropriate citation.

 

Most sources are properly cited. There is some citations on pictures taken from other places.

 

Few sources are properly cited. Citations are lacking completeness.

 

No sources are properly cited. There are no citations at all.

 

Organization

 

The sequence of information is logical and intuitive. Menus and paths to all information are clear and direct. There are no spelling mistakes leading to confusion.

 

The sequence of information is logical. Menus and paths to most information are clear and direct. Most of the words are spelled correctly.

 

The sequence of information is somewhat logical. Menus and paths are confusing and flawed. Spelling and conventions make it hard to follow.

 

The sequence of information is not logical. Menus and paths to information are not evident. 16 or more spelling errors.

 

Originality

 

The project shows significant evidence of originality and inventiveness. The majority of the content and many of the ideas are fresh, original, and inventive.

 

The project shows some evidence of originality and inventiveness.

 

The work is an extensive collection and rehash of other people's ideas, products, and images. There is little evidence of new thought or inventiveness.

 

The work is a minimal collection or rehash of other people's ideas, products, and images. There is no evidence of new thought.

 

Technical

 

Project runs perfectly with no technical problems. For example, there are no error messages, all sound, video, or other files are found.

 

Project runs adequately with minor technical problems.

 

Project runs minimally. There are many technical problems when viewing the project.

 

Project does not run satisfactorily. There are too many technical problems to view the project.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


15.05 Recommended Books

These are book recommendations based upon the subject matter.

If you happen to be someone who enjoys reading, the following books can usually be found at your local school or public library. They may interest you if you like learning about this time period. If you have any books that you have read that would fit this section, feel free to message me about them.

Louis Pasteur: and the Founding of Microbiology by Jane Ackerman

The same guy that gave us pasteurized milk also developed a vaccine for rabies. This book explains the highs and lows of his remarkable life. This is a great choice for those interested in science, and at 144 pages it isn’t a huge sacrifice.

The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin by Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin takes the reader on a tour of his life. It covers everything from his childhood to his experiments with electricity and his political career. As a Founding Father of the United States of America and a very influential man in France as ambassador, it is good to get a grasp on who this man was. At 144 pages it won’t bore you to death or take three years to read!

Isaac Newton: Organizing the Universe by William J. Boerst

This biography takes the large task of writing about Isaac Newton. It explores his accomplishments and some of the criticism he faced. There is some math in it, but not too much. At 144 pages this book is a quick enough read for those who are casually interested.

16.00 Revolution in Europe & North America Introduction (WorldCiv3)

French citizens storm the Bastille, a notorious prison, 1789: Wikimedia Commons, Jean-Pierre Houël, public domainFrench citizens storm the Bastille, a notorious prison, 1789: Wikimedia Commons, Jean-Pierre Houël, public domain
You probably remember that American colonists revolted against British rule in 1776, starting the War for Independence that resulted in a new country, the United States. However, you may not realize that revolutions and wars kept Europe in a tumult from the early 1500's to the middle of the 1800's. At the beginning of that period, most European countries were ruled by monarchs with absolute power. By the end, most countries had some kind of constitution, and even rulers were expected to obey the rule of law.

Unit 16: Revolution in Europe & North America

Time Period: (1509-1848)

Geographic Areas: Europe and North America

Unit 16 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the history of Europe and North America. General assignment information is as follows:

Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on information taken from articles that contain the required readings for the course. The articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

Outline: Allows for the creation of an outline that depicts the events and causes associated with three significant wars.

Survey: Student created survey to ask friends, family, etc.

Graph: Student selected method of displaying information acquired during the survey.

Essay: A five-paragraph essay that ties together information from all topics and activities studied in the chapter.

Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the unit. Points are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information, or any other topic,

Objective: Investigate the role of revolution in the establishment of governmental systems.

Explain the political, economic, and social philosophies that lead to revolution.
Compare and contrast major world revolutions, e.g., American, French, Russian, Chinese.

16.01 Revolution In Europe & North America Journal Assignment(WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

"All modern wars start in the history classroom.-Anonymous" (Szasz 1) Szasz, Ferenc M. "Quotations about History." Williamcronon.net. William Cronon, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2005. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. Detail from "The Battle of Waterloo", 1815: Wikimedia Commons, William Sadler, public domainDetail from "The Battle of Waterloo", 1815: Wikimedia Commons, William Sadler, public domain

Assignment 16.01:

Journal Entry: What reasons do people have for fighting, especially fighting which involves physical violence? What do you personally feel strongly enough about to fight for or hurt someone else for? Submit your journal entry to your instructor.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


16.02 Revolution in Europe & North America Reading Challenge (WorldCiv3)

Remember, you must log in to Utah Online Library before using these WorldBook Online links. From the Utah Online Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings. The log-in page will appear. The user name and password are available from your local school librarian or from your EHS teacher.

16.02 Revolution in Europe & North America Reading Challenge (WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 35 minutes

16.2 Revolution in Europe & North America Reading Challenge
Battle of Marston Moor, 1644, England: Wikimedia Commons, John Barker, public domainBattle of Marston Moor, 1644, England: Wikimedia Commons, John Barker, public domain
Assignment instructions:

To submit this assignment:
1. Create the assignment in a word processing document--copy and paste it in the questions between the two lines of asterisks, below. You will want to save these questions and answers to a place where you can review them before the final. SAVE YOUR WORK!
2. When you have finished, click “next” at the bottom of the screen. On the following screen you will find a submit this assignment tab.
3. Copy and paste the assignment into the text box and click [Save changes].
---
Assignment instructions:

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings."

Instructions for Required Reading Access

The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators, and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study.

Accessing the readings is a bit tricky but it is possible. To access the readings you must do the following.

1) Open 'a new Tab' on your internet browser and paste the web address for Pioneer Library Online found at the bottom of the assignment page.

The log-in page will appear. The user name and password is available from your local school librarian or from your EHS teacher.

The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: World Book Encyclopedia. The page will open in a new window or a new tab. You can close the new World Book window/tab but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab or you will NOT be able to access the readings, as this exits you from the Pioneer Library.
Now you are ready to access the readings.

2) Links to the Required Readings topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. You can either copy and paste the link into your browser, or just click on it and it should open up to the location needed for the current assignment. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information.

3) In many cases you will not be reading entire articles. The subsection/subsections of each article to be read is/are indicated below the name of the "Required Reading". Read only the subsections indicated. If there is no indication you should read the entire article.

4) If you have any further questions feel free to contact your instructor by email.

Each question is worth 2 points. Partial credit will be given for incomplete answers.

***************************************************************************************

Required Reading: Revolution:

 

1. What is a revolution?

2. What is guerrilla warfare? What is civil disobedience?

 

Required Reading: English Civil War:

3. Which two forces fought each other in the English Civil War?

 

4. What is tonnage and poundage? What is ship money?

5. Who were the Cavaliers? Who were the Roundheads?

6. Who ruled as Lord Protector?

7. After the Restoration, who had control of the Church of England and taxation?

 

 

Required Reading: American Revolution

8. What was the Boston Tea Party and why did it occur? What were the Intolerable Acts?

 

9. Who were the minutemen and what was the reason for their name?

10. Why did France provide vital support for the Revolutionary War? Which two other European countries provided support besides France?

11. Where was the last major battle of the Revolutionary War fought? Who was the commander of the British forces at the battle?

 

 

Required Reading: French Revolution:

12. What is the Reign of Terror?

 

13. What building was captured by Parisians on July 14, 1789?

14. What was the slogan of the Republic?

15. Who ended the revolution by seizing control of the government on Nov 9, 1799?

 

 

Required Reading: Napoléon I:

 

16. Who was the wife of Napoléon Bonaparte?

17. What did Napoléon revise with the Code Civil? What did these revised items incorporate? Give some examples.

18. What title did Napoléon receive in 1804?

19. Where was Napoléon sent on April 6, 1814?

20. What was the name of the English general credited with defeating Napoléon at Waterloo? To which island was Napoléon exiled following the battle?

 

Required Reading: Revolution of 1848:

21. What was the Revolution of 1848 and was it successful? What did it achieve?

 

 

 

Required Reading: Revolution in Latin America:
Read the following subsections: The conquest of the American Indians through and including Caudillismo.

 

 

22. Who are the mestizaje?

 

23. What event in Europe triggered the movement toward independence in Latin America?

 

 

Required Reading: The Mexican War:

24. What were the two aims of the Mexican War?

 

25. What was Manifest Destiny?

 

**************************************************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


16.03 Revolution Outline Assignment(WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 35 minutes

16.03 Revolution Outline Free men of color demand that France abolish slavery throughout its empire, 1794: Wikimedia Commons, Charles Thévenin, public domainFree men of color demand that France abolish slavery throughout its empire, 1794: Wikimedia Commons, Charles Thévenin, public domain

Assignment instructions: Prepare a brief listing of events and causes that lead to the outbreak of war for each of the three conflicts:

(1) English Civil War
(2) American Revolution
(3) French Revolution.

Add events to the outline that increase the conflict and those that help to resolve the conflict. Place a plus (+) sign next to those points that you feel that increased the conflict and a minus (-) sign next to those that helped to resolve it.

Please include at least 10 points for each conflict.  

Be thorough so that you are able to obtain and present a very clear idea showing how each conflict started and resolved.

You will also need to include a Works Cited page to show where you got your information.  

Submit your assignment to your instructor.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


16.04 Revolution Survey Assignment(WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 60 minutes

Assignment 16.4: Revolution Survey:
US Marines in Iraq, ca. 2005: Wikimedia Commons, USMC image, public domainUS Marines in Iraq, ca. 2005: Wikimedia Commons, USMC image, public domain
Assignment instructions:

The purpose of the survey is to determine the reasons that people have for armed conflict and determine the best ways to resolve such conflict as quickly as possible.

Design survey questions that will assist you in drawing conclusions regarding reasons for fighting and lead to decisions concerning the true value of conflict.

 

Your questions should start at the general level (wars, revolutions or conflict in general) and progress to more focused and specific questions (maybe about different, specific wars or revolutions). *Hint: Questions that request brief responses work best. Narrow your survey to ten questions.

Give the survey to at least ten junior high or high school students and ten adults. Select the people you survey randomly from a given population so that you have a representative sampling of opinion. Do not give the survey only to friends and close associates.

Tabulate the results of the survey. Create a table or spreadsheet showing the percent for each response for young people, for adults, and combined.

 

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


16.05 Graph Assignment(WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 25 minutes

Assignment 16.05: Graph:

Assignment instructions:
Using the information that you have gathered in your survey from 16.04 create a graph that shows the results of your survey.

The graph needs to be computer generated, and professional looking. Please make sure that it has all of the appropriate information from your survey needed.

 

Grading criteria-

 

Does your graph look neat, nice and is understandable?
Does your graph contain the relevant and pertinent information collected during your survey?
Does the information from your survey and your graph match up?
Does the graph help to show that the purpose of the survey was to determine the reasons that people have for armed conflict and determine the best ways to resolve such conflict as quickly as possible?

 

Click next and submit your graph to your instructor.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


16.06 Armed Conflict Essay Assignment(WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 40 minutes

Assignment 16.06:

Assignment instructions:

Armed Conflict Essay: Prepare an essay that summarizes your survey results. Include the data you gathered from your reading and study concerning the English, French, and American conflicts. Compare the historical data you have collected with the results of your survey and draw some conclusions regarding causes of conflict and steps to resolve it.

Write an introductory paragraph explaining the purposes of your survey, and why this topic is important.

 

Write at least one paragraph summarizing information about the historical conflicts you studied in this unit, and what we can learn from the causes and results of those conflicts.

Write a paragraph explaining the results of your survey, and what conclusions you think you can draw from this survey. What do you think might have affected people's responses to your questions?

Write a paragraph evaluating your survey questions, and suggesting changes that might improve them. Which questions were best?
General Mack surrenders to Napoleon at Ulm, 20 October 1805.: Wikimedia Commons, Paul-Émile Boutigny, public domainGeneral Mack surrenders to Napoleon at Ulm, 20 October 1805.: Wikimedia Commons, Paul-Émile Boutigny, public domain
Write a concluding paragraph comparing the results of your survey with historical conflicts and resolutions. What hope is there for preventing future conflicts? What can individuals or countries do to prevent or resolve conflicts?

 

 

Grading: Each paragraph is worth 4 points completed. Make sure that you follow the instructions and answer all the questions asked.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


16.07 Review Quiz Unit 15 and Unit 16

computer-scored 11 points possible 15 minutes

Assessment 16.07 Review Quiz Unit 15 and Unit 16

Complete

15 and 16 Review Quiz
Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment, Revolution in Europe and Northern America

This assignment is found under Review Quiz Unit 15 and Unit 16 on the course website. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do and will provide immediate feedback.

Complete this assignment after you finish reading lesson 15 and lesson 16 coursework..

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


17.00 Industrial Revolution Introduction (WorldCiv3)

The Industrial Revolution (1750 - 1914)
Mining coal to power factories, 1871: Wikimedia Commons, The Graphic, public domainMining coal to power factories, 1871: Wikimedia Commons, The Graphic, public domain

Unit 17: Industrial Revolution

Time Period: (1750-1914)

Geographic Areas: Europe and the United States

Unit 17 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the history of Europe and the United States. General assignment information is as follows:

Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on information taken from articles that contain the required readings for the course. The articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

Editorial: Student created article that discusses a topic from the unit that combines facts and student opinion.

Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the unit. Points are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information, or any other topic,
feel free to contact your instructor.

Objectives:

Identify the major technological advances of the Industrial Revolution and evaluate their effects on society and philosophical thought.
Analyze the economic transformation of production and distribution of goods in Europe.

  • Identify key individuals and their accomplishments during the Industrial Revolution.
  • Identify positive and negative consequences that followed the initial accomplishments.
  • Explore the philosophical thought of this time period and relate it to the events of the revolution.
  • Compare and contrast capitalism and socialism.
  • Explain the significance of the agricultural revolution.
  • Investigate the impact of the first and second Industrial Revolutions.
  • Draw conclusions about the impact of industrialization and technological advancement on society.

17.01 Industrial Revolution Journal Assignment(WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

"Life is not simple, and therefore history, which is past life, is not simple. -David Shannon" (Szasz 1) Szasz, Ferenc M. "Quotations about History." Williamcronon.net. William Cronon, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2005. Web. 20 Dec. 2012.

 1890's adding machine: Wikimedia Commons, trekphiler, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported1890's adding machine: Wikimedia Commons, trekphiler, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Assignment 17.01:

Journal Entry: How has technology affected your life? Has it complicated it or simplified it or both? What negative effects of technology have you encountered? Do you think its overall effect is good or bad? Submit your entry to your instructor.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


17.02 Industrial Revolution Reading Challenge (WorldCiv3)

Remember, you must log in to Utah Online Library before using these WorldBook Online links. From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings. The Uah Online Library log-in name and password is available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

teacher-scored 30 points possible 30 minutes

To submit this assignment:
1. Create the assignment in a word processing document - copy and paste in the questions between the two lines of asterisks, below. You will want to save a copy of the questions and answers to be able to study from for the final. SAVE YOUR WORK!
2. When you have finished, click “next” at the bottom of the screen. On the following screen you will find a submit this assignment tab.
3. Copy and paste the assignment into the text box and click [Save changes].
---
Assignment instructions:

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings".

Instructions for Required Reading Access

The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators, and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study.

Accessing the readings is a bit tricky but it is possible. To access the readings you must do the following:

1) Open "a new Tab" on your internet browser and paste the web address for Pioneer Library Online found at the bottom of the assignment page.

The login page will appear. The user name and password is available from your local school librarian or from your EHS teacher.

The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: World Book Encyclopedia. The page will open in a new window or a new tab. You can close the new World Book window/tab but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab or you will NOT be able to access the readings, as this exits you from the Pioneer Library.
Now you are ready to access the readings.

2) Links to the Required Readings topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. You can either copy and paste the link into your browser, or just click on it and it should open up to the location needed for the current assignment. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information.

3) In many cases you will not be reading entire articles. The subsection/subsections of each article to be read is/are indicated below the name of the "Required Reading". Read only the subsections indicated. If there is no indication you should read the entire article.

4) If you have any further questions feel free to contact your instructor by email.

Each question is worth 2 points. Partial credit will be given for incomplete answers.

 

.HMS Beagle in the Straits of Magellan: Wikimedia Commons, R. T. Pritchett, public domainHMS Beagle in the Straits of Magellan: Wikimedia Commons, R. T. Pritchett, public domain

***********************************************************************************************
Required Reading: The Industrial Revolution:

 

 

1. What two developments created an enormous increase in the production of goods during the Industrial Revolution?

2. What were the positive and negative effects of the Industrial Revolution on peoples' lives?

 

 

Required Reading: Scientific advances of the 1800's:

 

 

3. What was the name of the naturalist that sailed on the H.M.S. Beagle?

4. What is natural selection?

 

 

Required Reading: Medicine:
Read the following subsections and paragraphs:
The beginnings of modern research through and including The medical revolution (end of 2nd paragraph)

 

 

5. Who developed the first immunization? What disease did it prevent?

6. Which two scientists established the microbial theory of disease or the germ theory?

7. What was the name of the surgeon who used carbolic acid to sterilize surgical wounds?

 

 

Required Reading: Economic Thought:
Read the following subsections:
Early theories through and including Karl Marx and Communism.

 

 

8. Who is considered the father of modern economics?

 

 

Required Reading: Socialism:
Read the following subsections:
Socialism through and including Moderate socialism

 

9. What is Socialism?

 

10. What was the name of the most influential work of Karl Marx?

 

 

Required Reading: Romanticism:

 

 

11. The Romantic movement inspired what type of novel?

12. Who idealized the idea of the noble savage?

 

 

Required Reading: Music:
Read the following subsections:
The Classical period through and including Igor Stravinsky

 

13. What was the most popular instrument in the Romantic era that favored solo?

 

 

 

Required Readings:Realism; Impressionism:

 

14. Edgar Degas, Claude Monet and Pierre Auguste Renoir were all part of what artistic movement?

 

 

 

Required Reading: Postimpressionism:

 

15. Paul Cézanne, Paul Gauguin and Vincent van Gogh were all part of what artistic movement?

 

 

 

 

********************************************************************************************

 

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


17.03 Industrial Revolution Editorial (WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 30 minutes

17.03 Industrial Revolution EditorialMississippi steam boat 1876: Wikimedia Commons, Popular Science Monthly, public domainMississippi steam boat 1876: Wikimedia Commons, Popular Science Monthly, public domain

Assignment instructions:

 

Compose an editorial ( an editorial is an article stating your opinion on facts gained through study of a specific topic ) for one of the following topics.

Write the article as though you were a newspaper editor at the time of its occurrence:

  • the revolution in engines and other modes of transportation

  • the revolution in chemistry & physics

  • the revolution in biology & medicine

  • the development of new social theories

  • the origins of new economic systems

  • revolution in the arts

Be sure to include the following concepts in your editorial:

1) methods used by the key figures

2) outcomes of their work,

3) your opinion of the importance of their work 

4) names of the key figures involved.

Submit the completed editorial to your instructor.

 
7.5- Accomplished
5- Satisfactory
3-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.
Ideas The opinion of the work is easily understood and found in the article. The opinion of the work is easily found in the article and can be deciphered after some thought.. The opinion of the work is developing. The opinion of the writer about the work is not contained.
Originality The project shows significant evidence of originality and inventiveness. The majority of the content and many of the ideas are fresh, original, and inventive. It really sells the major idea/product. The project shows some evidence of originality and inventiveness. The work is an extensive collection and rehash of other people's ideas, products and images. There is little evidence of new thought or inventiveness. The work is a minimal collection or rehash of other people's ideas, products and images. There is no evidence of new thought.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


17.04 Book Recommendations

These are book recommendations based upon the subject matter.

If you happen to be someone who enjoys reading, the following books can usually be found at your local school or public library. They may interest you if you like learning about this time period. If you have any books that you have read that would fit this section, feel free to message me about them.

The Jungle by Upton Sinclair

This book highlights the rise of the industrial era in the United States. However, it is an interesting read about immigration, class structure and socialism. The author, Sinclair, originally wrote the book after spending time with a Lithuanian immigrant family in the Chicago meat packing district. His goal was to explain how socialism would help them have a better life. It led to such an outrage that the F.D.A. was formed. People wouldn’t eat meat for months after reading this book. As a result, I recommend a strong stomach, and don’t read this book after lunch.

Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens was not a fan of the industrial revolution. This book highlights the life of Oliver, an orphan boy who lives in a workhouse. Mr. Dickens shows the evil side of the industrial revolution with the child labor, crime and their dirty results. This classic novel will have you wondering about what else took place during the industrial revolution.

Hard Times by Charles Dickens

This book also outlines the hard lives of the poor during the industrial revolution. Mr. Dickens uses his fiction to criticize the injustices of the world. The plot is light and funny, but you still get a dose of historical context as well.

18.00 Growth of Democracy Introduction (WorldCiv3)

Map of electoral democracies, 2006: Wikimedia Commons, Freedom House, ACNTX, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedMap of electoral democracies, 2006: Wikimedia Commons, Freedom House, ACNTX, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedGrowth of Democracy (1815-1914)

During man's early experiments with democracy in small tribal villages and in Greece, news spread slowly and only over a relatively small area. However, with the advent of the printing press, faster transportation and more widespread literacy, ideas could spread more quickly. When the United States formed a democratic republic, it wasn't long until most Europeans knew about it. The concepts of choosing ones own government leaders and having the protections of law, were very appealing to people struggling to survive under absolute monarchies. Democracy spread to many European countries. Today, the internet can transmit ideas around the world almost instantly, and revolutions against totalitarian regimes still break out. No system of government is perfect, but the basic concept of all people having a say in determining laws and leadership of their own country has become more and more widely accepted and even sought after.

Unit 18: Growth of Democracy

Time Period: (1815-1914)

Geographic Areas: Europe and North America?

Unit 18 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the history of Europe and North America?. General assignment information is as follows:

Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on information taken from articles that contain the required readings for the course. The articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

Essay: A five-paragraph essay that ties together information from all topics and activities studied in the unit.

Political Cartoon: Student created cartoon(s) poking fun at a political topic(s) discussed in the unit.

Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the unit. Points are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information, or any other topic,
feel free to contact your instructor.

Objectives:
Analyze the development of classical political systems.
Investigate the rise and development of the modern European political system.
Assess the importance of intellectual and cultural change on early modern society.
Investigate the role of revolution in the establishment of governmental systems.

Learn the history of the development of democracy.

18.01 Democracy Journal Assignment(WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

"History is, in its essentials, the science of change. It knows and it teaches that it is impossible to find two events that are ever exactly alike, because the conditions from which they spring are never identical. -Marc Bloch" (Szasz 1) Szasz, Ferenc M. "Quotations about History." Williamcronon.net. William Cronon, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2005. Web. 20 Dec. 2012.

Assignment 18.01:

Journal Entry: What motivates people to want to change how the government extends certain rights to the citizens of its country? Under what circumstances do you think that this want for change can be good or bad for a country? What methods do you think would be the best to create the wanted change without creating anarchy throughout the country? Submit your journal entry to your instructor.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


18.02 Growth of Democracy Reading Challenge (WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 18 points possible 25 minutes

Greek stele personifying citizens being crowned by democracy: Wikimedia Commons, Marsyas, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 GenericGreek stele personifying citizens being crowned by democracy: Wikimedia Commons, Marsyas, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic
18.2 Growth of Democracy Reading Challenge

Assignment instructions:

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings" for Chapter 18.

1. Copy and paste the questions between the two lines of asterisks below into a word processing document. (You will want to save this assignment onto your computer to study from later. You will also want the questions to help you study!) SAVE YOUR WORK!
2. When you have finished, click “next” at the bottom of the screen. On the following screen you will find a "submit this" assignment tab.
3. Copy and paste the assignment into the text box and click [Save changes].

Submit your assignment to your instructor.

Each question is worth 2 points. Partial credit will be given for incomplete answers.

****************************************************************************************

Required Reading: Development of Democracy:
Read the following subsections: Origins of democracy through and including The spread of democracy (end of 2nd paragraph).

 

1. What type of democracy was practiced in the ancient Greek city-state of Athens?

 

 

2. What Roman statesman suggested that people have natural rights that every state must respect?

 

3. During the Middle Ages, all Christians were considered citizens of what two kingdoms?

 

4. What did the feudal court system lead to ?

 

5. What was the Magna Carta, and what demands did it support?

 

6. What changes to English law were a result of the Petition of Right and the English Bill of Rights? What war established the supremacy of Parliament in England?

 

7. Who declared that people "have a duty to obey only legitimate powers"?

 

8. Why was the electoral college established? Why did the Founding Fathers distrust direct democracy?

 

9. What is globalization?

 

**********************************************************************************************

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links.

From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings.

The Pioneer Library log-in name and password is available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

18.03 Democracy Essay Assignment(WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 35 minutes

British Houses of Parliament, 2008: Wikimedia Commons, Maurice from Zoetermeer, Netherlands, CC Attribution 2.0 GenericBritish Houses of Parliament, 2008: Wikimedia Commons, Maurice from Zoetermeer, Netherlands, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic

Assignment 18.03: Democracy Essay:

Assignment instructions:

1. Gather information from the Required Reading for Chapter 18: "Development of Democracy" and other sources of your choosing that discuss the growth of democracy in Great Britain, France, and the United States.

2. Write an original five-paragraph essay with in-text citations describing what took place in each country to develop a democratic system of government and important challenges, set-backs or difficulties during the process. Please view the instructions below for the specifics of what you need to do for this essay.

First paragraph: Introduction: A thesis statement is needed here explaining your following paragraphs. You also need to define what democracy is in this paragraph so that the reader of your essay knows what you are talking about throughout your paper.

Second paragraph: Please describe the development of democracy in Great Britain (England).

Third paragraph: Please describe the development of democracy in the United States.

Fourth paragraph: Please describe the development of democracy in France.

Fifth paragraph: Conclusion: Don't forget to restate your thesis in this paragraph. Wrap up all of your loose ends and tie each paragraph together in the conclusion.

At the end list your sources on a Works Cited page, including internet url's and book titles/authors using correct MLA citations. (You can visit www.easybib.com to help you create citations. Feel free to visit the discussions section of this class and check out "Citations and MLA help" as well if you aren't sure how to do MLA citations.) 3. Submit the essay to your instructor.

 
5
4
3
2
1
Ideas The major idea is clear and easily identified. All important ideas and terms are well defined. Major ideas are decipherable. Most ideas and terms are defined. Some major ideas are identified. One or two major ideas are identified. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. There is no central theme or purpose.
Organization The essay is plainly divided into at least 5 major paragraphs. It is easy to see that the student can organize a 5 paragraph essay. Essay is divided into paragraphs that can be deciphered. Some paragraphs lead the reader through the paper. Paragraphs are missing, but it does follow the assignment. Introduction or conclusion is missing. Paragraphing is disorganized. Does not follow paper assignment.
Presentation The Works Cited page is adequate and documented accurately, without the use of wikipedia. There are in-text citations in the essay. The Works Cited page is mostly adequate and many of the citations are correct. All sources are correctly cited but from Wikipedia. All sources are incorrectly cited and many are from Wikipedia. There is no Works Cited page.
Flow The major idea is backed up by the supporting information and that information is accurate. The major idea has some supporting information that is either weak or inaccurate. The major idea has some back up information but is mostly left on its own, or is incorrect. Awkward insertion of wording that does not help the information to flow. There is no major idea. Supporting information does not exist.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of punctuation, grammar, usage, and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message. There are no spelling mistakes or punctuation errors present. Less than three spelling, punctuation or other convention errors are present. Three to six spelling errors or other conventions present. Six to ten spelling errors or other conventions present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage and grammar and/or paragraphing distract the reader from the text and make it difficult to read. 16 or more spelling errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


18.04 Political Cartoon (WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 50 minutes

The US (Uncle Sam) and Great Britain each standing ready to "help" Baby Canada, just three years after Canada became independent: Wikimedia Commons, 1870, public domainThe US (Uncle Sam) and Great Britain each standing ready to "help" Baby Canada, just three years after Canada became independent: Wikimedia Commons, 1870, public domain

18.04 Political Cartoon

Political cartoons or editorial cartoons are drawn commentary on something that is happening or that has happened. They have been popular over the years because they appeal to all levels of readers. They also will not be fully understandable by someone who doesn't know the situation and background. It is almost like a puzzle for your brain! In this assignment you have the opportunity to create a cartoon using issues discussed in Unit 18.

Assignment instructions:

Create one political cartoon featuring all of the countries discussed in unit 18 (Great Britain, France, and the United States) OR create three political cartoons: one for each country. Make sure to pick one of the topics that can be easily identified from the government's point of view, or the reformer's point of view. (In other words: You can create a cartoon that features an idea common to all three countries, OR you can create three separate cartoons that poke fun at a different political idea related to each country.) If you would like more information regarding the making of political cartoons, see the link below. There is also a link to current political cartoons in case you need an example. The grading will be based on the following rubric.

 
5- Accomplished
3-Developing
1-Beginning
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.
Ideas The opinion of the work is easily understood and found in the cartoon. The opinion of the work is developing. The opinion of the writer about the work is not contained.
Originality The project shows significant evidence of originality and inventiveness. The majority of the content and many of the ideas are fresh, original, and inventive. The work is an extensive collection and rehash of other people's ideas, products, and images. There is little evidence of new thought or inventiveness. The work is a minimal collection or rehash of other people's ideas, products, and images. There is no evidence of new thought.
Organization The sequence of information is logical and intuitive. The product is professional and high quality. The sequence of information is somewhat logical. It was attempted to make the project professional. The sequence of information is not logical. Unprofessional and not cleanly created.
Countries The cartoon features all of the required countries. (Great Britain, France and the United States) OR There are 3 cartoons with one for each required country. Some of the required countries are missing. The instructions regarding required countries are not followed at all.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


18.05 Review Quiz Unit 17 and Unit 18

computer-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

Assessment 18.05 Review Quiz Unit 17 and Unit 18

Complete

17 and 18 Review Quiz
Industrial Revolution and Democracy

This assignment is found under Review Quiz Unit 17 and Unit 18 on the course website. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do and provides immediate feedback.

Complete this assignment after you finish reading lesson 17 and lesson 18 coursework..

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


19.00 Nationalism Introduction (WorldCiv3)

Bochnia massacre - German soldiers execute 56 Polish citizens, 1939: Wikimedia Commons, public domainBochnia massacre - German soldiers execute 56 Polish citizens, 1939: Wikimedia Commons, public domainSpread of Nationalism

Countries or nations, as we think of them today, are a relatively new idea in history. Until the past two hundred years or so, most people identified with their local region, town, church, extended family, culture or tribe more than they did with a larger political unit. Kings, emperors or war lords ruled over as much territory as they could conquer and defend so national boundaries were always changing. Transportation and communication were slow enough that most people didn't know much about political events that occurred beyond fifty or a hundred miles away.

With the spread of literacy and the invention of the telegraph, railroads, steam boats, telephone, radio and automobiles, all that began to change. Political leaders worked at creating a sense of national identity, pride and cohesion. Unfortunately, this was often done at the expense of other cultures or countries, encouraging the human tendency to believe that 'we' are superior to 'them.' It is much easier to justify killing or exploiting other people if we believe that those 'others' are not like 'us'--and are maybe even sub-human, evil or incapable of intelligence or mercy. Nationalism promotes the sense that one nation (along with the people of that nation) is naturally better than others. From there, it's just another step or two to believe that the superior nation deserves to rule over others, and war is a likely outcome.

Unit 19: Nationalism

Time Period: (1848-1914)

Geographic Areas: Europe

Unit 19 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the history of Europe. General assignment information is as follows:

Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on information taken from articles that contain the required readings for the course. The articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

Posters: Students create posters that depict events and individuals discussed in the unit.

Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the unit. Points are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information, or any other topic,
feel free to contact your instructor.

Objectives:

Investigate the rise and development of the modern European political system.

Analyze the political and economic global issues in the first half of the 20th century.

Investigate the impact of totalitarianism on Europe, i.e., Stalinism, Italian fascism, German National Socialism.
Identify nationalistic movements and major proponents of nationalism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
Compare and contrast the ways that nationalism advanced in Italy, Germany, Russia, and Eastern Europe.

19.01 Nationalism Journal Assignment(WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

19.01:

Journal Entry:

1. Little children sometimes taunt each other with the phrases, "My daddy can beat up your daddy," or "My house is better than your house." To what extent is it good to have loyalty to a family, cause, state or country? When can it become dangerous to do so?

2. Find three current news stories (published within the past three years) that advocate nationalism, and create MLA citations for each article. (You can visit "citations and MLA help" in the discussions section for help!) Paste those three citations at the end of the journal along with a short summary of each article.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


19.02 Nationalism Reading Challenge (WorldCiv3)

Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links.

From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings.

The Pioneer Library log-in name and password are available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

teacher-scored 40 points possible 30 minutes

Caricature of Alfred Dreyfus, 1899: Wikimedia Commons, public domainCaricature of Alfred Dreyfus, 1899: Wikimedia Commons, public domain19.02 Nationalism Reading Challenge

Assignment instructions:

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings" for Chapter 19. Submit your assignment to your instructor.

Each question is worth 2 points. Partial credit will be given for incomplete answers.

***************************************************************************************

Required Reading: Nationalism:

 

1. What are the three characteristics of a nation-state?

 

2. What is the doctrine of national self-determination?

 

 

 

Required Reading: France:
Read the following subsections: The revolutions of 1830 and 1848 through and including The Third Republic.

3. Who was overthrown in the July Revolution of 1830 in France? What was the outcome of the February Revolution of 1848 ?

 

 

4. What territories were lost in the Franco-Prussian War?

 

5. What was the Dreyfus affair and how did it strengthen support for the republic?

 

 

 

Required Reading: Germany
Read the following subsections: The revolution of 1848 through and including Foreign policy.

6. What was the effect of the French revolution of 1848 in Germany? What was the Frankfurt Assembly?

 

 

7. Who was Otto Bismarck? What did he create by winning three short wars? Who was the first kaiser (emperor) of the new German Empire?

 

8. What countries were the members of the Triple Alliance? What countries were the members of the Triple Entente?

 

 

 

Required Reading: Russia
Read the following subsections: Alexander I through and including The Revolution of 1905.

9. What reforms did Alexander I introduce in Russia?

 

 

10. What was the outcome of invasion of Moscow by Napoleon Bonaparte's forces in 1812?

 

11. Who were the Decembrists and what did they do?

 

12. Who became known as the "policeman of Europe"? Why was he known by this name?

 

13. What reforms did Alexander II introduce? How was he killed?

 

14. What were the three political movements the attracted the discontented Russians? Who were the Bolsheviks? Who were the Mensheviks?

 

15. Who was the czar when the Revolution of 1905 occurred? What is a soviet? What is the Duma?

 

*********************************************************************************************

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


19.03 Nationalism Posters (WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 90 minutes

Decembrist revolt 1825: Wikimedia Commons, Vasily F. Timm, public domainDecembrist revolt 1825: Wikimedia Commons, Vasily F. Timm, public domain

19.03 Nationalism Posters: Create four posters, one for each of the countries or areas (Italy, Germany, Russia, Eastern Europe), illustrating key events and individuals involved in moves toward 18th century nationalism.

You may draw this yourself or include images you find in books or on the internet, but create original arrangements and text. Attach and submit your assignment to your instructor. Grades given will be based on the rubric below.

 
5- Accomplished
3-Developing
1-Beginning
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.
Ideas The key events and individuals are highlighted and show the country's developing nationalism. The opinion of the work is developing. The opinion of the writer about the work is not contained.
Originality The project shows significant evidence of originality and inventiveness. The majority of the content and many of the ideas are fresh, original, and inventive. The work is an extensive collection and rehash of other people's ideas, products and images. There is little evidence of new thought or inventiveness. The work is a minimal collection or rehash of other people's ideas, products and images. There is no evidence of new thought.
Organization The sequence of information is logical and intuitive. The product is professional and high quality. The sequence of information is somewhat logical. It was attempted to make the project professional. The sequence of information is not logical. Unprofessional and not cleanly created.
Countries There are four posters featuring all of the required countries. (Italy, Germany, Russia and Eastern Europe.) Some of the required countries are missing. The instructions regarding required countries are not followed at all.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


 

 

In the list labeled AP European History.  Choose presentation #40.

This powerpoint goes through nationalism during the mid 1800s (19c).  It will help you understand the concept needed for the poster assignment.

20.00 Africa/Imperialism Introduction (WorldCiv3)

Africa in the Age of Imperialism (1700 - 1914)"Description of a slave ship," wood engraving, 1789: Wikimedia Commons, unknown artist, public domain"Description of a slave ship," wood engraving, 1789: Wikimedia Commons, unknown artist, public domain

Unit 20: Africa and the Age of Imperialism

Time Period: (1700-1914)

Geographic Areas: Africa

Unit 20 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the history of European imperialism and its effect on the peoples of Africa.

General assignment information is as follows:

Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on information taken from articles that contain the required readings for the course. The articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

Essay: A five-paragraph essay that ties together information from a specific topic and readings presented in the unit.

Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the unit. Points are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information, or any other topic,
feel free to contact your instructor.

Objective:
Evaluate the impact of Western imperialism in Africa

Examine the impact of Western imperialism on Africa.
Study the pros and cons of imperialism in the late 19th century through a study of original source materials and commentaries.

20.01 African Journal Assignment(WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

Immigration document for Jan Johannes van den Berg, born in the Netherlands, and moved his family to South Africa: Wikimedia Commons, Hettie Dreyer, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedImmigration document for Jan Johannes van den Berg, born in the Netherlands, and moved his family to South Africa: Wikimedia Commons, Hettie Dreyer, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Assignment 20.01:

Journal Entry: Imagine yourself moving into a different country. Your culture and traditions are different from those in the new country. What kinds of conflicts do you think could arise because of the difference between the two cultures? What do you think could be done to lessen the culture shock that you and your family would go through in this new environment? Do you think you should try to change others' ways of life to be more like your own? Submit your entry to your instructor.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


20.02 Africa/Imperialism Reading Challenge (WorldCiv3)

Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links.

From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings.

The Pioneer Library log-in name and password are available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

teacher-scored 24 points possible 35 minutes

To submit this assignment:

1. Create the assignment in a word processing document;
2. When you have finished click [Edit my submission];
3. Copy and paste the assignment into the text box and click [Save changes].

---

Assignment instructions:Arab slave-trading caravan moving black African slaves across the Sahara: Wikimedia Commons, public domainArab slave-trading caravan moving black African slaves across the Sahara: Wikimedia Commons, public domain

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings" for Chapter 20.

Instructions for Required Reading Access
The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators, and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study.

Accessing the readings is a bit tricky but it is possible. To access the readings you must do the following:

1) Open 'a new Tab' on your internet browser and paste the following web address:

 

http://pioneer.uen.org/k12/

The log-in page will appear. In the right-hand column type the information in the boxes as shown below

Log-in Name: pioneer
Password: time
Click the LOG-IN graphic

 

The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: "World Book Encyclopedia." The page will open in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings.

 

Now you are ready to access the readings.

2) Links to the Required Readings topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information on the second pages.

3) In many cases you will not be reading entire articles. The subsection/subsections of each article to be read is/are indicated below the name of the "Required Reading". Read only the subsections indicated. If there is no indication you should read the entire article.

4) If you have any further questions feel free to contact your instructor by email.

Each question is worth 2 points. Partial credit will be given for incomplete answers.

 

 

*************************************************************************************

Required Reading: Slave Trade: Beginnings:

 

1. From whom did the Euopeans purchase African slaves? What did the Europeans trade for slaves?

 

 

2. What was the Middle Passage?

 

3. What was loose packing? What was tight packing?

 

 

 

Required Reading: Slave Trade and Colonization:
Read the following subsections:
The Atlantic slave trade through and including Colonial rule.

 

4. Muslim reformers declared what in 1804? What did it help establish?

 

 

5. What is the Mfecane? Where did it occur?

 

6. Who was Muhammad Ali and what did he do?

 

7. Who were the Boers or Afrikaners? Where were they from and where did they settle?

 

8. What was the Berlin Conference and what did it establish?

 

 

 

Required Reading: Anglo-Zulu War:

 

9. Where did the Anglo-Zulu War take place? What was the reason for the conflict?

 

"Saving the guns at Colenso", Anglo-Boer War, ca. 1900: Wikimedia Commons, Sidney Paget, public domain"Saving the guns at Colenso", Anglo-Boer War, ca. 1900: Wikimedia Commons, Sidney Paget, public domain

 

Required Reading: Anglo-Boer War:

 

10. What were the Anglo-Boer Wars and why were they fought?

 

 

11. Who were the Uitlanders?

 

12. What was the outcome of the Anglo-Boer Wars?

******************************************************************************************

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


20.03 Imperialism Essay (WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 30 minutes

20.03 Imperialism Essay British colonial possessions in Africa highllighted in pink and red, ca. 1913: Wikimedia Commons, Eric Gaba, P. S. Burton, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 GenericBritish colonial possessions in Africa highllighted in pink and red, ca. 1913: Wikimedia Commons, Eric Gaba, P. S. Burton, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic

Assignment instructions:

Read "The White Man's Burden" by Rudyard Kipling and the selection by Mark Twain which comment on American imperialism--the take over of the Phillipines after the Spanish-American War. Write an original essay (at least 450 words) discussing your views on imperialism. Include at least one relevant direct quote from Kipling and one from Twain, and your reactions. Remember to use specific details, examples, evidence, and at least one source.

  • Introduction: a paragraph explaining western imperialism in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries
  • At least one paragraph about the arguments used at the time to justify imperialism. Include at least one direct quote from Kipling or Twain.
  • At least one paragraph about the arguments used at the time against imperialism. Include at least one direct quote from Kipling or Twain.
  • At least one paragraph explaining how an African might have felt about imperialism in the 1800's or early 1900's, and why.
  • Conclusion: A paragraph summarizing the effects of imperialism, and the relevance to present-day times.

Submit your completed essay to your instructor.

 
6
5
4
3
2
Ideas The major idea is clear and easily identified. All important ideas and terms are well defined. Major ideas are decipherable. Most ideas and terms are defined. Some major ideas are identified. One or two major ideas are identified. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. There is no central theme or purpose.
Organization The essay is plainly divided into at least 5 major paragraphs. It is easy to see that the student can organize a 5 paragraph essay. Essay is divided into paragraphs that can be deciphered. Some paragraphs lead the reader through the paper. Paragraphs are missing, but it does follow the assignment. Introduction or conclusion is missing. Paragraphing is disorganized. Does not follow paper assignment.
Presentation The Works Cited page is adequate and documented accurately, without the use of wikipedia. The Works Cited page is mostly adequate and many of the citations are correct. All sources are correctly cited but from Wikipedia. All sources are incorrectly cited and many are from Wikipedia. There is no Works Cited page.
Flow The major idea is backed up by the supporting information and that information is accurate with the use of in-text citations. The major idea has some supporting information that is either weak or inaccurate. The major idea has some back up information but is mostly left on its own, or is incorrect. There are some in-text citations but they are incorrect. Awkward insertion of wording that does not help the information to flow. There is no major idea. Supporting information does not exist. There are no in-text citations.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of punctuation, grammar, usage, and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message. There are no spelling mistakes or punctuation errors present. Less than three spelling, punctuation or other convention errors are present. Three to six spelling errors or other conventions present. Six to ten spelling errors or other conventions present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage and grammar and/or paragraphing distract the reader from the text and make it difficult to read. 16 or more spelling errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


20.04 Review Quiz Unit 19 and Unit 20

computer-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

Assessment 20.04 Review Quiz Unit 19 and Unit 20

Complete

19 and 20 Review Quiz
Nationalism and African Imperialism

This assignment is found under Review Quiz Unit 19 and Unit 20 on the course website. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do and provides immediate feedback.

Complete this assignment after you finish reading lesson 19 and lesson 20 coursework..

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


21.00 Asia and the West Introduction (WorldCiv3)

Asia and the West (1650 - 1920)Imperialism in China around 1900: the bear representing Russia in the north, the lion representing the UK in south China, frog representing France in southeast Asia, American eagle representing the United States: Wikimedia Commons, unknown artist, public domainImperialism in China around 1900: the bear representing Russia in the north, the lion representing the UK in south China, frog representing France in southeast Asia, American eagle representing the United States: Wikimedia Commons, unknown artist, public domain

Unit 21: Asia and the West

Time Period: (?)

Geographic Areas: India, China and Japan

Unit 21 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the history of India, China and Japan. General assignment information is as follows--

Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on information taken from articles that contain the required readings for the course. The articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

Geospatial Map: Students are provided with the tools to research information and create an animated map that depicts visual information on a selected topic. Questions are included that students will research and answer.

Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the unit. Points are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information, or any other topic,
feel free to contact your instructor.

Objective:
Evaluate the impact of Western imperialism in Asia and the Pacific.

Compare the reactions of China, India, and Japan to foreign domination.
Describe the influence Europeans had on the Asian countries.

21.01 Asia Journal Assignment(WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

Kampa Dzong, Tibet, 1904, intended site of British negotiations with China and Tibet: Wikimedia Commons, John C. White, public domainKampa Dzong, Tibet, 1904, intended site of British negotiations with China and Tibet: Wikimedia Commons, John C. White, public domain

Unit 21.01:

Journal Entry: What motivates people to take control of others by any means possible? When have others tried to dominate you? Can you think of a situation in which you felt the need to dominate others around you? What beliefs do you have that promote the desire you have to dominate others? What could be done to lessen the desire to dominate others around you? Submit the entry to your instructor.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


21.02 Asia and the West Reading Challenge (WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 36 points possible 30 minutes

To submit this assignment:

1. Create the assignment in a word processing document;
2. When you have finished click [Edit my submission];
3. Copy and paste the assignment into the text box and click [Save changes].

---

Assignment instructions:

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings" for Chapter 21.

Instructions for Required Reading Access
The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators, and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study.

Accessing the readings is a bit tricky but it is possible. To access the readings you must do the following:

1) Open "a new Tab" on your internet browser and go to Pioneer Library.

 

The login page will appear. In the right-hand column type the information in the boxes as shown below

You can get the username and password for the Pioneer Library from your teacher or your school librarian.

The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: "World Book Encyclopedia." The page will open in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab or you will NOT be able to access the readings.
Gandhi during the Salt March, March 1930, India: Wikimedia Commons, public domainGandhi during the Salt March, March 1930, India: Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Now you are ready to access the readings.

 

2) Links to the Required Readings topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links, you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information on the second pages.

3) In many cases you will not be reading entire articles. The subsection/subsections of each article to be read is/are indicated below the name of the "Required Reading." Read only the subsections indicated. If there is no indication, you should read the entire article.

4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor by email.

 

Each question is worth 2 points. Partial credit will be given for incomplete answers.
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Required Reading: India:
Read the following subsections: through and including
The coming of the Europeans through and including Rise of Indian nationalism.

 

1. What did the British victory at the Battle of Plassay begin, for the British, in India?

 

2. Who were the sepoys? What led to the Sepoy Rebellion? Was it successful?

 

3. What was the Raj? What were the princely states? What was the viceroy? What was the purpose of the residents in the princely states?

 

4. What was the Indian National Congress and who formed it? What was the All-India Muslim League?

 

5. What was the Amritsar Massacre? What occured because of it?

 

6. Who was Mohandas K. Gandhi, and what was his method for rebellion?

 

 

 

Required Reading: China:
Read the following subsections:
The early rule of the Manchus through and including The early republic

7. What is the dynastic cycle in China?

 

 

8. What is the Treaty of Nanjing? What did it provide?

 

9. What was the Taiping Rebellion?

 

10. What is the Open-Door Policy?

 

11. What is the Boxer Rebellion?

 

12. Who was the last emperor of China?

 

13. What was the Kuomintang?

 

 

 

Required Reading: Japan:

Read the following subsections:
Warring states period through and including Imperialism.

 

14. What is kabuki? what is banraku? What are ukiyo?

 

15. What is extraterritoriality?

 

16. What is the Meiji era?

 

17. What were the zaibatsu?

 

18. What three regions were the initial targets of Japanese expansion?

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links.

From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab or you will NOT be able to access the readings.

The Pioneer Library log-in name and password are available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

21.03 Asia Map (WorldCiv3)

Create a Google Earth (GE) Tour of locations you have already studied and share the GE Tour KMZ file with your teacher.

Pat Lambrose image, CC Share-AlikePat Lambrose image, CC Share-AlikeIn the next assignment you will be locating all the places listed below using Google Earth. Your final product will be a Google Earth Tour.
Countries:

_____ China
_____ India
_____ Japan
_____ Korea
_____ Mongolia
_____ Myanmar (Burma)
_____ Philippines
_____ Russia
_____ Thailand (Siam)

Water Bodies:

_____ Arabian Sea
_____ Indian Ocean
_____ Pacific Ocean
_____ South China Sea
_____ Sea of Japan

21.03 Asia Map Google Earth Tour (WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 28 points possible 60 minutes

Time to create a Google Earth Tour!

Use the Google Earth (GE) Tour above called Asia_Map_Instructions_WCQ3.kmz as a template to identify and locate 14 geographic features. Save this template to your hard drive where you will remember. Download Google Earth if you do not have the program on your computer. See links below.

Open Google Earth, then select File, Open, and browse to where you saved the Asia_Map_Instructions_WCQ3.kmz tour. Use this GE Tour template to complete your Asia Map. Enter the name of each feature next to the numbered Placemarks found in this region of the world! Once all 14 features are identified, rename this GE Tour as follows: Asia_Map_YourFirstName_YourLastName
Save your GE Tour on your hard drive.

See detailed instructions for this assignment in the PDF file listed above. The file name is Asia_Map_GE_Tour_WorldCiv_Q3.pdf. Once your GE Tour is completed, submit the Google Earth Tour KMZ file to your teacher.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


21.04 Asia Cause and Effect Study Guide & Quiz (WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 8 points possible 40 minutes

First complete this study guide. Then use your answers to complete the quiz.

Place numbers in the blanks below (1,2,3) to put the events in proper sequential order showing the cause and effect of the events. Research the events to discover the proper sequence. Use this worksheet to answer the quiz covering the topic.

1.
____ Sepoy Rebellion begins
____ Bullet cartridges were greased with beef or pork fat.
____ British set up full colonial rule in India

 

2.
____ Local industry hurt, famine.British troops storm the Taku Forts, China, in 1860, in Second Opium War.: Wikimedia Commons, William Heysham Overend, public domainBritish troops storm the Taku Forts, China, in 1860, in Second Opium War.: Wikimedia Commons, William Heysham Overend, public domain
____ Cotton was used in the British factories and the finished products were sold in India.
____ The British encouraged Indian farmers to grow cash crops instead of subsistence crops.

3.
____ Drained China of its silver.
____ Opium War began
____ British merchants discovered they could make huge profits trading opium from India and Turkey for Chinese goods.

4.
____ Manchu dynasty lost the Mandate of Heaven.
____ Secret Society "Fists of Righteous Harmony" of Boxers is formed.
____ International forces march on Peking.

5.
____ Save Japan from foreign domination by building up its political, military, and economic strength.
____ Japanese government abandons centralized feudalism.
____ Universal military service and constitutional government begun.

6.
____Japanese secure foothold on Asian mainland, gain western respect for Asian power
____ Rivalry between Russia and Japan over Manchuria.
____ Japan forced the Russians to retreat.

7.
____ Siam established as neutral buffer
____ Britain gained Burma, Malaya, and Singapore. France gained Indochina.
____ Europe looked to Southeast Asia for raw materials such as tin, rubber, and oil.

8.
____ United States acquired Guam and the Philippines.
____ United States annexes Hawaii
____ United States went to war with Spain to free Cuba

When you have finished placing the events in cause and effect order, use this worksheet to complete the quiz on Asian Cause & Effect. You do NOT need to send the worksheet to your teacher.

 

 

Take the Cause and Effect worksheet that you completed and use it to help answer the Quiz that covers the same information. Do not enter the quiz unless you are planning to complete it. The program will block you from reentering if you log out before completing the quiz.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


22.00 Latin America Introduction (WorldCiv3)

Revolution and Independence in Latin America (1750 - 1917)1913 poster recruiting soldiers for Zapata, Mexican Revolution: Wikimedia Commons, public domain1913 poster recruiting soldiers for Zapata, Mexican Revolution: Wikimedia Commons, public domain

Unit 22: Revolution and Independence in Latin America

Time Period: (1750-1917)

Geographic Areas: Latin America

Unit 22 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the history of Latin America. General assignment information is as follows:

Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on information taken from articles that contain the required readings for the course. The articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

Internet Blitz: Students select a country discussed in the unit and search the Internet to collect and present information.

Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the unit. Points are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information, or any other topic,
feel free to contact your instructor.

Objective:

Investigate the role of revolution in the establishment of governmental systems.
Identify the major forces behind the fight for independence from Spain in Latin America.

Explain the political, economic and social philosophies that lead to revolution.
Compare and contrast major world revolutions.
Examine the political and military conflict between the Spanish, Portuguese and the peoples of the New World.
Explain the roles played by individuals in the independence movement in Latin America
Describe the living conditions in Latin America after independence was won from Spain.
Describe the relationship the United States had with the Latin American countries before and after independence.

22.01 Latin America Journal Assignment(WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

Battle of Churubusco, 1847, Mexican-American War: Wikimedia Commons, unknown artist, public domainBattle of Churubusco, 1847, Mexican-American War: Wikimedia Commons, unknown artist, public domain

Assignment 22.01:

Journal Entry: Under what circumstances do people revolt? Under what circumstances could you predict a revolt against the government today? What are the possible positive and negative consequences of revolt? Should countries help each other to revolt? Submit your journal entry to your instructor.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


22.02 Latin America Reading Challenge (WorldCiv3)

Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links.

From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings.

The Pioneer Library log-in name and password are available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

teacher-scored 22 points possible 30 minutes

Segregated company of US Soldiers (likely Buffalo Soldiers) 1898 --during the Spanish-American War: Wikimedia Commons, NARA, public domainSegregated company of US Soldiers (likely Buffalo Soldiers) 1898 --during the Spanish-American War: Wikimedia Commons, NARA, public domainChapter 22.02 Latin America Reading Challenge

Assignment instructions:

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings" for Chapter 22. Submit the assignment to your instructor.

Each question is worth 2 points. Partial credit will be given for incomplete answers.
*******************************************************************************************

Required Reading: Latin America:
Read the following subsections:
Review reading: Colonial discontent through and including Caudillismo.
New reading: Regional conflicts through and including Political circumstances in the early to mid-1900’s.

1. What territories were lost by Mexico in the Mexican War? Who obtained the territories? What names are the territories known by today?

 

 

2. Who was Benito Juarez and what did he do?

 

3. What did the United States receive after the Spanish-American War of 1898?

 

4. What is gunboat diplomacy & how was it used?

 

5. Who were Emiliano Zapata and Pancho Villa and what did they want?

 

6. Who were the populists? What countries had populists leaders? What were some things that caused people to become frustrated with populists?

 

7. Who led the Cuban Revolution against dictator, Fugencio Batista y Zaldivar? Was he successful?

 

 

Required Reading: Mexico:
Read the following subsections: The Spanish conquest through and including The Constitution of 1917

8. Which country helped Maximilian become emperor of Mexico? Who took over the government from Maximilian?

 

 

9. Who was Porfirio Diaz, and what did he do?

 

10. What was the cause of the Revolution of 1910? What was the name of the Mexican who called for the revolution? Which foreign power assisted in determining the outcome?

 

11. What was adopted in 1917?

 

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


22.03 Latin America Internet Blitz(WorldCiv3)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 20 minutes

Chapter 22.03 Latin America Internet BlitzAnnouncement of Independence (detail), Brazil, 1822: Wikimedia Commons, François-René Moreaux, public domainAnnouncement of Independence (detail), Brazil, 1822: Wikimedia Commons, François-René Moreaux, public domain

Choose any of the countries from South America.
Spend one hour on the internet searching for information on that country. Keep a list of the citations of the sites you find that actually contain information on the country and their journey to independence.
 

Using your word-processor, create a chart or outline showing the citations (the easiest way is to use www.easybib.com to create complete citations) and one paragraph of information you acquired from that site about your chosen subject. Create a chart or outline similar to the one below to record your findings.

Each citation should have just one corresponding paragraph of information.

INTERNET BLITZ **********************************************************************************

 Instructions: List the citation and information. Total your points at the bottom of the sheet (Total should equal at least 25 points).

Total Points: Use the following point system for your findings.

* Citation (example: "Electronic High School." Electronic High School. Utah Electronic High School, 2 Aug. 2012. Web. 06 Aug. 2012. http://www.schools.utah.gov/ehs/.)--2pts

* ONE paragraph of information from the site, summarized in your own words--1pt

For each correctly cited URL you will receive 2 points, and the following paragraph and names will get you 1 point. Tally up your points and place them at the end of your assignment.

Grading Criteria: How many references did you find? Does your tally at the bottom of the page equal at least 25 points? Is the data easily read? Is the source clearly identified so as to be available for a works cited page?

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


22.04 Book Recommendations

These are book recommendations based upon the subject matter.

If you happen to be someone who enjoys reading, the following books can usually be found at your local school or public library. They may interest you if you like learning about this time period. If you have any books that you have read that would fit this section, feel free to message me about them.

Poems, protest and a dream by Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz

Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz was a nun in the 15th century. She was a champion of women’s rights and her writings at the time period have added to the Hispanic-American culture over the years. Her sonnets, religious poetry and even (scandal!) love poems are a beautiful look into the time period and New World culture. It's better in Spanish, but the English version isn't horrible either.

22.04 Review Quiz Unit 21 and Unit 22

computer-scored 11 points possible 15 minutes

Assessment 22.04 Review Quiz Unit 21 and Unit 22

Complete

21 and 22 Review Quiz
Industrial Revolution and Democracy

This assignment is found under Review Quiz Unit 21 and Unit 22 on the course website. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do and provides immediate feedback.

Complete this assignment after you finish reading lesson 21 and lesson 22 coursework..

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.