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1st Quarter, Exploring Computer Science (ECS)

00.00 *Student-supplies for Exploring Computer Science

Students will need a computer with internet access and a working email address.

Students will need to have access to Scratch programming. Students may use the web-based version or download the latest version for free. (Q2 only)

00.00 Start Here (Exploring Computer Science)

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Exploring Computer Science is designed to introduce students to the breadth of the field of computer science through an exploration of engaging and accessible topics. Rather than focusing the entire course on learning particular software tools or programming languages, the course is designed to focus the conceptual ideas of computing and help students understand why certain tools or languages might be utilized to solve particular problems. The goal of Exploring Computer Science is to develop in students the computational thinking practices of algorithm development, problem solving and programming within the context of problems that are relevant to the lives of today’s students. Students will also be introduced to topics such as interface design, limits of computers and societal and ethical issues.

CLASS OVERVIEW
Welcome! This two quarter course meets the Computer Technology (0.5 credit) requirements that are required of all Utah high school students to graduate. Along with reading, writing and arithmetic, computer technology is a needed skill in today's technological world. The skills learned in this course will help you with your future education, employment, and home life. 

CREDITS
1/2 credit for the entire semester course (1st and 2nd quarter), 1/4 credit for each quarter.

ASSIGNMENT INSTRUCTIONS
Be sure to include your name and assignment name on all attachments and emails. Be sure to follow all assignment instructions. ALWAYS keep a copy of all assignments and everything you send. Make sure you save and CLOSE the assignments before you attach them. You can also use email to send me any questions you may have about the course. This is an open entry course so you can begin working on the assignments at any time. Your 10 weeks does start when you are enrolled.

SUBMITTING ASSIGNMENTS
All of the course instructions, activities, and learning materials are found in the course modules. When you come to an assignment, quiz, or test in the course materials, you will need to complete it as you come to it. Submit the assignment or take the quiz or test. Most of your assignments will be submitted as text entries or attachments. YOU DO NOT E-MAIL THE INSTRUCTOR ANY ASSIGNMENTS. If the assignment requires a text entry, submit it in the course module. If the assignment requires attachments, browse to the needed file and upload it correctly. When including the questions on a submission, please bold your answers to make them more visible and easier to grade.

FILE FORMATS
Some of the instruction files you will retrieve have been saved in .pdf format. You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to be able to open these files. If you do not have Adobe Acrobat Reader, you can download it for free from Adobe. For documents you need to open and make changes to, the document has been saved in the Microsoft Office Word format. If you need to fill in information in a document or use the document for an assignment, you will want to save it and then retrieve it from the appropriate program. Please use a different font color or bold when you are answering questions on the various worksheets so it will be easier to correct. Q2 will have Scratch files for you to download and that you will need to upload. You will use the Scratch website for modifying and creating them.

COST
This course is free to Utah students through the Utah Electronic High School.

COMPUTER REQUIREMENTS
Students will need a computer with internet access and Adobe Reader.

Students will need to have access to Scratch programming. Students may use the web-based version or download the latest version for free. (Q2 only)

PRE-REQUISITE / HIGHLY RECOMMENDED
Math Level 1 (9th grade)

COURSE OUTLINE
This course is divided into nine units: Q1 includes Introduction, Web 2.0, Electronic Communication, Data, and Problem Solving.  Q2 includes Introduction, Searching, Introduction to Scratch Programming, and Scratch: Control Structures.

TIMELINE
This quarter credit (1st quarter) needs to be completed in ten weeks or fewer. You must be working on assignments each week you are registered for the course, or your name will be removed from the rolls. Be sure to contact the instructor if there is a special situation. After ten weeks, students will automatically be removed from this course. Be sure to finish all work and take the final within ten weeks of your enrollment date.

HOW YOUR WORK IS GRADED
You will be graded on tests, assignments, and quizzes. You can see your scores at any time in the grades section. If you have a zero on an assignment, it means that you did not do the assignment, you submitted the wrong assignment, OR the file could not be opened. Either complete the assignment if you did not do it, or save the file in a correct format. If you have a lower score than what is possible, you will see feedback from the instructor (except for quizzes and tests that are automatically scored). Students will be graded on the concepts being covered in each assignment. Be sure to follow all of the instructions within each assignment in order to receive full points. Extra credit to raise your grade at the end of the quarter is NOT given in this course. Assignments that you earn less than 90% on may be fixed and resubmitted for up to 90%.

You will have TWO attempts at each quiz and test EXCEPT the final test. You are only allowed to take the final test one time and you need to score 60% or better to get a grade for the class. You can decide if you want to use your two quiz/test attempts right away, OR save one until the end to help you study for the final. You will keep the highest score from the two attempts.  You are allowed to use your notes, worksheets, and assignments from the course during the quizzes and tests. You are NOT allowed to use the internet to find answers. No notes are allowed on the final test. 

FINAL PROCTORED EXAM
The final exam will be worth approximately 25% of the course grade.  There will be 50 questions composed of multiple choice, true/false, and matching questions. Each question is worth 3 points for a total of 150 points. You will have 90 minutes to complete the exam.  No notes will be allowed for use on the final. A proctored exam means that a specific person (proctor) needs to watch you take the test. You will have to schedule a time with an EHS certified proctor to take the test with them. If you fail the final test you will have to either retake the class to earn a second attempt at the final, or complete remedial work at the discretion of the teacher. After doing remedial work, and retaking the final test, the highest grade you can earn is a B. More information about the final test can be found in Module 4.

FINAL GRADE SCALE
The following grading scale will be used for the course:

  B+ 87-89% C+ 77-79% D+ 67-69%  
A  93-100% B   83-86% C   73-76% D   63-66% F  0-59%
A- 90-92% B-  80-82% C- 70-72% D-  60-62%  

 

ETHICS
Please be honest in all your coursework. If you are caught cheating on any course materials (either as a giver or receiver), you will be given a zero for all questionable work. If you are caught a second time, you will be removed from the course. You cannot use the internet to search for answers on any tests or quizzes.

Students are expected to follow the EHS Honor Code: "As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers, and staff with respect."

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Joanna Goode and Gail Chapman are the authors of  Exploring Computer Science and are the co-directors of the curriculum design team.  High school teachers have been involved in contributing instructional materials and have provided important feedback that has been used to improve the materials. Furthermore, along with a design team, the authors have conferred with K-12 and higher education computer science educators around the country involved in computer science reform to inform the creation of these materials.

COMMUNICATION
It will be great getting to know you better as we correspond throughout this course. Please do not hesitate to email the instructor if you have any questions regarding this course. You can find the instructors information on the Teacher - Contact Information page in Module 1.

LET'S GET STARTED
To begin this course, click the NEXT button at the bottom of this screen after you have read the directions for the About Me assignment.

00.01 About Me (Exploring Computer Science)

The "About Me" assignment is a way for the instructor to get to know you better. Please copy and paste the following questions, then answer them in bold (using complete sentences, correct spelling and grammar) when you submit your assignment.

The EHS Honor Code should be agreed to in the following manner: "As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers and staff with respect." A grading rubric is provided below.

1 - What is your first and last name and your preferred name if different than your first name?

2 - What school do you attend, and what grade are you in?

3 - Why did you choose to take Exploring Computer Science through EHS?

4 - What are some interesting things about you (hobbies, funny story, interests, etc.)?

5 - What is your 10 week completion date?

6 - Write a sentence or two stating your acceptance of the EHS honor code and your commitment to follow it throughout the course.

7 - Provide contact information for you and your parents, both email and phone.

 

 

************************GRADING RUBRIC************************

  Excellent Fair Poor
Answering all Questions All questions were fully answered using complete sentences. Some of the questions were answered with complete sentences. None of the questions were answered with complete sentences.
Sentence Structure All sentences were grammatically correct and properly punctuated and capitalized. Some of the sentences were grammatically correct and properly punctuated. None of the sentences were grammatically correct and properly punctuated.
Spelling All words were spelled out and spelled correctly. Most words were spelled out and spelled correctly. Many words weren't spelled out and/or spelled correctly.
Contact Information Parent and student email and phone numbers were provided. Partial parent and student email and phone numbers were provided. Contact information was not provided.

00.01.01 Student Software Needs

 

Students need access to a robust internet connection and a modern web browser.

This class may also require the Apple QuickTime plug-in to view media.

For students using a school-issued Chromebook, ask your technical support folks to download the QuickTime plug-in and enable the plug-in for your Chromebook.

$0.00

01.00 Introduction

Objectives:

The student will be able to:

  • Reflect on coursework.
  • Create a presentation with hyperlinks/action buttons.
  • Explain and give examples of the concepts of computers and computing.
  • Describe the uses for computer hardware components.
  • Choose hardware components for various types of users.

01.01 ePortfolio

Create an ePortfolio (electronic portfolio) to showcase your work throughout the quarter. You should include a title that introduces you and your ePortfolio. You need to pick eight assignments from the quarter. There needs to be at least one assignment from each of the units. Take a screen shot of your completed assignment and then reflect on it. Each reflection should be at least 100 words for a total of 800 words minimum in the entire portfolio. Here are some ideas to help you reflect:

  • Why are you including it in your portfolio
  • Describe the purpose of the assignment
  • What was learned/new to you
  • How is this concept important to computer science
  • What you still need help on and/or could have done better

You will turn this in at the end of the quarter. Be sure to add to it as you go throughout the quarter so you don't have a ton of work to do at the end and your reflection is more accurate because it was done after the assignment. Save all of your assignments!

You can create the ePortfolio using whatever software you prefer. It will need to be easy to navigate and professionally formatted. Microsoft Office Word and PowerPoint would both work great.

**The "About Me" assignment and ePorfolio should NOT be used as one of the assignments.

01.02 What is a Computer

Explain the differences between tasks that can and cannot be accomplished with a computer.

How many computers are in the room that you are in?

You may have only counted the desktop or laptop computer in the room or you may have recognized that there are other items that are computers as well.

  1. Make a list all the items you can think of that could be a computer (or things containing computers). Include everything you can think of on this list. No longer limit it to the items in the room you are in.
  2. Now think about a classification/categorization system of computing groups. Describe/define the classification system. (For example, on a scale of 1 to 5 with 1 being it is not really a computer and 5 being it is definitely a computer OR basic computing power to complex computing power.)
  3. Place all of the items you listed in part 1 under one of the categories you defined in part 2. (Create a document on the computer or use a poster and write it out.) One or two in each category will NOT be enough for full credit. Keep brainstorming.
  4. After grouping your items, come up with YOUR OWN definition for what is a computer.

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

The final assignment should have your categorization with all the "computers" you could think of and YOUR definition for what a computer is.

Upload your document

OR

take a picture of your poster and upload the picture.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.03 Computer Buying Project

Analyze the characteristics of hardware components to determine the applications for which they can be used. Identify computer hardware, peripherals, etc. and explain the functions of the item.

You may already have some knowledge about the parts that make up a computer. To learn more about the different components of a computer, please go to the Basic Computer Terms link provided and learn about the different parts. You will need to have background knowledge on each of the core parts. Learn about any you are unfamiliar with.

There are four main components to computers: input, output, processing, and storage. Below is a Venn diagram about what computer parts are input vs output (or both).

Interview ONE family member or friend to find out what features they would like to have if they were buying a new personal computer.  Possible questions could be: What will be the uses of the computer? What are the space constraints? What is the price range? How often will it be used? Etc.

After the interview, you will need to research THREE computer options that would fit that ONE persons needs. You could choose three different types of computers such as: 

Option A: Toshiba - Satellite 14" Laptop
Option B: HP - Pavilion Slimline Desktop
Option C: Microsoft- SurfacePro 3 - 12"

If your interviewer knows they want a particular type of computer, you could find three options in different price ranges such as:

Option A: Dell Inspiron 3043 19.5" All-in-One Desktop PC with Intel Celeron N2830 (on sale at Walmart)
Option B: ASUS Zenbook UX303LN-DB71% 13.3" Quad-HD Display Touchscreen Laptop (High End Laptop)
Option C: Acer Aspire E 15 ES1-512-C88M 15.6-Inch Laptop

*Note, do not use these exact examples, use what would meet the needs of your interviewee.

Below are the required components for you to investigate. You must investigate all items that are important to the options you have chosen. (You can add more if you feel they are important):

  1. Processor
  2. Operating System
  3. Memory
  4. Hard Drive
  5. Optical Drive
  6. Monitor
  7. Video/Graphics Card
  8. Speakers
  9. Keyboard
  10. Mouse

Create a table using word processing or spreadsheet program (Word or Excel) to create a computer comparison chart (table). Your comparison chart may not include all these items and it may contain additional items depending on what your scenario (interview) required.

Component Option A
<Computer Name>
Option B
<Computer Name>
Option C 
<Computer Name>
Type (laptop, desktop, tablet, etc.)      
Processor      
Memory (RAM)      
Hard Drive (storage)      
Monitor or screen size      
Video Card      
Operating System      
Other Accessories      
Optical Drive      
Cost      
...      

For each of the components, make sure you understand what it is used for and then write down the specifications for each option within your comparison chart:

  • The name/brand (ie: Operating System - Windows 8.1)
  • Different options or sizes of the components (ie: Monitor - 11")

Presentation

Create a presentation document (PowerPoint, Google Slides…) to display your information. Remember that this is a presentation, so you want to make it visually appealing and follow the common presentation rules. You must have a minimum of the following content in this order from left to right and then down.

 

For help on creating hyperlinks and/or action buttons in your presentation, you can view the Hyperlink and Action Button presentation. The directions are given for use in Microsoft Office PowerPoint, although that software is not required for the presentation. Keep in mind the hyperlinks should link you to another slide in the presentation, not to a website URL. If you have any PowerPoint creation questions, please ask the instructor.

teacher-scored 20 points possible 60 minutes

Upload your presentation.  FYI: If you are using Google Slides to create the presentation, download it as a PDF instead of PPTX or your hyperlinks will not work.

Below is a grading rubric.

Component Possible
Scenario: Design. Title slide. Interview results. Did you describe the scenario? Did you get a good description of what the user wanted? Do you have a menu with links to the option slides? 5
Option 1: Did you describe the product? Did you list sizes of components? Did you find the cost? Did you include a picture? Do your hyperlinks work? 3
Option 2: Did you describe the product? Did you list sizes of components? Did you find the cost? Did you include a picture? Do your hyperlinks work? 3
Option 3: Did you describe the product? Did you list sizes of components? Did you find the cost? Did you include a picture? Do your hyperlinks work? 3
Conclusions: Did you Create a Computer Comparison Chart (table)? Did you recommend a computer? Did you say why you recommended the computer you did? 6
TOTAL:  20

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.04 Unit 1 Test

Review the information learned in Unit 1.

computer-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Complete the Unit 1 Test.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.00 Web 2.0

Objectives:

The student will be able to:

  • Perform searches and explain how to refine searches to retrieve better information.
  • Identify resources for finding information in addition to ranking based search engines.
  • Differentiate between ranking based search engines and social bookmarking (collaborative search engines).
  • Use a variety of Web 2.0 applications.
  • Develop and use a rubric to evaluate websites.

02.01 The Internet

Understand the concepts, differences, and uses of the Internet, browsers, and WWW.

Web 2.0 is the term given to describe a second generation of the World Wide Web that is focused on the ability for people to collaborate and share information online. Web 2.0 basically refers to the transition from static HTML Web pages to a more dynamic Web that is more organized and is based on serving Web applications to users.

Other improved functionality of Web 2.0 includes open communication with an emphasis on Web-based communities of users, and more open sharing of information. Over time Web 2.0 has been used more as a marketing term than a computer-science-based term. Blogs, wikis, and Web services are all seen as components of Web 2.0. (webopedia.com)

teacher-scored 5 points possible 5 minutes

Journal Entry

Using complete sentences, answer the following:

Describe at least three ways in which you currently use the internet.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.02 Internet Scavenger Hunt

Use appropriate tools and methods to execute Internet searches which yield requested data.

View the Search Secrets presentation to help you be a more effective and efficient internet investigator! This presentation applies specifically to Google, but most of the items work across all search engines.

Then use the internet to search for the answers to the questions found on the Internet Scavenger Hunt worksheet. Use keywords in the search to help find the information, rather than typing complete sentences.

Don't forget that there are multiple search engines you can use if you aren't finding the information you are looking for with your first pick.

  • Google
  • Yahoo
  • Bing
  • Ask
  • Hotbot
  • Dogpile
  • Search
  • Go
  • and many more!

teacher-scored 10 points possible 40 minutes

Upload your completed Internet Scavenger Hunt worksheet.  *Make sure the URLs are clickable links.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.03 Online Resources

Use appropriate tools and methods to execute Internet searches which yield requested data.

Think about resources other than search engines that you use to find information on the internet. What are the advantages or disadvantages of using them instead of a general search engine?

Some examples of other resources might be:

  • Sites such as Google Maps or MapQuest to get directions or see satellite or street view images of anywhere in the country.
  • Address and telephone number lookup sites such as Switchboard or Yellow Pages to get personal and business information.
  • Sites such as the Internet Movie Database to get information on movies, television shows, and actors.
  • Sites such as Dictionary and Thesaurus to look up the meaning or spelling of a word or to find a synonym of a word.
  • Encyclopedic sites such as Wikipedia, Encyclopedia Britannica, World Book Encyclopedia, or How Stuff Works to find an overview of a particular topic.
  • The Wayback Machine which stores snapshots of websites on various dates so that you can “go back in time” to see a site as it used to be.
  • Video-based information sources such as YouTube and Howcast.

 

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Assignment:

  1. Use Google maps and StreetView to find and display where you live or the location of your school. Take a screen shot of the Street View to turn in.
  2. Use Wikipedia and World Book Encyclopedia (accessible from Utah's Online Library linked below) to find information on the SAME topic. Pick a topic that you have recently studied in one of your other classes, so you will know if the information is accurate or not. Compare/contrast the two articles and decide which provides more information and better information.
  3. Use the Wayback Machine to view an early version of your school’s website. Compare/contrast how much it has changed from the school’s current website. (If your school does not have an old version on there, try your previous school, EHS, or another high school in the area.)

Upload a three page document. Page 1 should have the screenshot. Page 2 should have your written comparison on the two articles and which "encyclopedia" you think is better for this topic. Page 3 should have your written comparison of the new and old websites.

FYI: Username and password for Utah's Online Library (formerly known as Pioneer Library) can be found on the first page of the Canvas Learning System, Dashboard, with other school announcements.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.04 Web 2.0 Applications

Understand the concepts, differences, and uses of the Internet, browsers, and WWW.

View the Web 2.0 presentation to learn more about how the Internet started and how it has transformed over the years. 

You would most likely trust your friends more than a company. Therefore it is important to have feedback on websites. Explore all of the linked Web 2.0 websites on this lesson. 

Then think about what issues might there be with creating accounts online?

You may have thought of privacy as one of the issues with creating accounts online.  There are certain items you should keep private and avoid disclosing online. Never post your:

  • Personal finance information
  • Address or phone number
  • Personal conversations
  • Social plans
  • Passwords
  • Password hints (example: if your hint is your pet’s name, don’t post your pet’s name or your mother’s maiden name)
  • Pictures of where you live
  • Pictures of vehicle license plate numbers
  • Birth date and place
  • Future vacations
  • Inappropriate photos
  • Confessionals

teacher-scored 10 points possible 50 minutes

Using complete sentences, tell me five things you learned from the Web 2.0 presentation. Please number them 1-5.

Using complete sentences, tell me five things you learned from exploring the Web 2.0 websites. ie: How these Web 2.0 sites differ from a static Web 1.0 site. Please number them 1-5.

For a total of ten new things you learned.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.05 Evaluating Websites Rubric

Evaluate the results of web searches and the reliability of information found on the Internet.

Why do you need to evaluate the websites you visit? Anyone can put whatever information they want on the Internet. That does not mean that it is true or reliable.

Watch the linked videos. Pay attention and take notes on any information that will help you evaluate a website. Then organize your notes into the following categories:

  • Authority
  • Purpose
  • Accuracy
  • Currency
  • Objectivity

Add any additional criteria that you personally use to determine if a website is a valid source for a research paper.

Using your notes from the videos, create a generic website evaluation rubric. Your rubric must contain the following items:

  • Use of a Table: format your document with a table using word processing or spreadsheet software
  • At least 2 questions from each of the above categories: total of 10 questions (or more)
  • Criteria on which each question is evaluated. You can use Yes, No, Unsure OR you could create a scale from 1 to 5

Here is a beginning sample:

You will not answer the questions on the rubric yet. Just create a rubric that can be used in the future.

Your grade will be based on the following criteria:

Criteria Points
Notes from the videos 2
Use of a table 1
Two valid questions from each category 5
Criteria on which each question is evaluated 2

 

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Upload your Notes and your Website Evaluation Rubric.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.06 Evaluate Websites

Evaluate the results of web searches and the reliability of information found on the Internet.

You will now use your rubric to evaluate TWO websites. Find one website that you think is a “good” accurate website and one that is a “bad” website. Pick one of the following categories to find your two websites:

  • News source
  • Shopping

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

You should have one good example website and one bad example website from the same category (either shopping or news). 

Explore each website and fill out a separate rubric for each one. Be sure to include the category you picked, the websites used, and which one was good and which one was bad in your opinion. Upload the two completed rubrics.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.07 Unit 2 Test

Review the information learned during unit 2.

computer-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Complete the Unit 2 Test.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.00 Electronic Communication

Objectives:

The student will be able to:

  • Explain how computers are used for communications.
  • Recognize various forms of communication as data exchange.
  • Describe the implications of data exchange on social interactions.
  • Consider privacy of data that they create.

03.01 Computational Communicating

Students will demonstrate the ability to live online by using digital communication to communicate in a variety of ways.

Electronic Communication (n) - communication by computer

Transmission- communicated by means of transmitted signals.

Data communication, digital communication- electronic transmission of information that has been encoded digitally.

(The Free Dictionary)

teacher-scored 5 points possible 5 minutes

Journal Entry

List as many computer-based communication tools as you can.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.02 Communications Methods

Students will demonstrate the ability to live online by using digital communication to communicate in a variety of ways.

Compare your list from the previous assignment to the following, did your list have a few of the ones listed?

  • Texting
  • Phone call
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Instagram
  • SnapChat
  • Email
  • Skype
  • FaceTime
  • Instant Messaging
  • Radio
  • TV

Go through and familiarize yourself with some of the following terms associated with each communication based method.

  • Email
    • Subject
    • BCC
    • CC
    • Attachment
    • Message
    • Email Address
  • Word Wide Web (www)
    • Browser
    • Browser History
    • Downloading
    • Uploading
    • URL
    • HTTPS
  • Texting
    • Emoticons
    • Acronyms
  • Social Media
    • Facebook
    • Twitter
    • Like

Now we are going to take a closer look at your electronic communication.

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

Complete the Communications Methods Chart and upload it.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.03 Privacy

Analyze the effects of computing on society within economic, social, and cultural contexts. Discuss privacy and security concerns related to computational innovations. Design slides based on good design principles, applying layout, animations, timing, transitions, etc.

Data are everywhere. You are ‘giving off data’ and providing data to others all the time. Sometimes this data can be directly linked to you as an individual; sometimes not.

Pick one of the following scenarios (many are based on real stories):

  • A boss sees an employee who called in “sick” in a picture that someone posted on Facebook. In this picture the employee is partying the night before. The boss fires the employee.
  • A company who has contracts with the Federal Government doesn't want to hire you because a Facebook friend leaves lots of enthusiastic “legalize marijuana” postings on your wall.
  • A teacher is fired because there is a picture of this teacher holding alcoholic drinks on her Instagram account.
  • Someone’s Netflix rental history is being used as evidence in a murder case because this person rented a lot of horror movies.
  • An 18-year old boy is charged with distributing child pornography when he uses his cell phone to send naked images of his 17-year-old ex-girlfriend to his friends.

Prepare a 3-5 minute presentation that includes answers to the following:

  1. The scenario you picked.
  2. In your scenario, did the people have the right to use the information they did or should it have been private? Why?
  3. Are the people who were affected by the use of this information at fault? Why?
  4. Give another example of something unexpected happening because of information shared at sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, blogs. (Not another one from above.)
  5. Think about what data you’ve made available in different places/spaces such as Facebook, Twitter, texting, Netflix, email, at the grocery store, etc. What might other people think about who you are based on these data? Is it an accurate impression of who you are?
  6. Consider each of the following broad categories of societal change:
    1. Privacy
    2. Safety
    3. Globalization
    4. Connectivity (keeping in touch with people)
    5. Permanence of historical information
  7. Discuss whether availability of data has had a positive or negative impact on each aspect of society and, if negative, how these consequences can be minimized.

teacher-scored 20 points possible 60 minutes

Presentation requirements:

  • 8 or more slides
  • Use of slide transitions
  • Appropriate design theme
  • Use of animations
  • 3 or more pictures spread out throughout the presentation
  • Use the notes section to write what you would say during your presentation (below each slide)
  • 6x6 rule (6 bullets or less per slide, 6 words or less per bullet)

Upload your presentation. FYI: if using Google Docs, turn in as a .pptx so I am able to see your animation, transitions, and notes.

Rubric provided below:

Criteria Points Possible
Scenario with opinion 4
Additional example 3
Your data 3
Societal Changes and +/- 3
8+ slides with pictures 2
Transitions, Design, and Animations 3
6x6 Rule and Notes 2
TOTAL 20

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.04 Unit 3 Quiz

Review the information learned in unit 3.

computer-scored 5 points possible 20 minutes

Complete the Unit 3 Quiz.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.00 Data

Objectives:

The student will be able to:

  • Explain how different views of data can tell a different story.
  • Recognize that data is an incomplete record of reality.
  • Describe the limits of measurement (what can and can't be captured in data).
  • Explain how computers can be used as tools for visualizing data, modeling and design, and art.
  • Identify mathematical connections in the output of the tools.
  • Learn that there are Mathematical Patterns in Nature, Art, and Culture
  • Learn how computers can be a tool for visualizing data, modeling and design, and art
  • Edit an image.
  • Explain the concept of a computer program.
  • Explain the idea of intelligence especially as it relates to computers.
  • Explain what it means for a machine to "learn".
  • Discuss whether computers are intelligent or whether they only behave intelligently.
  • Recognize various forms of communication as data exchange.
  • Describe the implications of data exchange on social interactions.
  • Consider privacy of data that they create.
  • Explain the difference between data used for making a case and data that informs a discovery.

04.01 What is Data

Students will use computers to translate, process and visualize data in order to find patterns and test hypotheses.

DATA: "dayta" or "dahta"?

teacher-scored 5 points possible 15 minutes

Journal Entry

Using complete sentences, answer the following:

  1. What do you think about when you hear the word data?
  2. Where can it be found?
  3. Where does it come from?

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.02 Room Activity

Justify conclusions drawn from data analysis.

Pick ONLY ONE of the attached Room Activity documents. ONLY LOOK AT THE ONE YOU PICKED. Do not open the other one (you will get to see it later).  Open the one you picked, and follow and answer the four instructions provided.

 

teacher-scored 15 points possible 45 minutes

After completing the four directions, you can look at the other document you did not choose. DO NOT complete the second paper. Just look at it to compare how the data was represented.  Now add these three questions and your response to each to the bottom of your original paper.

  1. Are there any advantages to one representation of data or another (not the assignment you had to do but how the data is represented)?
  2. Do you think different representations can tell different stories?
  3. What do you think came first, the drawing of the room or the list?

Upload the first document (and picture if you did Room Activity 2 first). Then make a post on the Room Activity Discussion. You can respond to other student comments, and/or just post your own opinions. PLEASE make sure you are respectful of other student opinions and only write positive comments.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.03 Data Journal

Create projects including: daily journal, project proposals, project reports, project documentation, letters, resume, etc.

A journal can be defined as “a daily record, as of occurrences, experiences, or observations” (thefreedictionary.com).

You are going to start a data journal to track your activity. To get you started, think about all of the communication methods talked about during unit 3. Data can include anything that can be recorded whether by phone, internet, camera (video or photo), GPS, and even pen/paper.

The following two assignments must be completed using spreadsheet software such as Microsoft Office Excel or Google Sheets.

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Pick one entire day (24 hours) to track your data. That will include your alarm going off in the morning to setting your alarm at night. (You might not have data recorded when you sleep, but to prove it was a full day of tracking, the alarm or wake/sleep time is helpful.)

Each piece of data that you track will need to be categorized in one of the following six categories:

  • Communication
  • Electronic (but does not use Internet)
  • Financial
  • Internet
  • School/Work
  • Travel

Some of the pieces of data might fit in more than one category. Pick only ONE category for each. If it fits into more than one, think of which one you think it fits in the most. Below is an example of some different things that might be journaled during a day. FYI: These are just a few examples and how they would be categorized, not a full 24 hour example.

Use a spreadsheet program (Excel or Google Sheets) to create your data journal. The above three columns are required: Time, Data, and Category. Be sure to professionally and correctly format the spreadsheet including enlarging the columns to fit all of the information included, use of borders, and shading (fill color). Include your name and the date you recorded the data from somewhere on the spreadsheet. Save the spreadsheet. You will add to it and turn it in during lesson 04.04.

FYI: Please ask your instructor if you need any help manipulating the spreadsheet program. You can also visit the Excel and spreadsheet tutorial websites linked to below.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.04 Data Journal Chart

Students will use computers to translate, process and visualize data in order to find patterns and test hypotheses. Students will learn and use the key application of a spreadsheet to create a variety of documents to solve problems.

You must finish activity 04.03 – Data Journal – before you can complete this activity.

Data can be tracked and displayed in many different formats. It is important to understand that the way data is displayed can manipulate how it is perceived. Charts and graphs are one way to show comparisons of data.

Spreadsheets can help create charts in a quick and professional manner. 

 

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Open your 24 hour Data Journal spreadsheet that you created during lesson 04.03. You will need to create a chart to show how much of each category is being used throughout the day.

Create the chart on Sheet 2. You need to count how many entries you have in each category and make a new table with that information. List all of the categories and all of the counts from each category. (See picture below.) Then select the categories and counts and click on Insert > Chart.  You can decide what type of chart, but make sure the values of each are known. (ie: for a pie chart percentages should appear, for a bar chart the y axis should have values, etc.) After ensuring all below requirements are met, Download As a Microsoft Excel (.xlsx) file. 

Here is an example chart created from the Data Journal example:

Requirements:

  • Your chart will need to be on a separate sheet than your Data Journal. Rename each sheet to help identify its contents.
  • Make sure your chart type makes sense for the data being represented (bar, column, pie, etc.) and the values are clearly represented
  • Use color
  • Include a chart title 
  • Chart cannot be a picture, must be an inserted chart
  • Print preview to make sure the chart fits on one page. If it doesn’t, you can change the page orientation, make it a little bit smaller, or fit it to one page.
  • When you are all finished, save and then make sure both sheets are correct. Upload one .xlsx file with two sheets in the one file.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.05 Culturally Situated Design Tools

Analyze how computing influences and is influenced by the cultures for which they are designed and the cultures in which they are used.

In this lesson, students learn how computers can be a tool for visualizing data, modeling and design, and art.

Mathematical Patterns in Nature, Art, and Culture

Pattern is a fundamental concept in both mathematics and the arts.  Music motifs are simple melodies that repeat over and again within a piece.  You can hear this very prominently in Beethoven's 5th symphony with the famous da da da dum. 

You also hear this in popular rock music.  From Pink Floyd to Imagine Dragons, they all use a simple guitar rhythm and chord set that maintains throughout the entire song.

Mathematical concepts are also used in Art.  The use of ratios can help to show depth in a painting.  Items on canvas or in a photograph are positioned in thirds to be the most appealing. 

You can even find mathematical patterns in nature.  You can see these patterns in Nature with fractals in leaves.  The number of petals in a flower is often one of the following numbers: 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, or 55.  These numbers belong to a sequence of numbers called Fibonacci sequence.

 

FYI: Hexastrip Weaving: Buckyballs is not currently working. Do not choose this tool.

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Assignment

Go to the  Culturally Situated Design Tools (first link) link below.  Select one of the topics that appeal to you the most.  Research the background of the tool and the mathematical connections. 

Options include:

Go through the tutorial on how to create with the tool.  Then create your own VIRTUAL design. Create your design BEFORE completing the presentation. Be sure you can get the design software to work before creating the presentation. Try a different tool if you can't get the initial one to work on your computer.

Take a screen shot of your design and save it as an image.  Include the design software in the screen shot.

Create a Presentation (PowerPoint) of what you have learned.  Your presentation must include the following information.

  • Title with your name and which design tool you are using
  • Information related to the culture in your own words
  • Mathematical connections to cultural design in your own words (look specifically for the words translation, iteration, dilation, and rotation and understand their meaning)
  • Display of your design (include the software in the screen shot)
  • Explanation of how your design was created

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.06 Following Instructions

Open and complete the Drawing Pictures Activity.

04.06.01 Drawing Pictures Activity

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

Upload a picture of the picture you drew during the Drawing Pictures Activity.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.06.02 Drawing Pictures Comparison

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Take the exact same directions to a friend or family member and ask them to complete the activity. (Do not show them your drawing until they are finished with theirs.) Compare your drawing with your friend/family member’s drawing. Talk to them about the differences in the two drawings and explain to each other why you drew it the way you did.

Journal Entry

Using complete sentences, answer the following:

  1. What specific differences did you notice in the two drawings?
  2. Why were there so many differences?
  3. What does following directions have to do with computers?

 

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.07 Designing a Program

Design, code, test, and execute a program that corresponds to a set of specifications.

When you tell someone what to do, there is some built in knowledge that a person can already understand.  As you noticed from your previous assignment, when you ask a person to draw a house or a rectangle, they can innately do the task.  They have the creativity to draw something and the intelligence to infer any missing data.  This is because we are human and have creativity and knowledge.

A computer on the other hand, does not have any background knowledge or creativity.  We cannot just tell it to draw a rectangle in the middle of the screen.  We can tell the computer to draw a rectangle if we give it a color, x and y coordinate, width and height, and fill style.  This requires a programming language to convert our requirements into commands the computer can understand and execute.  This is the purpose of a programming language.

There are many different computer languages.  Some examples are:

  • C, C--, C++, C#
  • Java
  • BASIC, Visual Basic
  • PHP
  • HTML, CSS, JavaScript
  • Python
  • Perl
  • SQL
  • Ruby

 

04.07.01 Designing a Program

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

Directions:
You are going to have the opportunity of your own to simulate how precise your commands need to be to get a computer to understand and follow along.  Take a look at the presentation on how to create an Origami heart.  Notice there are no directions.  Create a set of written instructions that someone could follow to create the heart.  You can only use words as your commands, you cannot use any images.  Upload your instructions.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.07.02 Running a Program

teacher-scored 5 points possible 30 minutes

Take your instructions to a friend or family member and ask them to create the origami heart.  They will only receive the instructions that you provide, not the pictures from the presentation. You cannot help them through the process.  If they are unable to complete the heart, you may go back and edit your instructions. 

There is implicit knowledge that you bring to the task and that has to be “unpacked” for the computer. Clearly, no matter how precise you tried to be, the instructions for making the origami heart were open to interpretation.  We need a better “language” than English for describing the instructions. This is, in fact, the idea behind a computer program.

Computer languages have a limited set of instructions which define very precisely what the computer does. For example, we can have a computer turn on a “dot” of a specific color in a specific location on the screen. By having the computer turn on many different dots in the different colors, we can have the computer draw a picture. Note though that we don’t have an instruction for the computer to “draw a picture of a house” as that’s much too general and too open for interpretation.

Reflect on your little experiment to answer the following questions in the journal entry.  

Journal Entry

Using complete sentences, answer the following:

  1. Describe any of the instructions that were easy for the person to follow.
  2. What was it about that instruction that the person was able to follow the task?
  3. Describe any instructions that were difficult for the person to follow.
  4. What changes did you have to make to the instructions for the person to understand?
  5. Was the person able or not able to complete the origami heart?
  6. Describe how you could write instructions to make a perfect origami heart every time.
  7. Why are instructions important in computer science?

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.08 Intelligence

Explain the differences between tasks that can and cannot be accomplished with a computer.

Intelligence and Artificial Intelligence

"I forgot to make a backup copy of my brain, so I lost everything I learned last semester."

04.08.01 Intelligence

teacher-scored 5 points possible 10 minutes

Journal Entry

Using complete sentences, answer the following:

  1. What is intelligence?
  2. Are computers intelligent? Why or why not?

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.08.02 Turing Test

teacher-scored 15 points possible 45 minutes

For centuries philosophers have argued about whether a machine could simulate human intelligence, and, conversely, whether the human brain is no more than a machine running a glorified computer program. The issue has sharply divided people. Some find the idea preposterous, insane, or even blasphemous, while others believe that artificial intelligence is inevitable and that eventually we will develop machines that are just as intelligent as us. A more balanced view is that artificial intelligence is neither preposterous nor inevitable; while no present computer programs exhibit “intelligence” in any broad sense, the question of whether they are capable of doing so is an experimental one that has not yet been answered either way.

In the late 1940s a British mathematician, Alan Turing, proposed an interesting approach to establishing intelligence.

The Turing Test is a way to test for intelligence in which you try to tell the difference between a human and a computer by asking questions. The computer passes the test if you can’t tell the difference reliably.  We will be conducting a test similar to his.

Open the document called The Turing Test and follow the directions provided.

Upload the question, response, and your reaction from the Execute the Test portion of the worksheet. Upload your essay from the Conclusions portion of the worksheet. They can all be in one document.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.09 Personal Data

Analyze the effects of computing on society within economic, social, and cultural contexts.

Think about your digital footprint!

teacher-scored 5 points possible 10 minutes

Journal Entry

Make a list of at least five different ways that YOU give off data digitally.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.10 Personal Data Collection

Communicate legal and ethical concerns raised by computing innovation.

Open the two previous assignments you completed: Communications Methods and Data Chart from 03.02 and Data Journal from 04.03. Review the data you give off to others.

What does your data tell you about yourself? What might it tell you if it was collected from lots of people? What good might be done? What services might be improved?

Think about which of these ways can be linked directly back to you. What are possible implications of the data being linked back to you?

Read the NY Times 1 article about aggregate search data. Making search data available to researchers would help improve search engines, but it turns out that search history is intensely personal.

The Netflix prize is another example. It has recently been canceled due to FTC concerns over privacy. Read about it on the Netflix link.

Volunteering data on Facebook and other social networking sites might tell people more about you than you intend. Read the NY Times 2 article about privacy.

Data can be used for making a case and/or discovery.

  • Making a case (advocacy) uses data to document situations that contribute to make a positive or negative case for something. Examples could be: let the Trax know about timing of trains and buses; tell the principal about something that needs to be done at the school; tell someone about something you'd like to see continued.
  • Discovery is when one collects data to document situations and then uses the data to learn something. Examples could be: could your food choices be improved?; do I always take an efficient route to activities?

After reading the above material and the three linked articles, go to the Discussions section of the course and post your thoughts. You can respond to other student comments, and/or just post your own opinions. PLEASE make sure you are respectful of other student opinions and only write positive comments.

**Be sure to keep your data journal because you may need the information in Q2 also!

teacher-scored 10 points possible 60 minutes

Submit your comment on the discussion board.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.11 Unit 4 Test

A computer has the ability to perform some operations quickly. Speed is not necessarily knowledge. Humans are “smart” and computers are “fast” and follow code explicitly. Intelligence is context dependent – ie: being able to thrive in mountains versus downtown in a city. If you are familiar with a city, you can find streets easily, etc. whereas if you are a newcomer, you need to have a map and more precise instructions. This ties to the origami heart instructions example.

Review all of the material learned during unit 4.

computer-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

Complete the Unit 4 Test.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.00 Problem Solving

Objectives:

Student will be able to:

  • Name and explain the steps in the problem-solving process.
  • Solve a problem by applying the problem-solving process.
  • Explain what the word algorithm means.
  • Express a solution using standard design tools.
  • Determine if a given solution successfully solves a stated problem.
  • Count forward and backward in binary
  • Explain why binary numbers are important in computer science.
  • Use binary digits to encode and decode messages.

05.01 Problem Solving

Name and explain the steps they use in solving a problem. Solve a problem by applying appropriate problem-solving techniques.

Problem Solving
Problem solving is the process of finding solutions to a task or issue.  It would be nice if it were as easy as just following steps.  Unfortunately there is not a single approach that one can take to solve all problems.  Problem solving is a skill that requires practice to develop your own techniques and strategies.  

Framework for Problem Solving
There are some phases that can be identified in the problem solving process.

  1. Identify the problem
  2. Explore information and create ideas
  3. Select the best idea
  4. Build and test the idea
  5. Evaluate the results
  6. Start over again!

 

Strategies
There are some strategies that can help you learn how to solve problems. 

Work Backwards- Start at what you want the outcome of the problem to be and find out what steps you can take to get you to that point.

Break it down- Break down the problem into parts.  Rather than tackle the entire problem at once, break the problem down into smaller sections.

Visual Aids- Draw out a picture of the problem, create a chart, a graph, a list, find some objects to represent items in your problem.  Do anything that will help you visualize the problem.

Guess and Check- Try every possible step until you get to the solution.

Patterns- Find a pattern within your problem.  Then you can solve the problem on a smaller scale.  Then use what you have learned to apply it to the entire problem.

Algorithms
When you make your plan to solve a problem, you can use the strategies listed above.  In computer science this plan you create to solve a problem is called an algorithm.  Watch the video listed below called What is an Algorithm to learn more about Algorithms.

 

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Practice Problem Solving
Go to the Problem Solving Games link listed below.  Choose one of the six problem solving games. 

Read all of the questions below before you play the game.  Observe how you go through the problem solving process while you play the game, and then answer the questions below.

  1. Tell me which game you played and define the problem.
  2. What plans did you use to solve the problem?
  3. Which problem solving strategies did you use?
  4. Which of your plans and strategies were successful?
  5. Reflect on your plan, would you use the same strategy the next time?
  6. Describe your algorithm for solving the problem? (Describe your steps as if you were going to get a computer to solve the same problem.) Try to get your same algorithm to work for every level of the game.

Submit the name of the game you played and your answers to these questions.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.02 Handshake and Fence Post Activity

Determine if a given algorithm successfully solves a stated problem.

For each problem presented, complete the problem-solving process by completing the following information:

  1. Understanding the problem: What data or information is known?   What is unknown?   What are the conditions?
  2. Plan the solution: Show your plan for solving this problem. Include an algorithm.
  3. Carry out the plan: Using your plan, show your work and your solution.
  4. Review and discuss your solution: Reflect on your solution.

Remember that an algorithm is a step-by-step procedure for calculations.

teacher-scored 20 points possible 45 minutes

Complete and write out the problem solving process for the three problems and then reflect:

  1. Handshake Problem #1: Assume there are 20 people in a room, including you. You must shake hands with everyone else in the room. How many hands will you shake? If there are N (where N>0) people in the room, how many hands will you shake?
  2. Fence Post Problem: You need to build one side of a fence that is 12 yards long. This fence will be built with fence posts and rails that connect one fence post to another. If each fence post is 1 yard away from the next fence post, how many fence posts will be needed for this side of the fence? How many fence posts will be needed for a side of a fence that is N (where N >0) yards long?
  3. Handshake Problem #2: Assume there are 10 people in a room, including you. Each person in the room must shake hands one time, and only one time, with all the other people in the room. How many handshakes will occur? If there are 20 people in the room, how many handshakes will occur? If there are N (where N>0) people in the room, how many handshakes will occur?
  4. Reflections: Why are problems like these important to learn how to solve? How could this type of solution be of benefit to a carpenter, a chef, a teacher?
  5.  

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.03 Counting in Binary

Explain the connections between binary numbers and computers.

The binary number system plays a central role in how information of all kinds is stored on computers. Understanding binary can lift a lot of the mystery from computers, because at a fundamental level they're really just machines for flipping binary digits on and off. Count the Dots is a fun and easy way to help you understand counting in binary.

For this activity, you will need a set of five cards, as shown below, with dots on one side and nothing on the other. You can use index cards, or just cut one sheet of paper into five equal pieces.

You should notice that each card has twice as many as the card to its right. How many dots would the next card have if we carried on to the left? Yes, 32, then 64, and so on. We can use these cards to make numbers by turning some of them face down and adding up the dots that are showing. To make the number 6, you will turn over the 16-dot, 8-dot, and 1-dot so only the 4-dot and 2-dot cards are showing.

When a binary number card is NOT showing, it is represented by a zero. When it IS showing, it is represented by a one. This is the binary number system. Make the binary number 01001. What number is this in decimal form? Yes, number 9. What would 17 be in binary? Yes, the answer is 10001.

In the presentation, Counting in Binary, you can see many different examples.

To get a better understanding of Binary, watch the video provided by the Harvard CS 50 site called Binary.

Be sure to put your name on all of the worksheets before you submit them.

05.03.01 Working with Binary Numbers

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Complete the worksheet activity Working with Binary. Upload your completed worksheet.

FYI: I have attached a picture of #4-13 in case the font doesn't show correctly for you.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.03.02 Sending Secret Messages

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Complete the worksheet activity Sending Secret Messages. Submit the results you found for 

What does his message say: ________________

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.03.03 Counting Higher than 31

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

Complete the worksheet activity Counting Higher than 31. Upload your completed worksheet.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.03.04 More on Binary Numbers

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

Complete the worksheet activity More on Binary Numbers. Upload your completed worksheet.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.03.05 Binary System

teacher-scored 5 points possible 10 minutes

Computers today use the binary system to represent information. It is called binary because only two different digits are used. It is also known as base two (humans normally use base 10). Each zero or one is called a bit (binary digit). A bit is usually represented in a computer’s main memory by a transistor that is switched on or off, or a capacitor that is charged or discharged.

When data must be transmitted over a telephone line or radio link, high and low-pitched tones are used for the ones and zeros. On magnetic disks (floppy disks and hard disks) and tapes, bits are represented by the direction of a magnetic field on a coated surface, either North-South or South-North.

Audio CDs, CD-ROMs and DVDs store bits optically – the part of the surface corresponding to a bit either does or does not reflect light.

One bit on its own can’t represent much, so they are usually grouped together in groups of eight, which can represent numbers from 0 to 255. A group of eight bits is called a byte.

The speed of a computer depends on the number of bits it can process at once. For example, a 32-bit computer can process 32-bit numbers in one operation, while a 16-bit computer must break 32-bit numbers down into smaller pieces, making it slower.

Ultimately bits and bytes are all that a computer uses to store and transmit numbers, text, and all other information. In some of the later activities we will see how other kinds of information can be represented on a computer.

Storage is measured using bytes.

8 bits = 1 byte
Kilobyte (KB) = 1024 bytes
Megabyte (MB) = 1024 Kilobytes (about a million bytes)
Gigabyte (GB) = 1024 Megabytes (about a billion bytes)
Terabyte (TB) = 1024 Gigabytes (about a trillion bytes)

Journal Entry

Using complete sentences, answer the following:

How high can you count with your ten fingers? Explain your answer.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.04 Unit 5 Test

Review the material learned during unit 5.

computer-scored 30 points possible 45 minutes

Complete the Unit 5 Test.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.05 ePortfolio Wrap-Up

Hopefully you have been working on the ePortfolio as you've gone through the course and you have an idea of the assignments you want to highlight. If you need a reminder of what should be included in the ePortfolio, you can revisit lesson 01.01. Remember that I have already seen all of your assignments, so the reflection is the most important piece to this assignment. You can just include a simple screen shot of the completed assignment and focus on the reflection.

Below is a grading rubric:

Criteria Points
Assignments: Eight assignments are represented with screen shots (at least one from each unit) 8
Reflection: Eight reflections on eight different assignments/100 words each (at least one from each unit) 32
Presentation: Professionally formatted, attractive layout, easy to navigate, correct spelling, grammar, punctuation 10
TOTAL 50

 

There is also a terms and topics test review attached. Please review for the final test. You must earn 60% or better on the final test to receive a grade. There is no extra credit if you do not score as well as you hope on the final test. Prepare accordingly.

teacher-scored 50 points possible 60 minutes

Upload your completed ePortfolio. Should be just one file.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 9 of your enrollment date for this class.