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World Civilizations, 2nd Quarter

00.0 Start Here - Introduction to this Class (World Civilizations)

Course Description

The study of World Civilizations emphasizes the increasing interrelationships over time of the world’s peoples. These interrelationships have developed in two major arenas.

First, the relationships have developed among major regions of the world: East Asia, South Asia, Southwest Asia (Middle East), Africa, Europe, North America and Latin America.

Second, they have developed within all aspects of human activity: political, economic, social, philosophical and religious, scientific and technological, and artistic.

Class Overview

The World Civilizations course is a full 1.0 credit but is broken into four quarter classes. You may enroll for one, two, three or all four quarters, BUT you can enroll in only one quarter at a time!

Each quarter of World Civilizations generates a .25 credit. If you do not turn in any work within the first week after you register, you may be dropped from this course.

You have up to 10 weeks to finish each quarter after you are enrolled. Please following the pacing recommendations for each assignment. Once you have completed a quarter (including all work and tests), you can request to be enrolled in the next quarter.

About the Curriculum

The class works like this. . . First you read the lessons (if you've done it right you started with Module 1, are now reading Module 2, move to Module 3, and finally Module 4).  The lessons have a little chain link next to them.  This is where you'll find the assignments.  Follow the instructions then you can either click next OR go back to the home page and click on the assignment submission page.  The assignment submission links have a paper with an "A" in it. The last link you'll see is the quiz link.  It has a "Q" next to it.  

Each Module will be locked until you have completed the prior Module.  To keep track of what you've done look along the left side of the home page.  There are check marks there.  Completed links have green checks.  Incomplete links have yellow checks. 

When you have finished Module 3, which is the class work, please move to Module 4 and submit the "Ready" assignment.

Required Readings

The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators, and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study. You need to be accessing the readings from a home computer--NOT a school computer lab.(Some school computer labs may work, but it depends on how the network is set up.) Accessing the readings is bit tricky. To access the readings you must do the following:

1) Open "a new Tab" on your internet browser and paste in the Utah Online Library (Pioneer Library) URL. The log-in page will appear. On the right-hand side, type the information in the boxes as shown below: Utah Student Log-in Enter the log-in name and password found on your dashboard--the main class page when you are logged in to your EHS class.

Log-in Name: online
Password: [Check the dashboard page or contact your EHS teacher or school librarian for the current password]

Click the LOG-IN graphic The Utah Online Library page will appear. Click on the last link in the first column titled: World Book Encyclopedia. The page will open in a new window or a new tab. Close or minimize the new World Book window/tab, but DO NOT close the original Utah Online Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings (you can minimize the window to get it out of the way). Now you are ready to access the readings.

2) The readings are divided by Chapters. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information on the second pages.

3) In many cases you will not be reading entire articles. The subsection/subsections of each article to be read is/are indicated below the name of the "Required Reading". Read only the subsections indicated. If there is no indication, you should read the entire article.

4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor by e-mail.

How work is graded

Most assignments have a corresponding rubric and a minimum score requirement. A general rule to understanding the score received is to check the rubric to see where points were lost. Assignments may be resubmitted for more credit. Work should be checked for errors before it is submitted. All work is graded as in the order it is turned in and in a timely manner. 

Proctored Final

The final is worth 26% of the class points. You must earn 60% on the final to receive a grade and credit for the class.

Grading Scale

You can check your progress and grade at any time on the "grades" page.

Final grades are based on this grading scale:

  • 94-100% A
  • 90-93% A-
  • 87-89% B+
  • 83-86% B
  • 80-82% B-
  • 77-79% C+
  • 73-76% C
  • 70-72% C-
  • 67-69% D+
  • 63-66% D
  • 60-62% D-
  • 0-59% no credit

00.00 *Student supplies for World Civilizations

The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators, and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study. The "Required Readings" are accessed through the Utah Online Library. The Utah Online Library is password protected. The Utah Online Library log-in name and password may be obtained from your EHS World Civilizations teacher or your school librarian.

00.00 About Me (World Civilizations)

teacher-scored 8 points possible 15 minutes

In an online class it is more challenging to get to know our students. We want you to be a person and not just a name on an email. Although this introduction will never take the place of being in class with you every day or two, it helps you tell your teacher what's important to you.

For this assignment, I'd like you to write a paragraph about you.  In the paragraph please include all of the following:

  1. Your name and the name you prefer to be called (if they are different).  
  2. Your current age and grade in school.
  3. Contact information for you and your parents. (Emails or phone numbers are fine.)
  4. The school you attend and the name and email address for your school counselor
  5. Some information that describes you such as your interests, family, school goals, etc.
  6. An acknowledgement and agreement to abide by the EHS honor code.
  7. An acknowledgement of the 10 week time limit.
  8. A statement letting me know you have watched the "how to review your assignments" video clip

"As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers and staff with respect." (EHS Honor Code)

This assignment will be graded using a rubric. You must get an 8/8 to move on to the next module, so pay attention and do it right the first time so you only have to submit it once.  (To submit click the NEXT BUTTON at the bottom of the page.  OR go back to the class home page and click on the "About Me" assignment submission link.  It has a paper with an 'A' in it next to it.)

 

  Meets Expectations (2) Meets Partial Expectations (1) Below Expectations (0)
Prompt Information is given in paragraph form and contains relevant information.  Assignment has been spell checked and there are no significant mechanincs or usage errors. Information not given in paragraph form or doesn't give relevant information about student's interests. Important information not included and significant mechanincs, spelling, or usage errors.
Contact Info Contact information (email or phone) for both STUDENT and PARENT is included. Only one contact is included. This element is missing.
School Info Current school and grade included as well as counselor's email address. Doesn't include all of the required elements This element is missing.
Acknowledgements Includes the student's acknowledgement of the EHS Honor Code, the 10-week time frame for the class, and viewing video clip. Missing one of the three requrements Missing two or more of the required acknowledgements.
       

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


00.01

00.01.01 Student Software Needs

 

Students need access to a robust internet connection and a modern web browser.

This class may also require the Apple QuickTime plug-in to view media.

For students using a school-issued Chromebook, ask your technical support folks to download the QuickTime plug-in and enable the plug-in for your Chromebook.

$0.00

08.00 Middle Ages Introduction (WorldCiv2)

Castelo de Óbidos, Portugal: Wikimedia Commons, Alegna13, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedCastelo de Óbidos, Portugal: Wikimedia Commons, Alegna13, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedChapter 8: Medieval Europe (500 - 1500)

Introduction:

The feudal system, with kings and queens, lords and knights, serfs and peasants, has
been the subject of numerous literary works. Much of what has been written is legend, but has roots
in real day-to-day events. Of major importance in this era is the appearance of the contract: an
agreement, either oral or written, between landowners and workers. The need for such an agreement was
a first step in the evolution of democratic thinking, in which all have rights and privileges.

Unit 8: The Middle Ages or Medieval Europe

Time Period: (500-1500 A.D.)

Geographic Areas: Europe

Unit 8 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of Europe in the Middle Ages. General assignment information is as follows:

Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on information taken from articles that contain the required readings for the course. The articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

Presentation: Students create a PowerPoint to present information on an aspect of Middle Age society.

Geospatial Map: Students are provided with the tools to research information and create an animated map that depicts visual information on a selected topic. Questions are included that students will research and answer.

Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the unit. Points are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information, or any other topic, feel free to contact your instructor.

Objective:
Appraise the major characteristics of interregional contact that linked the people of Africa, Asia and Europe.

Describe the impact the Silk Road had on trade across Europe and Asia.
Examine the consequences of the Crusades.
Analyze the impact of Mongol invasion on Europe and Asia

08.00.1 Photo in Learn

teacher-scored 0 points possible 10 minutes

This is an extra credit opportunity. I will give you an extra point if you add a photo of yourself into the class. This will show up when you comment, chat or post an assignment. Avatars don't count.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


08.01 Medieval Europe Journal Assignment(WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

Medieval peasants (serfs) at work, ca. 1400, France: Wikimedia Commons, Pietro de Crescenzi, public domainMedieval peasants (serfs) at work, ca. 1400, France: Wikimedia Commons, Pietro de Crescenzi, public domain "History, to be above evasion or dispute, must stand on documents, not on opinions." (Lord Acton 64) Acton, Lord. "INAUGURAL LECTURE ON THE STUDY OF HISTORY*." Online Library of Liberty. The Online Library of Liberty, 2012. Web. 24 Dec. 2012. Assignment 8.1: Journal Entry: How important is it to honor contractual agreements? What, in your mind, is a valid contract? Is it when you give your word or sign a written document? When are contracts invalid? Edit and submit your journal entry to your instructor.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


08.02 Middle Ages Reading Challenge (WorldCiv2)

Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links. From the Utah Online Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings. The Utah Online Library log-in name and password are available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

08.02 Middle Ages Reading Challenge (WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 40 minutes

08.02 Middle Ages Reading Challenge

To submit this assignment:
1. Create the assignment in a word processing document--copy and paste in the questions between the two lines of asterisks, below.
2. When you have finished, click “next” at the bottom of the screen. On the following screen you will find a submit this assignment tab.
3. Copy and paste the assignment into the text box and click [Save changes].
---
Assignment instructions:

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings."

Instructions for Required Reading Access

The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators, and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study.

Accessing the readings is a bit tricky so follow the directions below:

1) Open "a new Tab" on your internet browser and paste the web address for Pioneer Library Online found at the bottom of the assignment page.

The log-in page will appear. The user name and password is available from your local school librarian or from your EHS teacher.

The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: World Book Encyclopedia. The page will open in a new window or a new tab. You can close the new World Book window/tab but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab or you will NOT be able to access the readings, as this exits you from the Pioneer Library.
Now you are ready to access the readings.

2) Links to the Required Readings topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. You can either copy and paste the link into your browser, or just click on it and it should open up to the location needed for the current assignment. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information.

3) In many cases you will not be reading entire articles. The subsection/subsections of each article to be read is/are indicated below the name of the "Required Reading." Read only the subsections indicated. If there is no indication you should read the entire article.

4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor by email.

Each question is worth 2 points. Partial credit can be given.
*****************************************************************************************************

Medieval monastery, Germany, 1493: Wikimedia Commons, Michel Wolgemut, Wilhelm Pleydenwurff, public domainMedieval monastery, Germany, 1493: Wikimedia Commons, Michel Wolgemut, Wilhelm Pleydenwurff, public domain
Required Reading: The Middle Ages:

 

1. How did the Germanic invasions of the A.D. 400's change European life?

 

2. Which two institutions of the Christian church preserved learning during the early Middle Ages?

 

3. What were Charlemagne's accomplishments?

 

4. What was feudalism? What did it accomplish for Europe?

 

5. What were the three classes of medieval society during feudal times?

 

6. Why did towns develop during the high Middle Ages?

 

7. What was a fief? a manor? a vassal? a guild? the Black Death?

 

8. Why did economic and social progress come to a halt in the late medieval period?

 

9. What forces weakened the church in the late Middle Ages?

 

10. What was humanism? How did it affect medieval society?

 

 

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


08.03 Feudalism PowerPoint Assignment(WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 60 minutes

8.03 Feudalism PowerPoint Viking swords in museum: Wikimedia Commons, Berig, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedViking swords in museum: Wikimedia Commons, Berig, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Create a PowerPoint (or a Prezi) presentation (at least eight slides) of feudal scenes from your reading.

Your pictures may be made from any graphic media of your choice. They can be hand drawn or found on the internet and pasted in a collage like fashion in your project, but must closely reflect the feudal period.

Relate the pictures around a central theme or character, like Feudal Kings, Medieval Customs, Social Structures, Wars and Weapons, Nuns and Monks, etc.

Create at least five pictures with accompanying original text explaining the significance of the drawn feature on the picture. Be brief and concise with these text items, while being accurate and thorough. Write in your own words--do not copy and paste.

You will need MLA citations and in-text citations if you use direct quotes from your sources and a Works Cited slide at the end. Please view the "Citations and MLA Help" section under discussions if you are not familiar with how to do this. Include a list of your sources for both pictures and information, on the last slide (which should be entitled Works Cited).

When you have completed your presentation, attach and submit it to your instructor. (If you do not have access to PowerPoint, you may use similar software like Keynote, and save your presentation in .pdf or .ppt format.)

 
Excellent - 10
Good - 7
Satisfactory - 4
Needs Improvement - 1
Subject Knowledge Subject knowledge is evident throughout the project. All information is clear, appropriate, and correct. Subject knowledge is evident in much of the project. Most information is clear, appropriate, and correct. Some subject knowledge is evident. Some Information is confusing, incorrect, or flawed. Subject knowledge is not evident. Information is confusing, incorrect, or flawed.
Citing Sources All sources are properly cited. Pictures or other items taken from a source have appropriate citation. Most sources are properly cited. There is some citations on pictures taken from other places. Few sources are properly cited. Citations are lacking completeness. No sources are properly cited. There are no citations at all.
Organization The sequence of information is logical and intuitive. Menus and paths to all information are clear and direct. There are no spelling mistakes leading to confusion. The sequence of information is logical. Menus and paths to most information are clear and direct. Most of the words are spelled correctly. The sequence of information is somewhat logical. Menus and paths are confusing and flawed. Spelling and conventions make it hard to follow. The sequence of information is not logical. Menus and paths to information are not evident. 16 or more spelling errors.
Originality The project shows significant evidence of originality and inventiveness. The majority of the content and many of the ideas are fresh, original, and inventive. The project shows some evidence of originality and inventiveness. The work is an extensive collection and rehash of other people's ideas, products, and images. There is little evidence of new thought or inventiveness. The work is a minimal collection or rehash of other people's ideas, products, and images. There is no evidence of new thought.
Technical Project runs perfectly with no technical problems. For example, there are no error messages, all sound, video, or other files are found. Project runs adequately with minor technical problems. Project runs minimally. There are many technical problems when viewing the project. Project does not run satisfactorily. There are too many technical problems to view the project.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


08.04 Black Death Timeline in Google Maps (WorldCiv2)

Create a Black Death Timeline Google Map and share its "Short URL" with your teacher.


“20 million people--about one third of the approximately 60 million people living in Europe in the mid-fourteenth century--are believed to have died of plague in the years from 1347 to 1354.” (historymedren.about.com/library/bd/blbd101.htm)
Spread of "black death" from Asia towards Europe: Wikimedia Commons, Bunchofgrapes, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedSpread of "black death" from Asia towards Europe: Wikimedia Commons, Bunchofgrapes, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported
Let's become a map maker!

You will use Google Maps to build your Timeline showing dates and areas that were impacted by the "Black Death." First locate background information about the "Black Death" by finding answers to the questions below. Use the URLs/links provided below for your research.

- What is it?
- Why is it called the Black Death?
- When did it arrive in Europe?
- How did it arrive?
- Why are the trade routes important for the spread of the Black Death?
- What part might landscape and geography have played in its spread?

Note: The answers to these questions will be entered in the placemarks of your Google Map Timeline.

08.04.01 Black Death Timeline in Google Maps (WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 90 minutes

Time to become a map maker using Google Maps! Create a Google Map Timeline of the Black Death during the fourteenth century, from Dec. 1347 to Dec. 1350. The map will include the Timeline identifying the regions in Europe where the plague spread. Use the link below (the screen cast) to help you understand how to use Google Maps.  Be sure to use the "Spread of the Black Death Interactive Map" to find the areas needed to create highlighted shapes.

***********http://www.screencast.com/t/SuCIzzl43**********

 

MAP REQUIREMENTS:

1) Include the placemarker at Messina, Sicily and highlighted shape areas for the following dates. --Dec. 1347 -- June 1348 -- Dec. 1348 -- Dec. 1349 -- June 1350 -- Dec. 1350--

2) Draw four shapes (highlighted areas) for Dec. 1347.

3) Type your answers to the questions in the Description box of each highlighted area for Dec. 1347. (Open an Example of the Black Death Timeline Google Map from the first link below.)

4) Create highlighted shape areas for the above remaining five dates.

5) Remember to change colors for each date. Some dates will have more than one highlighted area like Dec. 1347.

See detailed instructions for this assignment in the screen cast file listed above. Once your map is completed, submit the URL to your teacher.  You will need to either change the privacy settings so anyone with that URL can view it, OR you need to share it with your insturctor (leslie.phillips@ehs.uen.org).  DO NOT SHARE THE "SHORT URL". That is no longer applicable.

 
10-Excellent
5-Satisfactory
1-Needs Improvement
Place markers and Dates Includes the placemarker at Messina, Sicily and highlighted shape areas for the following dates. --Dec. 1347 -- June 1348 -- Dec. 1348 -- Dec. 1349 -- June 1350 -- Dec. 1350-- Include some of the place markers at Messina, Sicily and highlighted shape areas for the some of the required dates. Missing the majority of the place markers and date.
Highlights All four shapes (highlighted areas) are accurate for each required date. Some of the four shapes are accurate for each required date. Missing shapes and/or possibly all inacurate.
Answers Answers to the questions in the Description box of each highlighted area for all required dates. Answers to the questions in the Description box of each highlighted area for some required dates. Missing answers to the majority/all of the questions in the description box for the required date.
Colors Colors are different for each date. Colors are mostly different for each date. Colors are the same for each date.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of punctuation, grammar, usage, and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message. There are no spelling mistakes or punctuation errors present. Three to six spelling errors or other conventions present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage and grammar and/or paragraphing distract the reader from the text and make it difficult to read. 16 or more spelling errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


08.05 Middle Ages Enrichment Videos(WorldCiv2)

Instructions for Enrichment Video AccessStained glass window from inside Chartres Cathedral: Wikimedia Commons, Urban, public domainStained glass window from inside Chartres Cathedral: Wikimedia Commons, Urban, public domain The "Enrichment Videos" for the course are provided by eMedia through the UEN Pioneer website and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies [The videos are accessed the same way as the "Reading Challenge" information].

Accessing the videos is a bit tricky but it is possible. To access the videos you must do the following:

1) Click on the blue link below to watch the videos.
 

The login page will appear in a new window and you will type in the Pioneer Library user name and password (which is available from your EHS teacher or from your local school librarian.

2) Links to the Enrichment Video topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. Currently there are no assignments connected to the videos. The purpose of the videos is to give information that coincides with and goes beyond the information normally required by the course giving students the opportunity to gain more knowledge regarding topics of interest to them.

3) Videos may be streamed for viewing, downloaded and viewed as Windows Media, or downloaded and placed on a portable video device such as iPod.

4) If you have any further questions feel free to contact your instructor via email.

Enrichment Videos for Chapter 8: Medieval Europe:

Nova: Secrets of Lost Empires II. Medieval Siege Synopsis: Nova puts together a team of timber framers and other specialists to design, build, and fire a pair of trebuchets, a devastating engine of war popular in the Middle Ages.

Catherine the Great 

Synopsis: The story of Catherine the Great, a young girl who would transform herself from an obscure German Princess into Russia's most powerful regent.

08.06 Book Recommendations

These are book recommendations based upon the material.

If you happen to be someone who enjoys reading, the following books can usually be found at your local school or public library. They may interest you if you like learning about this time period. If you have any books that you have read that would fit this section, feel free to message me about them.

Salt: A World History by Mark Kurlansky

This book is a personal favorite of mine. I had no idea that salt played such an important role in the history of the world. This book will take you through the ages as salt is used as a currency, starts wars, and causes problems for those who don’t have it. Even at 498 pages, the book is such a good read that you will forget it was that long.

Le Morte d’Arthur by Thomas Mallory

The legend of King Arthur is always an interesting read. This is one of the original classics to explain the legends surrounding the mysterious king and his knights. Written in 1485, it still continues to be a good read. If you have ever enjoyed Monty Python and the Holy Grail, there is a chance you will like this book too.

The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood of Great Renown by Howard Pyle

The story of Robin Hood and his merry band of thieves is one of my favorites. Howard Pyle’s version has entertained people for generations. Some of the reviews on Amazon state that this book is better than Russell Crowe’s Robin Hood movie. I’ll let you decide on that yourself.

09.00 Byzantine & Islamic Civilization Introduction (WorldCiv2)

Byzantine and Islamic Civilization (330-1453)
The Hagia Sophia in Constantinople (earlier called Byzantium, now Istanbul, Turkey): Wikimedia Commons, Avniyazici, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedThe Hagia Sophia in Constantinople (earlier called Byzantium, now Istanbul, Turkey): Wikimedia Commons, Avniyazici, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported
Introduction:

The Eastern Orthodox Church together with a strong economy was the foundation for the Eastern Roman empire, and later for the Byzantine Empire conquered by the Ottoman Turks. With the founding of Islam by Mohammed in 622 A.D., another empire developed. All these empires drew richly from contributions throughout their histories in mathematics, science and philosophy. It is important to build upon the accomplishments of the past in creating and maintaining solid and well ordered society.

Unit 9: Byzantine and Islamic Civilization

Time Period: (330-1453 A.D.)

Geographic Areas: Africa, Middle East, and Europe

Unit 9 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the Byzantine and Islamic Civilizations. General assignment information is as follows:

Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on information taken from articles that contain the required readings for the course. The articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

Sequencing: Students research an important event from the period and reconstruct it chronologically.

Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the unit. Points are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information, or any other topic,

feel free to contact your instructor.

Objective:
Appraise the major characteristics of interregional contact that linked the people of Africa, Asia and Europe.

Describe the impact the Silk Road had on trade across Europe and Asia.
Discuss the importance of cross-Saharan migrations.
Examine the consequences of the Crusades.
Analyze the impact of Mongol invasion on Europe and Asia

09.01 Byzantine & Islamic Civilization Journal Assignment(WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

Assignment 9.1: Journal Entry: "History remembers only the brilliant failures and the brilliant successes. Randolph S. Bourne" (Famous Trailblazers) "Famous Trailblazers Who Set The Stage." The Huffington Post. N.p., 23 Apr. 2012. Web. 26 Dec. 2012. Islamic art often uses elaborate geometric patterns; Alhambra, Spain: Wikimedia Commons, Jebulon, public domainIslamic art often uses elaborate geometric patterns; Alhambra, Spain: Wikimedia Commons, Jebulon, public domain

Chapter 9: Byzantine and Islamic Civilization (330-1453)

Journal Topic: It has been said that order is a sign of high civilization and intelligence. Do you agree or disagree? What areas of your life are ordered and well planned? What areas of your life could use more order? Why?

When you have finished this portion of your journal, edit and submit it to your instructor.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


09.02 Byzantine and Islamic Civilization Reading Challenge (WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 35 minutes

9.02 Byzantine and Islamic Reading Challenge

To submit this assignment:
1. Create the assignment in a word processing document and copy and paste in the questions between the two lines of asterisks, below.
2. When you have finished, click “next” at the bottom of the screen. On the following screen, you will find a submit this assignment tab.
3. Copy and paste the assignment into the text box and click [Save changes].
---
Assignment instructions:

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings".

Instructions for Required Reading Access

The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators, and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study.

Accessing the readings is a bit tricky but it is possible. To access the readings you must do the following:

1) Open 'a new Tab' on your internet browser and paste the web address for Pioneer Library Online found at the bottom of the assignment page.

The log-in page will appear. The user name and password is available from your local school librarian or from your EHS teacher.

The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: World Book Encyclopedia. The page will open in a new window or a new tab. You can close the new World Book window/tab but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab or you will NOT be able to access the readings, as this exits you from the Pioneer Library.
Now you are ready to access the readings.

2) Links to the Required Readings topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. You can either copy and paste the link into your browser, or just click on it and it should open up to the location needed for the current assignment. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information.

3) In many cases you will not be reading entire articles. The subsection/subsections of each article to be read is/are indicated below the name of the "Required Reading". Read only the subsections indicated. If there is no indication you should read the entire article.

4) If you have any further questions feel free to contact your instructor by email.

Each question is worth 2 points. Partial credit can be given for incomplete answers.

***********************************************************************************************

Required Reading: The Byzantine Empire:

 

1. What was the Byzantine Empire and by what other name was it known?

 

Required Reading: Islamic Civilization18th century Turkish tile, depicting the Masjid al-Haram with the Kaaba in the center: Wikimedia Commons, Louvre Museum, public domain18th century Turkish tile, depicting the Masjid al-Haram with the Kaaba in the center: Wikimedia Commons, Louvre Museum, public domain

 

Required Reading: Muslims
Read the following subsections: Muslims, through and including The spread of Islam

 

2. Who was the founder of Islam? In what century and to which peoples was the religion first preached?

3. What are the two major religious divisions of Islam?

4. Who built the Kaaba? In what city is it found? Where and what is the Black Stone?

 

5. Where was the Mughal Empire founded?

 

6. What was the Hijra or Hegira?

 

 

7. Who was the first caliph (leader) of Islam following the death of Muhammad? Which caliph later founded the Umayyad caliphate?

 

8. In a brief paragraph, summarize the new Muslim society under the Abbasids.

 

9. By the 1500's Muslim power reached new heights as Islam spread. Name the three powerful Muslim empires that were established:

 

10. Who were the Safavids?

 

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


09.02 Byzantine and Islamic Reading Challenge (WorldCiv2)

Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links.

From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings.

The Pioneer Library log-in name and password are available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

09.03 Byzantine & Islamic Civilization Sequencing (WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 15 minutes

09.03 SEQUENCING BYZANTINE & ISLAMIC CIVILIZATION
Artist's conception of Attila the Hun invading Italy: Wikimedia Commons, Ulpiano Checa, public domainArtist's conception of Attila the Hun invading Italy: Wikimedia Commons, Ulpiano Checa, public domain
Assignment instructions:

Sometimes the dates that something occurred in history are not as important as what actually occurred during that event. For this assignment, however, you will need to order the items in the appropriate dates that it occurred.

Take the items on the list below, and organize them into a time line. Cut and paste each of the 16 items into the appropriate place showing its order and including the DATE of the occurrence:

Use the links below, or do a search, to find information to help you organize your list.

List:

"Eternal City" of Rome sacked by Atilla the Hun

 

Byzantine empire defeated by Turks

Christianity proclaimed official religion of Eastern Empire

Justinian constructs church at Hagia Sophia

Constantine renames Byzantium, Constantinople

Council of Nicaea condemns Arian Christianity

Franks converted to Orthodox Christianity

Germanic kingdoms: Ostogoths, Franks, Bergundians, Visigoths, Vandals control Western Europe

Heraclius begins reign, focuses empire in East

Islamic armies defeated and Asia minor retained by Byzantines

Islamic armies overrun empire

Justinian codifies Roman Law in Corpus Juris Civilis

Lombards invade Italy

Nika riots in Constantinople

Odovacer defeats Romulus Augustus

Theodora raises an army that kills 35,000 in a single day

 

When you have finished submit your list to your instructor.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


09.04 Byzantine & Islamic Civilization Enrichment Videos(WorldCiv2)

self-scored (no gradebook points) 0 points possible 0 minutes

Instructions for Enrichment Video Access The "Enrichment Videos" for the course are provided by eMedia through the UEN Pioneer website and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies [The videos are accessed with the same username and password as the "Reading Challenge" information].

Accessing the videos is a bit tricky, but it is possible. To access the videos you must do the following:

1) Click on the Pioneer Library link shown below. The log-in page will appear in a new window. In the right-hand column, type the information in the boxes as shown below Log-in Name: pioneer Password: [obtained from your EHS teacher via e-mail or from your local school librarian].

Click the LOG-IN graphic

The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: "eMedia." The page will open in a new window or a new tab. Close the new eMedia tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you may NOT be able to access the videos.

Now you are ready to access the videos.

Church of the Twelve Apostles, Thessaloniki: Wikimedia Commons, Knop92, public domainChurch of the Twelve Apostles, Thessaloniki: Wikimedia Commons, Knop92, public domain

2) Links to the Enrichment Video topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. Currently there are no assignments connected to the videos. The purpose of the videos is to give information that coincides and/or goes beyond the information normally required by the course giving students the opportunity to gain more knowledge regarding topics of interest to them.

3) Videos may be streamed for viewing, downloaded and viewed as Windows Media, or downloaded and placed on a portable video device such as iPod.

4) If you have any further questions feel free to contact your instructor via email. Enrichment Videos for Chapter 9: Byzantine & Islamic Civilization:

Byzantine Civilization

Beyond our Borders: Jordan Synopsis: 

Jordan is a monarchy and one of the key modern Middle East countries, but its history includes many important events that continue to influence our lives. Part of it is the land of the Old Testament, where the River Jordan and Mt. Nebo, reputedly Moses' burial place, were significant.

Islamic Civilization

Empires Series: Islam: Empire of Faith Synopsis: Between the fall of Rome and the European voyages of discovery, no event was more significant than the rise of Islam. This three-part series tells the spectacular story of the great sweep of Islamic power and faith during its first 1,000 years--from the birth of the prophet Muhammad to the peak of the Ottoman Empire under the reign of Suleyman the Magnificent. Episode 01-The Messenger Synopsis: The first episode recounts the history of the religion of Islam, from its beginning in 622 A.D. as a small desert sect led by the prophet Muhammad, to its zenith hundreds of years later as an intellectual and artistic empire that spanned three continents and exercised tolerance for other religions. Episode 02-The Awakening Syopsis: Episode two explores the metropolis of Baghdad, a center of learning at a time when Europe was sunk in the Dark Ages. According to this program, the Islamic empire sent scholars throughout the world to gather all the knowledge of mankind, which was brought to Baghdad and studied by scholars. Episode 03-The Ottomans Synopsis: The third and last episode covers the history of the expansionist Ottoman Empire and its ambitious sultans through the reign of Suleiman the Magnificent. A key successful strategy of the Ottoman method of expansion was to leave in place the clerks -- the bureaucracy -- of the conquered territories.

Instructions for Enrichment Video Access The "Enrichment Videos" for the course are provided by eMedia through the UEN Pioneer website and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies [The videos are accessed with the same username and password as the "Reading Challenge" information]. Accessing the videos is a bit tricky but it is possible. To access the videos you must do the following:

1) Click on the Pioneer Library link shown below. The log-in page will appear in a new window. In the right-hand column type the information in the boxes as shown below Log-in Name: pioneer Password: [obtained from your EHS teacher via e-mail or from your local school librarian].

Click the LOG-IN graphic The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: eMedia. The page will open in a new window or a new tab. Close the new eMedia window/tab but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab or you may NOT be able to access the videos. Now you are ready to access the videos. Church of the Twelve Apostles, Thessaloniki: Wikimedia Commons, Knop92, public domainChurch of the Twelve Apostles, Thessaloniki: Wikimedia Commons, Knop92, public domain 2) Links to the Enrichment Video topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. Currently there are no assignments connected to the videos. The purpose of the videos is to give information that coincides with or goes beyond the information normally required by the course giving students the opportunity to gain more knowledge regarding topics of interest to them. 3) Videos may be streamed for viewing, downloaded and viewed as Windows Media, or downloaded and placed on a portable video device such as iPod. 4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor via email. Enrichment Videos for Chapter 9: Byzantine & Islamic Civilization: Byzantine Civilization

The World Heritage: Thessalonika Synopsis: Byzantine and early Christian monuments have long been watching the march of history in Thessalonika, a city where long ago the apostle Paul once carried out missionary work. In the Byzantine era, the city of Thessalonika in northern Greece prospered as the second most important city of the Byzantine Empire after Constantinople. The city is home to a large number of Byzantine and early Christian monuments, including the Church of Saint Demetrius, the Church of Agia Sofia, and the Church of the Holy Apostles.

Islamic Civilization

Empires Series: Islam: Empire of Faith Synopsis: Between the fall of Rome and the European voyages of discovery, no event was more significant than the rise of Islam. This three-part series tells the spectacular story of the great sweep of Islamic power and faith during its first 1,000 years -- from the birth of the prophet Muhammad to the peak of the Ottoman Empire under the reign of Suleiman the Magnificent. Episode 01-The Messenger Synopsis: The first episode recounts the history of the religion of Islam, from its beginning in 622 A.D. as a small desert sect led by the prophet Muhammad, to its zenith hundreds of years later as an intellectual and artistic empire that spanned three continents and exercised tolerance for other religions. Episode 02-The Awakening Syopsis: Episode two explores the metropolis of Baghdad, a center of learning at a time when Europe was sunk in the Dark Ages. According to this program, the Islamic empire sent scholars throughout the world to gather all the knowledge of mankind, which was brought to Baghdad and studied by scholars. Episode 03-The Ottomans Synopsis: The third and last episode covers the history of the expansionist Ottoman Empire and its ambitious sultans through the reign of Suleiman the Magnificent. A key successful strategy of the Ottoman method of expansion was to leave in place the clerks--the bureaucracy--of the conquered territories.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


09.05 Book Recommendations

These are book recommendations based upon the subject matter.

If you happen to be someone who enjoys reading, the following books can usually be found at your local school or public library. They may interest you if you like learning about this time period. If you have any books that you have read that would fit this section, feel free to message me about them.

The Qur’an

As Islam is constantly in the news these days, it might benefit you to read the religious text from which Islam originated. Originally written in Arabic, the translation is important. Don’t allow people to tell you what the Qur’an says. Pick up the book and read it. It will help you in this class, in current events and maybe even influence you in some way.

09.06 Unit 08-09 Review Quiz

computer-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

Assessment 09.05 Review Quiz Units 08-09

Complete

08-09 Review Quiz
Medieval Europe and Byzantine and Islamic Civilization

This assignment is found under Review Quiz Unit 08- Unit 09 on the course website. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do and will provide immediate feedback.

Complete this assignment after you finish reading lesson 8 and lesson 9..

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


10.00 Africa & The Americas Introduction (WorldCiv2)

Aztec sunstone calendar: Wikimedia Commons, Chez Cåsver, CC Attribution 2.0 GenericAztec sunstone calendar: Wikimedia Commons, Chez Cåsver, CC Attribution 2.0 GenericChapter 10: Africa and the Americas (3000 B.C. - 1532)

Introduction:

Developing civilizations in Africa and the Americas emerged almost in complete isolation from Europe and the rest of the world. Geographical features including terrain, climate, and the presence of water greatly affected the ways in which they lived. Economic activity grew out of the environment and was a major concern in the ordering of developing societies.

Unit 10: Africa and the Americas

Time Period: (3000 B.C. – 1532 A.D.)

Geographic Areas: Africa and the Americas

Unit 10 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the early history of Africa and the Americas. General assignment information is as follows:

Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on information taken from articles that contain the required readings for the course. The articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

Geospatial Maps: Students are provided with the tools to research information and create an animated map that depicts visual information on a selected topic. Questions are included that students will research and answer.

Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the unit. Points are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information, or any other topic,

feel free to contact your instructor.

Objectives:
Speculate about the factors that led to civilized society.

Investigate hunters and gatherers.
Explore man’s domestication of plants and animals.
Examine the role of irrigation in early agriculture.

Assess the impact of geography on the locations of early civilizations.

Examine why early civilizations developed in river environments.
Evaluate the diffusion of civilizations.

10.01 Africa & The Americas Journal Assignment(WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

"History without politics descends to mere Literature. Sir John Robert Seely" (Szasz 7) Szasz, Ferenc M. "Quotations about History." Williamcronon.net. William Cronon, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2005. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. Maletsunyane Falls, found in Lesotho, Africa: Wikimedia Commons, released into public domainMaletsunyane Falls, found in Lesotho, Africa: Wikimedia Commons, released into public domain

Assignment instructions: 10.1:

Journal Entry: Choose a perfect location to live and explain why you feel it is ideal. Consider at least geographic features, climate, transportation, culture and food.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


10.02 Africa & The Americas: Reading Challenge (WorldCiv2)

Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links.

From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings.

The Pioneer Library log-in name and password is available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

teacher-scored 54 points possible 35 minutes

10.02 Africa & The Americas: Reading Challenge

To submit this assignment:
1. Create the assignment in a word processing document - copy and paste in the questions between the two lines of asterisks, below;
2. When you have finished, click “next” at the bottom of the screen. On the following screen you will find a submit this assignment tab.
3. Copy and paste the assignment into the text box and click [Save changes].
---
Assignment instructions:

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings".

Instructions for Required Reading Access

The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators, and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study.

Accessing the readings is a bit tricky but it is possible. To access the readings you must do the following:

1) Open "a new Tab" on your internet browser and paste the web address for Pioneer Library Online found at the bottom of the assignment page.
The login page will appear. The username and password is available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: World Book Encyclopedia. The page will open in a new window or a new tab. You can close the new World Book window/tab but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab or you will NOT be able to access the readings, as this exits you from the Pioneer Library.
Now you are ready to access the readings.

2) Links to the Required Readings topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. You can either copy and paste the link into your browser, or just click on it and it should open up to the location needed for the current assignment. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information.

3) In many cases you will not be reading entire articles. The subsection/subsections of each article to be read is/are indicated below the name of the "Required Reading". Read only the subsections indicated. If there is no indication you should read the entire article.

4) If you have any further questions feel free to contact your instructor by email.

Each question is worth 2 points. Partial credit will be given for incomplete answers.
************************************************************************************************

The Malapa site valley, South Africa: Wikimedia Commons, Profberger, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedThe Malapa site valley, South Africa: Wikimedia Commons, Profberger, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported
Required Reading: Africa
Read the following subsections: History through and including The Atlantic slave trade

 

1. Why is Africa called the "cradle of humanity" ?

 

2. Africa’s earliest civilizations emerged in which area?

 

3. Where and when did the Kush civilization develop?

 

4. Where did Christianity first develop in Africa?

 

5. When and where were the first Islamic universities established? What did these universities teach?

 

6. Timbuktu was a city in which empire?

 

7. Who began the Atlantic slave trade?

 

 

 

Latin America

Required Reading: The Americas
Read the following subsections: History strong>through and including The conquest of the American Indians

 

8. Who were the first peoples in Latin America? How do scientists believe that they arrived in Latin America?

9. Which crops were the first cultivated by the American Indians?

10. What was the name of the earliest civilization which thrived from 1200 to 400 B.C.?

11. What were the major accomplishments of the Maya? What caused the collapse of their civilization around A.D. 900?

12. The Toltec and the Aztec built what kind of large structures? What was the purpose of these buildings?

13. What were the Flowery Wars and who conducted them?

14. How did the Inca keep records?

15. What was the name of the first European to reach Latin America in 1492?

16. Which two European countries signed the Treaty of Tordesillas? What was the purpose and results of the treaty?

17. Who was America named for? Why were the native peoples called Indians?

18. Who was Vasco Núñez de Balboa and why is he signficant?

19. Who was Ferdinand Magellan and why is he signficant?

20. Define the word "conquistadors" and briefly explain their significance in American history:

21. Which American peoples did Hernan Cortes defeat? Which disease assisted with the conquest?

22. Which American peoples did Francisco Pizarro conquer?

 

 

 

Required Reading: Mexico Aztec emperor Moctezuma II, from the Codex Mendoza (16th century): Wikimedia Commons, public domainAztec emperor Moctezuma II, from the Codex Mendoza (16th century): Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Read the following subsections: History through and including The Spanish conquest

23. Where did the first farming villages develop?

 

 

24. During the Classic period of Mexico, what was built at Teotihuacan?

 

25. Francisco Fernandez de Cordoba explored what area?

 

26. Who was Montezuma II? What stories did his people tell him regarding the Spanish explorers?

 

27. Who was the last Aztec emperor?

 

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


10.03: Africa Map Quiz Assignment(WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 18 points possible 25 minutes

10.3: Africa Map QuizRuins of wall around Great Zimbabwe, Africa: Wikimedia Commons, released into public domainRuins of wall around Great Zimbabwe, Africa: Wikimedia Commons, released into public domain

 

Time to create a Google Earth Tour!

Use the Google Earth (GE) Tour above called Africa_Map_Instructions_WCQ2.kmz as a template to identify and locate 5 geographic features. Save this template to your hard drive where you will remember. Download Google Earth if you do not have the program on your computer. See links below.

Open Google Earth, then select File, Open, and browse to where you saved the Africa_Map_Instructions_WCQ2.kmz tour. Use this GE Tour template to complete your African Map. Enter the name of each feature next to the numbered Placemarks found in this region of the world! Once all 5 features are identified, rename this GE Tour as follows: Africa_Map_YourFirstName_YourLastName
Save your GE Tour on your hard drive.

See detailed instructions for this assignment in the PDF file listed above. The file name is Africa_Map_GE_Tour_WorldCiv_Q1 copy.pdf. Once your GE Tour is completed, take the quiz by clicking next in the program. Make sure when you create your Google Tour that you keep the numbers as requested. In the quiz you will be recording where you put the countries based on the numbers.

Countries/Areas:
_____ Egypt
_____ Zimbabwe
_____ Axum
_____ Kush
_____ Timbuktu

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


10.04: Americas Map Quiz Assignment(WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 18 points possible 10 minutes

Iroquois women grinding corn or dried berries. 1664 engraving, anonymous.: Wikimedia Commons, public domainIroquois women grinding corn or dried berries. 1664 engraving, anonymous.: Wikimedia Commons, public domain10.4: Americas Map Quiz

Time to create a Google Earth Tour!

Use the Google Earth (GE) Tour above called Americas_Map_Instructions_WCQ2.kmz as a template to identify and locate 5 geographic features. Save this template to your hard drive where you will remember. Download Google Earth if you do not have the program on your computer. See links below.

Open Google Earth, then select File, Open, and browse to where you saved the Americas_Map_Instructions_WCQ2.kmz tour. Use this GE Tour template to complete your Americas Map. Enter the name of each feature next to the numbered Placemarks found in this region of the world! Once all 5 features are identified, rename this GE Tour as follows: Americas_Map_YourFirstName_YourLastName
Save your GE Tour on your hard drive.

See detailed instructions for this assignment in the PDF file listed above. The file name is Americas_Map_GE_Tour_WorldCiv_Q1 copy.pdf. Once your GE Tour is completed, take the quiz by clicking next in the program. Make sure when you create your Google Tour that you keep the numbers as requested. In the quiz you will be recording where you put the countries based on the numbers.

(*Hint: Area #1 (South America) fills three countries on the map as 3A, 3B, and 3C. However, the same peoples occupied the three areas.)

***************************************************************************************************

Peoples:
_____ Aztecs
_____ Inca
_____ Iroquois
_____ Maya
_____ Pueblo

 

 

***************************************************************************************************

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


10.05 Africa & The Americas Enrichment Videos(WorldCiv2)

self-scored (no gradebook points) 0 points possible 75 minutes

Instructions for Enrichment Video Access The "Enrichment Videos" for the course are provided by eMedia through the UEN Pioneer website and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies [The videos are accessed with the same username and password as the "Reading Challenge" information]. Archeological site at Machu Picchu, Peru: Wikimedia Commons, Allard Schmidt, released into public domainArcheological site at Machu Picchu, Peru: Wikimedia Commons, Allard Schmidt, released into public domain Accessing the videos is a bit tricky, but it is possible. To access the videos you must do the following:

1) Click on the Pioneer Library log-in link, below. The log-in page will appear in a new window. In the right-hand column, type the information in the boxes as shown below Log-in Name: pioneer Password: [obtained from your EHS teacher via e-mail or from your local school librarian].

Click the LOG-IN graphic The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: "eMedia." The page will open in a new window or a new tab. Close the new eMedia tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the videos. Now you are ready to access the videos. 2) Links to the Enrichment Video topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. Currently there are no assignments connected to the videos. The purpose of the videos is to give information that coincides and/or goes beyond the information normally required by the course giving students the opportunity to gain more knowledge regarding topics of interest to them. 3) Videos may be streamed for viewing, downloaded and viewed as Windows Media, or downloaded and placed on a portable video device such as iPod. 4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor via email. Enrichment Videos for Chapter 10: Africa and the Americas:

Ancient History: The Maya 
Synopsis: The Mayas are best known for their spectacular architecture that made up their city centers, but they are also the most misunderstood of the great ancient civilizations. First, they were not the blood thirsty warrior society as they often portrayed; and second, they were the world's first environmental farmers, creating a thriving agricultural society on poor land through advanced farming techniques and a profound sensitivity to their environment.

NOVA. The Great Inca Rebellion

Synopsis: The largest empire in pre-Columbian America, the Inca, ruled the most advanced civilization in the New World. By the time the Spanish arrived, the Inca had built the breathtaking city of Machu Picchu, pioneered a sophisticated system of high-altitude highways, and forged luxurious treasures of gold. So how could a tiny Spanish army of gold-seeking adventurers bring the powerful Inca Empire, home to over 10 million people, so quickly to its knees?

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


11.00 India, China, & Japan Introduction (WorldCiv2)

Introduction:

The family is the most basic and natural organization with rules of conduct. Powerful families passed rule down from one generation to another in India, China and Japan. The extent of their empires was great. The conditions, advantages, and disadvantages of dynastic rule are worth noting in the ongoing study of systems of government.
The Taj Mahal in India: (Wikimedia Commons, Amal Mongia, CC, Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic)The Taj Mahal in India: (Wikimedia Commons, Amal Mongia, CC, Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic)Chapter 11: India, China, and Japan

Unit 11: India, China, and Japan

Time Period: (550-1650 A.D.)

Geographic Areas: India, China, and Japan

Unit 11 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the history of early India, China and Japan. General assignment information is as follows:

Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on information taken from articles that contain the required readings for the course. The articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

Culture Comparison Chart: Students compare/contrast the cultures of ancient India, China and Japan in selected areas.

Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the unit. Points are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information or any other topic,

feel free to contact your instructor.

Objectives:
Appraise the major characteristics of interregional contact that linked the people of Africa, Asia and Europe.

Describe the impact the Silk Road had on trade across Europe and Asia.
Analyze the impact of Mongol invasion on Europe and Asia
Examine the influence of Chinese culture on Southeast Asia, Korea, and Japan.

Assess the influence of advancing technologies on the development of societies.

Identify the significant technological developments in Tang China.
Investigate key technologies that diffused to Europe from Asia, e.g., gunpowder, printing.

11.01 India, China, & Japan Journal Assignment(WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

Zhao Boju Han Palace, China: Wikimedia Commons, Song dynasty, public domainZhao Boju Han Palace, China: Wikimedia Commons, Song dynasty, public domain "What man is, only his history tells." (Dilthey 15) Dilthey, Wilhelm. Introduction to the Human Sciences: An Attempt to Law a Foundation for the Study of Society and History. N.p.: Wayne State UP, 1988. Print.

Assignment 11.1:

Journal Entry: What cultural elements establish and sustain prominent families? How is this different now than in the days of kings and emperors? How is it the same? What traditions will you establish in your future family to make it strong?

Create and submit your journal entry to your instructor.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


11.02 India China Japan Reading Challenge (WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 35 points possible 30 minutes

11.02 India China Japan Reading ChallengeKublai Khan on a hunting expedition, 1280: Wikimedia Commons, Liu Guandao, public domainKublai Khan on a hunting expedition, 1280: Wikimedia Commons, Liu Guandao, public domain

To submit this assignment:
1. Create the assignment in a word processing document - copy and paste in the questions between the two lines of asterisks, below;
2. When you have finished, click “next” at the bottom of the screen. On the following screen you will find a submit this assignment tab.
3. Copy and paste the assignment into the text box and click [Save changes].
---
Assignment instructions:

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings".

Instructions for Required Reading Access

The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators, and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study.

Accessing the readings is a bit tricky but it is possible. To access the readings you must do the following:

1) Open "a new Tab" on your internet browser and paste the web address for Pioneer Library Online found at the bottom of the assignment page.

The login page will appear. The user name and password is available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: World Book Encyclopedia. The page will open in a new window or a new tab. You can close the new World Book window/tab but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab or you will NOT be able to access the readings, as this exits you from the Pioneer Library.
Now you are ready to access the readings.

2) Links to the Required Readings topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. You can either copy and paste the link into your browser, or just click on it and it should open up to the location needed for the current assignment. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information.

3) In many cases you will not be reading entire articles. The subsection/subsections of each article to be read is/are indicated below the name of the "Required Reading". Read only the subsections indicated. If there is no indication you should read the entire article.

4) If you have any further questions feel free to contact your instructor by email.

Each question is worth 2 points. Partial credit can be given for incomplete answers.

*****************************************************************************************

Required Reading: India
Read the following subsections: Southern India through and including The coming of the Europeans

 

1. Who established the Mughal Empire?

 

2. Who built the Taj Mahal?

 

3. Who was the first European explorer to reach India?

 

4. Which European monarch granted a charter to the East India Company?

 

 

Required Reading: China
Read the following subsections: The period of division through and including The Ming dynasty

 

 

5. Which dynasty replaced the Sui in 618? What cultural accomplishments took place during the new dynasty?

 

6. The Song dynasty firmly established a system of civil service examinations. What shift in power was the result?

 

7. What was introduced during the Song dynasty that increased food production? Why was this increase important?

 

8. Who was Kublai Khan and which peoples did he lead?

 

9. What did the Ming rulers think of Europeans?

 

 

 

Required Readings: Japan
Read the following subsections: History through and including Tokugawa period Kusunoki Masashige, 14th century samurai who fought for Emperor Go-Daigo: Wikimedia Commons, Jim Epler, CC Attribution 2.0 GenericKusunoki Masashige, 14th century samurai who fought for Emperor Go-Daigo: Wikimedia Commons, Jim Epler, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic
Required Reading: Japan: The Samurai

10. What is a kofun? What is a haniwa?

 

 

11. What was the Taika Reform? The reform organized Japanese society following the example of which neighboring country?

 

12. During the Heian era, what name was given to the ruler of the imperial household?

 

13. What were shoen, and why were they established?

 

14. Who were the samurai? What is a shogun? Who was the first person to be given that title?

 

15. Who were daimyo?

 

16. The Tokugawa shogun shared power with which group of Japanese leaders?

 

17. What were the seclusion edicts? In which Japanese city were Dutch and Chinese settlers permitted to live and conduct business?

 

****************************************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links.

From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings.

The Pioneer Library log-in name and password is available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

11.03 India China Japan Culture Assignment(WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 45 points possible 30 minutes

Landscape in the Style of Yan Wengui, Dai Jin (1388–1462): Wikimedia Commons, public domainLandscape in the Style of Yan Wengui, Dai Jin (1388–1462): Wikimedia Commons, public domain

11.03 India China Japan Culture

Using the Reading Challenge links, compare and contrast the cultural development in India, China, and Japan in the following areas:

  • Religion
  • Political structure and government
  • Economic base
  • Geography
  • Lifestyle characteristics.

Show how they were similar and different in the areas that affected the formation of dynasties.  Focus on the time period of early days to 1600's.  You do not need to go into the modern comparisons unless you wish to do so. You may use a chart, a graph, or any other method of showing these contrasts. Edit and submit your information to your instructor.

Grading: Each category is worth 6 points (2 points per civilization). 30 points can be gained by correct information. Conventions are worth 15 points total.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


11.04 India, China, & Japan Enrichment Videos(WorldCiv2)

self-scored (no gradebook points) 0 points possible 180 minutes

Instructions for Enrichment Video Access

The "Enrichment Videos" for the course are provided by eMedia through the UEN Pioneer website and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies [The videos are accessed using the same username and password as the "Reading Challenge" information].

 

Accessing the videos is a bit tricky, but it is possible. To access the videos you must do the following:

1) Click on the Pioneer Library link shown below:

The log-in page will appear in a new window. In the right-hand column type the information in the boxes:

 

Log-in Name: pioneer
Password: [The Pioneer Library password can be obtained from your EHS teacher via email or from your local school librarian].

Click the LOG-IN graphic

 

The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: "eMedia." The page will open in a new window or a new tab. Close the new eMedia window/tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the videos.

Now you are ready to access the videos.

2) Links to the Enrichment Video topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. Currently there are no assignments connected to the videos. The purpose of the videos is to give information that coincides with and goes beyond the information normally required by the course giving students the opportunity to gain more knowledge regarding topics of interest to them.

3) Videos may be streamed for viewing, downloaded and viewed as Windows Media, or downloaded and placed on a portable video device such as iPod.

4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor via email.

 

Enrichment Videos for Chapter 11: India, China, and Japan:

Japan

 

Empires. Japan: Memoirs of a Secret Empire

Synopsis: Between the 16th and 19th centuries Japan experienced a renaissance, going from feudal chaos and violence to a land of ritual refinement and peace. Japan: Memoirs of a Secret Empire brings to life the unknown story of a mysterious empire, its relationship with the West, and the forging of a nation that would emerge as one of the most important countries in the world.

Episode 01-The Way of the Samurai

Synopsis: Episode One begins in the early 16th century, when Portuguese merchants arrive in 1543. Missionaries quickly set out to convert the nation to Christianity. In the same year, a samurai boy named Tokugawa Ieyasu is born to a low ranking daimyo family. As an adult, Tokugawa allies himself with the most powerful rulers in Japan, his samurai armies defeat daimyo rebels at the Battle of Sekigahara, and Ieyasu earns the title of shogun. It is the beginning of a dynasty that will endure for more than 250 years.

Episode 02-The Will of the Shogun

Synopsis: In Episode Two, the shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu has united the daimyo warlords and established a new society based on the samurai ethics of obedience and loyalty. But his grandson, Iemitsu, will rule more harshly. In order to prevent dissension resulting from foreign influence, Iemitsu closes Japan to the western world. It will be more than 200 years before the nation will open its doors again.

Episode 03-The Return of the Barbarians

Synopsis: Episode Three is a portrait of a nation completely isolated from the western world, and a time when Japan experiences a lively period of cultural flowering and intellectual pursuit. By the 18th century, Edo has become the largest and one of the liveliest cities in the world. In 1853, Commodore Mathew C. Perry and his ships sail into Edo Bay, demanding that Japan negotiate and trade with the United States. Ultimately, the Japanese government agrees to trade. Ten years later, the samurai class is disbanded and the Tokugawa Shogunate ends. The modern era of Japan has begun.
 

 

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


11.05 Book Recommendations

These are book recommendations based upon the material.

If you happen to be someone who enjoys reading, the following books can usually be found at your local school or public library. They may interest you if you like learning about this time period. If you have any books that you have read that would fit this section, feel free to message me about them.

The Analects of Confucius

Considered one of the most influential books in history the Analects of Confucius still is a popular read by many. As always, the translation can make or break your enjoyment of this book. You can find many free versions on e-readers and online. Don’t throw this one out until you’ve tried a few translations or learned Chinese.

The Tao de Ching by Lao Tsu

The Tao is a quick read, but understanding it takes some time. Watch for a good translation, as it does make a difference. This book is more poetry than prose and has many things in it that will force you to think. I have found that most people can read this in one setting. Pick it up! (92 pages and you can find this one free online as well)

11.06 Review Quiz Unit 10 and Unit 11

computer-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

Assessment 11.05 Review Quiz Unit 10 and Unit 11

Complete

10 and 11 Review Quiz
Africa and the Americas, India China and Japan

This assignment is found under Review Quiz Unit 10 and Unit 11 on the course website. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do and will provide immediate feedback.

Complete this assignment after you finish reading lesson 10 and lesson 11 coursework..

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


12.00 Renaissance & the Reformation Introduction (WorldCiv2)

Chapter 12: The Renaissance and the ReformationMartin Luther posting his 95 theses in 1517: Wikimedia Commons, public domainMartin Luther posting his 95 theses in 1517: Wikimedia Commons, public domain

Introduction

During the 14th through the 17th centuries, architecture, literature, music, painting, philosophy, and science in Europe blossomed. "Renaissance" means rebirth in the French language. Religion 're-formed' itself with splits away from the Catholic church when Martin Luther nailed his Ninety-Five Theses to a church door in 1517, sparking dissent and discussions about religious practices.

Unit 12: Renaissance and Reformation

Time Period: (1350-1600 A.D.)

Geographic Areas: Europe

Unit 12 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the Renaissance and Reformation periods. General assignment information is as follows.

Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on information taken from articles that contain the required readings for the course. The articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

Renaissance Ad: Students choose a topic of interest on an invention significant to the Renaissance period. Students create an advertisement to entice or inspire potential consumers to purchase the invention.

Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the unit. Points are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information or any other topic,

feel free to contact your instructor.

Objective:
Assess the importance of intellectual and cultural change on early modern society.

Compare the 'rebirth' of European culture during the Renaissance with the flowering Chinese culture of the Ming dynasty: i.e., literature, art, architecture, the humanities.
Examine the key events and ideas of the Protestant Reformation, the Counter Reformation, and Neo-Confucianism.

12.01 Renaissance & Reformation Journal Assignment(WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

Bauernhochzeit - peasants celebrating, c. 1567: Wikimedia Commons, Pieter Brueghel the Elder, public domainBauernhochzeit - peasants celebrating, c. 1567: Wikimedia Commons, Pieter Brueghel the Elder, public domain "History teaches us that men and nations behave wisely once they have exhausted all other alternatives. -Abba Eban" (Szasz 1) Szasz, Ferenc M. "Quotations about History." Williamcronon.net. William Cronon, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2005. Web. 20 Dec. 2012.

Assignment instructions: 12.1:

Journal Entry:

What motivates people to create new ideas and improvements in lifestyle? Under what circumstances do you do your very best work? To what extent are you motivated by money? How do you feel about money as a motivating factor for achievement? What reasons are there for and against doing things for money?

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


12.02 Renaissance and Reformation Reading Challenge (WorldCiv2)

Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links.

From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings.

The Pioneer Library log-in name and password are available from your teacher or your local school librarian.

teacher-scored 36 points possible 30 minutes

12.2 Renaissance and Reformation Reading Challenge

To submit this assignment:
1. Create the assignment in a word processing document--copy and paste in the questions between the two lines of asterisks, below.
2. When you have finished, click “next” at the bottom of the screen. On the following screen you will find a submit this assignment tab.
3. Copy and paste the assignment into the text box and click [Save changes].
---
Assignment instructions:

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings."

Instructions for Required Reading Access

The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators, and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study.

Accessing the readings is a bit tricky, but it is possible. To access the readings you must do the following:

1) Open 'a new Tab' on your internet browser and paste the web address for Pioneer Library Online found at the bottom of the assignment page.

The log-in page will appear. The user name and password is available from your local school librarian or from your EHS teacher.

The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: World Book Encyclopedia. The page will open in a new window or a new tab. You can close the new World Book window/tab but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab or you will NOT be able to access the readings, as this exits you from the Pioneer Library.
Now you are ready to access the readings.

2) Links to the Required Readings topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. You can either copy and paste the link into your browser, or just click on it and it should open up to the location needed for the current assignment. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information.

3) In many cases you will not be reading entire articles. The subsection/subsections of each article to be read is/are indicated below the name of the "Required Reading". Read only the subsections indicated. If there is no indication you should read the entire article.

4) If you have any further questions feel free to contact your instructor by email.

Each question is worth 2 points. Partial credit can be given for incomplete answers.
*************************************************************************************

Required Reading: The Renaissance:

 

1. What was the most significant intellectual movement of the Renaissance?Michelangelo's sculpture Pietà in St. Peter's Basilica: Wikimedia Commons, Stanislav Traykov, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedMichelangelo's sculpture Pietà in St. Peter's Basilica: Wikimedia Commons, Stanislav Traykov, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

 

2. What is meant by classical antiquity?

 

3. How did the Renaissance spread from Italy?

 

4. What are some lasting achievements of the Renaissance?

 

5. How did many attitudes and ideas of the Renaissance differ from those of the Middle Ages?

 

6. What three men dominated Italian arts during the late 1400's and early 1500's?

 

7. How did the signorial and republican governments of the Italian cities promote the Renaissance?

 

8. Define philology. Why was philology studied during the Renaissance?

 

9. What was The Book of the Courtier, and why was it important?

 

10. Name two Christian humanists. What did they refuse to do?

 

 

 

Required Reading: The Reformation

 

11. What is the Reformation, and who began the movement?

 

12. What was the Edict of Worms?

 

13. Who were the Anabaptists, and what did they teach?

 

14. Who was John Calvin, and what were his followers called?

 

15. Which British monarch was responsible for starting the English Reformation? Describe the situation involving the monarch that caused the break with the Catholic Church.

16. How did the Irish respond to the Reformation? How has it led to problems today?

17. What are the results of the Reformation?

 

18. What was the Protestant ethic?

 

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


12.03 Renaissance Ad Assignment(WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 40 minutes

12.03 Renaissance Advertisement Assignment instructions:

Create a one-page magazine advertisement, using one of the major accomplishments or inventions of a famous person of the Renaissance as the subject of your ad. When finished, attach the ad and submit it to your instructor.

Along with your ad, include answers to the following planning questions in the comments section:

1. What is the major idea or concept that will be portrayed in the ad?

2. What accompanying ideas are important to be displayed in the ad(at least six)? Where can you find these ideas? (MLA format citations!)

3. What will be used as a lead illustration or gimmick to attract immediate attention?

4. Make a rough draft diagram showing placement of graphic and text materials used in the ad. Place the six accompanying ideas in the ad so as to be informative but not overpowering. You may wish to create a couple of small columns at the bottom of the ad with two or three short paragraphs in small print. Designate the use of color and other special features (shading, 3d, etc.). Make every effort to make your product professional and high quality.

Grading Criteria:

Is the major idea clearly the focus of the ad? Are the accompanying items displayed in the ad helpful for expressing the main ideas? Is there sufficient information in the ad to be informative and interesting? Does it make the reader want to purchase or view the item? Are there citations that are correct for the item? How well did the ad attract attention and get the point across? What techniques used in the ad were particularly effective? Does the ad really "sell" the major idea or product?

 
Excellent - 6
Good - 5
Satisfactory - 3
Needs Improvement - 1
Subject Knowledge Subject knowledge is evident throughout the project. All information is clear, appropriate, and correct. The major idea of the project is portrayed and understandable. Subject knowledge is evident in much of the project. Most information is clear, appropriate, and correct. The major idea of the project is decipherable. Some subject knowledge is evident. Some Information is confusing, incorrect, or flawed. The major idea is hard to find. Subject knowledge is not evident. Information is confusing, incorrect, or flawed. The major idea is not evident.
Organization The sequence of information is logical and intuitive. The product is professional and high quality. The sequence of information is logical. The product is somewhat professional and of a good quality. The sequence of information is somewhat logical. It was attempted to make the project professional. The sequence of information is not logical. Unprofessional and not cleanly created.
Originality The project shows significant evidence of originality and inventiveness. The majority of the content and many of the ideas are fresh, original, and inventive. It really sells the major idea/product. The project shows some evidence of originality and inventiveness. It has the potential to sell the major idea or product. The work is an extensive collection and rehash of other people's ideas, products, and images. There is little evidence of new thought or inventiveness. It would not sell the major idea/product. The work is a minimal collection or rehash of other people's ideas, products, and images. There is no evidence of new thought. It would not sell the major idea/product.
Technical Project runs perfectly with no problems. The add attracts attention and the techniques are effective. There are no spelling or grammatical errors. Project runs adequately with minor technical problems. The add attracts attention and some techniques are effective. There are three to six grammatical or spelling errors. Project runs minimally. The add is distracting or doesn't catch the readers attention. There are six to ten grammatical or spelling errors. Project does not run satisfactorily. There are too many errors, and it is distracting and doesn't catch the readers attention. There are a lot of grammatical and spelling errors.
Ideas The six ideas are displayed and citations are provided to show where the ideas were found. The six ideas are displayed and some citations are provided to show where the ideas were found. Some ideas are displayed and some citations are provided to show where the ideas were found. Missing citations and ideas.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


12.04 Renaissance & Reformation Enrichment Videos(WorldCiv2)

self-scored (no gradebook points) 0 points possible 30 minutes

Instructions for Enrichment Video Access

The "Enrichment Videos" for the course are provided by eMedia through the UEN Pioneer website and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies [The videos are accessed with the same username and password as the "Reading Challenge" information].

Accessing the videos is a bit tricky, but it is possible. To access the videos you must do the following: 1) Click on the Pioneer Library link shown below. The log-in page will appear in a new window. In the right-hand column type the information in the boxes as shown:

Log-in Name: pioneer Password: [The Pioneer Library password can be obtained from your EHS teacher via email or from your local school librarian].

Click the LOG-IN graphic.

The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: "eMedia." The page will open in a new window or a new tab. Close the new eMedia tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the videos.

Now you are ready to access the videos.

2) Links to the Enrichment Video topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. Currently there are no assignments connected to the videos. The purpose of the videos is to give information that coincides with and goes beyond the information normally required by the course giving students the opportunity to gain more knowledge regarding topics of interest to them.

3) Videos may be streamed for viewing, downloaded and viewed as Windows Media, or downloaded and placed on a portable video device such as iPod.

4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor via email.

Enrichment Videos for Chapter 12: Renaissance and Reformation: The Renaissance: Italy

Empires: The Medici Godfathers of the Renaissance Part 1- Birth of a Dynasty Synopsis: From a small Italian community in 15th century Florence, the Medici family would rise to rule Europe in many ways. Using charm, patronage, skill, duplicity and ruthlessness, they would amass unparalleled wealth and unprecedented power. An epic drama played out in the courts, cathedrals and palaces of Europe, this series is both the tale of one family's powerful ambition and of Europe's tortured struggle to emerge from the ravages of the Dark Ages. Part One, Birth of a Dynasty, begins in the year 1400. Europe, a continent torn apart by war and plague is dominated by the authority of the Catholic Church. But in the towns and cities live merchants and entrepreneurs who sense that their world is changing. This is especially true in cosmopolitan cities like Florence, home of Cosimo de'Medici.

Empires: The Medici Godfathers of the Renaissance Part 2- The Magnificent Medici Synopsis: From a small Italian community in 15th century Florence, the Medici family would rise to rule Europe in many ways. Using charm, patronage, skill, duplicity and ruthlessness, they would amass unparalleled wealth and unprecedented power. An epic drama played out in the courts, cathedrals and palaces of Europe, this series is both the tale of one family's powerful ambition and of Europe's tortured struggle to emerge from the ravages of the Dark Ages. Part Two, The Magnificent Medici, begins with Lorenzo de'Medici, the 17-year-old heir to the dynasty. The Medici still dominate Florence, but now take extra precautions. For 25 years, Lorenzo fosters art and philosophy while surviving rivals' assassination attempts. When Lorenzo dies aged 42, the Medici are banished from Florence at the urging of the zealot monk, Savonarola.

Empires: The Medici Godfathers of the Renaissance Part 3- The Medici Popes
Synopsis: From a small Italian community in 15th century Florence, the Medici family would rise to rule Europe in many ways. Using charm, patronage, skill, duplicity and ruthlessness, they would amass unparalleled wealth and unprecedented power. An epic drama played out in the courts, cathedrals and palaces of Europe, this series is both the tale of one family's powerful ambition and of Europe's tortured struggle to emerge from the ravages of the Dark Ages. Part Three, The Medici Popes, shows the heirs of the Medici dynasty searching for a path back to power. By 1512, with the help of Pope Julius II, the exiles assemble an army and regain control of their city, but not the loyalty of the people of Florence. When Giovanni de'Medici becomes Pope Leo X, he builds a reputation for lavish excess and the sale of forgiveness. This leads to Martin Luther's "95 Theses" and sparks a religious revolution. After Leo's death, his cousin, Giulio, is subsequently crowned Pope Clement VII and must deal with the fall-out from Luther's reformation. In 1534, exhausted by the turmoil of his reign, Clement dies and the disastrous era of the Medici popes is over.

Empires: The Medici Godfathers of the Renaissance Part 4- Power vs. Truth 
Synopsis: From a small Italian community in 15th century Florence, the Medici family would rise to rule Europe in many ways. Using charm, patronage, skill, duplicity and ruthlessness, they would amass unparalleled wealth and unprecedented power. An epic drama played out in the courts, cathedrals and palaces of Europe, this series is both the tale of one family's powerful ambition and of Europe's tortured struggle to emerge from the ravages of the Dark Ages. Part Four, Power vs Truth, begins with a 17-year-old, plucked from obscurity to lead Florence. His rivals think he's a puppet, but Cosimo de'Medici, the new Duke of Florence, is ambitious. Soon, all of Tuscany capitulates to the Medici. Cosimo's cultural campaign is capped with a book which seals the reputation of the Medici forever. The "Lives of the Artists" is the first ever work of art history. Under Cosimo I, the Medici have scaled the heights of international royalty. They seem unassailable. Until, well after Cosimo's reign, the Medici family betrays their tutor, Galileo Galilei, to the Inquisition. They have failed to sustain what had set them apart from their rivals and the Renaisssance in Italy is over.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


12.05 Book Recommendations

These are recommendations based upon the subject matter.

If you happen to be someone who enjoys reading, the following books can usually be found at your local school or public library. They may interest you if you like learning about this time period. If you have any books that you have read that would fit this section, feel free to message me about them.

The River of Grace: The Story of John Calvin by Joyce McPherson

This biography of John Calvin traces his life from young adult to his conversion to Protestantism. It is geared towards younger audiences, but even older readers will appreciate the insights and information. (159 pages)

Tyndale: The Man who gave God an English voice by David Teems

William Tyndale dared to translate the Bible into English. This book outlines his attempts to bring Christian ideals to the people so that they could learn them themselves instead of relying upon someone else. Tyndale paid the ultimate price for his work: he was strangled and burned at the stake.

The Agony and the Ecstasy: A Biographical Novel of Michelangelo by Irving Stone

I don’t know how much of this book is novel versus actual history, but it is an interesting read for any who like art or the Renaissance. Some of the reviews from students that I have seen aren’t as positive, so it may be a 'hit or miss' type of book. The length of the book may be the most daunting feature for students. (776 pages)

13.00 European Expansion Introduction (WorldCiv2)

Detail from a map, 1590: Magellan's ship Victoria: Wikimedia Commons, Ortelius, public domainDetail from a map, 1590: Magellan's ship Victoria: Wikimedia Commons, Ortelius, public domainChapter 13: Exploration & Expansion (1450 - 1750)

Introduction:

Today, we take exploration for granted. Explorers, from the make-believe like Dora the Explorer to the scientific NASA's Mars Rover, are a normal part of our everyday lives. It hasn't always been that way. From 1450 through 1750, adventurers like John Cabot and James Cook ventured outside their comfort zones and explored the unknown world.

Unit 13: Exploration and Expansion

Time Period: (1450 – 1750 A.D.)

Geographic Areas: Africa, Americas, and Asia

Unit 13 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the era of European exploration and expansion into other areas of the world.

General assignment information is as follows--

Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on information taken from articles that contain the required readings for the course. The articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

Essay: Students choose an explorer from the period and write a five-paragraph essay on his life and discoveries.

Geospatial Map: Students are provided with the tools to research information and create an animated map that depicts visual information on a selected topic. Questions are included that students will research and answer.

Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the unit. Points are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information or any other topic, please feel free to contact your instructor.

Objectives:
Compare and contrast the founding and organization of Spanish and Portuguese colonial empires to northern European trading empires.

Assess the expansion of Portugal and Spain on Africa, India, and Southwest Asia.
Examine the political and military conflict between the Spanish, Portuguese, and the peoples of the New World.
Assess the impact of the exchange of ideas and goods on the New and Old Worlds.
Investigate French, Dutch, and English merchants’ impact on European overseas expansion.

13.01 European Expansion Journal Assignment(WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

Assignment instructions:Magellan space probe being deployed: Wikimedia Commons, NASA, public domainMagellan space probe being deployed: Wikimedia Commons, NASA, public domain "History will absolve me." (Castro) Castro, Fidel. "History Will Absolve Me." Castro Internet Archive. Marxists.org, 1997. Web. 3 Jan. 2013.

13.01:

Journal Entry: What motivates people to take risks and explore new areas in life? How much of a risk taker are you? Identify some areas in which you are willing to take risks, and explain why you are willing to do so.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


13.02 European Expansion Reading Challenge (WorldCiv2)

Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links.

From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings.

The log-in page will appear. The user name and password are available from your local school librarian or from your EHS teacher.

teacher-scored 26 points possible 35 minutes

13.02 Expansion Reading Challenge

To submit this assignment:
1. Create the assignment in a word processing document--copy and paste in the questions between the two lines of asterisks, below.
2. When you have finished, click “next” at the bottom of the screen. On the following screen you will find a "submit this" assignment tab.
3. Copy and paste the assignment into the text box and click [Save changes].
---
Assignment instructions:

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings."

Instructions for Required Reading Access

The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators, and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study.

Accessing the readings is a bit tricky, but it is possible. To access the readings you must do the following:

1) Open 'a new Tab' on your internet browser and paste the web address for Pioneer Library Online found at the bottom of the assignment page.

The log-in page will appear. The user name and password is available from your local school librarian or from your EHS teacher.

The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: "World Book Encyclopedia." The page will open in a new window or a new tab. You can close the new World Book window/tab but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab or you will NOT be able to access the readings, as this exits you from the Pioneer Library.
Now you are ready to access the readings.

2) Links to the Required Readings topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. You can either copy and paste the link into your browser, or just click on it and it should open up to the location needed for the current assignment. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information.

3) In many cases you will not be reading entire articles. The subsection/subsections of each article to be read is/are indicated below the name of the "Required Reading". Read only the subsections indicated. If there is no indication you should read the entire article.

4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor by email.

Each question is worth 2 points. Partial credit can be awarded for incomplete answers.

**************************************************************************************************

Required Readings: The great age of European exploration and Linking the globe
Read the following subsections: Linking the globe through and including Exploring the Pacific

 

1. What is a caravel? an astrolobe and a quadrant? and how did they impact exploration by sea?Looking down at the North Pole and Arctic Ocean: Wikimedia Commons, CIA World Factbook, public domainLooking down at the North Pole and Arctic Ocean: Wikimedia Commons, CIA World Factbook, public domain

 

2. Which two European countries took the lead in launching voyages to discover a direct ocean route to the Indies?

 

3. The French and English traded with the Indians in North America for what items?

 

4. Samuel de Champlain founded which city? What area did he chart?

 

5. What great river was reached by Louis Jolliet and Jacques Marquette ?

 

6. Who claimed Louisiana for France? Where did he travel?

 

7. Where was the first permanent English settlement in North America founded?

 

8. England was able to claim Eastern Canada as a result of the voyages of which famous explorer?

 

9. Who were the two army officers who explored the Pacific Northwest? What was the name of their guide and interpreter?

 

10. Who established the first European colony in Alaska?

 

11. Describe two developments that made long Pacific voyages safer than they had been.

 

12. Explorers from which European country first reached Australia, Tasmania and New Zealand?

 

13. Which great explorer of the Pacific was killed in Hawaii?

 

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


13.03 Explorer Essay Assignment(WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 70 points possible 60 minutes

Henry Hudson's Half Moon sailing ship: Wikimedia Commons, public domainHenry Hudson's Half Moon sailing ship: Wikimedia Commons, public domainAssignment 13.03 Explorer Essay Assignment instructions: Choose any one of the explorers mentioned in the Required Readings of 13.02, do additional research, and write an original, five-paragraph essay about the individual.

Include general biographical information, his motivation for wanting to explore, his voyages of discovery and his impact on Europe and the rest of the world.

Do not copy and paste--write the essay in your own words.

You need at least three citations in proper MLA format and in-text citations in your paper. Your paper needs to be 350 words long (at least).

Submit your essay to your instructor. Grading Criteria:

Is the major idea clear and easily identified in the introduction? Are all important new ideas or terms well defined? Is the essay plainly divided into at least five major sections: introduction (one paragraph), body (three paragraphs), and conclusion/summary (one paragraph.) Is the supporting information organized effectively and tied in to the main idea? Is the major idea backed up by the supporting information and is the information accurate? Are there in-text citations to help support the information? Does the conclusion sum up the essay well and make a strong final statement? Is the works cited page adequate and documented accurately? (Are the citations complete? Are there in-text citations to show where the information is from? Use www.easybib.com if needed):

 
14
11
8
5
1
Ideas The major idea is clear and easily identified. All important ideas and terms are well defined. Major ideas are decipherable. Most ideas and terms are defined. Some major ideas are identified. One or two major ideas are identified. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. There is no central theme or purpose.
Organization The essay is plainly divided into at least 5 major paragraphs. It is easy to see that the student can organize a 5 paragraph essay. Essay is divided into paragraphs that can be deciphered. Some paragraphs lead the reader through the paper. Paragraphs are missing, but it does follow the assignment. Introduction or conclusion is missing. Paragraphing is disorganized. Does not follow paper assignment.
Presentation The Works Cited page is adequate and documented accurately, without the use of wikipedia. There are also in-text citations. The Works Cited page is mostly adequate and many of the citations are correct. All sources are correctly cited but from Wikipedia. All sources are incorrectly cited and many are from Wikipedia. There is no Works Cited page.
Flow The major idea is backed up by the supporting information and that information is accurate. The major idea has some supporting information that is either weak or inaccurate. The major idea has some back up information but is mostly left on its own, or is incorrect. Awkward insertion of wording that does not help the information to flow. There is no major idea. Supporting information does not exist.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of punctuation, grammar, usage, and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message. There are no spelling mistakes or punctuation errors present. Less than three spelling, punctuation or other convention errors are present. Three to six spelling errors or other conventions present. Six to ten spelling errors or other conventions present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage and grammar and/or paragraphing distract the reader from the text and make it difficult to read. 16 or more spelling errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


13.04: Rivers of North America Map Quiz (WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 30 minutes

13.04: Rivers of North America Map Study Guide and "Quiz"

1. Visit the North American Rivers map quiz using the link above.

2. There are 15 questions. Do your best!

3. At the end of your quiz take a screen shot of your percentage and email it to leslie.phillips@ehs.uen.org with your name and 13.04 North American Rivers Map as the title of the email. This will become your score for the quiz.

If you do not know how to take a screen shot, please view the instructions at the link provided above. There are instructions for Windows, Mac, iPhone, iPod, iPad, KDE, and GNOME.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


13.05 European Expansion Enrichment Videos(WorldCiv2)

self-scored (no gradebook points) 0 points possible 45 minutes

Instructions for Enrichment Video Access Hand-drawn map from the Lewis and Clark Expedition, ca. 1800: Wikimedia Commons, public domainHand-drawn map from the Lewis and Clark Expedition, ca. 1800: Wikimedia Commons, public domain The "Enrichment Videos" for the course are provided by eMedia through the UEN Pioneer website and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies [The videos are accessed using the same username and password as the "Reading Challenge" information]. Accessing the videos is a bit tricky but it is possible. To access the videos, you must do the following:

1) Click on the Pioneer Library link shown below: The login page will appear in a new window. In the right-hand column type the information in the boxes as shown:

Log-in Name: pioneer Password: [The Pioneer Library password can be obtained from your EHS teacher via email or from your local school librarian].

Click the LOG-IN graphic. The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: "eMedia." The page will open in a new window or a new tab. Close the new eMedia tab,but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the videos. Now you are ready to access the videos. 2) Links to the Enrichment Video topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. Currently there are no assignments connected to the videos. The purpose of the videos is to give information that coincides and/or goes beyond the information normally required by the course giving students the opportunity to gain more knowledge regarding topics of interest to them. 3) Videos may be streamed for viewing, downloaded and viewed as Windows Media, or downloaded and placed on a portable video device such as iPod. 4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor via email.

Enrichment Videos for Chapter 13: European Expansion: Turning Points in History: Age of Exploration

Synopsis: This quick video looks at explorers from the time period, why they went and where they went. It also addresses how humans still continue to explore the world around them.

Pioneer Library

Henry Hudson

Synopsis: This video looks at Henry Hudson's exploration of North America in his search for a passageway across.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


13.06 Review Quiz Unit 12 and Unit 13

computer-scored 13 points possible 15 minutes

Assessment 13.06 Review Quiz Unit 12 and Unit 13

Complete

12 and 13 Review Quiz
Renaissance and Reformation, Absolute Monarchs

This assignment is found under Review Quiz Unit 12 and Unit 13 on the course website. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do and will provide immediate feedback.

Complete this assignment after you finish reading lesson 12 and lesson 13 coursework..

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


14.00 Absolute Monarchs Introduction (WorldCiv2)

Chapter 14: The Absolute Monarchs of Europe (1500 - 1795)Queen Elizabeth I of England, ca. 1580: Wikimedia Commons, unknown artist, public domainQueen Elizabeth I of England, ca. 1580: Wikimedia Commons, unknown artist, public domain

Introduction

The age of absolutism was a period of complete control by the monarchs of Europe of their peoples. Kings like Philip II of Spain, King Frederick William I, Louis XIV, and Peter the Great literally ruled the world.

Unit 14: Age of Absolutism / Age of Absolute Monarchs

Time Period: (1500 – 1795 A. D.)

Geographic Areas: Europe and Asia

Unit 14 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the Age of Absolutism. General assignment information is as follows:

Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on information taken from articles that contain the required readings for the course. The articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

Comparison Chart: Students create a chart that compares/contrasts different actions/lives of monarchs from the period.

Monarch Newspaper: Students create a detailed newspaper on the life of a monarch from the period.

Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the unit. Points are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information, or any other topic, please feel free to contact your instructor.

Objectives:
Investigate the rise and development of the modern European political system.

Describe the political and economic importance of the growth of towns in northern Europe.
Explain the political and economic consequences of the rise of national monarchies.
Examine the influence of mercantilism and commercial capitalism on France, England, and the Netherlands.

Assess the importance of intellectual and cultural change on early modern society.

Examine the roles and conditions of men, women, and children in European monarchies.

14.01 Absolute Monarchs Journal Assignment(WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

"Writing history is a perpetual exercise in judgment.-Cushing Strout" (Szasz 2) Szasz, Ferenc M. "Quotations about History." Williamcronon.net. William Cronon, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2005. Web. 20 Dec. 2012.

Assignment instructions: 14.1:

Journal Entry: What are the characteristics of a successful monarchy? When can rule by one person be effective and good for a country? Are there companies today that operate the same way monarchies do? What are the advantages and disadvantages? Submit your journal entry to your instructor.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


14.02 Monarchs Reading Challenge (WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 64 points possible 40 minutes

14.02 Monarchs Reading ChallengeThe coronation of Charlemagne by Pope Leo III: Wikimedia Commons, public domainThe coronation of Charlemagne by Pope Leo III: Wikimedia Commons, public domain

Assignment instructions:

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings" for Chapter 14. Submit your assignment to your instructor.

Each question is worth 2 points. Partial credit will be given for incomplete answers.

 

 

Required Reading: France
Read the following subsections: History through and including The French Revolution

1. What name did the Romans call the region we now call France?

 

2. Who was Charlemagne and what title was he given by Pope Leo III?

 

3. The Capetian dynasty is considered by historians to be the beginning of what modern nation?

 

4. Who established the first Estates-General? This group was the ancestor of which modern French political body?

 

5. Which French monarch began the Hundreds Years' War with England?

 

6. Which French king declared: "I am the State" ?

 

7. Which three groups were represented in the Estates-General? Which group declared themselves a National Assembly?

 

8. What is the Reign of Terror? What radical leader gained power during the Reign of Terror?

 

 

 

Required Reading: Germany
Read the following subsections: History through and including The rise of Prussia

9. What name did the Romans call the German tribes?

 

 

10. What is a duchie? How many duchies were there in Germany? Name them:

 

11. Who was Otto I and what title was he given? What Empire was established?

 

12. What was the Hanseatic League? Why was it important?

 

13. Which treaty ended the Thirty Years' War?

 

14. Who were the Hohenzollern family? What area did they enlarge and make a great power in Europe?

 

 

 

Required Reading: Russia
Read the following subsections: History through and including Catherine the Great

 

 

15. The ruler of Kiev was known by what official name?

 

16. What was the name of the Mongol armies who conquered Kiev?

 

17. What did the Mongols hope to accomplish?

 

18. Which Russian ruler made the final break from Mongol control in 1480?

 

19. Who was the first czar? What type of character did he possess?

 

20. Who were the service gentry? What became the economic basis of Russian power?

 

21. Which ruler introduced Western-type clothing, factories, and schools into Russian society?

 

22. Under which female ruler did Russia gain importance as a world power?

 

 

Required Reading: Spain
Read the following subsections: History through and including Conflict with the United Kingdom

23. What name did the Romans give to the Iberian peninsula?

 

 

24. Which group invaded Spain beginning in 711? What works did they make available to European scholars?

 

25. Who was El Cid?

 

26. What were the three Christian kingdoms in Spain during the time that the Kingdom of Granada was Muslim?

 

27. Who established the Spanish Inquisition? What was its purpose?

 

28. Which navigator was sent on a voyage by Ferdinand and Isabella and what did he discover?

 

29. Which grandson of Ferdinand and Isabella became Holy Roman Emperor?

 

30. Who was Charles's son? What accomplishments occurred during his reign?

 

31. What was the Spanish Armada? Was it successful? Describe the events of the battle with England:

 

32. What was the outcome of the War of the Spanish Succession?

 

 

*********************************************************************************************************

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links.

From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings.

The Pioneer Library log-in name and password are available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

14.03 Monarch Comparison Assignment(WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 40 minutes

Peter the Great, about 1700: Wikimedia Commons, Jean-Marc Nattier, public domainPeter the Great, about 1700: Wikimedia Commons, Jean-Marc Nattier, public domain

14.03 Monarch Comparison

Create a chart that compares and contrasts the accomplishments, policies, and characteristics of Philip II of Spain, Louis XIV, King Frederick William I, and Peter the Great.

When you have finished, attach and submit the chart to your instructor.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


14.04 Monarchs Newspaper(WorldCiv2)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 50 minutes

14.04 Monarchs NewspaperFrederick William I, 1732, giving a welcome to the protestant emigrants from Salzburg: Wikimedia Commons, Konstantin Johann Franz Cretius, public domainFrederick William I, 1732, giving a welcome to the protestant emigrants from Salzburg: Wikimedia Commons, Konstantin Johann Franz Cretius, public domain

Create an original newspaper page for one of the monarchs from this time period (e.g. Philip II of Spain, Louis XIV, King Frederick William I, or Peter the Great.), or use the Thirty Years' War as your subject.

This page should include THREE articles, specifically more than one story about the individual's accomplishments. Use your local newspaper as an example. Include at least:

1: factual ("news") story,

2: a human interest ("feature") story and

3: an opinion piece ("editorial") about him.

Gather materials from other sources besides your readings to use in the paper. (The Internet would be ideal to locate this information.) Gather enough material to make an informative and creative newspaper page. You will need at least three sources. Write in your own words--do not copy and paste. Create a headline for each story. You may include a picture, graph or map if it helps clarify your stories. Save everything to one document, but you don't have to format it to look like a newspaper. When you have finished, attach the articles (at least 700 words) and submit to your instructor.

 
5
4
3
2
1
Ideas The major idea is clear and easily identified. Each of the articles focuses on the required elements. Major ideas are decipherable. Most ideas and terms are defined. Some major ideas are identified. One or two major ideas are identified. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. There is no central theme or purpose.
Organization The newspaper page shows 3 distinct articles.  Each article shows solid organizational format. Three articles are present; organization is not as clear. Three articles are present; organization of information within articles isn't clear. Missing one or more of the articles.  Organization unclear Information not organized into distinct articles.  No clear organization.
Presentation Articles are set up in a newspaper-looking format which shows creativity and attention to presentation. Format includes each section, but lacking presentation detail Articles are just listed, but not organized into a newspaper page format. Information isn't separated into the 3 required areas.  No attempt made to follow presentation guidelines.
Flow The major idea is backed up by the supporting information and that information is accurate. The major idea has some supporting information that is either weak or inaccurate. The major idea has some back up information but is mostly left on its own, or is incorrect. Awkward insertion of wording that does not help the information to flow. There is no major idea. Supporting information does not exist.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of punctuation, grammar, usage, and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message. There are no spelling mistakes or punctuation errors present. Less than three spelling, punctuation or other convention errors are present. Three to six spelling errors or other conventions present. Six to ten spelling errors or other conventions present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage and grammar and/or paragraphing distract the reader from the text and make it difficult to read. 16 or more spelling errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


14.05 Book Recommendations

These are book recommendations based upon the subject matter.

If you happen to be someone who enjoys reading, the following books can usually be found at your local school or public library. They may interest you if you like learning about this time period. If you have any books that you have read that would fit this section, feel free to message me about them.

Catherine the Great: Portrait of a Woman by Robert K. Massie

Sophia was a German princess who was married to a Russian prince. She changed her name to Catherine and became one of the most influential rulers that the Russian nation had. She is remembered in history as Catherine the Great. This book outlines her life and gives the reader a more human take on her life. (672 pages)

The Complete Works of Shakespeare

Shakespeare’s influence on the modern English language is huge. Any of his works will have vocabulary from the time as well as heroes, villains, idiots and dirty jokes. If the language is too hard for you, I recommend the “No Fear Shakespeare” books as they give you translations and information on the same page.

The Prince by Machiavelli

Every time I’ve had students read this book (whether in class or on their own) I am always amazed at the responses I get. It is a 'how-to' manual for taking over a business, neighborhood or even a government. At only 80 pages it’s not exactly a quick read as the grammar and historical influences do require time to understand. However, you won't regret it!

Utopia by Sir Thomas Moore

What is a Utopia? This book outlines Sir Thomas More’s ideas for the perfect society. (He also coined the word Utopia, which means “in no place.”) This book offers arguments and critiques of the way society at the time was run; however, it is still relevant in many ways today. Make sure that you get a good translation though (as it makes a HUGE difference). 96 pages.

14.06 Review Quiz Unit 14 and Quarter 2

computer-scored 25 points possible 15 minutes

Assessment 14.05 Review Quiz Unit 14 and Quarter 2

Complete

14 and Quarter 2 Review Quiz
Renaissance and Reformation, Absolute Monarchs

This assignment is found under Review Quiz Unit 14 and Quarter 2 on the course website. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do and will provide immediate feedback.

Complete this assignment after you finish reading lesson 14 and all of the Quarter 2 coursework..

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.