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Geography for Life, 1st Quarter

00.0 Introduction to this Class (Geography for Life)

Course Description

Geography is described as the study of the "why of the where."

Geography for Life explores how to use geography as a tool to better understand the world in which we live. Students learn to evaluate and question the why and where of spatial perceptions that are read, seen, and heard.

The curriculum is best understood when using these geographic themes: location, place, movement, region, and human-environmental interaction.

Geography for Life is designed as a semester course, and includes map skills with physical and human geography essentials, beginning with North America, South America, Europe, and their connections to other world regions.

Class Overview

Geography for Life Credit: This quarter of Geography generates 0.25 credit if completed successfully. Students, this is your opportunity to learn responsibility. This is YOUR grade and YOUR life, and you need to learn to do things for YOURSELF. Since you are the one taking the class, you should be the one talking to me and asking me questions about the assignments. This class is YOUR responsibility. If we run into a problem that we can't resolve together, I am happy to visit with your parents.

How to get started

All assignments will be turned in online.

  • Please use Microsoft Word when doing your assignments. Please bold or change the color of your answers so that they are easy to read.
  • Make sure to keep extra copies of your work in case you have to re-submit them due to computer glitches.
  • You will upload your assignments on the assignment submission page. Please be sure to submit the correct assignment to the correct page. 

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** Please put my e-mail address in your address book so that my messages to you and the class will not automatically go to the spam folder. Also, please do not send me messages you are forwarding to your friends. 

00.00.01 About Me (Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

About Me Assignment Read the information on the "Start Here" page and answer these questions. As you complete assignments in this course you should use proper spelling and grammar. Please capitalize the beginnings of sentences and all proper nouns. Please proofread all of your assignments. You should also make sure you include both the questions and the answers in each assignment. The answers should be bolded or in a different color than the questions. Please just choose one color for all of your answers and do not use light colors, like yellow.

  1.  Which school do you attend and in what grade are you?
  2. Why are you taking this course from EHS?
  3. Take the day you started this course and add ten weeks—now look at the Friday of that week. This is the day you will need to have all of your work turned in and your final exam completed. What day is your completion date and how will you remember the day?
  4. List a phone number and e-mail address to contact you. List a phone number and e-mail address to contact your parent(s)/guardian(s).
  5. Write a paragraph telling me about yourself. What are your hobbies and interests?
  6. What is your favorite place you have lived or visited? What did you like about this place?

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


00.01.01 Student Software Needs

 

Students need access to a robust internet connection and a modern web browser.

This class may also require the Apple QuickTime plug-in to view media.

For students using a school-issued Chromebook, ask your technical support folks to download the QuickTime plug-in and enable the plug-in for your Chromebook.

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01.00 Geography Skills(Geo4life1)

Geography Skills Do you know how to get from your bedroom to your kitchen? Have you learned where your parents' room is? Can you find the bathroom in a hurry? Of course. They're all part of your home. You certainly know your own home. The earth is also your home. It's a little bigger and a bit more crowded. Fortunately, you aren't expected to help clean it up after school, but you should recycle and not throw trash on the ground. Still, the earth is where you live, and you should know your way around it. This course in Geography is your road map to the planet. It will tell you why some places are hot and others are cold, where there are mountains and where there are molehills. It will introduce you to some of the people, plants and animals that are your neighbors. It will help you discover how geography affects their lives as well as yours, and how all of us are shaped by the shape of the Earth. You'll want to keep paper and pencil in hand and take notes as you read through the material. Especially note the items in bold. Notetaking will help you in your assignments as well as give you the information you will need to pass the quizzes at the end of each unit. You CAN use your notes on the quiz. The quiz will be EASY as long as you have taken notes.

01.01 Geography Skills(Geo4Life1)

Most of the Earth is under water. In fact, oceans and lakes cover 70% of the planet. The surface area of the ocean is more than twice that of the continents. Although the ocean is one continuous body of water, geographers have given it different names depending on how the continents divide it. The Pacific Ocean is the largest, followed by the Atlantic, Indian and last, the Arctic Ocean. The ocean makes earth life possible. The earth's ocean is the only one in the solar system. The ocean plays a vital role in climate and weather. The sun's heat puts moisture in the air through evaporation. The water in the air condenses to form clouds which eventually releases moisture as some form of precipitation. Without this water cycle, nothing on the earth could survive. A continent is one of the earth's land divisions. In Latin, continent means "they contain" which came to mean "continuous mass of land." There are seven continents. Asia is the largest followed by Africa, North America, South America, Antarctica, Europe and the smallest is Australia. Australia is both a continent and a country. Europe and Asia are both located on the same landmass. This landmass is called Eurasia. Most geographers consider the continent's dividing line the Ural Mountains south to the Caspian Sea. Those are the seven continents. That's easy enough to remember because important things always come in groups of seven: seven wonders of the world, seven seas, seven dwarfs, seven days and so forth. The seven continents are once again:

  • North America
  • Latin America
  • Europe
  • Africa
  • Asia
  • Australia and Oceania
  • and finally, Antarctica

Did you notice that all of the continents start with an "A" except Europe? We will organize our study of the Earth by continent. But first, there are a few skills you'll need to develop before we begin our journey to the different continents. Be sure to take notes as you go for the quiz at the end! You will have five assignments for this section:

  1. Five Themes of Geography
  2. All About Maps
  3. Our World
  4. Landforms
  5. Exploring On Your Own: Mapping Your Neighborhood

Before starting the assignments please watch episode one, a 13-minute video about our Geospatial world:

01.01.01 Five Themes of Geography(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 60 minutes

Assignment 01.01.01

Content Objective: Learn the purpose and definitions for the five themes of geography

To aid in the study of geography, geographers have developed five themes or categories to organize geographic information. These themes help structure information in a way that helps us study all kinds of issues, both local and global. The following are the Five Themes of Geography:

I. Location II. Place III. Human/Environment Interaction IV. Movement V. Region

The Earth from space: NASA imageThe Earth from space: NASA image Five Themes Assignment

USE THE WEBSITES AND PDF PROVIDED IN THE LESSON--DO NOT USE WIKIPEDIA OR GOOGLE TO FIND THE ANSWERS There are many different definitions for these terms, I am looking for the specific geographic definitions from the website provided. 

1. LOCATION

a. In 1-2 sentences define and describe location.
b. Give 2 personal examples from your life for the theme location
c. Using the internet, find a picture that represent the theme location, copy and paste the image into your assignment.
d. Next to the picture explain in 2-3 sentences how and why this picture represents the theme location.

2. PLACE

a. In 1-2 sentences define and describe place.
b. Give 2 personal examples from your life for the theme place
c. Using the internet, find a picture that represent the theme place, copy and paste the image into your assignment.
d. Next to the picture explain in 2-3 sentences how and why this picture represents the theme place.

3. HUMAN AND ENVIRONMENT INTERACTION

a. In 1-2 sentences define and describe human and environment interaction.
b. Give 2 personal examples from your life for the theme human and environment interaction
c. Using the internet, find a picture that represent the theme human and environment interaction, copy and paste the image into your assignment.
d. Next to the picture explain in 2-3 sentences how and why this picture represents the theme human and environment interaction.

4. MOVEMENT

a. In 1-2 sentences define and describe movement.
b. Give 2 personal examples from your life for the theme movement
c. Using the internet, find a picture that represent the theme movement, copy and paste the image into your assignment.
d. Next to the picture explain in 2-3 sentences how and why this picture represents the theme movement.

5. REGION

a. In 1-2 sentences define and describe region.
b. Give 2 personal examples from your life for the theme region
c. Using the internet, find a picture that represent the theme region, copy and paste the image into your assignment.
d. Next to the picture explain in 2-3 sentences how and why this picture represents the theme region.

6. In two to three sentences, explain in your own words why geographers have developed Five Themes of Geography.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


Use these links to explore the Five Themes of Geography. Use them to do your Five Themes assignment.

01.01.02 Explorer's Map(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 60 minutes

ASSIGMENT 01.01.02

Content Objecive: Learn key terms and ideas about mapmaking.

For thousands of years people have mapped the land around them. It helps people travel, gives us perspective and teaches us about the world. We use specific terminology and skills when using maps. Read through the pdf about mapmaking and then answer the questions in the assignment. Some of the terms can be a little tricky-- be sure to pay attention to the subtle differences between them. 

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

1. What are lines of latitude and what do they measure?
2. What are lines of longitude and what do they measure?
3. What is the Prime Meridian?
4. What is the Equator?
5. How many miles does one degree of latitude represent?
6. How many miles does one degree of longitude represent?
7. What is the purpose of a legend?
8. What is the purpose of a scale?
9. What is a compass rose?
10. Where is the International Date Line?

For numbers 11 and 12 you will use the position map website. On this site you will be able to find the latitude and longitude or missing city names. The right side of the screen will show you the latitude and longitude for the red plus sign at the center of the map on the left. Find the cities and round the latitude and longitude to the nearest whole number. The first number will be latitude, a positive number means North and a negative number means South. The secong number will be longitude, a positive number means East and a negative number means West. For the time question use the time zone website. 

11. Fill out the chart below with latitude and longitude and the time if it is 2:00 PM on Tuesday, in Utah. (You can redraw the chart or label the answers as a-e)

 

City Latitude Longitude Time (hour and day)
Paris, France      
New Delhi, India      
Tokyo, Japan      
Lima, Peru      
San Francisco, USA      

 

12. Find the major world city located at the latitude and longitudes listed. Remember that one degree represents several miles, since these are rounded to the nearest whole number you may need to look around a bit.

    a. 42° N 71° W
    b. 40° N 3° W
    c. 37° N 127° E
    d. 23° S 43° W
    e. 34° S 18° E 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.01.03 All about the Earth(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 45 minutes

ASSIGNMENT 01.01.03

Content Objective: Examine how physical processes shape the earth's surface.

Our World The earth is a rocky body moving around the sun on a path called an orbit. Each journey around the sun is called a revolution which lasts one year. As the earth moves around the sun, it turns on its axis. It makes one complete turn in 23 hours and 56 minutes. This causes light and darkness or day and night. The earth is a spherical shape but is not perfectly round. The diameter at the equator is slightly longer than the Prime Meridian from pole to pole. No one has ever traveled below the earth's crust. Scientists have found other ways to gather information about our planet. They do this through the study of seismic waves, or vibrations that are caused by earthquakes.Use the link located at the end of the assignment to answer the questions. Copy the questions below between the rows of asterisks and submit them along with your answers. Please use a different font color when you type the answers. Also, if you can't figure out how to to include drawings, you can just describe the plate movement or drawing in words and still receive credit.  Directions:

1. Answer the questions. Follow the directions carefully. 2. Scroll down and click on the website to complete this assignment.

Now it is time to start!! ****************************************************************************************

Click on axis, tilt and seasons and answer the following questions.

1. What are the earth’s seasons caused by?

2. Why is summer warmer than winter?

Click on how fast is the world moving.

3. What was one of Einstein’s realizations?

Click on Sun found in the text on that page.

4. How far away is the sun?

5. When is the earth closest to the sun?

6. When is the earth the farthest from the sun?

Click the back button

7. In miles, How fast is the earth spinning around its axis?

Click on continental drift.

8. Draw the diagram of the earth and label the different sections (not the different plates, but the different layers of the Earth and if you can't figure out how to include a drawing, just describe it in words).

9. How do tectonic plates move?

10. Do they ever change shape?

11. What causes sea level to change?

12. What are the names of the earth’s major plates?

13. What does the movement of the earth’s plates cause?

14. Which is older the continental crust or the oceanic crust?

15. How fast are the plates moving?

16. The top layer of the earth’s surface is called what?

17. Why do you think the oceanic crust is more active than the continental crust?

18. What happens in seafloor spreading (causes and effects)?

19. What causes mountain ranges?

20. Draw a diagram and explain divergent plate movement: seafloor spreading (make sure to draw the diagram with the 2 round shapes with the arrows). If you can't figure out how to include a drawing, you can just describe divergent plate movement.

21. Draw a diagram and explain convergent plate movement. If you can't figure out how to include a drawing, you can just describe convergent plate movement.

22. What is subduction?

23. What do two colliding oceanic plates form?

24. What do two colliding continental plates form?

25. Draw a diagram of lateral slipping plate movement and explain what it is or if you can't figure out how to include a picture, describe lateral slipping movement with words.  What does this type of movement create?

26. What was Pangaea? Explain the theory of what happened to it.

Scroll down and click on interactive quiz about plate tectonics. If you answer the questions correctly, the question mark will turn into a picture. When you finish, return to the continental drift page.

Click on inside the earth.

27. Tell me two things about the earth’s core.

28. In miles, how thick is the mantle?

Click on oceans.

29. Oceans cover what percent of the earth’s surface?

30. Think about this one. You will not find it on the computer. If the oceans contain 97% of the earth’s total water supply, what percent left is fresh, drinkable water?

31. How do oceans affect weather and temperature of the earth?

32. What causes ocean waves?

33. In what direction do waves move?

34. Why are oceans salty?

35. Where is the saltiest water in the world?

36. What is the largest and smallest ocean?

37. Name three large seas (not oceans, but seas).

38. What causes tides?

Click on water cycle.

39. What is the water cycle?

40. Where does this cycle get its energy?

41. What is ground water?

Click on atmosphere.

42. What does the earth’s atmosphere do?

43. How thick is the atmosphere?

44. What happens to the oxygen level as you climb a mountain?

Click on greenhouse effect.

45. What is the greenhouse effect?

Click on "Why is the sky blue?"

46. Why is the sky blue?

47. What should you never do?

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.01.04 Landforms(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 60 minutes

ASSIGNMENT 01.01.04

Content Objective: Recognize and describe the different types of physical landforms. 

Landforms Lower Antelope Canyon, Arizona: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Meckimac image, Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedLower Antelope Canyon, Arizona: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Meckimac image, Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported A landform is a feature on the earth's surface. Mountains, rivers, valleys, and canyons are all types of landforms. Landforms are shaped by nature. Erosion, tectonic movement and weathering are all factors in shaping the earth. Plate movement pushes the land upward forming mountains. Weathering and erosion wear down the earth cutting into mountains and plateaus. Weathering can break down the earth into small sediments. These sediments can accumulate and create deltas. Today you have the opportunity to do some research of your own. You will find out about different landforms and create an island you have always dreamed of. Copy and paste the section between the rows of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work by pasting it in to the assignment submission window for this assignment. ***************************************************************************************************

The websites used for these activities are located at the bottom of the assignment. Define the following words, state all of the characteristics if given, and think of a real world example of each landform.  Make sure to look on the left side of your monitor when you click on the websites given. There you will find a link LIST OF ALL LANDFORMS. Please use a different font color when you type the answers. Many students use black for the questions and red for the answers. For example, if the term is "island" the definition would be "a piece of land completely surrounded by water." A real world example would be "Guam." 

1- Archipelago:

Example:

2- Bay:

Example:

3- Canal:

Example:

4- Canyon:

Example:

5- Cape:

Example:

6- Channel:

Example:

7- Reef:

Example:

8- Delta:

Example:

9- Fjord:

Example:

10- Gulf:

Example:

Trollfjord, Norway: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Grant from Oslo, Norway, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 GenericTrollfjord, Norway: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Grant from Oslo, Norway, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic

11- Isthmus:

Example:

12- Mesa:

Example:

13- Peninsula:

Example:

14- Plain:

Example:

15- Plateau:

Example:

16- Source:

Example:

17-Strait:

Example:

18- Swamp:

Example:

19- Valley:

Example:

20- Waterfall:

Example:

21- In three to four sentences, tell me what your favorite landform is and why.

22- In three to four sentences, explain how landforms are made (in your own words).

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.01.05 Create an Imaginary Island (Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 90 minutes

ASSIGNMENT 01.01.05

Content Objective: Demonstrate understanding of mapping concepts and investigate how people adapt to their environments.

You will create an imaginary island. Draw and color this island on a blank sheet of paper or use a computer program. Image from Wikimedia Commons, Phillip Capper, CC Attribution 2.0 GenericImage from Wikimedia Commons, Phillip Capper, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic You will need to think of a theme name for this island. Your island should have at least ten different landforms. Draw your island and decide where you would like to draw each landform. Label all landforms with fictitious names related to your island theme ("Music Island" might include Maroon 5 Mountain, Beyonce Bay, Taylor Swift Canyon, Weezer Waterfall). You now need to add a compass rose, a scale and a key.

You will write a paragraph about your island. You should explain how you are going to get the basics for survival: food, shelter and clothing. For example, will you have farms on the island for food or will you ship it in from another country? Then explain why your island is the ideal place to live. Upload your map and paragraph and submit. 

  • Theme name/island name 4 points
  • Ten different landforms (named and labeled)  20 points 
  • Compass rose 2 points
  • Scale  2 points
  • Legend or key  2 points
  • Paragraph at the end that explains how to get food, shelter, clothing and why your island is the ideal place to live 20 points

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.01.06 Mapping Your Neighborhood(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 60 minutes

ASSIGNMENT 01.01.06

Content Objective: Explore the concept of using mental maps to organize information and learn about satelite images.

Mapping Your Neighborhood When cartographers make maps, they use photographs of the earth's surface. This is done by satellites. Satelite images help geographers in many ways. Geographers can see how cities develop, how landforms throughout the world compare to one another and how the physical geography for the earth is changing.

In the following activity you are going to compare a satelite image of your neighborhood to a map you draw from memory. When you think about your neighborhood you don't draw a perfect map in your head everytime, but you can probably imagine/visualize what the layout on the street is, where major landmarks like trees and parks are, and have a general idea of how far apart the houses are. Begin the assignment by drawing a map of your neighborhood from memory-- draw it from a bird's eye view. You could also imagine you are in an airplane flying over your house. When you look down you will see the top of your home, the tops of trees, bushes and streets.  Then you will have the chance to view a satellite image of your neighborhood. Get ready to investigate.

Directions:

For this activity you can draw it on paper and scan it in. You can draw it in a computer program, like paint, and save the file. Or you can draw it and take a picture or screen shot and send in the image.  

1. On a blank piece of paper or on the computer, draw your neighborhood from a bird's eye view. Do this from memory without looking at a map.

2. Make sure to put a compass and a key on your maps explaining what your symbols mean. For example, if an X represents a tree on your map, then you would include it in the key.

3. When you have finished your map, scroll down to the Mapquest or Google Earth websites and search for your address.

4. Click on the area to zoom in until you find your neighborhood. Click on the arrows surrounding the photo to go north, east, etc.

5. When you have found your neighborhood, print a copy of it or save the image. Compare the actual photo to the map you created.

6. On another page, state the similarities and differences between your sketch and the photograph. This analysis needs to be at least three sentences in length. Follow directions carefully. You neighborhood map needs a compass and a key. Answer all questions in complete sentences.

9. Submit: your drawing, the aerial photo and the paragraph to be graded.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.01.07 Geography Skills Quiz(Geo4Life1)

computer-scored 100 points possible 30 minutes

Quiz Geography Skills This quiz covers your first unit about maps and the Five Themes of Geography. It is an open-note quiz; go ahead and use your assignments and notes. Your final test is made up of questions from all end-of-unit quizzes taken in this class.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.00 North America (Geo4Life1)

North America: The United States and CanadaSatellite image of North America: NASA image, public domainSatellite image of North America: NASA image, public domain

02.01 The United States and Canada(Geo4Life1)

North America is the world’s third-largest continent. It stretches from the southern border of Mexico to the Arctic Ocean in the north. What countries make up North America can be argued. Canada, the United States, Mexico, Greenland, the Caribbean, and Central America can be considered part of North America. The major part of the North American continent is divided into three great nations: Canada, the United States and Mexico. In this unit we will focus on Canada and the United States of America. Mexico, Central America and South America will be studied in the next unit, entitled Latin America.

The United States is the fourth largest country in area, and the third largest in population in the world. Flag of the United States: public domainFlag of the United States: public domain

This mighty nation is located in the middle of the North American continent. It also includes the large state of Alaska in the Northwest corner of North America and Hawaii, an island state out in the Pacific. The landscape ranges from warm, sunny beaches in California and Hawaii to the frozen lands of Alaska, the towering Rocky Mountains to the flat plains, and from the dry deserts in the west to the swamps of Florida. This nation truly is diverse. The U.S. is rich in natural resources, and these resources have helped make the United States one of the world’s most highly developed nations. The people of the U.S. enjoy one of the highest standards of living. Because of the freedoms and opportunities offered, many people have immigrated there. Today the U.S. is sometimes called a “nation of immigrants.” People go to the U.S. in search of a dream to find liberty and a better life.

Canada is the second largest country in the world, but it ranks a lot lower in population.

It is slightly larger than the U.S., but has about one-tenth as many people. Canada spans the northern end of the continent. Flag of Canada: CIA WFB, public domainFlag of Canada: CIA WFB, public domainMost Canadians live within 100 miles of the U.S./Canadian border because most of the country has a harsh climate and rugged terrain. Many cities and towns lie near the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River. Canada has towering mountains to the west and flat prairies inland. The north has lush forests, and beyond the forests lies the frozen Arctic. To the east are warm, sandy beaches. Canada’s people are varied also. About 40% are of British descent, and about 27% are descendants of French settlers. American Indians and Inuit make up about 2% of the population. Both English and French are the official languages today. Canada is an independent, self-governing nation with strong historic ties to Great Britain. It has a close, friendly relationship with the U.S. The border of the United States and Canada is the longest undefended border in the world.

Now that you have had your brief introduction to the U.S. and Canada, let’s see what assignments you will need to complete.

1. ASSIGNMENT ONE: FIVE THEMES
2. ASSIGNMENT TWO: POLITICAL MAPPING
3. ASSIGNMENT THREE: PHYSICAL MAPPING
4. ASSIGNMENT FOUR: COMPARE AND CONTRAST
5. ASSIGNMENT FIVE: EXPLORING ON YOUR OWN

To receive credit, you will need to complete ALL of the assignments.

02.01.01 North America 5 Themes Current Events(Geo4Life1)

02.01.01 North America Five Themes Current Events(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 120 minutes

ASSIGNMENT 02.01.01

Content Objective: Examine current events in the United States and Canada through the five themes of geography.

Introduction: Do you read the newspaper daily, or how about once a month? If not, here is your chance to be up to date on current events. During this unit you will have the opportunity to search through news sources to find articles about the U.S. and Canada. 

Assignment:

1. Use the news sites in the links below to find articles about the United States and Canada. Each article should talk about both countries. The easiest way to find these articles is to search for "Canada" on the news sites. Since it is a US news source the articles are typically about stories that affect both countries. It is okay to get articles from the past year.

2. When you find each article, copy and paste it into your assignment. If you only want to include the link to the article, that is okay.

3. Read the article and determine which of the five themes of geography under which it can be placed: Location, Place, Human/Environment Interaction, Movement, and Region.

4. You will need one article for EACH theme or category. That means five total articles.

5. After you have found five articles covering each geographic theme you will need to have a writen explanation for each article.

6. The written explanations should be two paragraphs in length: One paragraph for the summary and one paragraph for your explanation of how it fits under that geographic theme. Please use a different font color when you type your paragraphs. Many students use black for articles and red for the paragraphs.

Students will be graded by: Following instructions correctly (submitting five articles with summaries and explanations for each geographic theme). Summaries need to reflect the news article's content. (Note: Write in complete sentences) Making a sensible choice about which geographic theme they choose for the News article.

**Wikipedia and other reference websites are not news sources.  If you use these sources you will not get points for those questions and will need to redo the assignment. To save yourself the risk of redoing it, please use the links below- you can find all of the necessary articles on these sites.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.01.02 Political Mapping(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 60 minutes

ASSIGNMENTS 02.01.02

Content Objective: Review the location of states, provinces and major cities in the US and Canada through a political map.

Political Mapping Assignment Two:

A political map is a map which shows the government borders for countries and states as well as the location of capitals and major cities. 

Assignment:

1. Get your maps of the United States and Canada using the links below.

2. You will need to label all of the states and provinces on the maps. Then label the cities listed below, put a star where the cities are located and label them. Write the name of the state or province in the correct region.

3. After you have labeled the given information, you will color with your colored pencils each state a color. The same colors cannot touch.

4. Now do the same thing with Canada. Color each province and territory a color without the same colors touching.

5. After you have finished, you will take two fun quizzes. When you have finished both quizzes, print out or take a screen shot of your final scores to be turned in with your completed maps. When the results say quiz over, you will print or take a screen shot your score and remember to send me your quiz results.

Label the following states, territories, and cities.

The Canadian Provinces: British Colombia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island, Nunavut, Northwest Territories, Yukon, Nova Scotia.

Label all 50 states in the United States (you can use abbreviations if you would like).

Label the following Cities in the United States: New Orleans, Louisville, Nashville, Philadelphia, Fort Lauderdale, Helena, Tucson, Little Rock, Nome, Anchorage, Chicago, Portland, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Honolulu, Plymouth, and Reno.

Label the following cities in Canada: Vancouver, Whitehorse, Halifax, Winnipeg, Toronto, and Ottawa.

Label all of the items given to you. Color very neatly. Take both quizzes and send me a copy of your scores. Follow all directions.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.02 Physical Features(Geo4Life1)

Physical Features Both Canada and the United States are located on the same continent. Because they occupy the same landmass, they share some of the same landforms. Located to the west is the Pacific Ocean, which forms a coastline for both countries. There is a mountain system that runs parallel to the coastline. The name of this range is the Pacific Range. It consists of the Alaskan Range, Coast Range, Cascade Range and the Sierra Nevada. To the east of this mountain system lie the Rocky Mountains, which stretch for more than 3,000 miles from Northern Alaska to New Mexico. Mt. Denali (formerly known as Mt. McKinley), located in the Alaskan Range, is the tallest peak in North America. East of the Rockies are the Great Plains. They are level to gently rolling, and extend from the Rocky Mountains to the Appalachian Mountains in the east. The Appalachian Mountains run 1,500 miles from the Canadian province of Quebec to the state of Alabama. The U.S. and Canada have many lakes and rivers that supply fresh water to both nations. Rivers flow downhill, and landforms determine the direction in which they run. In the U.S., a high ridge in the Rockies called the Continental Divide separates the water that flows west to the Pacific Ocean from water that flows east toward the Mississippi. The Mississippi River is the largest river in the United States and Canada. The Great Lakes, on the border between the US and Canada, viewed from space: Wikimedia Commons, NASA SeaWIFS image, public domainThe Great Lakes, on the border between the US and Canada, viewed from space: Wikimedia Commons, NASA SeaWIFS image, public domain Rivers and lakes are important natural resources that supply large amounts of fresh water to both countries. The Great Lakes are connected and flow into the Canada's St. Lawrence River, that empties into the Atlantic Ocean. The Great Lakes have the greatest amount of freshwater of any lakes on earth: about 1/5 of the planet's water supply. Death Valley is the continent's hottest spot and is also the lowest in elevation, 282 feet below sea level. The Grand Canyon in Arizona is the world's largest gore. As you can see, there are many interesting places to visit and a lot of resources North America offers to its people.

02.02.01 Physical Outline Map(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 60 minutes

ASSIGNMENTS 02.02.01

Content Objective: Investigate the physical characteristics of the United States.

1. Get your two outline maps ready to label using the links below (you need one of the United States with the rivers and one of Alaska).

2. You will need to label all landforms listed below.

3. Color the rivers, lakes, and oceans blue.

4. Use green to color the mountain ranges drawn them in where they are located.

5. Color the desert yellow. Go to your local library and use its resources to complete this assignment if you can't find enough information on the Internet.

6.  You will need to label the following physical features on your map:

Death Valley: (lowest point of elevation in North America)Mark this point with a star.

Mt. Denali  (highest point of elevation North America--formerly known as Mt. McKinley) Mark this point with a triangle and label it.

RIVERS: Columbia, Snake, Missouri, Yellowstone, Colorado, Rio Grande, Red, Arkansas, Platte, Mississippi, Ohio, Tennessee, Yukon, Kuskokwim, San Joaquin, Gila, Pecos, Brazos, Canadian, Chattahoochee, Wabash, Susquehanna, Connecticut, and Illinois.

Draw in (if needed)and label the following bodies of water: Great Salt Lake, Lake Superior, Lake Michigan, Lake Huron, Lake Ontario, Lake Erie, Gulf of Mexico, Bering Sea, Pacific Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, and Gulf of Alaska.

Label with a triangles the following mountains: Cascade Range, Sierra Nevada, Rocky Mountains, Appalachian Mountains, Brooks Range, and Black Hills.

Neatly color all landforms the correct color. Label all items listed on the map. Follow directions completely.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.02.02 Compare and Contrast the U.S. and Canada(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 120 minutes

ASSIGNMENTS 02.02.02

Content Objective: Compare and contrast the physical and cultural characteristics of the United States and Canada. 

Compare and Contrast Introduction: You have spent some time looking up newspaper articles and studying the political and physical features of the U.S. and Canada. I hope you have noticed some of the similarities and differences between the two countries. If you have not noticed any, the following assignment will give you some time to do some detective work on your own. You will need to go to a public library and find some books about North America, the United States and Canada. The Internet is another good resource to use. Good luck!

Assignment:

1. You will type a five-paragraph essay, doubled-spaced paper using font size 12.

2. Compare and contrast the United States and Canada. How are they alike and how are they different? 3. You may choose what information you would like to compare and contrast.

3. Choose at least three subjects to discuss in your paper. There are many subjects to consider, here are some things you might want to compare and contrast: government, national anthems, political features, physical features, sports, flags, holidays, and leisure activities.

4. Make sure your paper has an introduction and a conclusion. Express some of your feelings about the similarities and differences of the two countries. Make sure to follow all directions.

5. Make sure to use complete sentences. It should be written at a ninth grade writing level.

One more thing--DO NOT PLAGIARIZE! If you do you will receive an automatic zero. It is obvious when you cut and paste information. I am able to find the link you used and give you a ZERO. I have had to do it numerous times.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.03 Recycle City(Geo4Life1)

Introduction:
Image from Open Clip Art Library, CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain DedicationImage from Open Clip Art Library, CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication
Think about the items you throw away in an average day. Make a list of these items and keep this list with you throughout this lesson. You will need your list at the conclusion of this lesson. Did you know that it was predicted that by the year 2000, about half of the landfills in America would be filled to capacity? Well, we have passed the year 2000, and we do suffer a pollution problem. The reason landfills are overflowing is because the garbage in them is not decomposing. With the increase of population comes an increase in waste. The United States and Canada rank high in their standard of living. With a high standard of living comes a lot of waste. The United States is the largest producer of wastes in the world. Just look in the mail each day. How much junk mail does your family receive in a week? What do you think we can do to stop the problem? If you are not sure, don't worry. By the end of this lesson, you will be a recycling genius.

Go to Recycle City (link below)
Click on Go to Recycle City. Before entering the city, scroll down and click on the history of Recycle City. Read about the history of Dumptown to answer the first question.

02.03.01 Recycle City Questions(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 80 points possible 60 minutes

ASSIGNMENTS 02.03.01

Content Objective: Evaluate the use of renewable and nonrenewable resources and conservation methods

Copy and paste the section between the rows of asterisks below into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work by pasting it in to the assignment submission window for this assignment. HACKENSACK MEADOWS DUMP: EPA image, NARA, public domainHACKENSACK MEADOWS DUMP: EPA image, NARA, public domain **********************************************************************************************

Answer the following questions.

1. In four to five sentences, summarize the history of Recycle City. To find the history, click on the green "Learn More" at the bottom right.

2. Cruise around Recycle City and find all the tips you can use to reduce pollution and waste that comes from cars. List at least five tips you can use to reduce pollution and waste around the City.  Click on Northwest and visit Yoshino’s Auto Wreckers to find at least five tips you can use to reduce pollution and waste that comes from cars.  There are some ideas in the Southwest corner too.

3. Click on the Northeast corner and go to the Materials Recovery Center.  Click on the different recyclable materials. What recyclable item makes up the largest percentage of trash?

4. Gas stations aren't just places to fill up the tank. Can you find six things that Shaq at the gas station (in the Southeast) does to help the environment?

5. Visit some houses in Recycle City in the Southwest and look for six examples of household waste. What are some examples of saving energy or disposing of the items?

6. Harlin Hazzard of the Recycle City Hazardous Waste Center (in the Northwest corner) wants to hire you as his assistant manager. Before you accept, you must name the four characteristics that make hazardous waste hazardous.

7. In four to five sentences, explain why you feel it is important to recycle.

Go to the link below to start your recycling adventure. Use this site as a resource to answer all of the questions. Make sure you answer each question with complete sentences. **********************************************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.03.02 Make your own recycled paper(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 90 minutes

ASSIGNMENTS 02.03.02

Content Objective: Particpate in recycling and evaluate how to conserve resources

Introduction: Have you ever recycled paper? Do you put your used paper into a recycling bin? Do you know how paper is recycled? Today is your lucky day. You are going to recycle paper on your own. All you need to do is follow these simple steps, and presto! You have recycled paper!

Materials:

2 to 3 cups of water

A blender (a kitchen mixer or similar hand tool will work also)

One woman's nylon stocking

Wire clothes hanger

2 tablespoons of school glue

2 full pages of newspaper cut or torn into small pieces the size of a quarter

Instructions: 1. Untwist the wire hanger and form it into a square.

2. Carefully slip the nylon stocking around the wire square. Pull the nylon tight so it fits snuggly. You will need to tie a knot on both sides so it will not move around.

3. Put some cut up newspaper into the blender. Close the lid and turn the blender on high. Slowly add the rest of the paper and small amounts of water until the paper disappears and the mixture turns into a large ball of pulp.

4. Put four inches of water into the dishpan. Add the glue and pulp mixture and stir.

5. Stir the mixture and quickly put the wire frame under the mixture and rest it on the bottom of the pan. Slowly lift the frame as you count to 25. Your nylon should be covered with the mixture.

6. Put your wire frame on paper towels and let it dry completely. When the paper is dry, carefully pull it off the frame. Now your paper is ready to use.

7. Look at the list you made at the beginning of this lesson. It should contain what you throw away in a day.

8. Take your recycled paper you just made and answer the following three questions on your recycled paper.  Scan the paper or take a picture and upload the picture file.

A. What was the hardest part of making your own paper?

B. What are the most common things that you throw away every day?

C. After all of your recycling research, what are some things you can do to eliminate or reduce your waste?  (2-3 sentences)

**If you do not have the ingredients for this or if you don't have a blender you can search online for another recycled paper recipe and follow the instructions. 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.00 Latin America(Geo4Life1)

Latin America

03.01 Latin America(Geo4Life1)

Latin America
Mt. Aconcagua, in Argentina: Wikimedia Commons, Winky from Oxford, UK, CC Attribution 2.0 GenericMt. Aconcagua, in Argentina: Wikimedia Commons, Winky from Oxford, UK, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic
The areas of South and Central America form a large cultural region referred to as "Latin America." People from Spain and Portugal settled most of Latin America. Because of this, Spanish and Portuguese are two of the most common languages. These two languages evolved from Latin, and for this reason geographers refer to this area as Latin America.

This region is often divided into three sections: Middle America, the Caribbean and South America. Middle America contains Mexico and Central America. Central America is an isthmus that connects Mexico to South America. The Caribbean, a series of islands, is also known as the West Indies. When Columbus saw these islands, he thought he was near India, so he named them the Indies. Because they are located in the Western Hemisphere, they are known as the West Indies. The continent of South America is the largest area in Latin America. Brazil is the largest country located in this region, and the official language spoken there is Portugese. More than half of South America's population is Brazilian.

The physical features in Latin America are very diverse and beautiful. The rain forests of the Amazon and the Andes mountain chain are the two main physical features. The Andes is the longest mountain range in the world, stretching 4,500 miles. Mount Aconcagua in Argentina is the highest peak in the Andes and in the Western Hemisphere. The mountains that cover much of Latin America have many volcanoes. Some of the Caribbean islands are peaks of an underwater mountain chain.

Tropical rain forests cover much of the Amazon Basin. The rain forest is in trouble due to urbanization and farming. In this unit we will discover why rainforests are so important.

There are many beautiful waterfalls in this region. Angel Falls in Venezuela is the world's highest uninterrupted waterfall; it drops 3,212 feet. South America also has the biggest river system, with the Amazon River being the second-longest river in the world and the largest in water volume. Lake Nicaragua has the only known species of fresh water sharks. Lake Titicaca, located in Peru and Bolivia, is the world's highest navigable lake. Atacama Desert is the world's driest desert. The Panama Canal, the man-made link between the Caribbean Sea and the Pacific Ocean, is located in Central America.

As you can see, Latin America sure does hold a lot of records with its physical features. Latin America is an exotic region with many sights to see. The people there are very friendly and have a rich cultural heritage. The people value their history and try to preserve it the best they can. There are many differences between the countries of Latin America, and there are also many similar activites in their way of life. These similarities are based on their common cultural heritage of living under European rule.

Use the websites below to see at least the following features:Mayan pyramid in Guatemala: Wikimedia Commons, Webber, public domainMayan pyramid in Guatemala: Wikimedia Commons, Webber, public domain

Atamcama Desert
Andes Mountains
Angel Falls
Amazon River

Latin America has so many interesting things to discover, so let's get started. For this unit you will have to complete the following assignments.

1. ASSIGNMENT ONE: CLIMATE MAPPING
2. ASSIGNMENT TWO: AMAZON RAINFOREST
3. ASSIGNMENT THREE: MEXICAN JOURNEY
4. ASSIGNMENT FOUR: MEXICAN FOOD
5. ASSIGNMENT FIVE: MEXICAN HOLIDAYS
6. ASSIGNMENT SIX: THE PANAMA CANAL
7. EXPLORING ON YOUR OWN

To receive credit, you will need to complete ALL of the assignments.

03.01.01 Climate Mapping(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 60 minutes

ASSIGNMENTS 03.01.01

Content Objective: Map the climate of South America. Identify the location of Latin American countries found in Central America, South America and the Caribbean. 

Introduction: Much of Latin America lies between the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn. Because of this, Latin America will have some type of tropical climate. This climate is humid with a great deal of rainfall. This type of weather creates the development of tropical rain forests. South America has a wide range of climates. The reason for the variety of climates is due to the mountainous landscapes. With elevation comes a cooler climate. In certain areas of Central and South America, you can go quickly from a tropical rain forest with a mild climate to a snowy arctic climate by climbing up a mountainside. Not only do the climates change, but the vegetation and crops change with elevation. Because mountainsides climb vertically in elevation, their altitude determines the three major climate zones. Areas from sea level to 3,000 feet fall into the zone called tierra caliente, which means "hot country" in Spanish. Lands from 3,000 feet to 6,000 feet are in the zone, tierra templada, which means "temperate country." And finally, areas from 6,000 feet to 10,000 feet fall into the zone, tierra fria, meaning "cold country." Frost may occur but the average temperature usually will not drop below 45 degrees F. Remember, we are in the tropics! Now it is your time to see where these zones are located. Ready to get started?

Materials:

Map of South America

Map of Central America

Colored pencils

Pen

Pencil

Assignment:

1. Print a map of South America.

2. Print a map of Central America and the Caribbean.

3. Label all of the countries on both maps (including the major Caribbean Islands on the Central America map). Include a list of all countries.

4. Color the countries of Central America. Do not color the countries of South America yet. This map will be your climate map. Make sure the same colors do not touch on the Central America Map.

5. Now it is time for you to create your climate map.

6. On the outer edge of the South America map you printed, make a legend and write in the different climates with the corresponding color. Look at the climate map when you click on the link. Now color the climate zones on your map just like the map shown.

7. Your map should resemble the climate map on the Internet.

8. Read the information given to you about South America's climate.

9. Answer the following questions on the back of your South America map. Use only your climate map as a resource. A. Look at your climate map. From the information given, where do you think the Andes Mountains are located? B. Where might the Atacama Desert be located? C. Where do you think the Amazon Jungles are?

The following sites will help you complete this assignment.

Now that you have finished your assignment go to the following quiz links, take the quiz for South America and Central America and print out your score to hand in with this unit. Carefully follow the directions. Label all the Latin American countries. Color neatly. Answer the three questions with complete sentences. Take the quiz and print out or take a screen short of the scores to hand in with the unit.

Make sure you had in your two maps, two quiz scores, and your South America map questions with this assignment.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.01.02 Rainforest Map and Questions(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 45 minutes

ASSIGNMENTS 03.01.01 Amazon Rainforest

Content Objective: Learn about the characteristics of rainforests and look specifically at the Amazon. 

Butterfly in Ecuador rainforest: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Kilobug, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedButterfly in Ecuador rainforest: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Kilobug, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Introduction: The Amazon Rain Forest is the largest rainforest in the world. About two-thirds of this forest is located in Brazil. More than 100 tree species can be found in one acre of this huge forest. There are many species of plants and animals thriving in this ecosystem. In recent years there has been more concern about protecting this area. Deforestation, the cutting down and clearing of trees, is a major concern. According to some estimates, over ten percent of the Amazon rainforest have been destroyed. Many activities have contributed to the practice of deforestation. Construction, farming, cattle ranches and lumber products all play a role in the destruction of these forests. Scientists are worried and feel that this practice might have serious long-term effects that could be impossible to overcome. There was once great concern that widespread deforestation might affect the earth's oxygen balance. This idea is no longer thought to be likely. The big concern now is the effect it might have on the heat balance of the earth. The earth might be threatened with a dangerous warming effect. It can also affect the water cycle, disrupting rainfall in areas around the globe. Another concern is that it might cause animal and plant species to become extinct. We need these species for medicine and other commercial use. There is alarm in the science community that there could be cures for many illnesses in the rain forests that we have not discovered yet; if the plant and animal species become extinct, we might never know their value. Which of the Five Themes of Geography do you think this lesson focuses on the most? If you guessed Human/Environment Interaction, you are right! Now it's time to travel to the tropical rainforest and discover what types of insects and animals live there.

Materials:

Computer "paint" program OR Colored pencils

Pencil

Pen

Click on the "All About Rainforests" link to complete the following assignment. It is located below the questions. Assignment:

1. After you have entered the rainforest site, click on "Where are rainforests?"

2. Next click on "Go to rainforest map printout."

3. Print out the rainforest map.

4. Follow the instruction by coloring the areas according to the directions.

5. When you are finished coloring, turn your colored map over and answer the following questions on the back of the paper (or do it in a word processing document). Remember to write in complete sentences.

A. Where are tropical rainforests located?

B.  What five land areas have tropical rainforests?

C. How much of the earth's surface do tropical rainforests cover?

D.What are the two seasons in a tropical rainforest?

E. What are the four strata (zones) of the rainforest, and what are they like?

F. What are two important things rainforests do?

G. Approximately how many inches of water do rainforests receive each year?

H. Where do the largest animals in a rainforest live?

I. What kinds of animals and insects live in rain forests (name at least five of each)?

J. In five or six sentences explain what you have learned about rain forests.

The following links are good resources for more information about rainforests.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.02 Mexican Journey(Geo4Life1)

Mexican Journey
Mexico is a diverse country with beautiful beaches, rainforests and deserts. Many of the people are descendants of the Mayan and Aztec civilizations. About 60 percent are mestizo (mixed Spanish and Indian), and about 9 percent are from European ancestry.
Mexico is about three times the size of Texas and shares a border with the United States to the north. The Sierra Madre mountain ranges and the various extinct volcanoes cover about two-thirds of the country. Near Mexico City, the Popocatepetl Volcano began to show signs of renewed activity in 1994.

Mexicans are friendly people who work hard, value their family and enjoy humor. Machismo, the idea of a forceful, ruling man is still prevalent, and the role of a woman is more traditional is most areas. Mexicans typically have a different view of time than we do in the U.S. They feel that people are more important than appointments and they will stop and talk to acquaintances even if they are running late. The United States has a fast-paced way of life, but they tend to be a lot more relaxed.

03.02.01 Borderland (Geo4Life1)

03.02.01 Borderland Questions(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 30 minutes

ASSIGNMENTS 03.02.01 Borderland

Content Objective: Students will assess the roles of movement and region along the US/Mexico border.

Introduction: Often people mistakenly think that the US/Mexico border not only divides two countries, but also divides two cultures. The truth is that the towns along both sides of the border often have their own unique “Bordertown” culture. These are places where English and Spanish are both spoken. Places where kids legally cross over the border to go to school and cross back to go home at night. In Bordertowns the food, music, holidays, language, traditions and clothing are heavily influenced by both American and Mexican traditions.

As you go through the slideshow of pictures, quotes and videos about Borderland, consider the unique border culture that has been created by people traveling back and forth between the two countries. 

  1. Click on the Borderland link above to begin your journey
  2. Click through the stories, pictures and videos for Stories 1-6 and answer the questions as you go through it.
  3. Click to Story 12 and answer the final questions (You will skip stories 7-11)

 

Copy and paste this text into your document and answer the questions. 

*********************************************************************************************************************

STORY 1

1. True or False- everyone who crosses from Mexico into the US is from Mexico.

2. How many countries did Saraa Zewedi Yilma pass through to get to the US?

3. In 2012 what percentage of applications for asylum were accepted?

STORY 2

4. From which country did Mexico gain its independence?

5. What we now call Utah was considered a part of which country in 1821?

6. What year was the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo?

STORY 3

7. How long is the US-Mexico Border?

8. Think back a few lessons--Which border is longer- the border between the US and Canada or the border between the US and Mexico?

9. What portion of the US-Mexico border is fenced?

10. Why don’t they use a fence along the entire border?

11. What does the fence look like? How does it change from place to place?

12. Why did the government originally put up a fence in 1909?

STORY 4

13. If you could interview one of the people picture in Story 4 who would you interview?

14. List 3 questions you would ask him/her about life on the border.

STORY 5

15. Why did many Mexicans move from Juarez, Mexico to El Paso, Texas?

16. As you look through the pictures of abandoned houses, how does it make you feel?

STORY 6

18. How did you feel about Junior’s story?

19. There are millions of undocumented students in the US, many of whom are separated from their parents, in what ways does this make school difficult for these students?

20. Do you feel like this story portrayed a balanced, unbiased view of the US-Mexico border, why or why not?

CLICK ON “ALL STORIES” THEN SELECT STORY 12 (you will skip stories 7-11)

21. Since you started reading this article: 

a. How many minutes have passed?

b. How many vehicles crossed legally? 

c. How many pedestrians crossed legally? 

d. How many people have been detained for illegal entry? 

e.How many pounds of marijuana have been seized? 

f. How many ounces of cocaine have been seized? 

22. Do any of these numbers surprise you? Which ones, if any? What do you think about them?

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.02.02 Mexican Foods(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 90 minutes

ASSIGNMENTS 03.02.02 Mexican Foods

Content Objective: Examine part of traditional Mexican culture through cooking.

Introduction: Mexican cooking began with the early Indian inhabitants. The Indians gave the world wonderful foods that were unknown in Europe before the Spanish conquest. The following foods came from Mexico: maize (corn), squash, sweet potatoes, avocados, peppers, different kinds of beans, chile, vanilla, chocolate and tomatoes. Maize or corn was very important to the Indians. They made tortillas and cornmeal pancakes. Tortillas are still very important to the Mexican diet. Some people call them the bread of Mexico. The Indians ate a lot of vegetables, but along with this diet, they ate turkeys and even small dogs. Along the coasts of Mexico, fish, shrimp and shellfish were eaten. Fruit was also used in recipes in this area. Cacao (cocoa) bean pods ripening on a tree: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Piekfrosch, public domainCacao (cocoa) bean pods ripening on a tree: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Piekfrosch, public domain Cocoa came from the Aztecs. During this time it was mainly used as a beverage. Wines and drinks were made from the white pulp around the seeds of the cocoa pod, and the beans were used to make hot and cold chocolate drinks. Cocoa beans were also used as a currency (money). The oily layer floating in the chocolate drink (cocoa butter) was used to protect the skin from the sun. For the Aztecs, cocoa had a religious significance. They believed that the cocoa tree was a bridge between heaven and earth. The Aztecs believed that in exchange for human sacrifices, the gods gave them chocolate. During marriage ceremonies, the wedded couple would drink a cup of chocolate and exchange cocoa beans. They also believed that drinking chocolate would bring mortals some of Quetzalcoatl's (the Aztec god) wisdom. The area of Mexico has produced many foods we eat each day. The world has been able to enjoy wonderful meals because of the Indian people. You are going to have the chance to make two important food items that come from Mexico. So get ready, put on your chef hat and get in the kitchen.

Materials:

Flour

Vegetable shortening

Salt

Baking powder

Warm water

Unsweetened chocolate Milk

Ground cinnamon

Vanilla

Assignment:

  1. You are going to make Aztec chocolate drink and homemade tortillas.
  2. Go to the link below and follow the recipe for making tortillas.
  3. After you have made your tortillas, find three different people to eat one.
  4. When they have finished eating, have them write three complete sentences on lined paper describing how they taste.
  5. When they have finished their description, they need to sign their name at the end of their description.
  6. After all three people have written about the tortillas, you need to write a paragraph about what it was like making them, and how you think they taste. Remember to use complete sentences.
  7. Now make the Aztec Chocolate Drink.
  8. Follow the same instructions by having three people drink it and write descriptions.
  9. You will again write a paragraph about what it was like making it and how it tastes and how you think the drink has evolved over the years.

Aztec Chocolate Drink

3 oz. unsweetened chocolate

2 cups milk

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

3 drops of vanilla

Put the milk in a saucepan and slowly warm it up. Add the rest of the ingredients and stir until the chocolate is melted and ready to drink.

After you taste the drink the Aztecs used to make, take a moment to think about how the taste of different foods have evolved over time. The Aztecs really liked this drink. What have we done to change the taste of the chocolate drink?

Your final activity for this lesson:

Go to the link below as a resource.

What are the following Mexican dishes? Explain the main ingredients of all ten Mexican meals. Write in complete sentences.

Mexican Food

  1. Escamoles
  2. Gusanos de Maguey
  3. Caracoles
  4. Chalupas
  5. Cochinita Pibil
  6. Mole Poblano
  7. Patlache
  8. Leche Quemada
  9. Mixiotes de Pollo
  10. Chimbo

What to turn in when you are finished:  two paragraphs (describing what it was like to make them), six people's descriptions of the food (three for tortillas and three for the drink), and the ten Mexican dishes.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.02.03 Mexican Holidays(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 45 minutes

ASSIGNMENTS 03.02.03 Mexican Hoiday

Content Objective: Examine part of traditional Mexican culture by investigating a Mexican holiday. 

PIÑATA: Image from Wikimedia Commons, public domainPIÑATA: Image from Wikimedia Commons, public domain Introduction: Mexican Americans are the largest Hispanic group living in the United States, with Puerto Rican Americans and Cuban Americans close behind. Mexicans celebrate many holidays here in the United States. Maybe you have seen some of the Mexican influence in your hometown. Have you ever wondered what Cinco de Mayo celebrates, or what date is Mexican Independence Day? In this lesson you are going to choose a holiday to explore, and report on what transpires during the festivities. Assignment:

1. You will choose a holiday or celebration.

2. Read about the holiday and gather all the information possible.

3. Type a (minimum one page) report (at least 250 words) explaining the purpose of the celebration and what activities the people participate in during that day or week. Write in your own words and in complete sentences.

4. Include the date of the celebration.

5. The paper needs to be double-spaced using font size 12. (if you copy and paste it into the submission box, it might change the spacing and that is okay)

6. Conclude the paper by telling your views about the holiday or celebration. Perhaps compare it to a holiday you celebrate.

Here is your list of celebrations. Pick one to research.

Cinco de Mayo

Dia de Los Muertos

Navidad

Mexican Revolution Day

Mexican Independence Day

Semana Santa

Carnaval

The links below will help you with your research. DO NOT PLAGIARIZE! If you do, you will receive an automatic zero. It is obvious when you cut and paste information. I am able to find the link you used and give you a ZERO. I have had to do it numerous times.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.03 The Panama Canal(Geo4Life1)

Panama Canal
Construction in 1904 of the Panama Canal: Public domainConstruction in 1904 of the Panama Canal: Public domain
Introduction:
Since the beginning of history, people have changed their natural environment to meet their needs. One of the biggest examples of this is the building of the Panama Canal. Not many people know the history behind this great man-made architectural masterpiece. Some people even consider it the eighth world wonder. On December 31, 1999, a big event transpired between Panama and the United States. During this lesson, you are going to discover what happened on that important date and learn many other interesting facts concerning the canal’s operation and construction.

Use the following links below to find answers to the Panama Canal questions.

03.03.01 Panama Canal Questions(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 45 minutes

ASSIGNMENTS 03.01.01 Panama Canal

Content Objective: Explore how humans change the environment in relation to the Panama Canal.

Assignment:

Answer the following questions about the Panama Canal, using the links and video to answer your questions. Write in complete sentences, telling me as much information as possible.

1. What is the Panama Canal?

2. Where is the Panama Canal?

3. What were some of the problems builders of the canal faced during construction?

4. What were three main problems in the building of the Canal?

5. What were three engineering problems they had to overcome?

6. What was France’s role in the Canal? What did they contribute toward building the canal?

7. What was the role the U.S. played in the construction? How were they able to finish it?

8. When did the Canal open for traffic?

9. How does the Panama Canal work? (Draw a diagram and explain, or use words and describe how the locks work)

10. How many miles does the Canal stretch?

11. How long does it take an average ship to pass through the Canal?

12. What happened on December 31, 1999?

Answer all the questions. Use complete sentences. It is always better to give too much information rather than too little. . One more thing--DO NOT PLAGIARIZE! If you do, you will receive an automatic zero.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.03.02 Race in Latin America(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 60 minutes

ASSIGNMENTS 03.03.02 Race in Latin America

Content Objective: Examine how movement has impacted racial and cultural diversity in Latin America.

Latin America is a region composed of Central America, the Caribbean and South America. That is, all of the Americas that are South of the United States.

Many people make the mistake of thinking that all Latin American countries are the same as Mexico. They don’t even speak the same languages. While many Latin American countries speak Spanish they speak Portuguese in Brazil, they speak French dialects in Haiti, Martinique, Guadeloupe and French Guiana. There are several English and Dutch speaking countries in the region as well. Throughout the region there are also groups of American Indians who speak in their own languages.

To better understand Latin America we are going to look at race. Just like many people think all Latin Americans speak Spanish, some people think that everyone from Latin America is the same race. To understand race in Latin America we need a brief history lesson.

  • Ancient Latin America was ruled by different indigenous groups and tribes. You may have heard of some of them, the Aztec, Inca, and Maya. Just like there were American Indians in North America, there were American Indians in Central and South America.
  • Columbus came to the Americas, he actually landed on an island he named Hispaniola. (Today we call this island Dominican Republic and Haiti. Other European explorers followed Columbus and came to the Americas. The Europeans intended to bring culture, civilization and religion to the Americans. They did not know that these were culturally rich, advanced civilizations who had their own religious beliefs. During this time the Europeans brought diseases and weapons which wiped out many of these early civilizations. They forced those who survived to learn their religions and languages.
  • At this point there were indigenous groups and European groups in the Americas—Then they began to have children together. These children were called “Mestizos” or “mixed-race.”
  • Fast forward a few years and the Europeans began the practice of taking Africans, from a variety of tribes, to the Americas to be slaves. There were millions more slaves brought to Central and South America than were ever brought to the US. These slaves and their descendants would become a part of Latin America. They would produce children with American Indians, Mestizos and those of European descent.

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Part 1 RACE-

The first part of this assignment is going to be an exploration of what race is. Go to the PBS Race website (link below) and begin by reading the 10 quick facts about race (the small circles in the bottom left corner of the Is Race for Real? Box) Then answer these questions about race.

TRUE OR FALSE:

  1. People have always been divided by their races. 
  2. There is a gene that determines which race a person is.
  3. Slavery is older than race.
  4. The idea of race was created to justify why some people were allowed rights and freedoms and others were slaves.
  5. Race has been used to justify taking land, killing people and excluding people from society.
  6. Humans are one of the most diverse species. Different races are actually sub-species, some of which are lower than others.
  7. The genes for race also determine how athletic people are. This is why certain races are faster than others.
  8. Two Koreans are likely to be as genetically different as a Korean and an Italian.
  9. Because race is not genetic racism does not exist.
  10. If we pretend race doesn’t exist then racism will go away.

CLICK ON SORTING PEOPLE Then Click BEGIN SORTING

Do the sorting activity.

11.  How many people did you correctly classify?
12.  Why is classifying people by how they look a problem?

Answers vary

Click on EXPLORE TRAITS.

13. Why can’t skin color, fingerprints or blood type determine race?

Part 2 Race in Latin America-

Watch the preview for the PBS special on being black in Latin America (link below) and then answer the following questions with complete sentences.

14. Why is it important to recognize diversity within a region? (2-3 sentences)

15. How do you think the culture in Latin America has been influenced by its diversity? (2-3 sentences)

16. Write a paragraph about how the theme of “movement” relates to the racial diversity in Latin America.  (5-8 sentences) 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.03.03 Latin America Quiz(Geo4Life1)

computer-scored 100 points possible 45 minutes

Quiz Latin America This quiz covers the information in the Latin America unit. It is an open-note quiz; go ahead and use your assignments and notes. Your final test is made up of questions from all end-of-unit quizzes taken in this class.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.00 Europe(Geo4Life1)

Europe is a continent with many small countries, peninsulas, rivers and seas. No point in Europe is far from an outlet to the ocean. Because of this access to trade routes, it has been able to progress exponentially. Out of all the European countries, only about 13 are landlocked (no access to the ocean). In the following mapping assignment, you are going to label countries, bodies of water, mountains and peninsulas.Satellite view of Europe: Wikimedia Commons, www.terraprints.com, CC Attribution 2.5 GenericSatellite view of Europe: Wikimedia Commons, www.terraprints.com, CC Attribution 2.5 Generic

These are the following assignments you will have to complete:

ASSIGNMENT ONE: MAPPING EUROPE
ASSIGNMENT TWO: POSTAGE STAMP COUNTRIES
ASSIGNMENT THREE: TOWER OF LONDON
ASSIGNMENT FOUR: TWO GREAT MONUMENTS
ASSIGNMENT FIVE: THE BERLIN WALL

To receive credit, you will need to complete ALL of the assignments.

04.01 Europe(Geo4Life1)

Europe

Europe and Asia are two separate continents that share the same landmass called Eurasia. Europe cannot be as easily identified on a map. Geographers have disagreed on the location of Europe’s eastern boundary, but most consider the Ural Mountains to the Caspian Sea the dividing line. Because of this boundary, Russia is split between the two continents. Europe is only slightly larger than the United States and of all the continents, only Australia is smaller. Europe has been considered a separate continent for quite some time because of the enormous impact Europe has played in history. Europeans have controlled a large part of the earth and because of this, one can find traces of European culture almost anywhere in the world.

Europe has been called “a peninsula of all peninsulas.” If you look closely, Europe forms a peninsula off of Asia. Europe then consists of many smaller peninsulas-the Iberian, Scandinavian, and the Apennine are a few of the many peninsulas.

There are many islands that surround Europe. To the north lies Iceland. Iceland is an area of hot springs, volcanoes and geysers. The British Isles are located to the northwest. They consist of two big islands, Great Britain and Ireland. Many smaller islands are located around these two Nations. There are many major islands south of Europe. Sicily, Corsica, Sardinia, and Malta are some of the islands located in the Mediterranean. Many tourists are attracted to this area because of the beautiful scenery and warm climate.

Europe has many mountainous regions. There are highlands that are found in Scandinavia and in the British Isles. The Alpine mountain system includes the Alps, Carpathian and Balkan mountain ranges which stretch across Europe from Spain to the Balkan Peninsula. Mont Blanc is the highest mountain in the Alps. Its peak is always covered with snow. Forming the eastern boundary in Russia, are the Ural Mountains, Caspian Sea, Black Sea and the Caucasus Mountains.

Rivers have played and important role in Europe’s history and continue to provide important transportation links between the many countries. The Rhine River flows from Switzerland, along the French border and through Germany and the Netherlands. This important river links many industrial cities to the port of Rotterdam in the North Sea. The Danube also plays an important role in Europe. It flows from Germany to the Black Sea. Many ships carry millions of tons of cargo to countries along this river. The city of London is located near the mouth of the Thames River, Great Britain’s longest river.

In Europe there are about 50 different languages and more than 100 dialects. Many countries have more than one official language. For example in Switzerland there are four official languages: German, French, Romansch, and Italian. Europe is a very diverse continent. There have been a lot of major wars and changes throughout the last century that have affected people around the globe. We are about to begin our journey across the seas and find out about the rich history and culture Europe has to offer.

Click on the links below to see some of the beautiful sights of Europe.

The southern coast of France (Cote d'Azur): Wikimedia Commons, Gilbert Bochenek, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedThe southern coast of France (Cote d'Azur): Wikimedia Commons, Gilbert Bochenek, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

04.01.01 Mapping Europe(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 60 minutes

ASSIGNMENTS 04.01.01 Mapping Europe

Content Objective: Identify physical landforms and political states on the European continent.

Mapping

Introduction: Europe is a continent with many small countries, peninsulas, rivers and seas. No point in Europe is far from an outlet to the ocean. Because of this access to trade routes, it has been able to progress exponentially. Out of all the European countries, only about 13 are landlocked (no access to the ocean). In the following mapping assignment you are going to label countries, bodies of water, mountains and peninsulas.

Assignment:

1. Use the map of Europe given in the link below.

2. Do not color, only label the following countries: Norway, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Ireland, United Kingdom, Portugal, Spain, France, Luxembourg, Belgium, Netherlands, Denmark, Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Austria, Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia, Hungary, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia or F.Y.R.M., Albania, Greece, Serbia and Montenegro, Bulgaria, Romania, Moldova, Ukraine, Belarus, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, and Russia.

3. Color the following peninsulas purple and label them: Kola, Scandinavian, Iberian, Apennine, Balkan, and Jutland

4. Use a blue pen and label the following bodies of water: North Sea, Mediterranean Sea, Black Sea, Caspian Sea, Bay of Biscay, Baltic Sea, English Channel, and Strait of Gibralter.

5. Draw in the following mountain ranges on your map with your brown colored pencil and label them: Ural Mountains, Pyrenees, Carpathian Mountains, and Alps.

Go to your local library to complete this assignment or Use the links below to help you complete the assignment. Label all the countries and make sure it is done neatly. Color the peninsulas neatly and label them. Label the bodies of water with a blue pen. Draw in the three mountain ranges with a brown pencil and label them.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.01.02 Postage Stamp Countries(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 60 minutes

ASSIGNMENTS 04.01.02 Postage Stamp Countries

Content Objective: Examine the physical and human characteristics of "Postage Stamp" countries in Europe.

Introduction: What are some of the smallest countries on earth? Do you know their names? Scattered throughout the world are many small countries. In Europe there are tiny countries referred to as "postage stamp" countries because of their small size and because they issue special postage stamps as revenue. The tiniest country is only 0.2 square miles. Do you know the name of that country? You might be surprised when you find out where these countries are found.

Assignment:

1. Use the map of Europe below.

2. Locate the following countries on the map. Label them by placing a star on their location and writing the name of the country next to the star: Andorra, San Marino, Monaco, Vatican City, Liechtenstein, and Malta.

3. Now provide the following information for each country:

A. Draw and color a picture of each country s flag.

B. What is the total area of the country? Compare it to an area in the U.S.

C. What is the highest point and lowest point in the country?

D. What are the natural resources of the country?

E. What languages are spoken there?

F. Explain one interesting fact you learned about the country.

Answer these questions in complete sentences. Use the following links as a resources below to complete this assignment.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.02 Population Pyramids(Geo4Life1)

Population Pyramids are a way to see the population of a given region or country. We can use them to analyze how populations change.

You will notice that the graph is split in two. One side is blue and the other is red. When we look at population we separate male and female. This can help us see different patterns.

census.gov

 

Along the Y axis (going up the middle of the chart) it lists age in 5 year increments. Along the X axis (going left and right across the bottom of the graph) it lists the number of people in millions.

So in this chart of population in Ethiopia you will see that there are 8 million males between the ages of 0-4. There are 1.6 million 45-49 year old females.

These charts can make very different shapes. You can see in this chart that in Ethiopia the Population chart looks like a Christmas Tree. This is very typical for developing nations. The largest population section is the 0-4 year olds. This tells you that there is a very high birth rate. As you look up the chart you will notice that while there are about 16 million 0-4 year olds (8 million female and 8 million male), there are less than 10 million adults over the age of 50. 

 

 

 

The United States is a developed nation. You will notice that most of the graph looks like a box. The top is still a pyramid, because not everyone lives to be 100. As you look at the box you notice that most age groups have about the same number of people in them. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Italy, like many European countries, has many adults between the ages of 35-54. Because there is a large group of people that are the same age there was probably a baby boom. A baby boom is a time when many people have children. One example is after World War II. The world had finally come out of the Great Depression, soldiers were returning from war and wanted to begin families. There was a very large baby boom at that time.

Today there are far fewer children being born than there are adults in Italy. In order to have a population that is growing each couple would need to have more than 2 children. To keep an exactly steady population each couple would need to have exactly 2 children. To have a population that is shrinking each couple would have fewer than 2 children. 

 

 

You will use the charts above for your first assignment. You will use the following links to answer complete the essay assignment:

04.02.01 Comparing Population Pyramid Shapes(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 40 points possible 60 minutes

ASSIGNMENTS 04.02.01 Population Pyramid Shapes

Content Objective: Examine population pyramids and interpret how different countries are impacted by it.

Assignment: Answer the following questions about the three graphs (Italy, Ethiopia and US) above:

1. Based on their population pyramid should Ethiopia be more concerned with improving education for youth or improving retirement benefits for the elderly?

2. Based on their population pyramid should Italy should be more concerned about improving education for youth or improving retirement benefits for the elderly?

3. In the US health care is an important political issue. Which group do you think would cost the most in health care expenses: teenagers, 20-30 year olds or people over 50?

4. Throughout history there have been major events that have suddenly changed the shape of a country’s population pyramid. This can have a drastic impact on the country. For example, many countries in Sub-Saharan African have lost large portions of their adult population with the AIDS epidemic. What is another event that could drastically change a country’s population pyramid?

5. Is the Ethiopian population growing, staying the same or decreasing?

6. Is the Italian population growing, staying the same or decreasing?

7. Is the US population growing, staying the same or decreasing?

8. Do men or women live longer in the US? How can you tell?

9. What are some complications with having a high youth population and a low adult population?

10. What are some complications with having a high adult population and a low youth population?

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.02.02 Population Pyramid Essay(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 60 points possible 90 minutes

ASSIGNMENTS 04.02.01 Population Pyramid Shapes Part B

Content Objective: Examine population pyramids and interpret how a European country is impacted by it.

Use the links for European Population Pyramids from 1991, 2001 and 2011. You will be writing a 1 page 300 word essay about the population of a specific European country. You will pick one country and look at how it changed between 1991, 2001 and 2011. Then you will write your essay and discusses how the population changes in that country will impact Place, Human/Environment Interaction, and Movement. Answer the questions in each theme below in your essay:

Place: Because of the population changes what are 3 changes that might be occurring in this country. For example, a large increase in children would mean a need for more teachers and schools.  Other areas you might consider (Education, Health Care, Jobs, Housing)

Human/Environment Interaction: How will the population changes in this country impact the environment? Will there be more or less pollution? Will farmland be taken up by houses? Will there need to be more food grown?

Movement: There are many causes of population control. Besides births and deaths, immigration is a large factor. How might immigration be impacting your country? Are people moving in or moving away? What are some positive and negative consequences of immigration?

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.03 Monuments(Geo4Life1)

Introduction:
Europe has many beautiful sights to see, both natural and man-made. The nation of France has produced some fascinating monuments that attract many tourists. People flock by the thousands to see the Eiffel Tower and the Statue of Liberty. Did you know there is a Statue of Liberty in France?

Today you are going to explore and discover some interesting facts about two fabulous monuments created by the French.

Click on the following links to find answers to the above questions.
Statue in France (Go to the website section of the class to view this site)

Statue of Liberty information (Go to the website section of the class to view this site)

Statue of Liberty history (Go to the website section of the class to view this site)

Statue of Liberty (Go to the website section of the class to view this site)

On the left side of the screen scroll down and click on Eiffel Tower.
Eiffel Tower (Go to the website section of the class to view this site)

04.03.01 Eiffel Tower and Statue of Liberty Questions(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 60 points possible 60 minutes

ASSIGNMENTS 04.03.01 Two Great Monuments

Content Objective: Expore the relationship between the US and France and how national monuments are used to represent cultural ideals.

Construction of the base of the Eiffel Tower, 1900: public domainConstruction of the base of the Eiffel Tower, 1900: public domain Assignment: Answer the following questions in your own words. Use complete sentences.

1. What color is the Eiffel Tower?

2. Where is the Eiffel Tower?

3. How tall is the Tower?

4. Who owns the Tower?

5. Can you climb to the top?

6. Summarize in your own words the history of the Tower (2-3 sentences).

7. Does the Tower sway in the wind?

8. Did/do the French have a picture of the Tower on their currency (money)?

9. How long is the line to the Tower during the busy seasons?

10. The Statue of Liberty was a gift from whom?

11. Who was the model for the Statue?

12. How many crates were used to ship the Statue to the U.S.?

13. What was the date of the Statue's dedication?

14. Why was the Statue closed to the public for two years?

15. What does the poem on the base of the Statue say?

16. In 1986, the Statue turned how old?

17. Why was the U.S. given the Statue?

18. Who built the pedestal?

19. Name two things the Eiffel Tower and the Statue of Liberty have in common.

20. After you have answered the questions above, send me a "postcard" pretending you have just visited the Eiffel Tower.  My email is in the teacher-contact information.  If you can't get the link to work, you can create your own postcard and email it to me or submit it with the assignment.

Go to the Postcard link below.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.03.02 Design Your own monument(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 40 points possible 45 minutes

ASSIGNMENTS 04.03.02 Great Monuments Part B

Content Objective: Demonstrate understanding of cultural values by designing a national monument.

Do not complete this assignment until you have answered the questions about the statue of Liberty and the Eiffel Tower. It is your turn to be the designer. Imagine designing a monument that represents a concept or ideal, such as 'Peace', 'Tolerance', 'Education', 'Health', or 'Harmony.' Draw your design (you may use a computer program or pen/pencil and paper), and support it with a paragraph describing why you chose the design to represent the concept. Create an electronic copy of your image (using scanner or camera if necessary). Write your paragraph in complete sentences. Cervantes monument in Madrid, Spain: Image from Wikimedia Commons, MarioM, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedCervantes monument in Madrid, Spain: Image from Wikimedia Commons, MarioM, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.03.03 Berlin Wall Questions(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 60 minutes

ASSIGNMENTS 04.03.03 The Berlin Wall

Content Objective: Examine the political and economic consequences of the Berlin Wall.

Introduction: The Berlin Wall was constructed during one night in 1961 while most Berliners slept. By the next morning, the work was done and the border to West Germany was closed. The barbed wire was up and the citizens were locked in as prisoners to their own country. The Berlin Wall was built during this era of the Cold War to divide East and West Berlin. It was about 26 miles long and ranged from 12 to 15 feet high. On November 9, 1989, the Wall was torn down, and people celebrated their new freedom. Why was the Wall constructed, and why was it torn down? You are going to go on an Internet scavenger hunt to find the answer to these and many other questions concerning the Wall. Use the links below to answer the following questions: The double row of bricks marks where the Berlin Wall used to stand: Wikimedia Commons, Anah, CC Attribution 2.0 GenericThe double row of bricks marks where the Berlin Wall used to stand: Wikimedia Commons, Anah, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic Answer the following questions in complete sentences.

1. When and how was the Berlin Wall built?

2. Why was it built?

3. Who built the Wall?

4. What was it made of?

5. What did it symbolize then and now?

6. Why was it torn down?

7. What did people spray on the walls? (Be more specific than "graffiti")

8. Why did the East side not permit people to approach the wall?

9. Do some people still want the wall to remain standing? Why?

10. How has life changed since reunification?

11. Was the economy like on each side?

12. Who were the leaders of the Soviet Union and the United States at the time the wall came down?

13. How many people were able to escape?

14. Describe one story of an escape.

15. What happened to those who tried to escape and were caught?

16. What were different methods used to escape?

17. Describe one thing you found interesting during this time (2-3 sentences).

Answer all of the questions correctly in your own words. Use complete sentences.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.03.04 Europe Quiz(Geo4Life1)

computer-scored 100 points possible 60 minutes

Quiz Europe This quiz covers what you have studied concerning Europe. I hope you read everything carefully and took great notes. It is an open note quiz; go ahead and use your assignments and notes. Your final test is made up of questions from all end of unit quizzes taken in this class.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.