Skip navigation.

Biology

01.01 Classification (Biology)

Generalize criteria used for classification of organisms

TO DO

Read: Chapter 1 Classification in the EHS Biology Quarter 1 - Biological Diversity text book.

Explore:  The URLs found under the heading 01.01 Classification (Biology).  

Complete: Once you have read the chapter and explored the URLs complete the following activities:

  • 01.01.01 Classification - Assignment
  • 01.01.02 Virtual pond dip – Lab
  • 01.01.03 Classification - Quiz
  • 01.01.04 Lesson Check 

Click here for the 01.01 Classification study guide.


 

00.0 Start Here (Biology)

Course Description

The Biology Core Curriculum has two primary goals: (1) students will value and use science as a process of obtaining knowledge based on observable evidence, and (2) students' curiosity will be sustained as they develop and refine the abilities associated with scientific inquiry.

The Biology Core has three major concepts:

  1. The structures in all living things occur as a result of necessary functions.
  2. Interactions of organisms in an environment are determined by the biotic and abiotic components of the environment.
  3. Evolution of species occurs over time and is related to the environment in which the species live.

Class Overview

Each quarter of Biology is worth .25 credit. Assignments should be sent via the text box in Module three (3) Lessons, Activities, Quizzes & Tests. 

Once you enroll in the class, you need to send your first assignment within one week. You do not have to do the assignments in order, but it may be helpful as they will give you knowledge about the basics in that unit.

At times if you are waiting for a reply to a question, it is fine to work ahead on the next assignment. You can send one assignment to me, or many at a time. Either way is fine. You need to MAKE SURE YOUR NAME IS ON EVERY ASSIGNMENT.  ALWAYS KEEP A COPY OF ALL ASSIGNMENTS SENT.

Make a folder on your desktop (or a Flash Drive, if you are working on a school computer), and save all your assignments there. 

As you work on your assignments, realize that the links you may need are in the course material in Topic Two in the units. I am continuously working on updating them. Please just use search engines if you find that a link is broken on an assignment you are working on. The links change so often it is very hard to keep up with them. I personally like the search engine, dogpile.com, as it includes quite a few of the other existing search engines.

You need to finish this course within nine weeks of your start date.  If you've passed the class your grade will be sent to the EHS office on the tenth week.  Please message me if you feel you need an extension to your completion date.  I am on-line each day. If you run into problems, just hold that assignment and send me a message through your class INBOX. You may go on to the next assignment or the next question in the assignment if you would like.

Grading

Each assignment within the course is worth 10 points, with the exception of a few large projects.

GRADING SCALE
A 93 - 100%
A- 90 - 92%
B+ 87 - 89%
B 83 - 86%
B- 80 - 82%
C+ 77 - 79%
C 73 - 76%
C- 70 - 72%
D+ 67 - 69%
D 63 - 66%
D- 60 - 62%
F 0 - 59%

In-class quizzes are counted as assignment grades, and the final test is worth 50% of your grade.

 

 

00.00 Orientation (Biology)

self-scored (no gradebook points) 0 points possible 8 minutes

Click here to watch the 6 minute orientation video.

Click here to download and save the pacing guide.  There are not any due dates listed in the course.  The pacing guide will tell you what you need to do each week, so you will complete the course in nine weeks.  Your grade will be sent to the EHS office on week ten.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


self-scored (no gradebook points) 0 points possible 8 minutes

Click here to watch the 6 minute orientation video.

Click here to download and save the pacing guide.  There are not any due dates listed in the course.  The pacing guide will tell you what you need to do each week, so you will complete the course in nine weeks.  Your grade will be sent to the EHS office on week ten.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


self-scored (no gradebook points) 0 points possible 8 minutes

Click here to watch the 6 minute orientation video.

Click here to download and save the pacing guide.  There are not any due dates listed in the course.  The pacing guide will tell you what you need to do each week, so you will complete the course in nine weeks.  Your grade will be sent to the EHS office on week ten.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


self-scored (no gradebook points) 0 points possible 8 minutes

Click here to watch the 6 minute orientation video.

Click here to download and save the pacing guide.  There are not any due dates listed in the course.  The pacing guide will tell you what you need to do each week, so you will complete the course in nine weeks.  Your grade will be sent to the EHS office on week ten.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


00.00 About Me (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 90 minutes

This is your first assignment. Copy everything between the asterisks, paste the assignment in a word document, complete the assignment, save the file.  Once you've saved your work copy and paste the assignment under "About Me".  Once you submit the "About Me" assignment, the other assignments will be made available.

 

***************************************************************
ASSIGNMENT About Me - REVISION DATE: 5/30/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

Instructional Procedures:

Fill out the assignment and submit it to your teacher.

 

STUDENT INFORMATION

Name

E-mail

Phone Number (Don't add hyphens.  Give the phone number in numerical digits only)                                                           

Can I text this number?

Which “brick and mortar” school do you attend?

What year do you graduate?

Counselor’s Name

Counselor’s E-mail

Counselor’s Phone Number (Don't add hyphens.  Give the phone number in numerical digits only) 

As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers and staff with respect. (Type Yes or No).

 

PARENT INFORMATION

Name

E-mail

Phone Number (Don't add hyphens.  Give the phone number in numerical digits only) 

Can I text this number?

 

EXPLORE THE COURSE

After watching the orientation video. Answer the following questions.

1. What is the icon next to the folder where you find your assignments?

A. a chain link

B. a piece of paper with an A+ on it

C. a circle with the letter Q

2. What is the icon next to the folder where you submit your assignments?

A. a chain link

B. a piece of paper with an A+ on it

C. a circle with the letter Q

3. What is the icon next to the folder where you take a quiz or exam?

A. a chain link

B. a piece of paper with an A+ on it

C. a circle with the letter Q

4.  What is your completion date?

The text book is found in Module 1 under the “Required Resources” section.

5. Did you download the biology book? 

6. Do you know where you saved the book on your computer?

A printable pacing guide is found in Module 2 under the "Start Here" section.

7.  Have you downloaded the pacing guide?

8. Do you know where you saved the pacing guide on your computer?

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


00.01.01 Student Software Needs

 

Students need access to a robust internet connection and a modern web browser.

This class may also require the Apple QuickTime plug-in to view media.

For students using a school-issued Chromebook, ask your technical support folks to download the QuickTime plug-in and enable the plug-in for your Chromebook.

$0.00

01.00 Diversity (Biology)

This unit is worth .25 credit and contains an introduction assignment, seven curriculum assignments and one review assignment. Once you have completed this unit, you will be able to schedule your proctored test.

Welcome to Biology.

This course is designed to follow the Biology core curriclum.

The Biology Core Curriculum is a set of learning standards that all students are expected to know and be able to do upon completion of this course. This course is designed to meet the requirements for biological science credit. All objectives and indicators may be successfully completed with a variety of learning activities. In many cases suggestions have been provided that may or may not be used.

A major guide used during the writing of this curriculum was Project 2061's Benchmarks for Science Literacy. It describes levels of understanding and ability that all students are expected to reach on the way to becoming science literate. According to Benchmarks, the Common Core of Science Learning should center on science literacy, not on an understanding of each of the separate disciplines. It is from this perspective that a functional approach was taken rather than the structural approach (e.g., "What functions are necessary for life?" versus "List the organs or organelles necessary for life.").

Benchmarks use only technical terms that ought to be in the vocabulary of science-literate people, therefore, this core curriculum includes a minimal amount of technical terminology.

An attempt has been made to increase the cognitive level and personalize the curriculum. Students are expected to explain ideas or concepts in their own words, relate them to other topics and apply them in a new context. Throughout the curriculum, students are provided with information and then are required to apply it (e.g., design a model, compare and contrast, infer). It is necessary for students to examine their decisions or actions, and determine how they impact the world around them.

Careers in many fields of biology are infused across the curriculum as well. Students will also become cognizant of current technologies, methods and changes in the practice of science. The hands-on nature of the Core increases the need for students to use appropriate precautions in the laboratory and field. Guidelines for the proper use of animals, equipment, and chemicals should be observed.

01.01.01 Classification (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

Summary:

Students will research information about Carl Linnaeus, how to classify organisms, and how to use and design a dichotomous key. Using the research information students will be able to document their findings and site the sources used.

Instructional Procedures:

This assignment contains five questions. Your answers must be VERY DETAILED. Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.

***************************************************************
ASSIGNMENT 01.01.01 - REVISION DATE: 7/30/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

  1. In your own words, write a 150 – 200 word description of Linnaeus' role in developing the modern system of naming organisms. List all websites and other reference materials you used to gain the knowledge to answer this question. Do not cut and paste; put the answer in your own words. Plagiarism is not ethical and will result in your being dropped from the course.
     
  2. In your own words, explain Linnaeus' scientific system for classifying organisms. Your explanation needs to be at least 150 words. List all websites and other reference materials you used to gain the knowledge to answer this question. Do not cut and paste; put the answer in your own words. Plagiarism is not ethical and will result in your being dropped from the course.
     
  3. Pick two organisms of your choice and classify each from the largest (kingdom) to smallest categories (species). EXAMPLE: Humans are classified under the following categories:
    Kingdom— Animal
    Phylum— Chordate
    Class— Vertebrate
    Order— Primate
    Family— Hominidae
    Genus— Homo
    Species— Sapien

     

  4. Describe how evolution is a part of classification. Your explanation needs to be at least 150 words. List all websites and other reference materials you used to gain the knowledge to answer this question. Do not cut and paste; put the answer in your own words. Plagiarism is not ethical and will result in your being dropped from the course.
     
  5.  Using the example from Chapter 1, design your own dichotomous key for the following six organism found in the Family Felidae: lion, tiger, leopard, cheetah, jaguar, and cougar. 

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.01.02 Virtual pond dip – LAB (Biology)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 120 minutes

Summary:

When you look at pond water under a microscope you are likely to see tiny organisms. If you spend enough time examining the pond water you will see organisms from the Monera, Animalia, and Protista Kingdoms. In this lab you will explore pond water virtually, and identify organisms from the Monera, Animalia, and Protista Kingdoms.

Instructional Procedures:

1.  Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.
2.  Open URL 1 - Virtual Pond Dip
3.  Explore the information found at URL 1. Use this information to fill in the table.
4.  Open and explore URL 2 - Pond Water Critters That You See With A Microscope.
5.  Use the information from PART I, URL 1, URL 2, and URL 3 to develop a dichotomous key.

***************************************************************
ASSIGNMENT 01.01.02 - REVISION DATE: 7/07/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

PART I
Instructions: Open and explore URL 1 - Virtual Pond Dip. Use the information found in the site to fill in the table below.

ORGANISM NAME SINGLE OR MULTICELLULAR KINGDOM PHYLUM UNIQUE CHARACTERISTICS
Actinosphaerium        
Amoeba        
Cycolps        
Daphnia        
Euglena        
Paramecium        
Rotifer        
Stentor        
Volvox        
Vorticella        

 

PART II

Instructions: Open and explore URL 2 - Pond Water Critters That You See With A Microscope. Using the information from PART I, URL 1, URL 2, and URL 3 develop a dichotomous key. The dichotomous key you develop must contain seven of the organisms from PART I.

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.01.03 Classification (Biology)

computer-scored 5 points possible 20 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.01.04 - Lesson Check (Biology)

both teacher- and computer-scored 13 points possible 15 minutes

This is a self-reflection on how you did this week and what you plan to do next week.  

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.02 Biological Diversity (Biology)

Relate principles of evolution to biological diversity.

TO DO

Read: Chapter 2 Biological Diversity in the EHS Biology Quarter 1 - Biological Diversity text book.

Explore:  The URL found under the heading 01.02 Biological Diversity (Biology).  

Complete: Once you have read the chapter and explored the URL complete the following activities:

  • 01.02.01 Biological Diversity - Assignment
  • 01.02.02 Biological Diversity – Quiz
  • 01.02.03 Lesson Check 

Click here for the 01.02 Biological Diversity study guide.


 

01.02 Biological Diversity (Biology)

This is a site to research organisms.  You are not limited to this site.  But, it's a great place to start.

01.02.01 Biological Diversity (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

Summary:

Students will research information about organisms. Using the research information students will be able to document their findings and site the sources used.

Instructional Procedures:

Research four organisms. Include one plant, bacteria, invertebrate and vertebrate. You will look at some of their normal everyday functions and discover how the organisms are different.  Make sure you include a list of resources you used.  For each organism, answer the questions listed below.  The URL listed above is a great place to start.

***************************************************************

ASSIGNMENT 01.02.01 - REVISION DATE: 7/22/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

Research how your four organisms:

1. Obtain food and derive energy from it

2. Protect themselves from injury (e.g., immune system, defenses, and integument)

3. Provide internal transportation (e.g., open or closed circulatory system, number of heart chambers)

4. Provide internal coordination (e.g., hormones, and nervous system)

5. Eliminate wastes (e.g., solid, liquid, and gas)

6. Support themselves (e.g., water buoyancy, xylem, phloem, skeleton)

7. Reproduce

List Resources below:

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.02.02 Biological Diversity (Biology)

computer-scored 5 points possible 20 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.03 Adaptation of Organisms (Biology)

TO DO

Read: Chapter 3 Adaptation of Organisms in the EHS Biology Quarter 1 - Biological Diversity text book.

Complete: Once you have read the chapter complete the following activities:

  • 01.03.01 Adaptation of Organisms - Assignment
  • 01.03.02 Adaptation of Organisms – Quiz
  • 01.03.03 Lesson Check 

 

01.03.01 Adaptation of Organisms (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

Summary:

An adaptation is any kind of inherited trait that improves the chances of survival and reproduction for an organism. These adaptations can occur over long periods of time. Adaptations are indeed changes, and change is a characteristic of evolution. How an animal changes to survive is an evolutionary adaptation. These changes are part of a process called natural selection (survival of the fittest).

The environment is the selecting force that chooses the best and most useful inherited characteristics. There are many different types of adaptations. Structural adaptations are adaptations that involve the body of the organism.The wings of birds, for example, are structural adaptations for flight. Physiological adaptations involve the metabolism of organisms. The protein web made by spiders is an example. Other adaptations are behavioral and some provide protection like camouflage (chameleon) and warning coloration (poisonous frogs). Listed below are definitions of each of the adaptions for which you will be asked to provide examples. Please do not use the examples given in the definition. Find your own!

  • Internal skeleton: is one that is inside the body of the animal. It is made of bone and cartilage, and its function is to protect the soft organs, tissues, and other parts of the vertebrate organisms. It gives something for muscles to attach to and pull against. The internal skeleton also stores mineral reserves and provides a site for blood cell formation.
  • External skeleton: is an outer covering on an invertebrate such as a spider, sea anemone, clam or lobster; very few vertebrates have an exoskeleton except the turtle. Some exoskeletons are made of chitin, calcium or silica. They have two advantages. They can protect the organism against their environment and danger, and they protect their wearer from drying out.
  • Internal Fertilization: is the union of gametes (egg and sperm) inside the body of the female, the sperm being transferred into the body of the female by the male sex organ. Internal fertilization can result in species that lay eggs like birds, or species that carry their embryos inside their bodies like cats.
  • External Fertilization: is the union of gametes (egg and sperm) outside of the bodies of the originating organisms; it occurs in most fish. The female deposits the eggs into the water and the male must swim to the eggs and deposit his sperm over the eggs. The water keeps the egg and sperm from drying out. Most species that exhibit external fertilzation either live in the water or have to return to water for reproduction. Amphibians also exhibit external fertilization.
  • Egg-laying: occurs in animals of all kinds including mammals (just a few - the duck-billed platypus and the spiny anteaters), birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish. An advantage to egg-laying is that the female does not have to continue to give the embryo nutrients and energy. Once the egg is laid, it has all the nutrients it needs until hatching. Eggs can be buried or protected until the animal hatches. In general, organisms can lay more eggs than carry live young.
  • Live birth: is when a mother gives birth to her baby or babies alive. She carries them inside her body until they are fully developed. An animal that carries her babies can protect them from predators. She can also maintain a constant temperature to keep them alive and healthy.
  • Camouflage: is the ability of an organism to blend into its surroundings to hide itself from predators or prey. Some animals mimic plants or ground cover like dead leaves in order to hide or hunt.
  • Mimicry: is the similarity between species which protects one or both. This might include warning coloration (like a fly that is colored like a bee), or coloration of a harmful organism, or a bitter tasting organism so others will not eat or bother them. On its back, the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail caterpillar has coloring that look like big eyes to scare away predators.
  • Nocturnal behavior: is when an animal sleeps during the day and is active at night. These animals generally have highly developed senses for seeing and hearing. At night, these animals hunt others that do not have as good as eyesight as they do. Some of these animals, like owls, hunt at night because there is less competition. In hot desert environments, being active at night can also help them conserve water because they are not in the hot sun.

Instructional Procedures:

Identify two different organisms for each adaptation and explain how this evolutionary adaptation has been beneficial to each of the organisms. 

A common mistake here is to take two organisms and report on each of the characteristics. The correct way is to take each characteristic (external skeleton, internal skeleton, internal fertilization. . .) and find two organisms that have that characteristic, and tell how that evolutionary adaptation has been beneficial to those organisms.

Here are a few examples:  DO NOT USE THESE EXAMPLES IN YOUR ASSIGNMENT

Internal skeleton

Giraffe--Long neck allows it to eat food off tall trees
Penguins--Heavy, solid bones serve as a diver’s weight belt and allow them to stay under water for long periods of time

External skeleton

Crab--Has a hard shell that covers its body and protects it from predators
Scarab--Hard exoskeleton offers protection against predators

Internal fertilization

Shark--Internal fertilization is a key adaptation for sharks, once born, a shark infant is fully developed and capable of fending for itself
Tailed frog--Due to swift currents, internal fertilization is necessary for survival of the young 

***************************************************************

ASSIGNMENT 01.03.01 - REVISION DATE: 7/22/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

1.  Internal skeleton

  • ANIMAL 1:
  • ANIMAL 2:

2.  External skeleton

  • ANIMAL 1:
  • ANIMAL 2:

3.  Internal fertilization

  • ANIMAL 1:
  • ANIMAL 2:

4.  External fertilization

  • ANIMAL 1:
  • ANIMAL 2:

5.  Egg laying

  • ANIMAL 1:
  • ANIMAL 2:

6.  Live Birth

  • ANIMAL 1:
  • ANIMAL 2:

7.  Camouflage

  • ANIMAL 1:
  • ANIMAL 2:

8.  Mimicry

  • ANIMAL 1:
  • ANIMAL 2:

9.  Nocturnal behavior

  • ANIMAL 1:
  • ANIMAL 2:

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.03.02 Adaptation of Organisms (Biology)

computer-scored 5 points possible 20 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.04 Characteristics of Life (Biology)

Relate genetic variability to a species’ potential for adaptation to a changing environment.

TO DO

Read: Chapter 4  Characteristics of Life in the EHS Biology Quarter 1 - Biological Diversity text book.

Explore:  The URLs found under the heading 01.04 Characteristics of Life (Biology).  

Complete: Once you have read the chapter and explored the URLs complete the following activities:

  • 01.04.01 Characteristics of Life - Pre Lab
  • 01.04.02 Characteristics of Life - Lab
  • 01.04.03 Characteristics of Life - Post Lab Quiz
  • 01.04.04 Characteristics of Life - Quiz
  • 01.04.05 Lesson Check
  • Exam - Covers lessons 1 - 4

 

01.04 Characteristics of Life (Biology)

01.04.01 Characteristics of Life Pre Lab (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Your answers must be VERY DETAILED. Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.

***************************************************************

Pre Lab 01.04.01 - REVISION DATE: 8/1/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

 

  1. We are studying biology this year.  “Bio” means _________, and “ology” means __________.  So “biology” means ______________________!
  2. What are the eight characteristics that define a living organism?  

 

 

 

   3.  Define:

  • Dead –
  • Alive –
  • Non-living –

***************************************************************

Adapted from Rebecca M. Fulop and Lindsay Penrose

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.04.02 Characteristics of Life Lab (Biology)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 60 minutes

Summary:

The word hypothesis can be defined as an "educated guess." For example, it might be an educated guess about why a natural event occurs. But not all hypotheses—even those about the natural world—are scientific hypotheses. What makes a statement a scientific hypothesis rather than just an educated guess? A scientific hypothesis must meet two criteria:

  1. A scientific hypothesis must be testable.
  2. A scientific hypothesis must be falsifiable.

A hypothesis is written using an "if" and "then" statement for example: "If _____[I do this] _____, then _____[this]_____ will happen." (Fill in the blanks with the appropriate information from the experiment.)

Instructional Procedures:

Your answers must be VERY DETAILED. Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.

***************************************************************

ASSIGNMENT 01.04.02 - REVISION DATE: 8/1/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

Introduction:

Question/Problem:  How can we tell whether an object is living or non-living?

Materials and Methods:

Water       Plant Larva Candle
Branch        Apple Chicken Egg                         Bone

Moldy Cucumber (Hint: don't just take the cucumber into consideration.)

      Snail Shell                                                                       Fossile Book
 
 
Think about the materials listed above.  You do not have to obtain them.  Make a hypothesis about whether each specimen listed above is living, nonliving, or dead.  Your hypothesis needs to be written as an "if" and "then" statement.  For example:  
If an object has the ability to reproduce, then it is alive.
 
Support your hypothesis with EVIDENCE from the eight characteristics of life all living organism share.
 
***************************************************************
Adapted from Rebecca M. Fulop and Lindsay Penrose

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.04.03 Post Lab Characteristics of Life (Biology)

computer-scored 10 points possible 5 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on the Post Lab Quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.04.04 Characteristics of Life (Biology)

computer-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.05 Biodiversity to Extinction (Biology)

Relate principles of evolution to biological diversity.

TO DO

Read: Chapter 5 Biodiversity to Extinction in the EHS Biology Quarter 1 - Biological Diversity text book.

Complete: Once you have read the chapter complete the following activities:

  • 01.05.01 Biodiversity to Extinction - Assignment
  • 01.05.02 Biodiversity to Extinction – Quiz
  • 01.05.03 Lesson Check 

 

01.05.01 Biodiversity to Extinction (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

In this assignment you will be writing three one-page papers. Do not copy and paste from your sources-- summarize the information in your own words.

Paper #1: Species diversity or biodiversity is the number of different species living within an ecosystem. These species live together and interact with each other. Your task for the first paper is to explain in 200 words or more, the importance of biodiversity in a particular ecosystem. You will want to choose an ecosystem in which you can use examples to support your explanation. Use these terms to help search: Ecosystem info Franklin Institute info. On ecosystems (tours) Exploring ecosystems online (interactive) Virtual ecoystem.  Include a reference of web sites that you used.

Paper #2: You studied and discovered many evolutionary adaptations in the third diversity assignment. You read about natural selection (survival of the fittest), but have you thought much about what happens to the "unfit"? Yes, individuals die. But what about an entire species dying? Have you given much thought to that? Is it possible for an entire species to vanish because of natural selection? What about natural disasters or dramatic climatic changes? The most common theory of why the dinosaurs became extinct is the meteorite theory. It is thought that a large meteorite or asteroid hit the planet, causing major changes in the environment. The dinosaurs are gone, and we have learned a lot about them through their fossil remains. But is it possible to do anything to help save other species from extinction? That is the question I would like you to write about. Research technologies and methods that we as humans have to help prevent the extinction of other organisms. Try to include 3-4 different approaches that are being used today to prevent extinction in your 200 words or more report. Use these terms to help search:  Extinction search words Extinction - World book reference with links Dinosaur Extinction Extinction Sucks Audubon Society watch list for kids.  Include a reference of web sites that you used.

Paper #3: Now that you've studied and researched some of the different, current approaches to preventing extinction, pick one of them and tell me why it is or isn't a good approach. After you've expressed your opinion, then explain in the next few paragraphs an idea or approach that you think would work better. Be creative, think about all the technology we have today. Complete a 200 words or more paper. Include a reference of web sites that you used.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.05.02 Biodiversity to Extinction (Biology)

computer-scored 5 points possible 20 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06 Natural Selection (Biology)

TO DO

Read: Chapter 6 Natural Selection in the EHS Biology Quarter 1 - Biological Diversity text book.

Explore:  The URLs found under the heading 01.06 Darwin's Finches (Biology).  

Complete: Once you have read the chapter and explored the URLs complete the following activities:

  • 01.06.01 Darwin's Finches - Assignment
  • 01.06.02 - Virtual Peppered Moth - Lab
  • 01.06.03 Natural Selction - Quiz
  • 01.06.04 Lesson Check 

 

01.06 Natural Selection (Biology)

Click on this link and listen to information about the scientists now studying on the Galapagos Islands and how the finches have continued to evolve. You must have iTunes and Quicktime installed on your computer to access this.

01.06.01 Darwin's Finches (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

Summary:

The theory of evolution consists of the following four major points:

1. Variation exists within the genes of every species (the result of random mutation).

2. In a particular environment, some individuals of a species are better suited for survival, so   leave more offspring (natural selection).

3. Over time, change within species leads to the replacement of old species by new species as less successful species become extinct.

4. There is clear evidence from fossils and many other sources that the species now on Earth have evolved (descended) from ancestral forms that are extinct (evolution).

 

Instructional Procedures:

Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.

Using URLs 1 – 4, answer these general questions about Diversity and Evolution (Please use your own wording--no cut and paste).

***************************************************************
ASSIGNMENT 01.06.01 - REVISION DATE: 7/29/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

1. Why is diversity (differences) among the finches important for their survival?

 

2. How did the different islands play a role in the diversity of the finches?

 

3. Why do you think scientists believe that the finches came from one species?

 

4. When would the importance of different beaks be important for the finches' survival?

 

5. What is your opinion about the variation in the sizes of the birds? How could one species be so much smaller or larger than another if they all came from one original species?

 

6. After reading the information below, write a paragraph explaining how diversity helps us to understand evolution.

 The theory of evolution consists of the following four major points:

1. Variation exists within the genes of every species (the result of random mutation).

2. In a particular environment, some individuals of a species are better suited for survival, so   leave more offspring (natural selection).

3. Over time, change within species leads to the replacement of old species by new species as less successful species become extinct.

4. There is clear evidence from fossils and many other sources that the species now on Earth have evolved (descended) from ancestral forms that are extinct (evolution).

 

 

 

 

 

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06.02 - Virtual Peppered Moth - LAB (Biology)

01.06.02 - Virtual Peppered Moth - Pre Lab (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Summary:

Charles Darwin gathered a large collection of facts to support the theory of evolution by natural selection. One problem that he ran into was the inability to persuade people of his theory. All of the specimens he studied had a long life cycle and evolved over hundreds of years. He needed a specimen that had a short life cycle. A great example of natural selection can be seen in the peppered moth, Biston betularia. This moth has a short life cycle, making it easier to study natural selection. Unfortunately, Darwin didn’t realize natural selection was happening among smaller specimens, like the peppered moth, which were found in his home country of England.

​Instructional Procedures: 

Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and   all questions into a word document.

  Open URL 1 – Peppered Moths and Melanism
  Read the information found at URL 1. Use this information to answer PART 1 of the lab.
  Open and explore URL 2 – Peppered Moths, Black and White.
  Use the information from URL 2 to complete PART II of the pre lab.

***************************************************************

ASSIGNMENT 01.06.02 - REVISION DATE: 8/06/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

The Industrial Revolution brought on great changes. There were no environmental regulations, and the factories produced tons of ash and soot. It didn't take long until there was a blanket of soot darkening homes, trees, rocks, and anything else it could land on. It was under these conditions that the first dark colored moth was discovered. Today, in some areas, 90% or more of the-peppered moths are dark in color.

Instructions Part I: Open and read URL 1 - Peppered Moths and Melanism. Use the information found in the site to answer the questions.

1. What are the characteristics of the Peppered Moth? Why are the characteristics important when studying natural selection?

Instructions Part II: Open and explore URL 2 – Peppered Moths White and Black. Using the sections of the URL titled “Life Cycle”, “Impact of Polluitn” and “Kettlewells Experiments”. Answer the following questions.

1. What are the natural preditors of the peppered moth?

2. What is a lichen? Why is the lichen important to the survival of the peppered moth? You may have to do additional independent research to answer this question.

3. How is the larvae of the peppered moth protected?

4. How long does a peppered moth live?

5. Who is RS Edleston? Why was his discovery significant?

6. What is Natural Selection?

7. Who is J.W. Tutt? What was his theory?

8. In 150 words or more explain who Barnard Kettlewell is and his work as it deals with natural selection. You may have to do additional independent research on Kettlewell.

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06.03 - Virtual Peppered Moth - LAB (Biology)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 120 minutes

Instructional Procedures: 

Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and   all questions into a word document.

  Open and explore URL 2 – Peppered Moths, Black and White.
  Use the information from URL 2 to complete the lab.

***************************************************************

ASSIGNMENT 01.06.03 - REVISION DATE: 8/06/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)
 

Instructions: Open and explore URL 2 – Peppered Moths White and Black. Using the section of the URL titled “Birds Eye View” run the simulation for a dark and light forest, fill in the table and draw a conclusion.
  

  PERCENT OF DARK MOTHS PERCENT OF LIGHT MOTHS
DARK FOREST    
LIGHT FOREST    

1. Draw a conclusion. Your conclusion needs to contain at least 150 words.

***************************************************************

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06.04 Natural Selection (Biology)

computer-scored 5 points possible 20 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.07 Biomes (Biology)

Describe the effects of environmental factors on natural selection.

TO DO

Read: Chapter 7 Biomes in the EHS Biology Quarter 1 - Biological Diversity text book.

Explore:  The URLs found under the heading 01.07 Biomes (Biology).  

Complete: Once you have read the chapter and explored the URLs complete the following activities:

  • 01.07.01 The American Prairie - Assignment
  • 01.07.02 American Prairie - Quiz
  • 01.07.03 Lesson Check 
  • Exam - Covers lessons 5 - 7

 

01.07 Biomes (Biology)

National Geographic Habitats, good information about prairies

01.07.01 The American Prairie (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

Summary:

In order for any animal to survive within a given ecosystem, it must be adapted in two ways:

  1. Physically - this includes characteristics such as fur, eyes, color, etc.
  2. Behaviorally - this includes characteristics such as hunting strategies, breeding patterns, social habits and more that help an animal cope with the conditions it faces while living in the ecoystem.

The ecosystem we will study here will be the prairie. The term prairie derives from the French and was the word French trappers and explorers gave to the sea of grass they encountered in the center of North America. As a vegetation type, the prairie is divided into three formations: Tall grass, mixed prairie and short grass.

Instructions:

Reseach the following information:

  1. The location of the North America Prairies
  2. Basic environment conditions of the prairies (Climate - temperature, rainfall, winds...)
  3. Plants of the prairie 
  4. Animals of the prairie, and how they are adapted to their environment

As you gather this information, keep in mind that later in the assignment you will be answering some questions about prairie life--you may want to read the questions ahead of time, so if you find that information, you can highligh it or print it. To gain this information you will want to use a search engine (I like Google) with the key words: Prairies, American Prairies, North American Prairies, Prairie Animals, and Prairie Plants.

This assignment has three parts.  Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.  

***************************************************************

ASSIGNMENT 01.07.01 - REVISION DATE: 7/29/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

Part One:

Gather information about the prairie including:

  1. The location of the North America Prairies
  2. Basic environment conditions of the prairies (Climate - temperature, rainfall, winds...)
  3. Plants of the prairie
  4. Animals of the prairie, and how they are adapted to their environment

Once you have gathered this information, put it in a 250 - 350 word research paper.   Make sure you list your resources.

Part Two:

Your next job is to create an animal that would thrive on the prairie. You will need to consider both physical and behavioral characteristics of your animal. Turn in a  DRAWING and TWO PARAGRAPHS about your animal.  

TIP:  The first paragraph should contain a physical description and the second your animal's behavioral characteristics.  To submit this part of the assignment I suggest that you draw the picture on regular paper. Scan or take a picture of it, and upload the .jpeg as your assignment.

Part Three:

Prairie Questions

1. Prairie plant species are very diverse. Speculate about why such a diverse system evolved. What natural advantages might it offer?

2. The American bison was almost hunted to extinction. Describe the effect its disappearance would have had on the prairie ecosystem.

3. Describe one of the many relationships that exist between a particular animal or insect and a species of plant living on the prairie.

4. Compare and contrast the ways in which Native Americans and early European settlers lived on the prairies. What advantages and disadvantages does each way offer?

5. Describe the effects of fire suppression on the American prairie.

 

(This lesson was adapted from discoveryschool.com)

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.07.02 American Prairie (Biology)

computer-scored 5 points possible 20 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.08 Quarter Review (Biology)

This is a review for you to prepare for the final test.

TO DO

Complete: 

  • 01.08.01 Quarter Review

Proctored Final:  Once you earn at least 60% on each assignment and 80% on each quiz module 4 will open.  Once Module 4 is open you will need to:

  • Complete the Ready Assignment.
  • Right under the Ready Assignment, there is a link with a list of proctors. The proctors are listed by county. Select a proctor from the list.
  • Contact the proctor (via e-mail or phone) and make arrangements to take the final.
  • When you show up to take the final the proctor will type in the password and you will be ready to go.
  • In order to earn 0.25 biology credit, you need to get at least 60% on the final.
  • To prepare for the final I recommend you understand the concepts from assignment 01.08.01 and the quizzes.

 

01.08.01 Quarter Review (Biology)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 90 minutes

Your answers must be VERY DETAILED. Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.

***************************************************************
ASSIGNMENT 01.08.01 - REVISION DATE: 10/11/13 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

1st quarter Biology final study guide

Make sure you understand all of your assignments and this study guide.

1. List 3 advantages of hibernation.

2. Biodiversity makes ecosystems more _____________.

3. Why do we now classify organisms into 6 kingdoms, and not 5?

4. Briefly compare the scientific name and common name of an organism.

5. What is a dichotomous key? Why would you use one?

6. List 3 specific animals that have inherited a trait that would help them to be camouflage in their environment.

7. List and explain 3 different inherited traits that help animals survive.

8. Explain how a non-native organism could cause another organism become extinct.

9. Select a mammal. Starting with the mouth trace the path that food would pass through.

10. There are 7 different taxa used to classify organisms. Starting with Kingdom list the other six in order of most inclusive to least inclusive.

11. What contributions did Carolus Linnaeus give toward the naming of organisms that we use today?

12. Briefly describe how the characteristics listed below describe a species.

  • sexual reproduction
  • interbreeding
  • natural
  • population

13. What are common characteristics of most prokaryotes?

14. What are common characteristics of most eukaryotes?

15. The vascular tissues of plants are composted of xylem and phloem. Briefly describe the role they play in the plant.

16. What makes up the vascular system in animals?

17. What is the cycle of flowering plants?

18. What is the meaning of co-evolution? Give 5 examples.

19. Explain why bees co-evolved with flowering plants.

20. Describe how cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems all work together.

21. List 5 reasons why there are more animals living in the tropics than the arctic.

22. Describe and give an example of the different symbiotic relationships listed below:

 

  • parasitism
  • mutualism
  • neutral
  • competitive
  • commensalism

23. Organisms protect themselves in a variety of ways. Briefly describe the defensives listed below and give an example of each:

  • warning coloration
  • display behavior
  • chemical defenses
  • mimicry
  • camouflage

 

24. Define:

 

  • evolution
  • growth
  • reproduction
  • photosynthesis
  • Plantae
  • Protista
  • Bacteria
  • Fungi
  • Animalia

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.00 Ecology and Evolution (Biology)

Term 2: Ecology and Evolution includes eight assignments.
The information necessary for you to complete each assignment is included with the assignment itself. As you investigate many locations on the web, you will come to a better understanding of how organisms interact and have changed through time. If you deem it necessary, you may also borrow a biology book from your local school to help you through the assignments.

02.01 Nature's Interactions (Biology)

Investigate an ecosystem using methods of science to gather quantitative and qualitative data that describe the ecosystem in detail.

TO DO

Read: Chapter 1 Nature's Interactions in the EHS Biology Quarter 2 - Ecology text book.

Complete: Once you have read the chapter complete the following activities:

  • 02.01.01 Nature's Interactions - Project
  • 02.01.02 Nature's Interactions Continued - Project
  • 02.01.03 Nature's Interactions - Quiz 
  • 02.01.04 - Lesson Check

 

02.01.01 Nature's Interactions (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

 

DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITY:

This assignment is a two part project that will take you 4 WEEKS to complete. You should start this and be prepared to keep notes and pictures for at least one month. The goal is for you to gain an understanding of the relationships and interactions within an ecosystem. 

Scenario: Imagine you are an ecologist studying an ecosystem. Because you live far from the ecosystem you are studying, you decide to simulate the natural ecosystem by setting up a mini-ecosystem. You may use an aquarium, a large tupperware container, 2 litter pop bottle, or any container that you have available. 

Materials:

4 plants Large container
3 animals (ie. worms, insects) Camera – any camera will work, even your phone.
Soil Cheese cloth or other covering that will allow air

 

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Choose an ecosystem, such as a pond, forest, or grass field that you would like to simulate. Design a mini-ecosystem that will support at least four types of plants and three types of animals from that ecosystem. 
  2. Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.

  3. Answer the questions and submit it to be graded.

***************************************************************

ASSIGNMENT 02.01.01 - REVISION DATE: 7/28/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

  1. The ecosystem I am going to simulate is ____________________.
  2. The 4 plants I am going to use are:
  3. ​The 3 aminals I am going to use are: 
  4. My plan for the container is
  5. This project will take me 4 weeks.  If I start today, I will have it completed by (month/day/year) _________________.

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.01.02 Nature's Interactions Continued (Biology)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 150 minutes

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Put your plan from assignment 02.01.01 into action.
  2. Add soil characteristic of the ecosystem.
  3. Add plants and/or sow seeds and spores. Allow time for seeds and spores to germinate.
  4. Add several types of animals to the mini-ecosystem. Cover with screen or cheesecloth and place in a well-lit area.
  5. Observe the ecosystem daily for four weeks, adding water as it is required. Record the number of species of plants and animals, and note their behaior and growth. Look for interactions between organisms and for any changes that may occur. Remember to take weekly pictures and document daily observations.
  6. Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.
  7. After the four week period, type your observations and answer the questions about your mini-ecosystem. Make sure you take weekly pictures of your project, and include them as part of your observations. To earn full credit you need at least 25 days of observation and 4 pictures.

***************************************************************

ASSIGNMENT 02.01.02 - REVISION DATE: 7/28/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.) 

OBSERVATION:

  1. What is the energy source in your ecosystem?
  2. How many different species did you observe in your ecosystem?
  3. Define limiting factor.
  4. Which organisms increased in number? Which decreased in number? What factors may have caused these changes?
  5. Describe the niche of any one of the organisms in the ecosystem you designed.
  6. Add weekly pictures and daily observations. You should have at least 4 pictures of your ecosystem and at least 25 daily observations.

DRAWING CONCLUSIONS:

  1. What are the general conditions necessary to maintain an ecosystem?
  2. Write out the food chain for your ecosystem. Identify producers, consumers, and decomposers.
  3. Diagram how carbon is recycled within your ecosystem. Make sure you use the organisms that are unique to your ecosystem.
  4. What evidence is there of competition among the organisms in your ecosystem?

THINKING FURTHER:

  1. What factors in your ecosystem would limit population growth?
  2. How do you think adding more plants would affect your ecosystem?
  3. How is the ecosystem you have designed different from an actual ecosystem found in nature? In what way is it similar?
  4. How can studying ecosystems be of benefit as humans begin to populate more and more space on earth?

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.01.03 Nature's Interactions (Biology)

computer-scored 5 points possible 20 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.02 Circle of Life (Biology)

Describe how interactions among organisms and their environment help shape ecosystems.

TO DO

Read: Chapter 2 Circle of Life in the EHS Biology Quarter 2 - Ecology text book.

Explore:  The URL found under the heading 02.02 Circle of Life (Biology).  

Complete: Once you have read the chapter and explored the URL complete the following activities:

  • 02.02.01 Circle of Life 
  • 02.02.02 Circle of Life - Quiz 
  • 02.02.03 - Lesson Check

 

02.02.01 Circle of Life (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

Summary:

A symbiotic relationship, is a relationship between two different species. Symbiotic relationships can be benifical to both species, benifical to one species and harmful to the other, or benifical to one and the other is neither benefited or harmed.  

Instructional Procedures:

This assignment has 2 parts. Your answers must be VERY DETAILED. Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.

***************************************************************
ASSIGNMENT 02.02.01 - REVISION DATE: 7/10/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

PART 1:  Research one pair of organisms per relationship, that have co-evolved and are in a:

A. Predator/Prey relationship:

B. Mutualistic relationship:

C. Parasitic relationship:

D. Commensalitic relationship: 

Briefly (a sentence or two) describe the relationship of the two organisms in terms of beneficial, harmful, or neither.

PART 2: Research five organisms that were introduced to an environment (in Utah) and have caused major changes (negative or positive). Please read the article found at URL 02.02:  Utah's exotic species: the good, the bad and the ugly. Name the five organisms you chose from the article and explain the environmental problems/changes that have occurred, and describe the ways we are controlling them because of their arrival. Only use the organisms mentioned in the article.

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.02.02 Circle of Life (Biology)

computer-scored 5 points possible 20 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.03 Recycling Life: Food Chains (Biology)

Use diagrams to trace the movement of matter through a cycle

TO DO

Read: Chapter 3 Recycling Life: Food Chains in the EHS Biology Quarter 2 - Ecology text book.

Complete: Once you have read the chapter complete the following activities:

  • 02.03.01 Recycling Life: Food Chains - Assignment
  • 02.03.03 - Lesson Check

 

02.03.01 Recycling Life: Food Chains (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

***************************************************************
ASSIGNMENT 02.03.01 - REVISION DATE: 7/9/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

1.  Pick an ecosystem  

2.  Outline by words or drawings three food chains within that system (Notice the direction of the arrows.  The arrows show you the direction of the energy flow - not who eats whom).

3.  Outline by words or drawings the food web in your ecosystem (Several food chains make a food web).

4.  Outline by words or drawings the ecological pyramid of your three food chains (label the levels--producers, consumers and decomposers). 

5.  Use at least two of your organisms from your ecosystem in a drawing depicting one of the biogeochemical cycles (oxygen and carbon cycle or nitrogen cycle).

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.04 Human Influences on Ecosystems (Biology)

Research and evaluate local and global practices that affect ecosystems.

TO DO

Read: Chapter 4 Human Influences on Ecosystems in the EHS Biology Quarter 2 - Ecology text book.

Explore:  The URL found under the heading 02.04 Human Influences on Ecosystems (Biology).  

Complete: Once you have read the chapter and explored the URL complete the following activities:

  • 02.04.01 Human Influences on Ecosystems - Pre Lab
  • 02.04.02 Human Influences on Ecosystems - Lab
  • 02.04.03 Human Influences on Ecosystems - Post Lab
  • 02.04.05 Lesson Check 
  • Exam - Covers lessons 1 - 4

 

02.04 Human Influences on Ecosystems (Biology)

EPA site for high school students, air quality

02.04.01 Human Influences on Ecosystems Pre Lab (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

Your answers must be VERY DETAILED. Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.

***************************************************************

Pre Lab 02.04.01 - REVISION DATE: 8/4/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

  1. Where in Utah do you live?
  2. Do you think there is air pollution in the area where you live? 
  3. Why do you think that? 
  4. What do you think air pollution looks, feels, and smells like? 
  5. What effects do you think air pollution has on the environment?

***************************************************************

Adapted from http://www.ck12.org/biology/Air-Pollution/preread/Air-Pollution-Pre-Read/

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.04.02 Human Influences on Ecosystems Lab (Biology)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 120 minutes

Summary:

You will conduct an experiment to sample and measure the particulate matter in the air at various locations and/or elevations in your neighborhood. Cover index cards with VaselineTM and place them at various locations in your neighborhood, leaving them for a minimum of 24 hours.  

The following information will provide you with the steps for setting up your air quality test. It is important to hold all of the variables constant except for those that are being manipulated. 

  • Constant (or controlled variables) would be such things as: the size of the cardboard/collection space, the amount of time the experiment is conducted, the amount of VaselineTM on the card, etc.
  • Manipulated (or independent variables)  would be those things that we change to see if the response will be different, such as: location of the card, height of the card, weather on day of collection, etc.
  • The responding (or dependent variable)  for this experiment will be the number and variety of particulates you gather on your cardboard.

TIP:  Temperature is one variable that will be difficult to control or intentionally manipulate in this experiment. However, from your experiments, you may be able to infer as to whether temperature has any impact on the number and variety of particulates collected. The reporting form for this experiment is set up so that you can determine how many collecting boards you want to put out, where you want to place them, and what elevations you want to use.

TIP:  Be sure to leave your collection boards out for a 24-hour period so that all results are consistent.

Introduction:

Question/Problem:  How much air pollution is in my neighborhood?

Materials:

  • Large index cards (4 x 6 or larger recommended) or pieces of cardboard 
  • Something to attach the cards to various objects outside (tape, string, clothespins)
  • VaselineTM  or petroleum jelly
  • plastic serrated knife
  • ruler
     

Instructional Procedures:

  1. Decide how you will measure the particulates collected on your collection cards. It is recommended that you draw a grid, which contains 4 cm x 4 cm squares. Be sure to draw this grid using a pen or marker that won’t smear when VaselineTM is spread on it.
  2. Choose three different locations for your collection cards that will not get a lot of human interference for a minimum of a 24-hour period.
  3. Write the location where you will be placing the card on the back of the card.
  4. Once you have chosen the location to place the card, decide how you will attach your card to this location. Keeping this in mind, completely cover the collection card with VaselineTM to the depth of the serration on the knife. Note: it is recommended that you lay the card on a paper towel so that you keep your work area from getting messy.
  5. Attach the cards to the three locations you have chosen in your neighborhood.
  6. After a minimum of 24 hours, return to your cards and take them down.

  7. Document your observations.  How many particulates are in the grid?  What types of particulates are there (dust, leaves, bugs)? Compare the different cards.  Are there more particulates on any of the cards?  Do particulates differ from card to card?

  8. Fill out and submit the lab report between the asterisks.  Do not include the bulleted comments as part of your report.  The bullets are instructions to help you fill out the report.

Your answers must be VERY DETAILED. Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all parts of the lab report into a word document.

***************************************************************

ASSIGNMENT 02.04.02 - REVISION DATE: 8/4/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

Title:   

  • a brief, concise, yet descriptive title

Introduction:

  • Statement of the Problem:
  • What question(s) are you trying to answer?  Include any preliminary observations or background information about the subject.
  • Example:  Is there air pollution is in my neighborhood?

Hypothesis:

  • Write a possible solution for the problem.  Make sure this possible solution is a complete sentence.  Make sure the statement is testable; an if-then statement is recommended to illustrate what criteria will support your hypothesis (and what data would not support the hypothesis).
  • Example:  If I see particles on the VasalineTM then there is air pollution in my neighborhood.

Materials and Methods:  

  • If you follow directions from a book or paper, just say so. You do not need to repeat them in your paper.   If, however, you change the procedure, you should explain why you did so and exactly what you did differently.
  • Materials:
  • Make a list of ALL items used in the lab. Alternatively, materials can be included as part of the procedure.

Procedure:

  • Write a paragraph (complete sentences) which explains what you did in the lab as a short summary.  Add details (step-by-step) of your procedure in such a way that anyone else could repeat the experiment.

Results (Data):

  • This section should include any data tables, observations, or additional notes you make during the lab.  You may attach a separate sheet(s) if necessary.  All tables, graphs and charts should be labeled appropriately.

Conclusions:

  • Accept or reject your hypothesis. EXPLAIN why you accepted or rejected your hypothesis using data from the lab.  Include a summary of the data - averages, highest, lowest, this will help the reader understand your results. Try not to copy your data here, you should summarize and reference KEY information.  List one thing you learned and describe how it applies to a real-life situation.   Discuss possible errors that could have occurred in the collection of the data (experimental errors).

 

 
***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.04.03 Human Influences on Ecosystems Post Lab (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

Instructional Procedures:

Your answers must be VERY DETAILED. Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.

***************************************************************

ASSIGNMENT 02.04.03 - REVISION DATE: 8/4/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

  1. We are going to build a class data base on air conditions in Utah.  Click here and enter your data from 02.04.02 Lab.
  2. What could you infer based on your conclusions?
  3. What do you think caused the air pollution at the different sites?
  4. How would you design this experiment differently the next time?

 
***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.04.04 Human Influences on Ecosystems (Biology)

computer-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.05 Evidence of Evolution (Biology)

Cite evidence that supports biological evolution over time

TO DO

Read: Chapter 5 Evidence of Evolution in the EHS Biology Quarter 2 - Ecology text book.

Explore:  The URL found under the heading 02.05 Evidence of Evolution (Biology).  

Complete: Once you have read the chapter and explored the URL complete the following activities:

  • 02.05.01 Evidence of Evolution - Assignment
  • 02.05.02 Evidence of Evolution - Quiz
  • 02.05.03 Lesson Check 

 

02.05 Evidence of Evolution (Biology)

02.05.01 Evidence of Evolution (Biology)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 180 minutes

Summary:
A giant tortoise labors along across the terrain to feed on the lush green vegetation in its path. Tortoises have labored along for millions of years now. How do we know that they have lived for millions of years? We have fossils from many paleontological digs that prove their and other reptiles' ancient existence. The evidence we can gather from the past not only tell us, they were alive millions of years ago, but it can also tell us if they are the same today as they were then. If we have extensive samples of organisms, we can also see evidence of evolution (change) within the organisms.

In order for fossils to form, special conditions have to be in place. Most animals die and decay without leaving a trace of their existence. The majority of fossils have been found in sedimentary rock. When animals died in shallow seas or bodies of water, over time sediments (fine particles of rock) form over the bodies and in time slowly harden to rock. There are some fossils in which most of the organisms (including the soft tissues) are preserved. A few examples are insects found in amber and organisms, such as the woolly mammoth, recently found preserved in ice. Other fossils go through a process called petrifaction in which the organism dies in a body of water with a high mineral content.  Over time, the original substances of the organism dissolve and are replaced by minerals from the water. Whole trees, estimated to be over 150 million years old, have been preserved in the Petrified Forest in Arizona.

Scientists use the fossil record to create a timeline called the Geologic Time Scale. It divides the earth's history into several major divisions called eras. Each era is further divided into periods and epochs. Evidence from the past.

There are three parts to this assignment. Part one and two will focus on past evidence of evolution by examining fossils and the geological time scale. Part three will focus on evolution by examining living organisms and their characteristics.

Instructional Procedures:

***************************************************************
ASSIGNMENT 02.05.01 - REVISION DATE: 7/21/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

 

PART 1: Evidence from the past

Create a geological time scale showing the main subdivisions, along with a brief summary of the various types of organisms that appeared, flourished, or disappeared during each time interval. Be as specific as you can with the types of organisms. For each era, also include the age in millions of years. Websites: (Use these key words to search for related information) Geological timeline, Evolutionary timeline, or Evidence from the past.   

PART 2: Evidence from the past – taking a closer look

Once you have finished your geological time scale, draw a 12-hour clock on a piece of paper (just the normal face of a household clock). Now, using a calculator and some math, figure out the relative times (times as in 2:00 o'clock) of the Cambrian, Devonian, Triassic, Tertiary and Quaternary periods. Keep these things in mind: the earth is approximately 4.5 billion years old, for most of the first several hundred million years our planet was a fiery ball of molten rock, the water vapor from the cooling earth probably condensed to form the oceans, the earliest traces of the simplest life was found in the seas 3.5 billion years ago, and modern humans are about 300,000 years old. I'll get you started by telling you that the formation of the earth occurred at midnight on the clock, while the oldest human fossils date from just before noon.

 

PART 3: Evidence from living organisms

The similarities between some species of animals, for example, a horse and zebra, have led scientists to believe that these animals many have a common ancestor (a single organism from which both new species evolved). In many cases, the fossil remains of these common ancestors have been found. Comparing these remains with living organisms has added to the evidence for organic evolution (the changing of species since they first appeared on the earth). We can compare structural similarities and differences among living things to look for evolutionary relationships between species. Commonly, scientists look for:

1. Anatomical Similarities (likenesses in body structure)

2. Embryological Similarities (likenesses in development of the embryo)

3. Biochemical Similarities (likenesses in the DNA and protein patterns of organisms).

Using the following topics in your search, study the three types of evidence that are used for making evolutionary connections between organisms. Then describe those similarities and differences in a 250 - 300 word paper.

·         Homologous Structures

·         Bat and Human Comparison

·         Embryonic Development

·         Similarity of embryos

·         Similarity between human and chicken embryo

·         Embryological Review

·         Embryological similarities

·         Biochemical Similarities Cats and Humans share Similar DNA

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.05.02 Evidence of Evolution (Biology)

computer-scored 5 points possible 20 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.06 Natural Selection: Rat Island (Biology)

Cite evidence for changes in populations over time and use concepts of evolution to explain these changes.

TO DO

Read: Chapter 6 Natural Selection: Rat Island in the EHS Biology Quarter 2 - Ecology text book.

Complete: Once you have read the chapter complete the following activities:

  • 02.06.01 Natural Selection: Rat Island - Assignment 
  • 02.06.02 Natural Selection: Rat Island - Quiz 
  • 02.06.03 - Lesson Check

 

 

02.06.01 Natural Selection: Rat Island (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

Summary

After many years of studying nature and observing animals and their traits, Charles Darwin came up with his theory of evolution. In 1838, the idea came to him that organisms with favorable variations would be better able to survive and to reproduce than organisms with unfavorable variations. He called this process Natural Selection, because nature "selects" the survivors. The results of natural selection would be evolution.  Darwin published a book in 1859, On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection. Darwin's book was supported by many examples. The six main points of his theory are as follows:

  • Overproduction - Most species produce more offspring than needed to maintain a population, but only a small fraction of those offspring live.
  • Competition - Offspring must compete against one another for food and shelter, so only a small fraction will survive long enough to reproduce.
  • Variation - Some characteristics of species are different (variation). These characteristics are vital in the survival of the individual. Some may affect the ability to get food, run faster, escape enemies or find a mate.
  • Adaptations - Because of variations, some individuals may be better adapted to reproduce and survive than others. An adaptation is an inherited trait that improves the organism's chances of survival and reproduction.
  • Natural Selection - The environment selects plants and animals to be the parents of the upcoming generations. They must have favorable traits in order to survive. Those offspring better adapted to survive in their environment will pass those traits on to their offspring.
  • Speciation - Over many generations, favorable traits accumulate in species and form new species. The formation of a new species is called speciation.

RAT ISLANDS: An Exploration in Speciation - Adapted from Access Excellence activity by Leslie Tong

***************************************************************
ASSIGNMENT 02.06.01 - REVISION DATE: 7/21/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

This Assignment has three parts. Knowing what you do now about evolution and Darwin's theory of natural selection, you job is to create a rat for each of the island descriptions below. Think about the build and anatomy of a normal rat, and then give your rat the necessary variations and adaptions to survive the environment of each island.

PART 1

Make up a story for each of the four rats. They can be as elaborate as you want to explain how the rats ended up on each of their islands (A, B, C or D) and how long they have been on the island in order to change so much.

PART 2

Draw each of the islands and each of the rats with its adaptations.

TIP:  To submit this part of the assignment I suggest that you draw the picture on regular paper. Scan or take a picture of it, and upload the .jpeg as your assignment.
 

PART 3

Explain how each adaption allows the rat to survive.

***************************************************************

Examples:

ISLAND A The island is fairly flat, with an occasional hill. The ground is soft dirt, and several species of shrubs grow toward the center of the island. There is no animal life on land; but the water is teaming with fish. The island is surrounded by a coral reef which keeps the predators out. The shore is sandy with no algal growth. Fresh water is available.

ISLAND B The island has a rocky shoreline. Numerous tide pools dot the island along the shore where the wave action is somewhat sheltered by rock outcrops. The tide pools host barnacles, chitons, abalone, sea urchins and crabs. Algae grows all around the island; however, it is quite sparse in the tide pools where the various animals feed. The current is quite strong along the rocky outcrops where the algae grows best. Fresh water is available.

ISLAND C The island is somewhat barren. A few species of cactus thrive on the bare rocks. A large cactus-eating tortoise inhabits the island. A species of very large bird nest on the island annually. They build their nests on the rocks and protect their eggs from the sun by standing over the nests with outspread wings. The nests are always found on the windy side of the island which is cooled somewhat by offshore breezes.

ISLAND D The island is an extinct volcano. Vegetation on the island changes with the altitude moving up the volcano. Grasses grow at the base. Farther up the slope, the grasses give way to low shrubs. Halfway up, the island becomes quite lush; tropical plants and trees dominate the landscape. At this altitude, the island experiences frequent rain showers. There are two species of birds that inhabit the island. One is a raptor which preys upon the smaller birds. The other fishes the waters approximately one mile offshore. Both nest in trees.

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.06.02 Natural Selection: Rat Island (Biology)

computer-scored 5 points possible 20 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.07 Evolutionary Biology (Biology)

Review a scientific article and identify the research methods used to gather evidence that documents the evolution of a species.

TO DO

Read: Chapter 7 Evolutionary Biology in the EHS Biology Quarter 2 - Ecology text book.

Explore:  The URL found under the heading 02.07 Evolutionary Biology  (Biology).  

Complete: Once you have read the chapter and explored the URL complete the following activities:

  • 02.07.01 Evidence of Evolution - Assignment
  • 02.07.02 Evidence of Evolution - Quiz
  • 02.07.03 Lesson Check
  • Exam - Covers lessons 5 - 7

 

02.07 Evolutionary Biology (Biology)

02.07.01 Evolutionary Biology (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 100 minutes

Summary:

Each person seems to have their own view of what evolution is or is not. Some people regard evolution as a false theory because they think that evolution simply means that humans have evolved from apes. To explore these different points of view, access the website TheTalk - Origins Archive (see URLs).

Instructional Procedures:

The paper you are about to read may help you understand what Evolutionary Biology is, or it may help you pose questions that you have about Evolution. In either case, your job here is to read each of the sections identified below, and write your feelings, statements or questions about the information. Please follow my outline closely, as I do not intend you to read the entire paper--it is very lengthy. You may copy this outline onto a wordprocessing document and fill it in with your feelings, statements and questions as you read. Evolutionary Biology Paper Responses Read the three introductory paragraphs to understand the intentions of the author of this paper. Read the sections identified and respond to each section with your feelings, statements and questions.

***************************************************************

ASSIGNMENT 02.07.01 - REVISION DATE: 7/21/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

1. What is Evolution (6 paragraphs)

2. Common Misconceptions about evolution (3 paragraphs)

3. Genetic Variation (7 paragraphs)

4. Natural Selection (paragraph 11 - 14 in that section)

5. Genetic Drift (all 6 paragraphs)

6. Mutation (this section is really long, browse through it and pick and choose 2-3 types of mutation to read about)

7. Recombination (all 3 paragraphs)

8. Overflow of evolution with a lineage (all paragraphs)

9. The pattern of macroevolution (all 3 paragraphs)

10. The importance of evolutionary biology (all 6 paragraphs)

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.07.02 Evolutionary Biology (Biology)

computer-scored 5 points possible 20 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.08 Unit Review (Biology)

This is a review for you to prepare for the final test.

TO DO

Complete: 

  • 02.08.01 Quarter Review

Proctored Final:  Once you earn at least 60% on each assignment and 80% on each quiz module 4 will open.  Once Module 4 is open you will need to:

  • Complete the Ready Assignment.
  • Right under the Ready Assignment, there is a link with a list of proctors. The proctors are listed by county. Select a proctor from the list.
  • Contact the proctor (via e-mail or phone) and make arrangements to take the final.
  • When you show up to take the final the proctor will type in the password and you will be ready to go.
  • In order to earn 0.25 biology credit, you need to get at least 60% on the final.
  • To prepare for the final I recommend you understand the concepts from assignment 02.08.01 and the quizzes.

 

 

02.08.01 Quarter Review (Biology)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 90 minutes

Your answers must be VERY DETAILED. Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.

***************************************************************
ASSIGNMENT 02.08.01 - REVISION DATE: 10/11/13 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

2nd quarter Biology final study guide

1. Explain in detail the differences between a decomposer, producer, level 1 consumer, level 2 consumer, and level 3 consumer. Give 3 examples of different organisms that would be found in each level.

2. What is the difference between a food web, food chain, and an energy pyramid?

3. Explain how scientists have been able to prove that there is evolution within a species. Is there any evidence that supports evolution between species?

4. Find 3 examples where people use “selective breeding”- to develop desired traits in plants and animals.

5. What is a scientific theory? What has to happen for an “idea” to become a “theory”? Give 5 examples of scientific theories.

6. Explain what takes place during photosynthesis.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.00 Cell Biology (Biology)

Term 3: Cell Biology, includes eight main assignments.
The information necessary for you to complete each assignment is included with the assignment itself. As you investigate many locations on the web, you will come to a better understanding of cells and how they interact in your body. If you deem it necessary, you may also borrow a biology book from your local school to help you through the assignments.

03.01 Cell Chemistry (Biology)

Describe the fundamental chemistry of living cells.

TO DO

Read: Chapter 1 Cell Chemistry in the EHS Biology Quarter 3 - INSIDE A CELL text book.

Complete: Once you have read the chapter complete the following activities:

  • 03.01.01 Cell Chemistry - Assignment
  • 03.01.02 Cell Chemistry - Quiz 
  • 03.01.03 Cell Chemistry- Lesson Check

 

03.01.01 Cell Chemistry (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

Assignment 03.01.01 – Cell Chemistry

Summary:

In this assignment, you are going to complete an outline that will be used to teach students about cell chemistry.   

Search engines that include words such as "cell biology", "cell chemistry", "on-line biology courses"and/or any of the concepts below will help you navigate through the internet to find information. Other known sites to use in a search engine:
The Biology project
Britannica Encylopedia
Frontier High School - Internet Science Room

 

Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.

***************************************************************
ASSIGNMENT 03.01.01 - REVISION DATE: 7/26/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

Cell Chemistry Outline I.

  1. Define the following words used to describe smaller parts in chemistry
    1. elements—
    2. atom—
    3. symbol—
    4. compound—
    5. molecule—
  2. Some of the most common elements found in the cell are listed below.   Research the function (purpose) of each as they relate to biology.
    1. Carbon—
    2. Hydrogen—
    3. Oxygen—
    4. Nitrogen—
  3. Organisms consist of both organic and inorganic compounds. Define and give 2 examples of each.
    1. organic—
    2. examples –
    3. inorganic—
    4. examples –
  4. Types of compound formulae (Formula- shows the composition of a compound) Define the following types of formulas.
    1. Structural Formula—
    2. Molecular formula—
    3. Empirical Formula—
  5. Acidity and Basicity in the environment. Define and give 2 examples
    1. Acids—
    2. Example—
    3. Bases—
    4. Example—
    5. Buffer—
    6. pH scale—
  6. Basic Organic Compounds in Living Things. Define and give 2 examples
    1. Carbohydrates—
    2. Types of Carbohydrates
    3. Monosaccharides—
    4. Examples—
    5. Disaccharides—
    6. Examples—
    7. Polysaccharides—
    8. Examples—
  7. What are 3 major  Carbohydrate functions—
    1.  
    2.  
    3.  
  8. Proteins –  Define the following as they relate to proteins
    1. Major Protein Functions—
    2. Amino acids—
    3. peptide bond—
    4. Examples of proteins—
  9. Lipids— Define the following as they relate to lipids
    1. Major Lipid Functions—
    2. Examples of Lipids—
    3. Differences in saturated and unsaturated fats –
  10. Nucleic Acids— Define the following as they relate to nucleic acids
    1. DNA -- Function of DNA—
    2. RNA -- Functions of RNA—
  11. Six Properties of Water Essential to Life –
    1.  
    2.  
    3.  
    4.  
    5.  
    6.  

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.01.02 Cell Chemistry (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.02 Structure of a Cell (Biology)

Investigate the structure and function of cells and cell parts.

TO DO

Read: Chapter 2 Structure of a Cell in the EHS Biology Quarter 3 - INSIDE A CELL text book.

Complete: Once you have read the chapter complete the following activities:

  • 03.02.01 Structure of a Cell - Assignment
  • 03.02.02 Structure of a Cell - Quiz 
  • 03.02.03 Structure of a Cell - Lesson Check

 

 

 

03.02.01 Structure of a Cell (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

Have you ever received a clothing catalog or parts catalog in the mail?  The company is showing you their products.  Each product usually has a picture, a short description and a price.  

Your assignment is to act as if you are presently on the staff of the EHS Cell Replacement Parts Company. Competition in this new field of cell replacement parts has been very fierce. As Advertising and Marketing Director, you think your company needs to be on the cutting edge in the promotion of these important cell replacement products.  Search the internet and use the text book to gathered information about the different types of organelles found in plant and animal cells.  You will use the information to produce a cell replacement parts catalog for typical plant and animal cells.  

Please be certain to include the following in the production of your catalog:

1.  Explain the structure of the cell part (organelle) including location and function.

2.  Include illustrations, descriptions, cost, and just about any other selling point that will increase your company's share of the market.

The following cell organelles can be replaced and should be included in your catalog: (Note whether the organelle is strictly for a plant cell in your description.)

a. nucleus

b. chromosomes

c. mitochondrion

d. chloroplasts

e. endoplasmic reticullum

f. cell membrane

g. cell wall

h. ribosome

i. Golgi body

j. lysosome

 

A creative and appealing approach will enhance your chances of a promotion and bonus within the EHS Cell Replacement Parts Company! Your CEO is available for consultation if you have any questions on the production of your catalog (PS. That's me--just send me an email). As always, the sources of your information should be documented (you can index these sources at the back of your catalog).

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.02.02 Structure of a Cell (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

If you score below 80%, take the quiz again until you have all questions correct.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.03 Scientists - Who's Who

TO DO

Read: Chapter 3 Scientists - Who's Who in the EHS Biology Quarter 3 - INSIDE A CELL text book.

Complete: Once you have read the chapter complete the following activities:

  • 03.03.01 Scientists - Who's Who - Assignment
  • 03.03.02 Scientists - Who's Who - Quiz 
  • 03.03.03 Scientists - Who's Who - Lesson Check

 

 

 

 

03.03.01 Scientists - Who's Who (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

Your name is Kay Hooke (not really just pretend).  Recently you traced your family history and discovered that one of your ancestors of the 17th century is Robert Hooke. Your mother explains to you that Robert was an inventor and scientist, and without his work, science wouldn't be the same today. You are curious about this relative and would like to do research on his personal life and find out why he was so important.

Using search engines, encyclopedias, dictionaries, text books etc. find out why your ancestor was so important.

  • Be sure to include and describe a certain theory that came along right after his important work.
  • Name and describe the work of at least five other scientists whose theories mirrored those of your ancestor (aka Robert Hooke).

You may do this in an essay or research paper. Your paper is to be no less than 250 words. When completed, please submit it to your teacher.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.03.02 Scientists - Who's Who (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.04 Observing Cells (Biology)

Experiment with microorganisms and/or plants to investigate growth and reproduction.

TO DO


Read: Chapter 4 Observing Cells in the EHS Biology Quarter 3 - INSIDE A CELL text book.

Explore:  The URLs found under the heading 03.04 Observing Cells (Biology).  

Complete: Once you have read the chapter and explored the URLs complete the following activities:

  • 03.04.01 Observing Cells - Assignment
  • 03.04.02 Observing Cells - Quiz 
  • 03.04.03 Observing Cells - Lesson Check
  • Exam - Covers lessons 1 - 4


 

03.04 Observing Cells (Biology)

03.04.01 Observing Cells (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

Your job in this assignment is to have fun looking at cells and/or microscopic organisms that are not seen with the unaided eye. Surf the net using a search engine for "microscopic organisms", "cells" or use the URLs listed in this unit. 

Assignment:

  • Observe five different cells, cell components and/or microscopic organisms (viruses and bacteria are fun).
  • List them on a paper and write a paragraph explaining how they appear when viewed with magnification.
  • Then write down some information you learned about this organism or component.

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.05 Experimenting with Cells (Biology)

Investigate the structure and function of cells and cell parts.

TO DO


Read: Chapter 5 Experimenting with Cells in the EHS Biology Quarter 3 - INSIDE A CELL text book.

Complete: Once you have read the chapter complete the following activities:

03.05.01 Experimenting with Cells - Lab
03.05.02 Experimenting with Cells - Quiz 
03.05.03 Experimenting with Cells - Lesson Check


 

 

 

 

03.05.01 Experimenting with Cells (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

In this assignment you will be completing two experiments to help you understand the terms "diffusion" and "osmosis" and also to help you see how important these mechanisms are to cells. Before you begin, write down the definitions of "diffusion" and "osmosis" as part of the assignment. You will also need to make a data table to keep daily observations on your experiments. After the experiments are completed, answer the questions below.

The materials you will need for the first experiment are as follows: 

3 - 10-12 ounce glasses 

string 

vinegar 

measuring tape or meter stick

Karo syrup

salt 

distilled water

eggs

food scale

 

Follow the procedure below to complete the Egg experiment:

1. Place 3 eggs in a glass of vinegar. Let eggs remain in beaker keeping eggs completely covered for 3 days or until outer shell is dissolved.

2. Remove eggs from vinegar, rinse off. Determine the weight and circumference and record on a chart.

3. Place eggs in separate glasses and cover with equal amounts of distilled water, Karo syrup, and salt water. Record volume of liquids.

4. Daily determine weight and circumference of eggs and record.

5. Conclude experiment in 4-5 days. Take final measurements: weight and circumference of eggs, and volume of liquid.

6. Discuss answers to these questions:

Egg Experiment Questions:

1. Which egg is the largest? Why?

2. Which egg is the smallest? Why?

3. How much liquid was left? Why did the amounts of liquid vary?

4. Could the egg represent a model of a cell with cell membrane? Why or why not?

5. Is this process diffusion or osmosis? Explain.

 

The materials needed for the second experiment are as follows:

Two tall glasses

Water

Salt

Knife

String

Follow the procedure below to conduct the Carrot Experiment

1. Fill two glasses with equal amounts of water.

2. Add 15 g salt to one beaker and label it "Salt Water".

3. Cut a carrot in half. Tightly tie a piece of string two cm below the cut end of both pieces.

4. Place one carrot half (cut end down) in the "Salt Water" beaker. Place the other carrot with cut end down in the "Fresh Water" beaker. Allow carrots to remain undisturbed for 24 hours. At this point you need to form a hypothesis (make an educated guess about what might happen).

5. After 24 hours, remove carrots and observe them and the tightness of the strings. Record data.

Determine which of the following answers are correct and record them in a format that can be sent to me:

1. Loose thread: Fresh water or Salt water Tight thread: Fresh water or Salt water Soft texture: Fresh water or Salt water Firm texture: Fresh water or Salt water Increase in cell size: Fresh water or Salt water Decrease in cell size: Fresh water or Salt water Loss of water by cells: Fresh water or Salt water Gain of water by cells: Fresh water or Salt water

2. What was the purpose of tying thread on each carrot?

3. In which kind of water did the carrot cells lose water? What evidence is there?

4. In which kind of water did the carrot cells gain water? What evidence is there?

5. Infer: what would happen to human blood cells if placed in a beaker of salt water?

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.05.02 Experimenting with Cells (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.06 You are what you eat (Biology)

TO DO

Read: Chapter 6 You are what you eat  in the EHS Biology Quarter 3 - INSIDE A CELL text book.

Explore:  The URLs found under the heading 03.06  You are what you eat (Biology).  

Complete: Once you have read the chapter and explored the URLs complete the following activities:

  • 03.06.01 You are what you eat - Assignment
  • 03.06.02 You are what you eat - Quiz 
  • 03.06.03 You are what you eat - Lesson Check

 

 

03.06 You are what you eat (Biology)

03.06.01 You are what you eat (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 90 minutes

Summary:

Now that you've learned about cells, cell chemistry, properties of elements in cells and much more, let's put a little of that to use in our everyday world. Sure, you understand that you and other organisms are made up of cells and that cells have an important function in our bodies. You have researched the macromolecules (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids), and you have looked at some of the major elements that play a role in the makeup of the human beings and all other organisms. Don't forget that inorganic materials (those not containing Carbon - nonliving factors in our environment) are also present in our everyday lives.

You've heard the phrase "you are what you eat." Let's take a little stroll to your kitchen and see what exactly it is that you take into your body daily, and what these items may do for your body.

Instructional Procedures:

This assignment contains two parts.  Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document. 

******************************************************

ASSIGNMENT 03.06.01 - REVISION DATE: 8/28/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

PART 1

  • Obtain the original label from any type of non-perishable food Item (get the can or the box). 
  • List all of the Ingredients. There should be at least 7 different ingredients. 
  • Research and explain each of the ingredients.  Make sure you include the purpose for the ingredient in the food and how it helps or hinders your body. (Note: Some items have no nutritive value. You should explain what their purpose is in the product. Why put them in?)
  • Give references for you information. 

PART 2

Being properly hydrated is important for you to stay healthy.  There are several ways to determine how much water you need to drink each day.  Use the following formula to calculate how much water you need to drink each day.  

current weight/2 = how many ounces of water you need to drink each day

1 cup = 8 ounces

For example a person who weighs 130 pounds should drink 65 ounces of water each day.  That's equivalent to 8.125 cups of water each day.

130/2 = 65 ounces  

65 ounces ÷ 8 ounces = 8.125 cups  

  1. How many ounces of water do you need to drink each day?
  2. How many cups of water do you need to drink each day?

******************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.06.02 You are what you eat (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.07 Stem Cell Research (Biology)

Research, report, and debate genetic technologies that may improve the quality of life (e.g., genetic engineering, cloning, gene splicing).

TO DO

Read: Chapter 7 Stem Cell Research  in the EHS Biology Quarter 3 - INSIDE A CELL text book.

Explore:  The URL found under the heading 03.07 Stem Cell Research (Biology).  

Complete: Once you have read the chapter and explored the URL complete the following activities:

  • 03.07.01 Stem Cell Research - Assignment
  • 03.07.02 Stem Cell Research - Quiz 
  • 03.07.03 Stem Cell Research - Lesson Check
  • Exam - Covers lessons 5 - 7


 

03.07 Stem Cell Research (Biology)

03.07.01 Stem Cell Research (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

Summary:

Issues surrounding stem cell research have taken a prominent place in public eye. What do you know about stem cells? What do your friends, family or teachers know? When you hear people discussing stem-cell research, do you understand what they are talking about?

Stem cells differ from other kinds of cells in the body.  A stem cell does not have a determined job in the body. Therefore, they can mature into cells in bones, heart muscle, nerves, and other organs and tissue.

Instructional Procedures:

This assignment has three parts. Your answers must be VERY DETAILED. Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.

***************************************************************
ASSIGNMENT 03.07.01 - REVISION DATE: 7/14/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

Part One:

Interview 4 different people (including yourself).  Ask them the following questions:

MYSELF:

1.  What do I know about stem cells?

2.  What questions do I have about stem cells? 

FRIEND:  

1.  What do you know about stem cells? 

2.  What questions do you have about stem cells? 

PARENT/GRANDPARENT/GUARDIAN:

1.  What do you know about stem cells? 

2.  What questions do you have about stem cells? 

TEACHER (not a science teacher) OR NEIGHBOR:

1.  What do you know about stem cells? 

2.  What questions do you have about stem cells? 

 

Part Two: 

Visit URL 1.   Click on "Stem Cells" and browse through the information. Some activities are interactive with sound and comic characters and other activities are to read and learn. After you engage yourself on the website, write down which activity was your favorite,  and the total time you were at the site.

 

Part Three:

1. What is a stem cell?

2.  What does it mean to differentiate?

3.  A stem cell differentiates by making new ____________. (select one lipids, carbohydrates, or proteins)

4. What are some different types of stem cells?

5. What is the purpose of stem-cell research?

6. What are some ways that stem cells have been successfully used in medicine?

7. What are some of the issues in stem cell research?

8. What are some of the misconceptions that people have about stem-cell research?

 

This assignment was adapted from the Genetics Learning Science Center.

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.07.02 Stem Cell Research (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.08 Unit Review (Biology)

This is a review for you to prepare for the final test.

TO DO

Complete: 

  • 03.08.01 Quarter Review

Proctored Final:  Once you earn at least 60% on each assignment and 80% on each quiz module 4 will open.  Once Module 4 is open you will need to:

  • Complete the Ready Assignment.
  • Right under the Ready Assignment, there is a link with a list of proctors. The proctors are listed by county. Select a proctor from the list.
  • Contact the proctor (via e-mail or phone) and make arrangements to take the final.
  • When you show up to take the final the proctor will type in the password and you will be ready to go.
  • In order to earn 0.25 biology credit, you need to get at least 60% on the final.
  • To prepare for the final I recommend you understand the concepts from assignment 03.08.01 and the quizzes.

 

 

03.08.01 Quarter Review (Biology)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 90 minutes

Your answers must be VERY DETAILED. Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.

***************************************************************
ASSIGNMENT 03.08.01 - REVISION DATE: 10/11/13 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

EHS Biology 3rd Quarter Study Guide

Make sure you understand all of your assignments and this study guide.

1. What’s the difference between an element, compound, and a molecule? Give 3 different examples of each.

2. When looking at a periodic table – where would you find the atomic number? What information does the atomic number tell us?

3. What are the 3 subatomic particles that make up an atom? What is the charge of each subatomic particle? Where in the atom is each particle located?

4. Where is the nucleus of the atom located?

5. What’s an ion?

6. Water is important to the interactions of biological molecules because it promotes hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions? Briefly explain these interactions.

7. Water is important to the interactions of biological molecules because it stabilizes temperature. Briefly explain how water stabilizes temperature.

8. The word “phobic” or phobia means to fear. For example arachnophobia is the fear of spiders. What is a hydrophobic molecule? What does “hydro” refer to? Come up with a short story to help you remember what a hydrophobic molecule is.

9. What type of bonds hold water molecules together?

10. List 6 different properties of water.

11. What is a pH scale? What is it used for?

12. What does the “H” in pH refer to?

13. Which is more acidic a pH of 10 or a pH of 1?

14. A pH of 5 is how many times as basic as a pH of 7?

15. What makes up a cell membrane?

16. How does the body use hydrogen?

17. How does the body use oxygen?

18. How does the body use carbon?

19. What does organic mean?

20. Which atom can be found in all organic compounds?

21. Why is carbon dioxide not considered to be an organic compound?

22. What form do plants store their excess carbohydrates in?

23. What is a monosaccharide? Give an example.

24. What accomplishments did Anton van Leeuwenhoek do toward the study of cells?

25. What was the first cell seen by Robert Hooke?

26. Briefly describe what each of the follow scientists did toward the study of cells –

 

  • Robert Brown
  • Anton van Leeuwenhoek
  • Robert Hooke
  • Rudolf Virchow

27. What is the cell theory?

28. Briefly describe the following properties of life:

 

  • metabolism
  • controlled responses to the environment
  • reproduction
  • growth

29. What is a prokaryotic cell?

30. What is a eukaryotic cell?

31. When looking at cells under a microscope – how can you tell the difference between a prokaryotic cell and a eukaryotic cell?

32. Is a bacterial cell prokaryotic or eukaryotic? Explain your answer.

33. What is the function of the following cell organelles:

 

  • chloroplasts
  • mitochondria
  • Golgi bodies
  • rough Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER)
  • smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum
  • nucleus
  • ribosomes
  • chromosomes
  • lysosome
  • cell wall

34. What are cytoplasmic organelles? Give 3 examples.

35. How does concentration gradient affect the rate of diffusion through a selectively permeable membrane?

36. How does temperature affect the rate of diffusion through a selectively permeable membrane?

37. How does molecular size affect the rate of diffusion through a selectively permeable membrane?

38. When reading a nutritional fact label of package food, what is a "Cal" or "Nutritional calorie"?

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.00 Heredity and DNA (Biology)

Term 4: Heredity and DNA

The information necessary for you to complete each assignment is included with the assignment itself. As you investigate many locations on the web, you will come to a better understanding of how genes are passed on and why our current understanding of DNA is so important. If you deem it necessary, you may also borrow a biology book from your local school to help you through the assignments.

04.01 Cellular Reproduction (Biology)

Compare Meiosis (sexual reproduction) and Mitosis (asexual reproduction).

 

 

TO DO

Read: Chapter 1 Cellular Reproduction in the EHS Biology Quarter 4 - DNA the GENETIC MAP text book.

Explore:  The URL's found under the heading 04.01 Cellular Reproduction (Biology).  Some of the URL's contain videos.  Watch the videos, do not do the quizzes at the bottom of the videos.

Complete: Once you have read the chapter and explored the URL's complete the following activities:

  • 04.01.01 Cellular Reproduction 
  • 04.01.02 Virtual Mitosis – Lab 
  • 04.01.03 Cellular Reproduction - Quiz 
  • 04.01.04 - Lesson Check

 

04.01 Cellular Reproduction (Biology)

04.01.01 Cellular Reproduction (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 90 minutes

***************************************************************
ASSIGNMENT 04.01.01 - REVISION DATE: 3/6/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

  1. Define mitosis and meiosis.
  2. Draw sketches of each mitosis and meiosis phase and describe what is happening during the individual phases.
    • Tip: I suggest that you draw the picture on regular paper. Scan or take a picture of it, and upload the .jpeg as your assignment.
  3. Compare and contrast mitosis and meiosis.  Discuss the evolutionary advantages and disadvantages of sexual and asexual reproduction. Think about and include things like energy expenditure, survival and genetic recombination. 

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.01.02 Virtual Mitosis – LAB (Biology)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 120 minutes

Summary:

  • Cells go through the cell cycle when a living organism needs new cells to repair damage, grow, or just to maintain its condition. Mitosis is one part of the cell cycle. During mitosis the nucleus and DNA divide. Mitosis consists of four major stages: Prophase, Metaphase, Anaphase, and Telophase. For this lab you will establish how long a cell will be in each stage of mitosis.

 

Instructional Procedures:

  1.   Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and   all questions into a word document.
  2.   Watch the short video titled “Onion Cell”. You may need to pause the video at each example to allow yourself time to study the picture.
  3.   Once you’ve determined the phase of each example, fill out the table in PART I.
  4.   Carefully study the picture of the magnified onion root. Complete Part II.

 

***************************************************************

ASSIGNMENT 04.01.02 - REVISION DATE: 4/14/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

One purpose of the cell cycle is to aid in the growth of an organism. In a plant, the root is an area of rapid growth. Because the area is constantly growing, it’s easy to find cells that are undergoing mitosis. A thin slice of onion root, was placed on a microscope slide and stained to make the chromosomes more visible. As you look at the pictures notice the different mitosis stages that are taking place. Keep in mind that the cell cycle is a continuous process.

PART I: PRE LAB
Instructions: Watch the video titled “Onion Cells”. Each picture contains a cell that is circled. Identify the phase of the circle cell. If you need help with identifying the phases refer to URL 1 – Examples of Mitosis Phases

Click here to watch the Onion Cells Video

 

Picture
1
2
3
4
5
Mitosis Phase
 
 
 
 
 

 

PART II: LAB

Instructions: Carefully examine the picture of the onion root. Count the total number of complete cells. Don't count the cells that are only partially in the picture. Count the cells that are in each phase and place the data in the table below. Calculate the percent of time each cell will spend in each mitosis phase. Add the percentages to the table.

Click here to view the Magnified Onion Root

  Interphase Prophase Metaphase Anaphase Telophase Total
Number of Cells/stage            
Percent/stage           100%

 

 

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.01.03 Cellular Reproduction (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.02 Heredity and Genetics (Biology)

Predict and interpret patterns of inheritance in sexually reproducing organisms.

TO DO

Read: Chapter 2 Heredity and Genetics in the EHS Biology Quarter 4 - DNA the GENETIC MAP text book.

Explore:  The URL's found under the heading 04.02 Heredity and Genetics (Biology).  

Complete: Once you have read the chapter and explored the URL's complete the following activities:

  • 04.02.01 Heredity and Genetics
  • 04.02.02 Heredity and Genetics - Quiz
  • 04.02.03 - Lesson Check

 

04.02 Heredity and Genetics (Biology)

04.02.01 Heredity and Genetics (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

***************************************************************
ASSIGNMENT 04.02.01 - REVISION DATE: 3/29/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

 

1.  What is the difference in zygote development between fraternal and identical twins? 

 

2.  Pick two of the following disorders and research the: symptoms, how the disorder is detection, whether or not the defective gene is dominant or recessive, how the disease can be treated. Write a 150 word paper, on each of the two that you chose. Be sure to use your own words and list all references.

  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Sickle Cell Anemia
  • Tay-Sachs Disease
  • Phenylketonuria
  • Hemophilia
  • Huntington's Disease
  • Muscular Dystrophy 

 

3. Of the seven genetic disorders listed above, which two are sex-linked? 

 

4. Develop a story in which a pedigree can be drawn.  You don't need to draw the pedigree, just write the story that show an inherited trait that has been passed down from generation to generation.

Be creative in thinking of characters and traits that you choose to follow through several generations. To illustrate your pedigree stories, you may add "family portraits" if you'd like. Include at least five generations. Traits could include, but are not limited to, variations of the following: face shape, chin shape, skin color, hair type, widow's peak, eyebrow variations, eye color and shape, lip size and thickness, nose size and shape, earlobe attachment and freckles. You do not have to stick with the human face.

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.02.02 Heredity and Genetics (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.03 What is DNA? (Biology)

Explain how the structure and replication of DNA are essential to heredity and protein synthesis.

 

TO DO

Read: Chapter 3 What is DNA? in the EHS Biology Quarter 4 - DNA the GENETIC MAP text book.

Explore:  The URL's found under the heading 04.03 What is DNA? (Biology).  

Complete: Once you have read the chapter and explored the URL's complete the following activities:

  • 04.03.01 What is DNA?
  • 04.03.02 What is DNA? - Quiz
  • 04.03.03 - Lesson Check

 

04.03 What is DNA? (Biology)

04.03.01 What is DNA? (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

Summary:

Students will construct a model of DNA and reseach how it replicates.  

Instructional Procedures:

This assignment contains 3 parts. Your answers must be VERY DETAILED. Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.

***************************************************************

ASSIGNMENT 04.03.01 - REVISION DATE: 7/15/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

Part 1:

Make a model of the structure of DNA, include a key that designates different bases, bonds, and molecules. You can use whatever you want to make the model - a few ideas might be food, clay, legos, etc.  Take a picture of your model and submit the picture and key.

 

Part 2:

Research and learn how DNA replicates itself. Using your own words, explain the process. Make sure to include the two roles that DNA polymerase plays in replication.

 

Part 3:

It always helps to draw things out and label pieces and parts. For part 3 you need to draw and label protein synthesis. Include transcription and translation, DNA, mRNA, tRNA, codons, ribosomes, and protein. Also include short descriptions of what is happening at each step.

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.03.02 What is DNA? (Biology)

teacher-scored 5 points possible 25 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.04 Genetic Alteration on Living Things (Biology)

Predict and interpret patterns of inheritance in sexually reproducing organisms.

TO DO

Read: Chapter 4 Genetic Alteration on Living Things in the EHS Biology Quarter 4 - DNA the GENETIC MAP text book.

Explore:  The URL's found under the heading 04.04 Genetic Alteration on Living Things (Biology).  

Complete: Once you have read the chapter and explored the URL's complete the following activities:

  • 04.04.01 Genetic Alteration on Living Things - Assignment
  • 04.04.02 Genetic Alteration on Living Things - Quiz
  • 04.04.03 - Lesson Check
  • Exam - Covers lessons 1 - 4

 

 

04.04 Genetic Alteration on Living Things (Biology)

04.04.01 Genetic Alteration on Living Things (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

 

This assignment contains two parts. Your answers must be VERY DETAILED. Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.

***************************************************************
ASSIGNMENT 04.04.01 - REVISION DATE: 7/15/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

Part 1:

Using at least three sources on the Human Genome Project, write a 250-300 word persuasive essay supporting your own view of the genome project. Include a list of sources that you used in your research.  Do not cut and paste; put the answer in your own words. Plagiarism is not ethical and will result in a zero.

Part 2:

Find something in biotechnology that interests you, something that you have feelings about, and research it. Write a 250 - 300 paper that covers the following: Explain, first of all, what the process or technology involves list its benefits and risks.  Explain how its power is being regulated, and who is regulating it.  Also, find out what some influential scientists' and/or politicians' views are on the subject. Don't forget to include a list of sources you used in your research.  Do not cut and paste; put the answer in your own words. Plagiarism is not ethical and will result in a zero.

Possible subjects could include, but not limited to:

  • Gene Therapy
  • Genetic Screening
  • Cloning
  • Recombinant organisms
  • Genetically engineered crops
  • Biological weapons
  • Transgenic organisms

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.04.02 Genetic Alteration on Living Things (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.05 DNA Extraction (Biology)

The basic structure of DNA is the same in all living things.

TO DO

Explore:  The URL's found under the heading 04.05 DNA Extraction (Biology).  

Complete: Once you have explored the URL's complete the following activities:

  • 04.05.01 DNA Extraction - Assignment
  • 04.05.02 DNA Extraction - Quiz
  • 04.05.03 - Lesson Check
  • Exam - Covers lesson 5

     


 

 

04.05 DNA Extraction (Biology)

04.05.01 DNA Extraction (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

Summary:

Students will extract DNA from organisms.

Instructional Procedures:

Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.

***************************************************************
ASSIGNMENT 04.05.01 - REVISION DATE: 7/15/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

PRE LAB

Complete the DNA extraction simulation found at the first URL listed under 04.05 DNA Extraction (Biology).

LAB

Follow the lab instructions found at the second URL listed under 04.05 DNA Extraction (Biology)

POST LAB

1. From what source did you extract your DNA?

2. Why do you think you blended the item?

3. What purpose does the detergent have in your experiment?

4. What does the tenderizer do to the cells?

5. What purpose did the alcohol have in your experiment?

6. Describe how your experiment went and how your results compare to the picture on the website.

7. What was the hardest part of the experiment?

8. Why might it be helpful for scientists to be able to extract DNA from cells?

9. List other related job fields that may extract DNA from cells and why they might need it.

Let's take it one more step. Choose another source to extract your DNA from and answer this question:

10. What was your second source in which you used to extract DNA?

11. Which source gives you the most DNA? How can you compare them?

Now experiment with a different kind of soap or detergent.

12. What was your new source of detergent? Do powdered soaps work as well as liquid detergents? How about shampoo or body scrub?

Experiment with leaving out or changing steps. We've told you that you need each step, but is this true? Find out for yourself. Try leaving out a step or changing how much of each ingredient you use.

13. What change did you make? How did that affect your results? Do only living organisms contain DNA? Try extracting DNA from things that you think might not have DNA.

14. What did you think would not have DNA? What were your results when you took that item through the same experiment?

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.05.02 DNA Extraction (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.08 Quarter Review (Biology)

This is a review for you to prepare for the final test.

TO DO

Complete: 

  • 04.08.01 Quarter Review

Proctored Final:  Once you earn at least 60% on each assignment and 80% on each quiz module 4 will open.  Once Module 4 is open you will need to:

  • Complete the Ready Assignment.
  • Right under the Ready Assignment, there is a link with a list of proctors. The proctors are listed by county. Select a proctor from the list.
  • Contact the proctor (via e-mail or phone) and make arrangements to take the final.
  • When you show up to take the final the proctor will type in the password and you will be ready to go.
  • In order to earn 0.25 biology credit, you need to get at least 60% on the final.
  • To prepare for the final I recommend you understand the concepts from assignment 04.08.01 and the quizzes.

 

 

04.08.01 Quarter Review (Biology)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 90 minutes

Your answers must be VERY DETAILED. Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.

***************************************************************
ASSIGNMENT 04.08.01 - REVISION DATE: 10/11/13 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

4th quarter Biology final study guide

Make sure you understand all of your assignments and this study guide.

1. Where in a mammal would mitosis take place?

2. Where in a mammal would meiosis take place?

3. Where in a plant would mitosis take place?

4. Where in a plant would meiosis take place?

5. Explain the difference between identical and fraternal twins related?

6. Which nucleotide does guanine bond with?

7. Which nucleotide does adenine bond with?

8. What is genetic engineering?

9. When diagramming a segment of DNA what does:

 

  • G stand for?
  • T stand for?
  • A stand for?
  • C stand for?
  • How do the nucleotides pair up?

10. What is asexual reproduction? Give an example of an organism that reproduces asexually. How does asexual reproduction help the survival of a species?

11. Draw and label the structural shape of DNA.

12. Explain mRNA and how the different nucleotides combine.

13. What is contained in the nucleus of a cell? Do all cells have a nucleus?

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


Biology Book

There are 3 options for the text book - .pdf, ipad/android, and kindle. Click one of the links below to download and save the EHS BIOLOGY - QUARTER 1 text book.

 


Please click here for instructions on how to download the ePub onto your device.

Please click here for instructions on how to download the Kindle Book onto your Kindle.


 

There are 3 options for the text book - .pdf, ipad/android, and kindle. Click one of the links below to download and save the EHS BIOLOGY - QUARTER 3 text book.

 


Please click here for instructions on how to download the ePub onto your device.

Please click here for instructions on how to download the Kindle Book onto your Kindle.


 

Biology Book and Pacing Guide

There are 3 options for the text book - .pdf, ipad/android, and kindle. Click one of the links below to download and save the EHS BIOLOGY - QUARTER 4 text book.

 


Please click here for instructions on how to download the ePub onto your device.

Please click here for instructions on how to download the Kindle Book onto your Kindle.


 

There are 3 options for the text book - .pdf, ipad/android, and kindle. Click one of the links below to download and save the EHS BIOLOGY - QUARTER 2 text book.

You will also want to save a copy of the pacing guide.  There are not any due dates listed in the course.  The pacing guide will tell you what you need to do each week, so you will complete the course in nine weeks.  


Please click here for instructions on how to download the ePub onto your device.

Please click here for instructions on how to download the Kindle Book onto your Kindle.