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World Civilizations, 1st Quarter

00.0 Start Here - Introduction to this Class (World Civilizations)

Course Description

The study of World Civilizations emphasizes the increasing interrelationships over time of the world’s peoples. These interrelationships have developed in two major arenas.

First, the relationships have developed among major regions of the world: East Asia, South Asia, Southwest Asia (Middle East), Africa, Europe, North America and Latin America.

Second, they have developed within all aspects of human activity: political, economic, social, philosophical and religious, scientific and technological, and artistic.

Class Overview

The World Civilizations course is a full 1.0 credit but is broken into four quarter classes. You may enroll for one, two, three or all four quarters, BUT you can enroll in only one quarter at a time!

Each quarter of World Civilizations generates a .25 credit. If you do not turn in any work within the first week after you register, you may be dropped from this course.

You have up to 10 weeks to finish each quarter after you are enrolled. Please following the pacing recommendations for each assignment. Once you have completed a quarter (including all work and tests), you can request to be enrolled in the next quarter.

About the Curriculum

The class works like this. . . First you read the lessons (if you've done it right you started with Module 1, are now reading Module 2, move to Module 3, and finally Module 4).  The lessons have a little chain link next to them.  This is where you'll find the assignments.  Follow the instructions then you can either click next OR go back to the home page and click on the assignment submission page.  The assignment submission links have a paper with an "A" in it. The last link you'll see is the quiz link.  It has a "Q" next to it.  

Each Module will be locked until you have completed the prior Module.  To keep track of what you've done look along the left side of the home page.  There are check marks there.  Completed links have green checks.  Incomplete links have yellow checks. 

When you have finished Module 3, which is the class work, please move to Module 4 and submit the "Ready" assignment.

Required Readings

The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators, and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study. You need to be accessing the readings from a home computer--NOT a school computer lab.(Some school computer labs may work, but it depends on how the network is set up.) Accessing the readings is bit tricky. To access the readings you must do the following:

1) Open "a new Tab" on your internet browser and paste in the Utah Online Library (Pioneer Library) URL. The log-in page will appear. On the right-hand side, type the information in the boxes as shown below: Utah Student Log-in Enter the log-in name and password found on your dashboard--the main class page when you are logged in to your EHS class.

Log-in Name: online
Password: [Check the dashboard page or contact your EHS teacher or school librarian for the current password]

Click the LOG-IN graphic The Utah Online Library page will appear. Click on the last link in the first column titled: World Book Encyclopedia. The page will open in a new window or a new tab. Close or minimize the new World Book window/tab, but DO NOT close the original Utah Online Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings (you can minimize the window to get it out of the way). Now you are ready to access the readings.

2) The readings are divided by Chapters. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information on the second pages.

3) In many cases you will not be reading entire articles. The subsection/subsections of each article to be read is/are indicated below the name of the "Required Reading". Read only the subsections indicated. If there is no indication, you should read the entire article.

4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor by e-mail.

How work is graded

Most assignments have a corresponding rubric and a minimum score requirement. A general rule to understanding the score received is to check the rubric to see where points were lost. Assignments may be resubmitted for more credit. Work should be checked for errors before it is submitted. All work is graded as in the order it is turned in and in a timely manner. 

Proctored Final

The final is worth 26% of the class points. You must earn 60% on the final to receive a grade and credit for the class.

Grading Scale

You can check your progress and grade at any time on the "grades" page.

Final grades are based on this grading scale:

  • 94-100% A
  • 90-93% A-
  • 87-89% B+
  • 83-86% B
  • 80-82% B-
  • 77-79% C+
  • 73-76% C
  • 70-72% C-
  • 67-69% D+
  • 63-66% D
  • 60-62% D-
  • 0-59% no credit

00.00 *Student supplies for World Civilizations

The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators, and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study. The "Required Readings" are accessed through the Utah Online Library. The Utah Online Library is password protected. The Utah Online Library log-in name and password may be obtained from your EHS World Civilizations teacher or your school librarian.

00.00 About Me (World Civilizations)

teacher-scored 8 points possible 15 minutes

In an online class it is more challenging to get to know our students. We want you to be a person and not just a name on an email. Although this introduction will never take the place of being in class with you every day or two, it helps you tell your teacher what's important to you.

For this assignment, I'd like you to write a paragraph about you.  In the paragraph please include all of the following:

  1. Your name and the name you prefer to be called (if they are different).  
  2. Your current age and grade in school.
  3. Contact information for you and your parents. (Emails or phone numbers are fine.)
  4. The school you attend and the name and email address for your school counselor
  5. Some information that describes you such as your interests, family, school goals, etc.
  6. An acknowledgement and agreement to abide by the EHS honor code.
  7. An acknowledgement of the 10 week time limit.
  8. A statement letting me know you have watched the "how to review your assignments" video clip

"As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers and staff with respect." (EHS Honor Code)

This assignment will be graded using a rubric. You must get an 8/8 to move on to the next module, so pay attention and do it right the first time so you only have to submit it once.  (To submit click the NEXT BUTTON at the bottom of the page.  OR go back to the class home page and click on the "About Me" assignment submission link.  It has a paper with an 'A' in it next to it.)

 

  Meets Expectations (2) Meets Partial Expectations (1) Below Expectations (0)
Prompt Information is given in paragraph form and contains relevant information.  Assignment has been spell checked and there are no significant mechanincs or usage errors. Information not given in paragraph form or doesn't give relevant information about student's interests. Important information not included and significant mechanincs, spelling, or usage errors.
Contact Info Contact information (email or phone) for both STUDENT and PARENT is included. Only one contact is included. This element is missing.
School Info Current school and grade included as well as counselor's email address. Doesn't include all of the required elements This element is missing.
Acknowledgements Includes the student's acknowledgement of the EHS Honor Code, the 10-week time frame for the class, and viewing video clip. Missing one of the three requrements Missing two or more of the required acknowledgements.
       

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


00.01

00.01.01 Student Software Needs

 

Students need access to a robust internet connection and a modern web browser.

This class may also require the Apple QuickTime plug-in to view media.

For students using a school-issued Chromebook, ask your technical support folks to download the QuickTime plug-in and enable the plug-in for your Chromebook.

$0.00

01.00 Foundations of Civilization Introduction (WorldCiv1)

Chauvet cave painting, France, about 31,000 years old: Wikimedia Commons, HTO, public domainChauvet cave painting, France, about 31,000 years old: Wikimedia Commons, HTO, public domain

Unit 1: Foundations of Civilization

Time Period: (Prehistory - 3000 B.C.)

Geographic Areas: Africa, Middle East, and Europe

Unit 1 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the foundations
of civilizations. General assignment information is as follows:

1. Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that
connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

2. Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on
information taken from articles that are required readings for the course. The
articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

3. Report: Students select a topic of interest from subjects discussed in the chapter
and compose a five-paragraph essay explaining the topic.

4. Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who
may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the chapter. Points
are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information or any other topic,
feel free to contact your instructor.

The time before written history is a time that is shrouded with mystery. Processes used to uncover historical events have been slow to reach meaningful conclusions.
Archaeologists, anthropologists, and other scientists are carefully piecing the evidence of the past together.

Objective:
Speculate about the factors that led to civilized society

Investigate hunters and gatherers.
Explore man’s domestication of plants and animals.

01.00.1

teacher-scored 0 points possible 10 minutes

This is an extra credit opportunity. I will give you an extra point if you add a photo of yourself into the class. This will show up when you comment, chat or post an assignment.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.01 Foundations of Civilization Journal Assignment(WorldCiv1)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

"Whoever wishes to foresee the future must consult the past; for human events ever resemble those of preceding times. This arises from the fact that they are produced by men who ever have been, and ever shall be, animated by the same passions, and thus they necessarily have the same results." (Machiavelli XLIII) Machiavelli, Niccolo. The Prince, Discourses on the First Ten Books of Titus Livius, Thoughts of a Statesman. Vol. 2. Boston: J.R. Osgood and, 1882. The Historical, Political, and Diplomatic Writings. The Online Library of Liberty, 2012. Web. 20 Dec. 2012.

Assignment 1.01: Journal Topic:

What is important enough to write about? How do historians decide what is important in history? How will you decide what should go into your personal history? What good reasons are there for keeping a journal? Answer the questions based upon your own opinion and knowledge. Use examples that back up your ideas. Write your entry in a word-processing file that you can keep up during the course. Title this first journal entry: "Foundations of Civilization Journal." Copy and paste it into your assignment on the course home page.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors.  Entry is a full 5 sentences in length. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.02 Foundations of Civilization Reading Challenge (WorldCiv1)

teacher-scored 24 points possible 40 minutes

Assignment 1.2: Reading Challenge
Hominid (Australopithecus) skull, South Africa: Wikimedia Commons, Brett Eloff, Courtesy Profberger and Wits University, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedHominid (Australopithecus) skull, South Africa: Wikimedia Commons, Brett Eloff, Courtesy Profberger and Wits University, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

To submit this assignment:
1. Create the assignment in a word processing document--copy and paste in the questions between the two lines of asterisks, below.
2. When you have finished, click “next” at the bottom of the screen. On the following screen you will find a submit this assignment tab.
3. Copy and paste the assignment into the text box and click [Save changes].
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Assignment instructions:
Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings."
Instructions for Required Reading Access
The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study.
Accessing the readings is a bit tricky, but it is possible. To access the readings you must do the following
1) Open "a new Tab" on your internet browser and paste the web address for Pioneer Library Online found at the bottom of the assignment page.
The log-in page will appear. The user name and password is available from your local school librarian, or you can get it from your instructor.
The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: World Book Encyclopedia. The page will open in a new window or a new tab. You can close the new World Book window/tab but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab or you will NOT be able to access the readings, as this exits you from the Pioneer Library.
Now you are ready to access the readings.

2) Links to the Required Readings topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. You can either copy and paste the link into your browser, or just click on it and it should open up to the location needed for the current assignment. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information.

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Required Reading: Prehistoric people:

 

1. What does the term “Prehistoric People” mean? How has the advancement in the study of such peoples grown and developed over time?

 

2. Where (location) and when (date) were the remains of the oldest known hominid found?

 

3. Which species of Australopithecus is “Lucy”? What is the significance of her discovery?

 

4. Which of the three species of human beings is most like modern humans?

Briefly describe the characteristics of these people:

 

5. Who were the Neanderthals? Where did they come from? What were their physical characteristics? Are they part of the single or multiple origin theory?

 

6. Write a paragraph or create a chart that compares/contrasts the Stone Age to the Bronze Age. Please include how they got their food, how writing was used, when speaking became prevalent and any other interesting facts in your paragraph/chart.

 

 

 

Required Reading: Archaeology:

 

7. What is archaeology?

 

 

8. Briefly define the three basic kinds of archaeological evidence:

 

9. What are the main steps in surveying an archaeological site?

 

10. What tools do archaeologists use in excavation?

 

11. How do archaeologists determine the age of remains through radiocarbon dating?

 

12. What is a concern of archaeology today on an international scale and what suggestions does the article give to resolve the problem?

 

******************************************************************************************
Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links.

Click on the link below for the Pioneer Library which will bring up a log-in box. Here you will type in the user name and password for that is available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian. Once you have logged in, this link will take you to the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Next, click on the link for the article you want to read, and you will be taken straight to that article.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.02 Foundations of Civilizations Reading Challenge (WorldCiv1)

01.03 Foundations of Civilization Report (WorldCiv1)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 70 minutes

Assignment 1.03 Foundations of Civilization Report "Leaf-point," probably a spear tip, England, c.38-35,000 years old: Wikimedia Commons, Pigsonthewing, Derby Museum, CC Attribution 3.0 Unported"Leaf-point," probably a spear tip, England, c.38-35,000 years old: Wikimedia Commons, Pigsonthewing, Derby Museum, CC Attribution 3.0 Unported Directions:

a) Select a subject for a report that relates to prehistory in some way. Suggested topics for the report include, but are not limited to: Lascaux Cave, cave paintings, ice age, Stone Tools, Paleolithic Art, Chatal Huyuk, Isturitz, Apollo 11 Cave, Neolithic Warfare, Schoningen spears, Temples of Malta, Neanderthal flute, Altamira Cave, Gardom's Edge, Podgoritsa, The Pagan's Wall, Ardi, etc. b) Research your topic, locating at least three sources (only one may be an encyclopedia). Note your sources for a Works Cited page, writing down the name or title, author, publisher, date of publication, pages referenced, url if online etc. (You may want to use a search engine to locate sites on a given topic). Make sure you cite your electronic resources properly for your Works Cited page, and in your in-text citations. (If you need help with this please view the "Citations and MLA help" in the discussions section of this class.) c). Write an original report in your own words. Make sure that you understand plagiarism in all its forms so you don't accidentally plagiarize in this work. (You can find more information on what is plagiarism in the discussions section of this class.) d) Be sure to fill in the objectives on the report form. Use any appropriate vocabulary terms from this unit for the report. This report should be three pages in length: two 12pt Times New Roman typed pages (double spaced!) and a Works Cited page (3 pages total). Title your report "Foundations of Civilizations Report." Submit the report to your instructor via the front page of the course, or by clicking next to the submission page. Think about the following criteria as you write: What is the major idea or concept to be portrayed? What terms will need to be defined? Choose information to support the major concept in the body of the essay (maximum of six items, minimum of three items). Check the information to be sure of its relevance to the main idea, and its authenticity and accuracy. What conclusion do you wish to reach? Is there a conclusion reached in your paper? Do you have a thesis statement? In case you forgot a thesis statement is the Main idea+ supporting idea A, supporting idea B, and supporting idea C. Write or type the essay and edit so as to be free of spelling and punctuation errors.

Grading

Your report will be based on the grading criteria listed below. It will be broken into categories that can be viewed in the rubric. Is the major idea clear and easily identified in the introduction? Are all important new ideas or terms well defined? Is the essay plainly divided into at least five major sections: introduction (one paragraph), body (three paragraphs), and conclusion/summary (one paragraph.) Is the supporting information organized effectively and tied in to the main idea? Is the major idea backed up by the supporting information and is the information accurate? Does the conclusion sum up the essay well and make a strong final statement? Is the Works Cited page adequate and documented accurately? Are there in-text citations to show where the information was taken from? (See the citation URLs below, and don't forget to look at the "Citations and MLA help" in the discussions section.)

 
10
8
6
4
2
Ideas The major idea is clear and easily identified. All important ideas and terms are well defined. Major ideas are decipherable. Most ideas and terms are defined. Some major ideas are identified. One or two major ideas are identified. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. There is no central theme or purpose.
Organization The essay is plainly divided into at least 5 major paragraphs. It is easy to see that the student can organize a 5 paragraph essay. Essay is divided into paragraphs that can be deciphered. Some paragraphs lead the reader through the paper. Paragraphs are missing, but it does follow the assignment. Introduction or conclusion is missing. Paragraphing is disorganized. Does not follow paper assignment.
Presentation The Works Cited page is adequate and documented accurately, without the use of wikipedia. In-text citations are used throughout the paper. The Works Cited page is mostly adequate and many of the citations are correct. All sources are correctly cited but from Wikipedia. All sources are incorrectly cited and many are from Wikipedia. There is no Works Cited page.
Flow The major idea is backed up by the supporting information and that information is accurate. Information is supported with in-text citations. The major idea has some supporting information that is either weak or inaccurate. The major idea has some back up information but is mostly left on its own, or is incorrect. Awkward insertion of wording that does not help the information to flow. There is no major idea. Supporting information does not exist.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of punctuation, grammar, usage, and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message. There are no spelling mistakes or punctuation errors present. Less than 3 spelling, punctuation or other convention errors are present. Three to six spelling errors or other conventions present. Six to 10 spelling errors or other conventions present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage and grammar and/or paragraphing distract the reader from the text and make it difficult to read. 16 or more spelling errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


Easy Bib is a free automatic bibliography and citation maker that allows you to create a Works Cited instantly.

01.04 Foundations of Civilization: Enrichment Videos(WorldCiv1)

Instructions for Enrichment Video Access

The "Enrichment Videos" for the course are provided by eMedia through the UEN Pioneer website and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies [The videos are accessed with the same username and password as the "Reading Challenge" information].

Accessing the videos is a bit tricky, but it is possible. To access the videos, you must do the following:

1) Click on the blue link listed below.

2) Links to the Enrichment Video topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. When you click on the link, the log-in page will appear in a new window. On the front of the class page is the Pioneer Library log-in information. Once you have typed in that information from the log-in screen, click on the Log-in button. Currently there are no assignments connected to the videos. The purpose of the videos is to give information that coincides with and goes beyond the information normally required by the course, giving students the opportunity to gain more knowledge regarding topics of interest to them.

3) Videos may be streamed for viewing, downloaded and viewed as Windows Media, or downloaded and placed on a portable video device such as iPod.

4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor via email.

Enrichment Videos for Chapter 1: Foundations of Civilization:

Journey of Man

Synopsis: How did the human race populate the world? THE JOURNEY OF MAN examines the latest in genetic evidence to tell the story of the great migrations of man through history. Dr. Spencer Wells travels to Africa, Australia, Siberia, the Middle East, the Himalayas and the United States to piece together our history with clues gathered along the way.

NOVA. America's Stone Age Explorers.

Synopsis: Who were the first Americans, and where did they come from? Come explore Stone Age America, and see how the Clovis Spear can give us clues to answer this integral question.

01.04.01 Foundations of Civilization: Enrichment Videos(WorldCiv1)

02.00 Ancient Egypt Introduction (WorldCiv1)

Egyptian pyramids (watercolor painting): Wikimedia Commons, Henry A. Bacon, public domainEgyptian pyramids (watercolor painting): Wikimedia Commons, Henry A. Bacon, public domain
Unit 2: Ancient Egypt

Time Period: (7000 BC – 30 B.C.)

Geographic Area: Africa/Egypt

Unit 2 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the civilizations
of ancient Egypt. General assignment information is as follows:

1. Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that
connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

2. Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on
information taken from articles that are required readings for the course. The
articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

3. Report: Students select a topic of interest on several different monuments built by
the ancient Egyptians and compose a five-paragraph essay explaining the topic,].

4. Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who
may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the chapter. Points
are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information, or any other topic,
feel free to contact your instructor.

Fabulous ruins have been uncovered by skilled archaeologists to reveal the splendor that was early Egypt. The Egyptians, with a belief in the afterlife, exemplify the values of permanence.
They did everything they could to preserve their lives and culture, leaving lasting monuments of their greatness. Yet, even the glorious accomplishments of the pharoahs crumbled over time.

Egyptian culture was, and is, unique, in providing not only for the survival, but for the flourishing of life in a harsh environment.
In a desert climate with the only viable places to live located close to the Nile River, Egyptians formed and followed a unique set of beliefs about nature and nature's impact on them.
In this lesson, you should carefully evaluate the way the Egyptians dealt with their environment, contrasting it with your own environment and survival techniques.

Objectives:
Assess the impact of geography on the locations of early civilizations.

Examine the role of irrigation in early agriculture.
Examine why early civilizations developed in river environments.
Evaluate the diffusion of civilizations.

Examine the major characteristics of the early civilization of Egypt.

Analyze the social, political, and economic structure of ancient civilizations.
Investigate the technological advancements and writing systems that developed in early river valley cultures.
Identify the factors that led to the rise of cities.

02.01 Ancient Egypt Journal Assignment(WorldCiv1)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

"There is properly no history, only biography." (Emerson par. 9) Emerson, Ralph Waldo. "1 - Essays - Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)." 1 - Essays - Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882). About.com Classic Literature, 2012. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. Hapi, a deification of the annual flooding of the Nile River, which deposited rich silt on its banks, allowing the Egyptians to grow crops: Wikimedia Commons, illustration from the Encyclopaedia Biblica, 1903, public domainHapi, a deification of the annual flooding of the Nile River, which deposited rich silt on its banks, allowing the Egyptians to grow crops: Wikimedia Commons, illustration from the Encyclopaedia Biblica, 1903, public domain

Assignment 2.01: Journal Topic:

Do you control your environment or does your environment control you? How much control do you have over your life and the way you live? How responsible are you for the way your life goes? What things are beyond your control?

Title this portion of your journal,"Ancient Egypt Journal," and submit it to your instructor via the front page of the course in Topic 3.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. Entry is a full 5 sentences in length. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.02 Ancient Egypt Reading Challenge (WorldCiv1)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 30 minutes

To submit this assignment:

1. Create the assignment in a word processing document. Copy and paste in the questions between the two lines of asterisks, below.
2. When you have finished, go to the assignment in Topic 3 of the class and click [Edit my submission].
3. Copy and paste the assignment into the text box and click [Save changes].

---

Assignment instructions:

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings" for Chapter 2.

 

Instructions for Required Reading Access
The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study.

Accessing the readings is a bit tricky, but it is possible. To access the readings you must do the following:

1) Open "a new Tab" on your internet browser and paste the following web address.

Log in to the Pioneer Library (http://onlinelibrary.uen.org/) using the username: pioneer and the password: explore.  Once logged in, click on the World Book link in the bottom left of the page. It will send you a page with a bunch of boxes, click on the student box.  LEAVE THIS PAGE OPEN.  Now, in another page, go back to the lesson (this is where the direct links for the readings are) and click on the link for the reading you are trying to access.  Let me know if that works for you.

Now you are ready to access the readings.
Hieroglyphics on calendar in the temple of Kom Ombo: © Ad Meskens / Wikimedia CommonsHieroglyphics on calendar in the temple of Kom Ombo: © Ad Meskens / Wikimedia Commons

2) Links to the Required Readings topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links, you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information on the second page.

3) In many cases you will not be reading entire articles. The subsection/subsections of each article to be read is/are indicated below the name of the "Required Reading." Read only the subsections indicated. If there is no indication, you should read the entire article.

4) If you have any further questions feel free to contact your instructor by email.

*******************************************************************************************

 

Required Reading: Ancient Egypt:

 

1. Why did the ancient Greek historian Herodotus call Egypt "the gift of the Nile"?

 

2. What were some achievements of the ancient Egyptians?

 

3. Why did the ancient Egyptians make mummies? Why did the Egyptians build pyramids?

 

4. What was the Amarna Revolution?

 

5. Describe why being a woman in Egypt was better than many other ancient civilizations.

 

6. What discovery led to the deciphering of the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics in modern times?

 

7. When did ancient Egypt reach the height of its power?

 

8. What did the ancient Egyptians call their country? Why?

 

9. From where does our knowledge of ancient Egypt come?

 

10. The majority of Egyptian workers in the Nile Valley were involved in what type of work?

 

 

Reading Required: Mythology:
Read the following subsections:
Mythology through and including The influence of Egyptian mythology.

 

11. What is the difference between a generic and a genetic relationship among myths?

 

12. How does a myth differ from a folk tale?

 

13. What is the function of a creation myth? An explanatory myth?

 

 

Required Reading: Egyptian Mythology:

 

 

14. Define the Great Ennead.

 

15. List the name of each god/goddess in the Great Ennead and briefly describe his/her area of power/control:

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.03 Ancient Egypt Report (WorldCiv1)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 60 minutes

Assignment 2.3: Ancient Egypt Report:Karnak Temple, Egypt: Wikimedia Commons, Tizianok, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedKarnak Temple, Egypt: Wikimedia Commons, Tizianok, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported Directions:

a) Use the Internet to find information about at least three (or more) archaeological sites and ancient monuments in Egypt. Using the data you have obtained, write a report that explains the conclusions you reached. The report must be a minimum of five paragraphs long (at least 300 words) and should focus on the above stated objective. It must have a Works Cited page and contain in-text citations. (Please view the "Citations and MLA help" section in discussions if you are not familiar with MLA format citations.) Also, please use 12pt Times New Roman font.

(b) Give a summary of the monuments discovery, their importance to the people of Egypt and what information we can obtain from the monuments regarding the culture of ancient Egyptians. What conclusions can you reach based on these remains? Make sure that you use a thesis statement, address conclusions you have made, and have a concluding paragraph that ties all of your conclusions together.

Submit the report by clicking next to the submission page.

 
10
8
6
4
2
Ideas The major idea is clear and easily identified. All important ideas and terms are well defined. Major ideas are decipherable. Most ideas and terms are defined. Some major ideas are identified. One or two major ideas are identified. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. There is no central theme or purpose.
Organization The essay is plainly divided into at least 5 major paragraphs. It is easy to see that the student can organize a 5 paragraph essay. Essay is divided into paragraphs that can be deciphered. Some paragraphs lead the reader through the paper. Paragraphs are missing, but it does follow the assignment. Introduction or conclusion is missing. Paragraphing is disorganized. Does not follow paper assignment.
Presentation The Works Cited page is adequate and documented accurately, without the use of wikipedia. In-text citations are used throughout the paper. The Works Cited page is mostly adequate and many of the citations are correct. All sources are correctly cited but from Wikipedia. All sources are incorrectly cited and many are from Wikipedia. There is no Works Cited page.
Flow The major idea is backed up by the supporting information and that information is accurate. Information is supported with in-text citations. The major idea has some supporting information that is either weak or inaccurate. The major idea has some back up information but is mostly left on its own, or is incorrect. Awkward insertion of wording that does not help the information to flow. There is no major idea. Supporting information does not exist.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of punctuation, grammar, usage, and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message. There are no spelling mistakes or punctuation errors present. Less than 3 spelling, punctuation or other convention errors are present. Three to six spelling errors or other conventions present. Six to 10 spelling errors or other conventions present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage and grammar and/or paragraphing distract the reader from the text and make it difficult to read. 16 or more spelling errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.04 Ancient Egypt Enrichment Videos (WorldCiv1)

Instructions for Enrichment Video Access

The "Enrichment Videos" for the course are provided by eMedia through the UEN Pioneer website and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies [The videos are accessed the same way as the "Reading Challenge" information].

1) Use the link to the video you want to view. The login page will appear in a new window. You will need to type in the user name and password for Pioneer Library. Your EHS teacher or your local school librarian can give you the Pioneer username and password.

2) Links to the Enrichment Video topic titles are listed below. Currently there are no assignments connected to the videos. The purpose of the videos is to give information that coincides with and goes beyond the information normally required by the course, giving students the opportunity to gain more knowledge regarding topics of interest to them.

3) Videos may be streamed for viewing, downloaded and viewed as Windows Media, or downloaded and placed on a portable video device such as iPod. 4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor via email.

------- Enrichment Videos for Chapter 2: Ancient Egypt: Empires Series: Egypt's Golden Empire Synopsis: Egypt's Golden Empire presents the most extraordinary period in Egyptian history: from 1570 B.C. to 1070 B.C., when the Egyptian Empire reached its zenith. Amazingly preserved letters and records bring to life the passion and incomprehensible riches of a time when Egypt was the center of the known world, and its Pharaohs were known as gods. Great cities, temples and tombs were built, and art, education and technology were propelled to new heights.

Episode 01-The Warrior Pharaohs Episode 02-Pharaohs of the Sun Episode 03-The Last Great Pharaoh

02.04.01 Ancient Egypt Enrichment Videos (WorldCiv1)

02.05 Book Recommendations and Unit 1-2 Quiz

These are book recommendations based upon the material.

If you happen to be someone who enjoys reading, the following books can usually be found at your local school or public library. Not all of them are long--some would be a quick read. They may interest you if you like learning about this time period. If you have any books that you have read that would fit this section, feel free to message me about them. Ankhenaten: Egypt’s False Prophet by Nicholas Reeves

This book outlines the life and information that we know about the man who started the Amarna Revolution. Why were the people upset? This book can help you to learn more about the situation. Not everyone that I know was pleased on how Mr. Reeves discusses Nefertiti, however, so be aware of that as you read this book.

Amarna Sunset: Nefertiti, Tutankhamun, Ay, Horemheb, and the Egyptian Counter-Reformation by Aidan Dodson

This book outlines much of the life of the Pharaoh Akhenaton. It looks at new research (in 2009) and then continues after the death of Akhenaton five generations of pharaohs. It also gives a different view on Nefertiti and her role as wife and then leader. (192 pages)

Tutankhamen: In Search for an Egyptian King by Joyce Tyldeseley

Tutankhamen became pharaoh at age eight. This book examines his interesting and short life. Ms. Tyldeseley tries to explain what we know about him and how we made that discovery from the excavation of the tomb of Tutankhamen. (336 pages)

Click the "Next" button below to take your Unit 01-02 Quiz. 

02.05 Unit 01-02 Review Quiz

computer-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

Assessment 02.05 Review Quiz 01-02

Complete

01-02 Review Quiz
Foundations of Civilizations and Ancient Egypt

This assignment is found under Review Quiz 01-02 on the course website. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do and will provide immediate feedback.

Complete this assignment after you finish reading lessons 1 and 2.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.00 Ancient Middle East Introduction (WorldCiv1)

The Fertile Crescent and ancient civilizations: Wikimedia Commons, Nafsadh, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedThe Fertile Crescent and ancient civilizations: Wikimedia Commons, Nafsadh, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Unit 3: The Ancient Middle East

Time Period: (4500 B.C. - 331 B.C.)

Geographic Area: Middle East/Mesopotamia

Unit 3 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the civilizations
of the ancient Middle East. General assignment information is as follows:

1. Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that
connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

2. Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on
information taken from articles that are required readings for the course. The
articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

3. Study Guide: The guide uses knowledge of the past to solve problems of
the present. The activity is designed to encourage critical. There is no
specific 'right' answer.

4. Cause and Effect: The activity creates a connection between an action and its
result upon a civilization. Another Critical Thinking assignment.

5. Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who
may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the chapter. Points
are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information, or any other topic,
feel free to contact your instructor.

The Ancient Middle East was a site where many different peoples interacted. As their cultures intermixed, societies changed, grew, and conflicted.
A study of this area serves as an example of how varied civilizations coexist or destroy one another.
It is interesting to study the traditions, practices and characteristics of such societies as we try to relate to diverse groups of peoples in our own civilization.

Objectives:
Assess the impact of geography on the locations of early civilizations.

Examine the role of irrigation in early agriculture.
Examine why early civilizations developed in river environments.
Evaluate the diffusion of civilizations.

Examine the major characteristics of the early civilization of Mesopotamia.

Analyze the social, political, and economic structure of ancient civilizations.
Investigate the technological advancements and writing systems that developed in early river valley cultures.
Identify the factors that led to the rise of cities.

03.01 Ancient Middle East Journal Assignment(WorldCiv1)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

"History consists, for the greater part, of the miseries brought upon the world by pride, ambition, avarice, revenge, lust, sedition, hypocrisy, ungoverned zeal, and all the train of disorderly appetite." (Burke par. 242) Burke, Edmund. "Reflections on the French Revolution." Paras. 225-249. Burke, Edmund. 1909-14. Reflections on the French Revolution. The Harvard Classics. Bartleby.com Great Books Online, 2012. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. Votive figure from Mesopotamian temple, c. 2750-2600 B.C.: Wikimedia Commons, Rosemaniakos, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 GenericVotive figure from Mesopotamian temple, c. 2750-2600 B.C.: Wikimedia Commons, Rosemaniakos, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic

 

Assignment 3.01: Journal Entry

Are there any actions that don't have consequences? In the long run, can you really 'get away with' anything? If every action has a consequence, how does that knowledge affect the way you live? Edit and submit your assignment to your instructor in the Topic 3 area on the front page of the course.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The journal entry is 1 paragraph (5 sentences in length). The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.02 Ancient Middle East Reading Challenge (WorldCiv1)

teacher-scored 36 points possible 25 minutes

3.02 Ancient Middle East Reading Challenge(WorldCiv1)

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings" for Chapter 3.

To submit this assignment:
1. Create the assignment in a word-processing document. Copy and paste it in the questions between the two lines of asterisks, below;
2. When you have finished, click “next” at the bottom of the screen. On the following screen you will find a "submit this" assignment tab.
3. Copy and paste the assignment into the text box and click [Save changes].
---
Assignment instructions:
Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings."

Instructions for Required Reading Access

The "Required Readings" for the course are provided by World Book Encyclopedia and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies. The readings are written by college professors, historians, museum curators and institute directors recognized world-wide as experts in their fields of study.

Accessing the readings is a bit tricky, but it is possible. To access the readings you must do the following:

1) Open "a new Tab" on your internet browser and paste the web address for Pioneer Library Online found at the bottom of the assignment page.

Log in to the Pioneer Library (http://onlinelibrary.uen.org/) using the username: pioneer and the password: explore.  

Once logged in, click on the World Book link in the bottom left of the page. It will send you a page with a bunch of boxes, click on the student box.  LEAVE THIS PAGE OPEN.  

In another page, go back to the lesson (this is where the direct links for the readings are) and click on the link for the reading you are trying to access. 

Now you are ready to access the readings.

2) Links to the Required Readings topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. You can either copy and paste the link into your browser, or just click on it--it should open up to the location needed for the current assignment. Read all "Required Readings" designated for each chapter INCLUDING all links to second pages found in the "Required Readings" articles (such links may include pictures, charts, graphs, maps, audio and video clips, other articles, etc.). Once you have read or viewed the information in the original articles and the links you are finished. You DO NOT need to read or view links to information.

3) In many cases you will not be reading entire articles. The subsection/subsections of each article to be read is/are indicated below the name of the "Required Reading." Read only the subsections indicated. If there is no indication, you should read the entire article.

4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor by email.

 

******************************************************************************************

Required Reading: Mesopotamia:

 

1. What is Mesopotamia? Why was it so named, and which modern countries are included in the region?

 

2. When were the first cities founded? When was writing invented? Which group is credited with these accomplishments?

 

3. Who were the Akkadians? Why are they important?

 

 

Required Reading: Sumer:

 

4. Which city-states of Sumer became small kingdoms?

 

 

Cuneiform writing on clay tablet, British Museum, Assyrian collections: Wikimedia Commons, Matt Neale, CC Attribution 2.0 GenericCuneiform writing on clay tablet, British Museum, Assyrian collections: Wikimedia Commons, Matt Neale, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic
Required Reading: Cuneiform:

 

 

5. What is cuneiform? Who developed it? How is it created?

 

 

6. Who translated cuneiform? What item was instrumental in the translation? Why was cuneiform so difficult to translate?

 

 

Required Reading: Babylonia:

 

7. Who is Sargon? Name one of his accomplishments:

 

8. What are ziggurats, and who built them?

 

9. What are the two most famous examples of Babylonian literature, and what are they about?

 

10. The Babylonians excelled in which two sciences?

 

 

Required Reading: Assyria:

 

11. Who are the Assyrians? Why are they called the "Romans of Asia"?

 

 

12. What were the most important Assyrian cities?

 

13. Which two writings systems were used by the Assyrians?

 

14. What reputation did the Assyrians have as conquerors?

 

 

 

Required Reading: Ancient Persia:
Read the following subsections: Persia, Ancient, through and including The Achaemenid Empire.

 

 

15. Who established the Achaemenid Empire?

 

16. Who was Darius I and what did he do?

 

17. What peoples were the Persians attempting to conquer during the Persian Wars? Were the Persians successful?

 

18. Who conquered Persia and ended the Achaemenid Empire?

 

****************************************************************************************

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.03 Making Connections with Hammurabi's Code

teacher-scored 25 points possible 20 minutes

Early Mesopotamia Study Guide- Making Connections with Hammurabi's Code
Assyrian warship, 700-692 BC From Nineveh, probably built and manned by Phoenicians employed by Sennacherih: Wikimedia Commons, World Imaging, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 GenericAssyrian warship, 700-692 BC From Nineveh, probably built and manned by Phoenicians employed by Sennacherih: Wikimedia Commons, World Imaging, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic

 

1. To start, please view the World Book Online entry about Hammurabi found in the links below. (Don't forget that you will need to log into the Pioneer Online Library first before you can access the World Book Online.)

 

2. As discussed in the article Hammurabi was a king of Babylonia who expanded his kingdom. He was also very influential because of his collection of laws which he revised and expanded. There is much debate today about laws and punishment. Please view Hammurabi’s Code at the Avalon Project (Yale Law School) found in the links below.

You do not need to read the introductory information. Skip to the laws. (It reads CODE OF LAWS.) You only need to read the laws 185-282 and choose one law that you feel would be beneficial in our society today.

3. Please write at least 200 words about the implications of this law today, and why you feel that this could help and benefit our society. Compare it with what actually happens to someone who commits this type of crime in our society (if you know).

 

 

Grading Criteria:
Informative: You obviously have read the law and have an understanding of what it means. You are able to transfer that knowledge and make connections to the law today.
Conventions: You should have no grammatical or spelling errors. It should be obvious that spell check was used.
Context: Your suggestion for following the law today makes sense, and would be beneficial for our society today.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


These links will be used with assignment 3.03 Making Connections with Hammurabi's Code. Use the instructions from 3.02 to access the Utah Online Library. The username and password can be requested from your teacher.

03.04 Mesopotamia Mini-Saga

teacher-scored 25 points possible 25 minutes

Mesopotamia Mini-Saga

A mini-saga is a form of writing that uses 50 words exactly. It requires discipline and creativity. For more information on what a mini-saga is, and how to create one, please visit the link provided below entitled "Mini Saga." It is very helpful to visit “Mini Saga Workshop” link as well. It will take you step by step on how to write a mini saga. Be prepared to have to edit your mini sagas until it is 50 words.

Using the following groups and/or people create two (2) mini sagas using what you have learned about them in the Required Readings. (The required readings can be found in lesson 3.02.) You only need to use one group per mini saga, but you can have more than one group in it.

  • Your two mini-sagas must be about at least two different groups.
    • Sumerian Civilization
    • King Hammurabi
    • Assyrians
    • Hebrews
    • Sargon
    • Hittites
    • Babylonia
    • Achaemenid Empire

Some ideas/suggestions to write about or include would be the technological advances, factors that led to the rise of cities, social structure, political structure and economic structures. It can be a story, but it can’t be completely untrue. Look back at the required readings from 3.02 if you need help.

Grading criteria:

Grading will be based on if the context of the mini sagas are engaging, and shows that the student is familiar with the civilization. Each mini saga MUST be exactly 50 words. (The title doesn't count.) Originality of the mini saga will be worth points as well. If it seems like a rehash of someone else’s ideas the score will be lower. Lastly, it needs to show a grasp of conventions. Spelling, grammar and punctuation will play a large role in the grading of this assignment.

 

8- Accomplished

 

6- Satisfactory

 

4-Developing

 

1-Beginning

 

Context

 

Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas.

 

Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type.

 

Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general.

 

No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the mini saga has no clear purpose or central theme. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.

 

Originality

 

The project shows significant evidence of originality and inventiveness. The majority of the content and many of the ideas are fresh, original, and inventive.

 

The project shows some evidence of originality and inventiveness.

 

The work is an extensive collection and rehash of other people's ideas, products, and images. There is little evidence of new thought or inventiveness.

 

The work is a minimal collection or rehash of other people's ideas, products, and images. There is no evidence of new thought.

 

Conventions

 

The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors.

 

The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present.

 

Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present.

 

Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


These links will help students learn how to write a mini-saga and give them basic steps in order to complete the assignment 3.04

03.05 Ancient Middle East Enrichment Video(WorldCiv1)

Instructions for Enrichment Video Access The "Enrichment Videos" for the course are provided by eMedia through the UEN Pioneer website and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies [The videos are accessed with the same username and password as the "Reading Challenge" information].

Accessing the videos is a bit tricky, but it is possible. To access the videos you must do the following.

1) Click on the blue link shown below for the video you want to watch. The log-in page will appear in a new window. You will type in the Pioneer username and password. You can get the Pioneer username and password from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian. Now you are ready to access the videos.

2) Links to the Enrichment Video topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. Currently there are no assignments connected to the videos. The purpose of the videos is to give information that coincides with and goes beyond the information normally required by the course, giving students the opportunity to gain more knowledge regarding topics of interest to them.

3) Videos may be streamed for viewing, downloaded and viewed as Windows Media, or downloaded and placed on a portable video device such as iPod.

Persian ceremonial gold drinking cup and bowl, Achaemenid era; 5th century B.C.: Wikimedia Commons, Rosemanios, CC Attribution 2.0 GenericPersian ceremonial gold drinking cup and bowl, Achaemenid era; 5th century B.C.: Wikimedia Commons, Rosemanios, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic
4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor via email.

Enrichment Video for Chapter 3: Ancient Middle East:

Filmed in 2005 by Iranian-born, noted filmmaker Aryana Farshad, this program reveals the historically important Persia (Iran) to your students with more insight and passion than they will experience anywhere else. Settled early by Aryan peoples who spoke Indo-European languages, Persia nonetheless represented Asia in turning point battles with Greece, when the latter was creating European civilization. Persia's historical legacy continued throughout the medieval period, as the center of great Islamic traditions, notably those of the Shiites and Sufis. Iran became the internationally accepted name for this country only in the 20th century; it remains an important political and cultural power to the present day.

04.00 Ancient India & China Introduction (WorldCiv1)

Unit 4: Ancient India & China

Time Period: (2500 B.C. - 256 B.C.)

Geographic Areas: India and China

Unit 4 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the civilizations
of ancient India and China. General assignment information is as follows:

1. Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that
connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.
India: carved scene from the battle of Mahabharata: Wikimedia Commons, Ishwar, CC Attribution 2.0 GenericIndia: carved scene from the battle of Mahabharata: Wikimedia Commons, Ishwar, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic
2. Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on
information taken from articles that are required readings for the course. The
articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

3. Culture Comparison: The Culture Comparison allows students to compare/
contrast their culture to the cultures of ancient India and China.

4. Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who
may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the chapter. Points
are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information, or any other topic,
feel free to contact your instructor.


The Indus, Yangtze, and Yellow Rivers all provided life sustaining environments in which new civilizations developed.
Even though conditions were very similar to those in Egypt along the Nile and in the Fertile Crescent along the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, very different civilizations still developed.
It is interesting to note how these societies came about and what factors contributed to the formations of their cultures.
Religious, economic, social and political elements impacted these areas in very different ways than those in other more western areas.

Objectives:
Assess the impact of geography on the locations of early civilizations.

Examine the role of irrigation in early agriculture.
Examine why early civilizations developed in river environments.
Evaluate the diffusion of civilizations.

Examine the major characteristics of the early civilizations of the Indus Valley and the Yellow River.

Analyze the social, political, and economic structure of ancient civilizations.
Investigate the technological advancements and writing systems that developed in early river valley cultures.
Identify the factors that led to the rise of cities.

04.01 Ancient India & China Journal Assignment(WorldCiv1)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

"History is a means of access to ourselves. Lynn White, Jr." (Szasz 18) Szasz, Ferenc M. "Quotations about History." Williamcronon.net. William Cronon, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2005. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. Assignment 4.01: Journal Entry Terracotta Warriors - clay figures from a tomb in Xi'an, China,: Wikimedia Commons, Maros M r a z, CC CC-BY-SA-2.5Terracotta Warriors - clay figures from a tomb in Xi'an, China,: Wikimedia Commons, Maros M r a z, CC CC-BY-SA-2.5

Journal Topic: Do people have more similarities or differences? What feelings are stirred up when we emphasize differences between people? What feelings are stirred up when we emphasize similarities?

Edit and submit your completed journal entry to your instructor via the Topic 3 area on the front page of the course.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.02 Ancient India/China Reading Challenge (WorldCiv1)

teacher-scored 22 points possible 20 minutes

Directions: Copy and paste the questions in this assignment between the two rows of asterisks below into a word processor. Respond to each item using the "Required Readings" for Chapter 4. Title your assignment: "Ancient India/China Reading Challenge: 4.2." When you have finished, edit and submit your assignment to your instructor via the submission form in Topic 3 on the front page of the course.

You will receive 2 points for every correct answer. Partial credit can be awarded.

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Required Reading: Ancient India:Clay tablets from the Indus Valley Civilization, before 1700 BC, northwest India: Wikimedia Commons, Vadivel, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedClay tablets from the Indus Valley Civilization, before 1700 BC, northwest India: Wikimedia Commons, Vadivel, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

 

1. Name the first two major cities of the Indus Valley including the years they are believed to have developed and some of the accomplishments of their citizens:

 

2. How and around what period of time did the Indus Valley culture end?

 

3. Briefly discuss the coming of the Aryans: where they came from, whom they conquered, and their main source of food:

 

4. How were the villages organized? How was wealth measured in the Aryan society?

 

5. Briefly explain the caste system (if you need more information, double click on the word “caste” anywhere in the reading.):

 

6. Briefly describe the religious practices of the Brahmans including religious writings and scriptures:

 

7. Describe the situation surrounding Alexander the Great and India:

 

 

Required Reading: Ancient China: Clay water jar from Yangshao culture, ca. 5000-3000 BC, Shaanxi Province, China: Wikimedia Commons, Editor at Large, CC-BY-SA-2.5Clay water jar from Yangshao culture, ca. 5000-3000 BC, Shaanxi Province, China: Wikimedia Commons, Editor at Large, CC-BY-SA-2.5

 

 

8. Relate the history of early writing in China between 1500 B.C. through 100 B.C.:

 

9. List a few difference in lifestyle between the Yangshao civilizations and the Longshan people:

10. What is Legalism?

11. Briefly compare and contrast the first Chinese dynasties that developed between the years 2100 B.C. and 221 B.C. (include the Xia Dynasty through the Han dynasty):

 

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.02 India/China Reading Challenge & Culture Comparison (WorldCiv1)

04.03 India and China Culture Comparison Chart Assignment(WorldCiv1)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 35 minutes

Culture Comparison
Copy and paste the information below into a word processing document. Read from the "Required Readings" list for this unit and fill in the following chart. Please include the information about your life, and then follow with information from ancient India, then ancient China. The reading questions from 4.02 should give you a general idea about the time period. There are links below to help you fill in the gaps that the reading left. You do not need to read all of them, but use them as a resource as needed. When you have finished, title the chart, "India China Culture Comparison".

Edit and submit it to your instructor via Topic 3 on the front page of the course, or by clicking next to the submission page.
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1. Item: Religion

My culture: What beliefs do I have or are commonly prevalent in my society? How do they influence the way we live?

 

Ancient India:

Ancient China:

 

2. Item: Politics/Government

 

My culture: What type of government does my country have? How are rules made for this society?

 

Ancient India:

Ancient China:

 

 

 

3. Item: Lifestyle:

My culture: What is the standard of living for the average person in my society? What is my standard of living? (Don't be afraid to look up what standard of living means.) What is the typical daily life of people in my culture? What is my typical daily life?

 

Ancient India:

Ancient China:

 

4. Item: Occupations

 

My culture: How do people make their living? Which areas have the most economic activity?

 

Ancient India:

Ancient China:

 

5. Item: Cultural Traditions:

 

 

My culture: What traditions have been passed from one generation to the next? What are the customs of society? Do you have any traditions that have been passed down?

 

Ancient India:

Ancient China:

 

6. Choose one of the following works: Tao Te Ching, The Bhagavad Gita, The Upanishads, The Vedas.

 

 

Read a small section of this work, and document what section it is. Express what you think it might mean. Does it sound like anything you have read before? Would it be a document that you would be interested in reading all of it? Why or why not?

 

 

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.03 India/China Reading Challenge & Culture Comparison (WorldCiv1)

Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using the WorldBook Online (Reading Challenges Only) links. From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings. The Pioneer Library log-in name and password is available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

04.04 Ancient India & China Enrichment Videos(WorldCiv1)

Instructions for Enrichment Video Access 
The "Enrichment Videos" for the course are provided by eMedia through the UEN Pioneer website and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies [The videos are accessed the same way as the "Reading Challenge" information].

1) Use the link to the video you want to view. The log-in page will appear in a new window. You will need to type in the user name and password for Pioneer Library. Your EHS teacher or your local school librarian can give you the Pioneer username and password.

2) Links to the Enrichment Video topic titles are listed below. Currently there are no assignments connected to the videos. The purpose of the videos is to give information that coincides and/or goes beyond the information normally required by the course giving students the opportunity to gain more knowledge regarding topics of interest to them.

3) Videos may be streamed for viewing, downloaded and viewed as Windows Media or downloaded and placed on a portable video device such as iPod. 4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor via email. -------

Enrichment Videos for Chapter 4: Ancient India & China: Ancient India
Beyond Our Borders: India
Synopsis:

India is one of the most diverse nations on earth, in languages, ethnic backgrounds of its peoples, religions, and landscapes. Yet it seems to represent so much of what Asia means to the rest of the world. It birthed the religions of Hinduism and Buddhism. Sarnath and Varanasi reveal some of the feelings of each religion, but we also see the remains of Islamic culture in the North. These, and other religions, reflect the many historical invasions of India, each bringing new peoples and cultures. What these influences mean to modern India, and how it reacts to influences from other modern cultures, is revealed as we visit various locations throughout this captivating subcontinent.
 

The Story of India: Episode 2 The Power of Ideas  
Synopsis: 
The second episode of Michael Wood's journey through Indian history covers the last centuries BCE the age of the Buddha, the coming of the Greeks and the rule of the emperor Ashoka, one of the greatest figures in world history. Beginning with incredible images of a Jain festival that takes place once every twelve years, Wood sees the Buddha as India's first protester, follows the invasion of India by Alexander the Great and ends with the birth of the first great Indian empire.

Ancient China Nova: Secrets of Lost Empires II. China Bridge
Synopsis:
The ancient Chinese relied on bamboo, one of nature's most versatile building materials, to lash together their famous rainbow bridges. This video documents a 1999 effort by a NOVA-assembled crew of scholars and timber framers to design and build a Chinese bridge known only from an ancient painting.

 

04.05 Book Recommendations

These are book recommendations based upon the material.

If you happen to be someone who enjoys reading, the following books can usually be found at your local school or public library. Not all of them are long--some would be a quick read. They may interest you, if you like learning about this time period. If you have any books that you have read that would fit this section, feel free to message me about them.

The Upanishads

This is one of the oldest religious texts in existence. It is considered a classic text of Indian spirituality. It is an interesting read for those who like to learn more about world religions. It also is available for free in some areas online. Be careful with the free online texts, as with some the translations are not very good. You will want a text that is easy to read and understandable as well. Make sure you find one that works for you.

The Bhagavad Gita

The Bhagavad Gita is the Hindu religious text. For anyone who is interested in world religions, I recommend picking this up. I believe that you can find it for free online as well. Make sure that you find a good translation on this one as well. The translation can make a huge difference!

04.05 Unit 03-04 Review Quiz

computer-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

Assessment 04.05 Review Quiz 03-04

Complete

03-04 Review Quiz
Ancient Middle East and Ancient India and China

This assignment is found under Review Quiz 03-04 on the course website. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do and will provide immediate feedback.

Complete this assignment after you finish reading lessons 3 and 4.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.00 Ancient Greece Introduction (WorldCiv1)

Unit 5: Ancient Greece

Time Period: (2000 B.C. - 133 B.C.)

Geographic Areas: Greece and the Mediterranean Area

The Acropolis in Athens, Greece,: Wikimedia Commons, Ggia, CC License 3.0 Share-AlikeThe Acropolis in Athens, Greece,: Wikimedia Commons, Ggia, CC License 3.0 Share-Alike
Unit 5 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the civilizations
of ancient Greece. General assignment information is as follows:

1. Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that
connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

2. Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on
information taken from articles that are required readings for the course. The
articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

3. PowerPoint: Students are required to choose and research a topic of interest
involving ancient Greek civilization. Students present the information as a
PowerPoint.

4. Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who
may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the chapter. Points
are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information, or any other topic,
feel free to contact your instructor.

The Greeks were excellent examples of self-reliance and independence. There are both assets and liabilities to such independence.
There is strength in alliance and unity amongst groups. Isolated independence can be weak and sometimes lead to extreme and eccentric behavior.
There is a delicate balance that must be discovered between healthy, independent self reliance and the strength that exists in large, unified societies.

Objectives:
Analyze the development of classical political systems.

Contrast the evolution of Athenian democracy and Spartan rule.

Investigate the purpose and influence of religions and philosophies on classical
civilizations of Greece.

Examine the essential elements of the belief systems of Greek mythology.

Investigate the importance of the expansion of trade.

Identify routes of early colonization, e.g., Phoenician, Greek, Hellenistic.
Examine the technological improvements in transportation over time.
Assess the importance of the Mediterranean trade routes.

Evaluate the significance of classical sculpture, architecture, and performing arts.

Examine the importance and influence of Greek art and architecture.
Investigate the importance and influence of the performing arts on classical civilizations.

Analyze the social organization of classical cultures.

Describe the role of slavery in Greece.

05.01 Ancient Greece Journal Assignment(WorldCiv1)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

"Men make their own history, but they do not make it just as they please; they do not make it under circumstances chosen by themselves, but under circumstances directly found, given and transmitted from the past." (Marx par. 2) Marx, Karl. "18th Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte." 18th Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte. Karl Marx 1852. Marxists Internet Archive, n.d. Web. 21 Dec. 2012.

Assignment 5.01: Journal Entry: How independent are you? To what extent do you rely on other people? How well could you survive if you were totally responsible for yourself without relying on others for anything?

Title this portion of your journal, "Ancient Greece Journal". Edit and submit your journal entry to your instructor.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.02 Ancient Greece Reading Challenge (WorldCiv1)

Remember, you must log in to Pioneer Library before using these WorldBook Online links.

From the Pioneer Library page, open the WorldBook Online in a new window or a new tab. Close the new World Book tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the readings.
The Pioneer Library log-in name and password are from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

teacher-scored 42 points possible 35 minutes

Assignment 5.02: Ancient Greece Reading ChallengeBust of Sophocles, ca. 270 BC: Wikimedia Commons, Wolfgang Sauber, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedBust of Sophocles, ca. 270 BC: Wikimedia Commons, Wolfgang Sauber, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Directions: Copy and paste the assignment into a word processor. Respond to each item using the "Required Readings" for Chapter 5. Title your assignment: "Ancient Greece Reading Challenge: 5.2." Edit and submit your completed assignment to your instructor. Each question is worth 2 points, but partial credit can be awarded.

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Required Reading: Ancient Greece:

 

1. Explain the importance and development of the Greek city-state and the difference between a citizen and a non-citizen:

 

2. What territories were a part of ancient Greece? Which seas surrounded the peninsula? (What were the natural resources?)

 

3. Write a short paragraph that compares/contrasts education and government in Athens vs. education and government in Sparta (Hint: be sure to read through the ENTIRE article to obtain complete information):

 

 

Required Reading: Greek Literature:
Read the following subsections: Greek literature through and including The Greco-Roman Age

4. Who was Hesiod and what type of poetry did he write? What were his most important works?

 

 

5. What type of poetry was originally sung to the music of the lyre and described personal feelings instead of acts of heroism? Who wrote the "Iliad" and the "Odyssey"? What is the story of each poem?

 

6. What is "Old Comedy"? What was it about? When did it end and why? When did "New Comedy" begin?

 

7. Who were Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides and what specific works did they write? Why were their works important?

 

8. Who was Herodotus? By what "nickname" is he known? What did he write?

 

9. Who was Thucydides? Why is he significant?

 

10. Who's death established the Hellenistic age? What is the significance of the spread of Greek culture?

 

11. What is the Greco-Roman age? When was it?

 

12. Who was Plutarch and what did he write?

13. Who was Epictetus and why was he important?

14. What contributions did Pausanias and Galen make?

15. What was the Sophists' Banquet and why was it important?

16. What contribution did Plotinus make?

 

17. What new works appeared during the Greco-Roman Age? Name them and their authors:

 

 

 

Required Reading: Greek Mythology:

 

18. Who wrote the "Theogeny"? What was it about? Who were Gaia, Uranus and the Titans? How did the Olympian gods come into being?

 

19. Create a chart or list of the 12 Olympian gods and their powers:

 

20. Discuss the Greek heroes who came before the Trojan War (Jason, Theseus, and Oedipus) and explain what each did that made him famous:

 

21. What was the reason for the Trojan War? Who were Agamemnon, Menelaus, and Odysseus and what did they do?

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.03 Greek PowerPoint Assignment(WorldCiv1)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 90 minutes

Assignment instructions:Relief from the agora of Thasos, ca. 480 BC: Wikimedia Commons, Jastrow, public domainRelief from the agora of Thasos, ca. 480 BC: Wikimedia Commons, Jastrow, public domain

Create a Presentation about a topic you studied in the previous lesson.

  • You may use PowerPoint, Prezi, or another presentation maker approved by your instructor on one of the subjects listed below.  If you'd like to do a different theme please request permission from the instructor.

  • Relate the presentation around a central theme or character(s) listed below:

the Olympic games

Greek Mythology

enduring monuments of Greece

theater

plays

playwrights

poets or poetry

medicine

Persian wars

Sparta and Athens

or another topic approved by the instructor.

  • Your presentation should have at least eight slides.  Five of the eight slides should contain ORIGINAL IMAGES.
  • Your pictures may be made from any graphic media of your choice but should be ORIGINAL PICTURES (not pictures you have found on the internet):
    • (1) poster board and construction paper, paint or crayons, (scan),
    • (2) graphic computer software,
    • or (3) any other suitable medium for graphic illustration and page development.
    • Your pictures may be hand-drawn or from another picture source with appropriate citing given to the source.
  • Along with the five images add original text explaining the significance of the drawn feature on the picture. Be brief and concise with the text items, while being accurate and thorough.
  • Do NOT copy and paste the text from another source; compose it yourself, summarizing and synthesizing important ideas about the topic of the picture.

You will need MLA citations, in-text citations if you use direct quotes from your sources and a Works Cited slide at the end. Please view the "Citations and MLA help" section under discussions if you are not familiar with how to do this.

You may send the PPT to your instructor via email.

 
Excellent - 10
Good - 7
Satisfactory - 4
Needs Improvement - 1
Subject Knowledge Subject knowledge is evident throughout the project. All information is clear, appropriate, and correct. Subject knowledge is evident in much of the project. Most information is clear, appropriate, and correct. Some subject knowledge is evident. Some Information is confusing, incorrect, or flawed. Subject knowledge is not evident. Information is confusing, incorrect, or flawed.
Citing Sources All sources are properly cited.  Text taken from a source have appropriate citation. Most sources are properly cited.  Few sources are properly cited. Citations are lacking completeness. No sources are properly cited. There are no citations at all.
Organization The sequence of information is logical and intuitive. Menus and paths to all information are clear and direct. There are no spelling mistakes leading to confusion. The sequence of information is logical. Menus and paths to most information are clear and direct. Most of the words are spelled correctly. The sequence of information is somewhat logical. Menus and paths are confusing and flawed. Spelling and conventions make it hard to follow. The sequence of information is not logical. Menus and paths to information are not evident. 16 or more spelling errors.
Originality The project shows significant evidence of originality and inventiveness. The majority of the content and many of the ideas are fresh, original, and inventive. The project shows some evidence of originality and inventiveness. The work is an extensive collection and rehash of other people's ideas, products, and images. There is little evidence of new thought or inventiveness. The work is a minimal collection or rehash of other people's ideas, products, and images. There is no evidence of new thought.
Technical Project runs perfectly with no technical problems. For example, there are no error messages, all sound, video, or other files are found. Project runs adequately with minor technical problems. Project runs minimally. There are many technical problems when viewing the project. Project does not run satisfactorily. There are too many technical problems to view the project.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.04 Ancient Greece Enrichment Videos(WorldCiv1)

Instructions for Enrichment Video Access

The "Enrichment Videos" for the course are provided by eMedia through the UEN Pioneer website and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies [The videos are accessed using the same username and password as the "Reading Challenge" information].

1) Click on the blue link shown below for the video you want to view. You will be required to type in the user name and password for the Pioneer Library which you can get from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

Now you are ready to access the videos.

2) Links to the Enrichment Video topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. Currently there are no assignments connected to the videos. The purpose of the videos is to give information that coincides and/or goes beyond the information normally required by the course giving students the opportunity to gain more knowledge regarding topics of interest to them.

3) Videos may be streamed for viewing, downloaded and viewed as Windows Media, and/or downloaded and placed on a portable video device such as iPod.

4) If you have any further questions feel free to contact your instructor via email.

Enrichment Videos for Chapter 5: Ancient Greece:

Empires Series: The Greeks: Crucible of Civilization

Synopsis: This Empires series examines classical Greece of the 4th and 5th centuries, B.C. It was a magnificent civilization that laid the foundations for modern science, politics, warfare, and philosophy, and produced some of the most breathtaking art and architecture the world has ever known.

Episode 01-The Revolution

Synopsis: Episode One, The Revolution, begins at the dawn of democracy in 508 B.C., with the revolution of the common people against aristocratic rule. The documentary then travels further back in time to chronicle the key events leading up to the revolution.

Episode 02-The Golden Age

Synopsis: The second episode of Greece: The Crucible of Civilization, opens in 490 B.C. when tiny Athens prepares to safeguard its growing economy and infant democracy against multiple invasion attempts by Persia. Athens then turns its attention back to its economy and to other domestic affairs. Soon, the democratic system unleashes the power of the human mind, and Greece enters a Golden Age in which every branch of learning advances and a new leader, Pericles, emerges to take Athens to the zenith of its power.

Episode 03-Empire of the Mind

Synopsis: Episode 03-Empire of the Mind: Having taken great leaps forward in every field of learning, and with a strong economy that dominates Mediterranean trade, Athens and its 150,000 residents are the envy of their neighbors, in particular, bellicose Sparta. As expected, the Spartans invade and burn the open areas around the city. But it is plague, brought by rats feeding on grain in the holds of supply ships, that defeats the city. The disease ravages the Athenians, inflicting agony on them and killing one out of every three. Finally in 404 B.C., Athens surrenders.

06.00 Ancient Rome Introduction (WorldCiv1)

Unit 6: Ancient Rome: Republic to Empire

Time Period: (509 B.C. - 476 A.D.)

Geographic Areas: The Ancient Roman Empire

Roman road through Glanum, built ca. 1st or 2nd century BC: Wikimedia Commons, SiefkinDR, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedRoman road through Glanum, built ca. 1st or 2nd century BC: Wikimedia Commons, SiefkinDR, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported
Unit 6 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the creation
of the ancient Roman Republic through Empire. General assignment information is as
follows:

1. Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that
connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

2. Geospatial Map: Students are provided with the tools to research information
and create an animated map that depicts visual information on the Mediterranean area.

3. Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on
information taken from articles that are required readings for the course. The
articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

4. Outline: Students choose a topic of interest on Rome and create a detailed outline
of events.

5. Video Study Sheet/Quiz: Students complete the study sheet while watching a
specific video on the Roman Republic. Students reference the Study Sheet while
taking the 'open-note' quiz on the film contents.

6. Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who
may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the chapter. Points
are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information, or any other topic,
feel free to contact your instructor.

The Roman Empire evolved from a small state to a dominant world power that culminated in the Pax Romana, a nearly 500 year period of peaceful reign.
The Romans were remarkable in their ability to assimilate other cultures and established a strong centralized government over a large territory.
The factors that led to such a unified empire are important to note for nations, states, communities, and even families.

Objectives:
Analyze the development of classical political systems.

Examine the consequences of Persian and Macedonian expansion.

Investigate the purpose and influence of religions and philosophies on classical
civilizations of Rome.

Examine the essential elements of the belief systems of Roman mythology.

Investigate the importance of the expansion of trade.

Identify routes of early colonization, e.g., Phoenician, Greek, Hellenistic.
Examine the technological improvements in transportation over time.
Assess the importance of the Mediterranean trade routes.

Evaluate the significance of classical sculpture, architecture, and performing arts.

Examine the importance and influence of Roman art and architecture.
Investigate the importance and influence of the performing arts on classical civilizations.

Analyze the social organization of classical cultures.

Describe the role of slavery in Rome.

06.01 Ancient Rome Journal Assignment(WorldCiv1)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

Relief of a Roman soldier, 4th century AD: Wikimedia Commons, Wolfgang Sauber, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedRelief of a Roman soldier, 4th century AD: Wikimedia Commons, Wolfgang Sauber, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedAssignment Instructions: "History is philosophy teaching by example and also by warning." (Bolingbroke 177) Bolingbroke, Lord Viscount. "Letters on the Study and the Use of History Letter II." Eliohs. Electronic Library of Histoiography, Mar. 1996. Web. 24 Dec. 2012. 6.1:

Journal Entry: In any organization, like an athletic team, a club, business, etc., what qualities make it strong and powerful?

Edit and submit your journal entry to your instructor.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.02 Mediterranean Map (WorldCiv1)

Create a Google Earth (GE) Tour of locations you have already studied and share the GE Tour KMZ file with your teacher.

In the next assignment you will be locating all the places listed below using Google Earth. Your final product will be a Google Earth Tour.Map of the Mediterranean region: Google Earth image, Pat Lambrose, CC Share-AlikeMap of the Mediterranean region: Google Earth image, Pat Lambrose, CC Share-Alike

Countries/Areas:

_____ Asia Minor
_____ Crete
_____ Egypt
_____ Greece
_____ Italy
_____ Macedonia
_____ Sicily

Rivers:

_____ Euphrates
_____ Nile
_____ Tigris

Cities:

_____ Alexandria
_____ Athens
_____ Byzantium
_____ Carthage
_____ Jerusalem
_____ Rome
_____ Sparta
_____ Troy

Water Bodies:

_____ Adriatic Sea
_____ Aegean Sea
_____ Black Sea
_____ Red Sea

06.02 Mediterranean Map Google Earth Tour (WorldCiv 1)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 60 minutes

Time to create a Google Earth Tour!

Use the Google Earth (GE) Tour above called Mediterranean_Map_Instructions_WCQ1.kmz as a template to identify and locate 22 geographic features. Save this template to your hard drive where you will remember. Download Google Earth if you do not have the program on your computer. See links below.

Open Google Earth, then select File, Open, and browse to where you saved the Mediterranean_Map_Instructions_WCQ1.kmz tour. Use this GE Tour template to complete your Mediterranean Map. Enter the name of each feature next to the numbered Placemarks found in this region of the world! Once all 22 features are identified, rename this GE Tour as follows: Mediterranean_Map_YourFirstName_YourLastName
Save your GE Tour on your hard drive.

See detailed instructions for this assignment in the PDF file listed above. The file name is Med_Map_GE_Tour_WorldCiv_Q1.pdf. Once your GE Tour is completed, submit the Google Earth Tour KMZ file to your teacher.

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.03 Ancient Rome Reading Challenge (WorldCiv1)

teacher-scored 32 points possible 40 minutes

Bust of Julius Caesar made during his lifetime: Wikimedia Commons, public domainBust of Julius Caesar made during his lifetime: Wikimedia Commons, public domainAssignment 06.03: Ancient Rome Reading Challenge

Respond to each item below using the "Required Readings" for Chapter 6. Edit and submit the completed assignment to your instructor.

Each question is worth 2 points, but you can receive partial credit.

********************************************************************************

Required Reading: Ancient Rome:

 

1. Who was the first Roman emperor? Who was the last?

 

2. Why did rhetoric play an important role in higher education in ancient Rome?

 

3. What two engineering achievements made it possible for the Romans to construct large buildings?

 

4. What led to the Conflict of the Orders?

 

5. Who were the Etruscans and when did they control Rome?

 

6. Name the river on which the city of Rome was built?

 

7. What three groups made up the army? How were they different?

 

8. What steps did Diocletian take to restore order in the Roman Empire?

 

9. What were the Punic Wars and when did they take place and which peoples did the Romans fight during the wars?

 

10. To which tribe did the Romans belong? What other tribes also lived on the Italian Peninsula?

11. What are some of the ways that Rome continues to influence us today?

 

 

Required Reading: Roman Mythology:

 

12. Who are Romulus and Remus in Roman mythology?

 

13. Who were the Seven Kings and why were they important?

14. Who are the archiaic triad and when were they worshiped?

15. Who were the Capitoline triad and when were they worshiped?

16. What is the Aeneid? Why is it important?

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.04 Rome Outline Assignment(WorldCiv1)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 40 minutes

Assignment 06:04

Rome Outline

Go to the Roman empire website and create a more specific outline of ONE of the 10 chapter topics listed:

  • The Founding
  • The Kings
  • The Republic
  • Early Emperors
  • The Decline
  • The collapse
  • Constantinople
  • Religion
  • Society
  • The Army

Create and submit the assignment to your instructor.

Make sure that you are doing the complete outline of the reading.  If you are not familiar with how to do an outline then please check out the examples in the links below.  Notice that you will be using Roman numerals!

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.05 Rise of the Roman Republic Video (WorldCiv1)

Ancient Rome: Reexamined.
The Rise of the Roman Republic Video Study Sheet Roman aqueduct at Pont Du Gard: Wikimedia Commons, Guenter Wieschendahl, public domainRoman aqueduct at Pont Du Gard: Wikimedia Commons, Guenter Wieschendahl, public domain

Directions:
(1) Print the Study Sheet shown below.

(2) Follow the instructions shown beneath the Study Sheet to access the video: "The Rise of the Roman Republic."

(3) As you watch the video, circle the correct answer for each item. Use the completed Video Study Sheet to answer the questions found in the 6.05.01 Rise of the Roman Republic Video Quiz.

(The information below is for your use only, to help you on the quiz. Do NOT send the study sheet to the teacher)

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The Rise of the Roman Republic Video Study Sheet

1. Among Rome’s great contributions, which has been used by the United States?
a. The aqueduct
b. The Via Appia
c. Rome’s constitutional system of checks and balances
d. Roman satire

2. The city-state of Rome lasted longer than any other city-state of the ancient world.
a. True
b. False

3. Rome began as a
a. Large Etruscan port city
b. Humble Iron Age village
c. Vast religious center
d. None of the above

4. Rome was in a unique position to become a powerful city-state because of
a. Fertile plains, lush valleys and green hills
b. Mild, year-round Mediterranean climate
c. Geography
d. All of the above

5. The legends of Rome discuss it being founded by
a. Etruscan Kings
b. Greek City-States
c. Romulus and Remus
d. Juno and Jupiter

6. Rome’s greatest strength would be its citizenship.
a. True
b. False

7. The fundamental structure of Roman society was based upon
a. Slavery
b. All were free and equal
c. Socialism
d. The client-patron system

8. Rome’s social system had a shared set of ethical values that included
a. Heroism and valor
b. Service to Rome and the community
c. Never giving up
d. All of the above

9. The reward for living in accordance with the Roman values was increased status in Roman society.
a. True
b. False

10. Rome was founded on the
a. Caelian Hill
b. Capitoline Hill
c. Palatine Hill
d. Valentine Hill

11. The Forum was a place where Romans
a. Set up stalls to sell goods
b. Held political meetings
c. Held court sessions
d. All of the above

12. The greatest evil that Romans saw in government was
a. Free speech
b. Freedom of religion
c. Power concentrated in the hands of one man or woman
d. All of the above

13. In the Roman republic all citizens had a say and were heard equally.
a. True
b. False

14. Much of Rome’s success and prosperity was fueled by its remarkable engineering feats.
a. True
b. False

15. The man most responsible for Rome’s aqueducts and roads was
a. Caesar Augustus
b. Appius Claudius Caecus
c. Julius Caesar
d. Romulus

16. The first Roman aqueduct was
a. Aqua Alexandrina
b. Aqua Appia
c. Aqua Novus
d. Aqua Virgo

17. The aqueduct was powered by gravity alone.
a. True
b. False

18. In all, Roman engineers built ________ different aqueducts.
a. 5
b. 7
c. 9
d. 11

19. The first great Roman road was the
a. Via Appia
b. Via Duct
c. Via Napoli
d. Via Roma

20. The Roman road system spanned over ___________ miles.
a. 25,000
b. 50,000
c. 75,000
d. 100,000

21. Appius Claudius Caecus was responsible for the
a. Building of Roman fortifications throughout the peninsula
b. Creation of an independent Roman judiciary
c. Presentation of one of the first speeches recorded in Italian
d. None of the above

22. The language spoken by the Romans was
a. Etruscan
b. Italian
c. Latin
d. Romani

23. By 260 BC, Rome had everything it needed to become the greatest city-state in the ancient world:
a. A nearly invincible army
b. Superior engineering skills
c. A political policy and social structure directed toward colonial expansion
d. All of the above

****************************************************************************************************************************************************************

Instructions for video access:

To access the videos you must do the following:
Click on the link below for the Rise of the Roman Republic video.

The log-in page will appear in a new window or a new tab. A box titled "Copyright Protected" will appear over the top of the page. You will need to type Pioneer Library username and password available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian.

A page will appear with the film title and a picture of two Roman soldiers. Click on the picture. Be patient. It may take a few seconds for the video to appear and play.

Video Information

Ancient Rome: Reexamined.
the Rise of the Roman Republic

Synopsis: The video brings a new perspective to growth and development in Ancient Rome, its unique accomplishments (nurtured via a merit-driven leadership system), and selected incredible developments in architecture, government, and culture.

The video is approx. 29 minutes in length.

06.05 Rise of the Roman Republic Video Quiz (WorldCiv 1)

computer-scored 23 points possible 45 minutes

Take the Rise of the Roman Republic Video Quiz.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.06 Ancient Rome Enrichment Video (WorldCiv1)

Instructions for Enrichment Video Access
Palmyra citadel at night: Wikimedia Commons, M. Disdero, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 GenericPalmyra citadel at night: Wikimedia Commons, M. Disdero, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic
The "Enrichment Videos" for the course are provided by eMedia through the UEN Pioneer website and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies [The videos are accessed using the same username and password as the "Reading Challenge" information].

1) Click on the blue link below for the video and the log-in page will appear in a new window. Once you have typed in the user name and password for the Pioneer Library (available from your EHS teacher or your local school librarian), it will take you directly to the video where you will click on the arrow to start the video to play.

2) Links to the Enrichment Video topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. Currently there are no assignments connected to the videos. The purpose of the videos is to give information that coincides and goes beyond the information normally required by the course, giving students the opportunity to gain more knowledge regarding topics of interest to them.

3) Videos may be streamed for viewing, downloaded and viewed as Windows Media, or downloaded and placed on a portable video device such as iPod.

4) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact your instructor via email.

Enrichment Video for Chapter 6: Ancient Rome:

The World Heritage. Palmyra

Synopsis: Palmyra was a trade city connecting the East and West that flourished under Queen Zenobia and fell when she did. Situated in the approximate center of the Syrian Desert, the caravan city of Palmyra prospered under the protection of the Romans as a trade station on the Silk Road. The city fell in 273 because Queen Zenobia rebelled against Rome, but there are many structures remaining such as the Temple of Bel, the colonnaded streets, the Tetrapylon, a Roman theater, and tomb towers, that all hint at the prosperity of those bygone days.

06.06 Ancient Rome Enrichment Video Link (WorldCiv1)

06.07 Book Recommendations

These are book recommendations based upon the material.

If you happen to be someone who enjoys reading, the following books can usually be found at your local school or public library. Not all of them are long--some would be a quick read. They may interest you if you like learning about this time period. If you have any books that you have read that would fit this section, feel free to message me about them.

The Percy Jackson and the Olympians Series by Rick Riordan

As funny as it sounds to see these books on a list of books about Greece, I think they are relevant. Mr. Riordan does a good job of including information about Ancient Greece and the gods of Olympus. If you haven’t read the series I recommend picking it up at your local library. It may even help you on the exam.

Theogony by Hesiod

This ancient Greek text outlines who the gods and goddesses are and how they came to be.

Bullfinch’s Mythology by Thomas Bullfinch

This book goes through several time periods’ myths. It covers Greece and Rome, the times of King Arthur and finishes up in the later middle ages. The language can be a bit dry, but if you are interested in myths you may want to pick this book up.

The Iliad by Homer

If you saw the movie Troy and are interested in reading the book then this is for you. This epic war story covers the great heroes of the past and will keep you interested. The language may be difficult at first, but give it time and you will be able to move through it. Having a good translation will make or break this book for you, but just like the Odyssey, there are plenty of sites online to help you if you get confused.

The Heroes of Olympus Series by Rick Riordan

This series by Mr. Riordan moves more into the Roman gods and goddesses. As weird as it sounds to see these books on my list, I feel that you can garner a lot of information from these books. You might even find that the information you learn about Roman culture might help you on your exam!

Aesop’s Fables

Many of you may be familiar with Aesop’s fables, which have been teaching and entertaining people for hundreds, if not thousands, of years. It isn’t a bad thing to review the morals and teachings here. You may be more familiar with them than you think.

06.08 Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome Review Quiz

computer-scored 14 points possible 20 minutes

Assessment 06.07 Review Quiz

Complete

05-06 Review Quiz
Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome

This assignment is found under Review Quiz 05-06 on the course website. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do and will provide immediate feedback.

Complete this assignment after you finish reading lessons 5 and 6.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


07.00 India China Introduction (WorldCiv1)

India and China take up most of southern Asia: Wikimedia Commons, CIA World Factbook, public domainIndia and China take up most of southern Asia: Wikimedia Commons, CIA World Factbook, public domain
Unit 7: The Heritage of India and China

Time Period: (1500 B.C. – 220 A.D.)

Geographic Areas: India and China

Unit 7 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the heritage of
India and China. General assignment information is as follows:

1. Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that
connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

2. Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on
information taken from articles that are required readings for the course. The
articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

3. Summary: Students will write a short essay on a topic from the reading.

4. Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who
may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the chapter. Points
are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information, or any other topic,
feel free to contact your instructor.

In India and China, religion and philosophy shaped the development of culture and significantly impacted the order of society.
Hinduism established a class-oriented society with castes.
Buddhism taught the necessity of eliminating worldly desires from one's life. Confucianism and Taoism emphasized withdrawal from the world.
Ideas from these religions provided a basis for the rule of an empire that lasted some 400 years.

Objectives:
Analyze the development of classical political systems.

Contrast Zhou feudalism, the Greek city-state, and the caste system of India.
Compare the development of the Roman and Han empires.

Investigate the purpose and influence of religions and philosophies on classical
civilizations of China and India.

Examine the essential elements of the belief systems of Confucianism, Buddhism, Hinduism and Islam.

Investigate the importance of the expansion of trade.

Identify routes of early colonization, e.g., Korean, Japanese.
Examine the technological improvements in transportation over time.
Assess the importance of the East Asian trade routes.

Evaluate the significance of classical sculpture, architecture, and performing arts.

Examine the importance and influence of Indian and Chinese art and architecture.
Investigate the importance and influence of the performing arts on classical civilizations.

Analyze the social organization of classical cultures.

Compare the role of the family in Imperial Rome and Confucian China.
Explain the caste system of India.
Compare the treatment of women in China, Athens, Sparta, India and Rome.

07.01 Heritage of India China Journal Assignment(WorldCiv1)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

Women in tribal village, Umaria district, India: Wikimedia Commons, Yann, Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedWomen in tribal village, Umaria district, India: Wikimedia Commons, Yann, Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported "If you would understand anything, observe its beginning and its development." (Aristotle) "Seattle Pacific University History Department: Home." Seattle Pacific University History Department: Home. SPU History Department, 2012. Web. 24 Dec. 2012.

Assignment Instructions: 7.1: Journal Entry: If you were in charge of a group of people that had to complete a job by a certain date, what would you do to make sure that a quality job was done on time?

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


07.02 Heritage of India/China Reading Challenge (WorldCiv1)

teacher-scored 26 points possible 30 minutes

Assignment 7.02: Reading Challenge

Directions: Copy and paste the assignment (between the two lines of asterisks) into a word processor. Respond to each item using the "Required Readings" for Chapter 7. Edit and submit your completed assignment to your instructor.

Each question is worth 2 points, but partial credit can be awarded.
**************************************************************************************

Required Reading: Indian Heritage: History:Lord Balaji in Sri Venkateswar Swamy (Hindu) temple: Wikimedia Commons, Phanibandaru, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedLord Balaji in Sri Venkateswar Swamy (Hindu) temple: Wikimedia Commons, Phanibandaru, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

 

1. How did the experience of war affect emperor Ashoka? What actions did he take as a result of the experience? The message spread by Ashoka was based on which religion?

 

2. Why was the Gupta Empire known as India’s “golden age”?

 

 

 

Required Reading: Indian Heritage: People:

 

3. Why do most Dravidians live in the south of India while the Indo-Aryan peoples live in the north?

4. How many different languages and dialects are spoken in India? Why is the number significant?

 

5. List five languages spoken in India, including the name of the national language:

 

 

 

Required Reading: Indian Heritage: Religion:

 

6. Briefly explain the four varnas or castes as listed in the Indian social groups:

 

 

7. Which Indian religion comprises more than 80% of the population? Briefly explain five beliefs of the religion:

 

8. List five minor religions in India. Choose one religion and give examples of how the religion affected the Indian people:

 

 

 

Required Reading: Chinese Heritage: History:

 

9. What were the major contributions of Qin emperor Shi Huangdi to ancient Chinese civilization?

10. Discuss five major innovations that occurred during the Han dynasty. During which years did the dynasty flourish?

Buddhist monk at a temple in Tianjin, China: Wikimedia Commons, gill_penney, CC Attribution 2.0 GenericBuddhist monk at a temple in Tianjin, China: Wikimedia Commons, gill_penney, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic

 

Required Reading: Chinese Heritage: Religion:

11. Discuss the basic beliefs and development of the following religions in China:

 

Confucianism:

 

Taoism:

Buddhism:

 

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


07.03 Heritage of India & China Summary Topic Assignment(WorldCiv1)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 35 minutes

Assignment 7.03: Chapter Topic Summary AssignmentGiant Buddha Statue of Leshan, Sichuan, China: Wikimedia Commons, Ariel Steiner, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 GenericGiant Buddha Statue of Leshan, Sichuan, China: Wikimedia Commons, Ariel Steiner, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic

a) Select a subject that caught your interest in the readings questions from 7.02. Suggested topics include:

  • Emperor Ashoka
  • Gupta Empire
  • caste system
  • religions in India
  • languages in India
  • Qin Emperor Shi Huangdi
  • the Han dynasty
  • Confucianism
  • Hinduism
  • Buddhism

b) Research your topic, locating AT LEAST three sources. (You should automatically have one in the World Book Encyclopedia.) Note your sources for a Works Cited page, writing down the name or title, author, publisher, date of publication, pages references, URL (if online), etc.. Make sure you cite your electronic resources correctly and have correct in-text citations. If you need help with this please view the “Citations and MLA help” in the discussions section of this class.

c) Write an original 5 paragraph (400 word) report in your own words. Do not plagiarize.

d) Use any appropriate vocabulary terms from this unit for the report. This report should be three pages in length (at least 400 words). Two pages should be text and the final page should be a Works Cited page. Submit the report to your instructor via the front page of the course, or by clicking next to the submission page.

 
5
4
3
2
1
Ideas The major idea is clear and easily identified. All important ideas and terms are well defined. Major ideas are decipherable. Most ideas and terms are defined. Some major ideas are identified. One or two major ideas are identified. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. There is no central theme or purpose.
Organization The essay is plainly divided into at least 5 major paragraphs. It is easy to see that the student can organize a 5 paragraph essay. Essay is divided into paragraphs that can be deciphered. Some paragraphs lead the reader through the paper. Paragraphs are missing, but it does follow the assignment. Introduction or conclusion is missing. Paragraphing is disorganized. Does not follow paper assignment.
Presentation The Works Cited page is adequate and documented accurately, without the use of wikipedia. In-text citations are also included and correct. The Works Cited page is mostly adequate and many of the citations are correct. There are no in-text citations. All sources are correctly cited but from Wikipedia. All sources are incorrectly cited and many are from Wikipedia. There is no Works Cited page.
Flow The major idea is backed up by the supporting information and that information is accurate. The major idea has some supporting information that is either weak or inaccurate. The major idea has some back up information but is mostly left on its own, or is incorrect. Awkward insertion of wording that does not help the information to flow. There is no major idea. Supporting information does not exist.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of punctuation, grammar, usage, and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message. There are no spelling mistakes or punctuation errors present. Less than three spelling, punctuation or other convention errors are present. Three to six spelling errors or other conventions present. Six to ten spelling errors or other conventions present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage and grammar and/or paragraphing distract the reader from the text and make it difficult to read. 16 or more spelling errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


07.04 Heritage of India China Enrichment Video (WorldCiv1)

Instructions for Enrichment Video Access
A section of the Great Wall of China near Jinshanling: Wikimedia Commons, Jakub Hałun, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedA section of the Great Wall of China near Jinshanling: Wikimedia Commons, Jakub Hałun, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported
The "Enrichment Videos" for the course are provided by eMedia through the UEN Pioneer website and are aligned to the Utah State Core Curriculum for Social Studies [The videos are accessed using the same username and password as the "Reading Challenge" information].

Accessing the videos is a bit tricky but it is possible. To access the videos you must do the following:

1) Click on the first blue link shown below

The log-in page appears in a new window. In the right-hand column, type the information in the boxes as shown below. You can get the Pioneer username and password from your EHS teacher or from your local school librarian.

Once you have typed in the user name and password for the Pioneer Library it will take you directly to the video, where you will click on the arrow to start the video to play.

If you have problems with the first link show below, you can click on the second link

The Pioneer Online Library page will appear. Click on the link in the first column titled: "eMedia." The page will open in a new window or a new tab. Close the new eMedia window/tab, but DO NOT close the original Pioneer Library tab, or you will NOT be able to access the videos.

Now you are ready to access the videos.

2) Links to the Enrichment Video topic titles are colored blue and are listed below. Currently there are no assignments connected to the videos. The purpose of the videos is to give information that coincides and goes beyond the information normally required by the course giving students the opportunity to gain more knowledge regarding topics of interest to them.

3) Videos may be streamed for viewing, downloaded and viewed as Windows Media, or downloaded and placed on a portable video device such as iPod.

4) If you have any further questions feel free to contact your instructor via email.

Enrichment Videos for Chapter 7: Heritage of India & China:

India

Beyond Our Borders: India

Synopsis: India is one of the most diverse nations on earth, in languages, ethnic backgrounds of its peoples, religions and landscapes. Yet it seems to represent so much of what Asia means to the rest of the world. It birthed the religions of Hinduism and Buddhism. Sarnath and Varanasi reveal some of the feelings of each religion, but we also see the remains of Islamic culture in the North. These, and other religions, reflect the many historical invasions of India, each bringing new peoples and cultures. What these influences mean to modern India, and how it reacts to influences from other modern cultures, is revealed as we visit various locations throughout this captivating subcontinent.


China

Beyond Our Border:. China

Synopsis: China has the world's fastest growing economy, yet it also has many ancient traditions. Starting in Beijing, we see where the direction for the blend of ancient and modern originates, since China is still ruled from this political center despite its decentralizing economic changes. We also visit country villages, where peasants live more closely to ancient traditions. But, everywhere, powerful diversifying forces are accelerating, especially in cities such as Shanghai, and in mammoth rural dam building projects, which contrast with what remains of Confucian, Taoist, and Buddhist philosophical-religious practices.

07.04 Heritage of India China Enrichment Videos(WorldCiv1)

07.05 Review Quiz Unit 7 and Q1

computer-scored 29 points possible 15 minutes

Assessment 07.05 Review Quiz Unit 7 and Q1

Complete

07 and Q1 Review Quiz
Heritage of India and China

This assignment is found under Review Quiz Unit 07 and Quarter 1 on the course website. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do and will provide immediate feedback.

Complete this assignment after you finish reading lesson 7 and all the course work for Quarter 1.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.