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3rd Quarter, Language Arts 10

0.00 Start Here - English 10

Course Description

The skills and understandings students are expected to demonstrate in this class have wide applicability outside the classroom or workplace.

In this class, students will:

  • undertake the close, attentive reading that is at the heart of understanding and enjoying complex works of literature and language mediums
  • perform the critical reading necessary to be able to carefully analyze and understand the available information in literature and media
  • actively seek the wide, deep, and thoughtful engagement with high-quality literary and informational texts that builds knowledge, enlarges experience, and broadens worldviews
  • demonstrate reasoning and use of evidence that is essential in deliberations

In short, students who meet the the requirements in this class will develop the skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening that are the foundation for any creative and purposeful expression in language.

Class Overview - HOW TO COMPLETE THIS CLASS

It will be necessary for you to read the course lessons to complete the assignments, master the material, and finish the class in a timely manner. If you try to complete the course by using the "assignments" link, you will not be successful. Please view the power point presentation, above, for clarification on how to view and complete the course through the course modules.

REMEMBER TO SCROLL DOWN, ON THE COURSE PAGE, TO VIEW ALL OF THE LESSONS.

WHAT THIS CLASS IS: A .25 credit class to fulfill the English 10 requirement, according to the Utah core graduation requirements.

WHAT THIS CLASS IS NOT: This class is NOT an easy way to get your English credit without doing any real work.

PREREQUISITES

1. 9th grade level reading and writing skills

2. A computer with Internet access

3. A working e-mail address, that does not block our messages with your spam filter

4. Word processing software to type your assignments

5. Course supplies listed at the beginning of each quarter

6. Acrobat Reader, QuickTime reader, and a PowerPoint reader (all available free online)

HOW YOU WILL BE GRADED

Each assignment has a maximum number of points you can earn. You can revise all assignments until you are satisfied with your scores. When you have completed all of the course assignments with 70% accuracy or better, you can take the final exam. Your final grade is determined by the average between the course assignments and the final test. The assignments count as 50% of your final score, and the final exam counts as 50%. If you score below 60% on the final exam, you will not earn credit for the class.

GRADING SCALE

A 90-100

B 80-89

C 70-79

D 60-69

No credit - below 60

FINAL EXAM

When you have finished all the assignments you need for your credit, you will take the final exam under the supervision of an EHS approved proctor.

ABOUT HOMEWORK

Please complete assignments according to the instructions given in each class section. Revise assignments, as necessary, to ensure you are mastering the material and earning the best grade possible.

CLASS PLAGIARISM POLICY

Copying someone else's sentences, phrases or organization of ideas and failing to give credit to the original author is plagiarism. In some papers it is appropriate to quote a short section of someone else's exact words, but when you do, that section needs to be set off in quotation marks or otherwise set apart, and the author identified either in a sentence, or in a parenthetical note. You also need to provide an internal citations to allow readers of your writing to know where facts, figures, and/or ideas, presented in your writing, were learned if you are not the original source of that information. Plagiarism is unlawful and unethical, and against the EHS Honor Code. If you turn in a plagiarized assignment, recourse will be taken by your teacher.

HOW TO TURN IN HOMEWORK

Save all of your work on your own hard drive and in the submission sections of the class. When you turn in your homework, ALWAYS save and keep a copy of it for yourself on your hard drive.

00.01.01 Student Software Needs

 

Students need access to a robust internet connection and a modern web browser.

This class may also require the Apple QuickTime plug-in to view media.

For students using a school-issued Chromebook, ask your technical support folks to download the QuickTime plug-in and enable the plug-in for your Chromebook.

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00.02 About Me - English 10

teacher-scored 5 points possible 15 minutes

Getting to know you! Copy and paste the following questions between the rows of asterisks below into a word document and answer them accordingly. *******************************************************************

In a numbered LIST, provide the following information:

1. What is your first and last name, parent(s) name(s), and contact information for both you and your parent(s)?

2. Where do you go to school?

3. What is your counselor's full name and email address/contact information?

4. What year will you graduate and have you read the EHS Honor Code and understand that this class needs to be finished within the 10 week limit?

In a few sentences, tell me about yourself being sure to answer the following questions in the process:

          a. Tell me something about yourself.

          b. Why are you taking this class and what do you expect to get out of it?

          c. What is one word that best describes you?

By the way, here is the EHS honor code: "As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers, and staff with respect."

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I am excited to get to know you! Grading Criteria:

1. Writing mechanics

2. All requested information is included in your numbered list.

3. You have written the pertinent information (a.b.c.) in your final sentences.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.00 NARRATIVE WRITING - English 10

Sharing experiences: "Family On Bicycle Ride" by Vlado FreeDigitalPhotos.netSharing experiences: "Family On Bicycle Ride" by Vlado FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Narrative Writing Materials Needed:

1. Novel: "My Antonia" by Willa Cather

2. A clear mind!

3. Internet access Grading Criteria: Please refer to the criteria provided, with each assignment, to understand how you will be graded and the level of proficiency that is expected on all of your work.

Class Expectations:

1. Creativity

2. Hard work

3. Organization with the completion of assignments Narrative writing begins with a moment. It can be a moment that seems ordinary and nondescript at first but then, with a closer look, it can expand into a narrative before your mind's eye. It can also be a moment that is larger than life that screams to be shared and embellished. Whatever the circumstances are, certain techniques will help you to draw the picture of that moment with your words.

This unit will have you writing and revising minute experiences, thoughts, feelings, imaginations, dreams, etc. in narrative format as well as listening to the stories of others. You will be reading the writings of a great narrative writer, Willa Cather. You will be creating a visual or verbal presentation as your final project to capture the essence of your personal narrative writing. A justification for the promotion of Narrative Writing; it is a POWERFUL vehicle for change and social reform; it is a means by which we create meaning in our lives.

The following article, company mission, and video clips found in the URL links below illustrate the power and importance of narrative story telling.

05.00.01 NARRATIVE WRITING - English 10

05.00.02 A Justification for the Promotion of Narrative Writing

teacher-scored 20 points possible 60 minutes

Narrative Understanding Read and view each segment found in the URL links above, then craft a statement that explains the need and role of narrative writing/expression. You will see a synopsis of each link below. Make sure you reference at least three supporting facts from EACH of the sources above (at least 12 facts in all) and label each submission with the appropriate link title.

Reference information for each URL segment: The Inside Story By Peter Guber, published on March 15, 2011 - last reviewed on January 23, 2012

Read and explain the narrative significance of StoryCorps from the front page of their website; this is a group that is reinventing the art of listening and validation through the art of story telling.

Read the explanation and watch the two short videos at the end of the page.

TEDxMarin - Robert Tercek - Reclaiming The Power of Personal Narrative This is an excellent talk about the role of narrative in our society. HEADS UP: One part is a mildly questionable comment about body parts. If you would like to avoid this remark, mute the video at 5:15 and start it again at 5:18.

Jane Smiley on Charles Dickens and Social Change February 22, 2011, listen and read.

Submission Inclusions:

1. A statement that explains the need and role of narrative writing/expression.

2. References to three supporting facts from the sources above (at least 12 facts in all).

3. All references are labeled correctly.

Grading Criteria:

1. A clear and concise statement that justifies the need for narrative communication.

2. At least three supporting facts from EACH of the sources above (at least 12 facts in all), are included.

3. Each submission is labeled with the appropriate link title.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.01 Think, think, think & write, write, write - English 10

To help you understand "narration," watch the video above before moving on to the lesson below.

05.01.01 Think, think, think & write, write, write - English 10

Make effective vocabulary choices. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. Produce clear and coherent writing. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. Write routinely, gathering relevant information from multiple sources.

Get your brain engaged!: Download "Brain Studies" by Boaz Yiftach FreeDigitalPhotos.netGet your brain engaged!: Download "Brain Studies" by Boaz Yiftach FreeDigitalPhotos.net

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading. Set up a folder on your desktop where you will save all of the narrative exercises for this course. Label it as ENGLISH 10 NARRATIVE WRITING and leave it on your desktop for easy access.

A KEY TO NARRATION: ELABORATION Complete each of the following activities as prep work for your writing process.

Copy and paste the material between the rows of asterisks below into a word document and complete the prompts accordingly. ****************************************************************************************************

1. Write down three events from your life that seem ordinary and not worth focusing on. These moments should not have lasted anymore than a minute or two, maybe even a few seconds.

2. Under each event listed from above, write a cluster of words that describe the four senses involved in the experiences.

3. Analyze which of these experiences have the highest potential for a successful writing prompt and mark it with an asterisk.

4. Isolate that moment and write a list of ten sensory details that played a part in that memory. Elaborate, embellish, include thoughts, memories it evoked, and imaginative inclinations that may or may not have been a part of the experience. What senses or feelings were involved?

5. Once you have these details in place, re-watch the video above in the URL link to help you start thinking further about the expression of the details of your own experience. "Barry Lane writes about . . ."

6. Once you have watched the video again, go back to #4 and add any details that would heighten the interest level of your experiential writing.

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* All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

05.01.02 STORY BREAK #1 - English 10

STORY BREAK COURTESY OF "STORYCORPS" Listen to the story above . . . “What is your legacy?”

Write down how you can and can't relate to these people. Save your response in its own document/file to be submitted separate from the rest of the assignments.

* All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

05.02 Here We Go Again! - English 10

To help you understand 'narration' even better, watch the video above before moving on to the lesson below.

05.02.01 Here We Go Again! - English 10

Make effective vocabulary choices. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. Produce clear and coherent writing. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. Write routinely, gathering relevant information from multiple sources.

I have an idea!: "Idea Bulb" by Pixomar FreeDigitalPhotos.netI have an idea!: "Idea Bulb" by Pixomar FreeDigitalPhotos.net *All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading. You will now follow the same pattern of brain storming, as above, but for a more important moment in your life.

Complete each of the following activities as prep work for your writing process. Copy and paste the material between the rows of asterisks below into a word document and complete the prompts accordingly.

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1. Write down three events from your life THAT ARE IMPORTANT to you. These moments should not have lasted any more than a minute or two, maybe even a few seconds.

2. Under each event, listed from above, write a cluster of words that describe the four senses involved in the experiences.

3. Analyze which of these experiences have the highest potential for a successful writing prompt and mark it with an asterisk.

4. Isolate that moment and write a list of ten sensory details that played a part in that memory. Elaborate, embellish, and be sure to include thoughts and imaginative inclinations that may or may not have been a part of the experience. What senses or feelings were involved?

5. Once you have these details in place, re-watch the video, "Explode a Moment with Barry Lane, from above in the URL links, to help you start thinking further about the potential expression of detail of your own experience. After you have watched the video, go back to #4 and add any details that would enhance the interest level of your experiential writing.

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All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER *You are now ready to begin your narrative writing unit.

05.02.02 STORY BREAK #2 - English 10

STORY BREAK COURTESY OF "STORYCORPS" Listen to the story above. . . “She died on an incident that I sent her on.”

Write down how you can and can't relate to these people. Save your response in its own document/file to be submitted separate from the rest of the assignments.

*All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

05.03 Outlines for Drafts - English 10

teacher-scored 50 points possible 120 minutes

Your first draft! Submit BOTH narrative brain storming sessions from the previous two lessons for feedback, revisions and grading. Final Submission Inclusions: 1. Both narrative brain storming sessions. Grading Criteria: All 6 of the prompts in each of the lessons, 05.01 & 05.02, are responded to completely with detail and a unique perspective. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.03.01 STORY BREAK #3 - English 10

Listen to the story above. . . “I remember many months with no lights.” Write down how you can and can't relate to these people. Save your response in its own document/file to be submitted separate from the rest of the assignments. *All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

05.04 Brainstorming With A Purpose - English 10

Write routinely. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. Knowledge of Language 3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

Brainstorming

To continue brainstorming your narrative ideas, complete the following activities.

Copy and paste the material between the rows of asterisks below into a word document and complete the prompts accordingly.

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1. Using your two lists of experiences, isolate your favorite unimportant event and your favorite important event. Make sure you want to write about each of them further.

2. List both your chosen unimportant and important event ideas at the top of a page and list everything that comes to mind when you think of them. Feel free to use the information you compiled from the last lessons.

3. After you have a list for each topic, begin writing two narrative essays, one for each of your chosen experiences. You will be writing two short stories/narratives, one for each prompt. You do not have to write in any particular format--just write. This will give you the opportunity to get your thoughts on paper without wondering if it is the 'right' way.

4. Refer back to the list of words that you previously created for each event to stimulate ideas about what to write about. Once your writing has begun and you have found a stopping point for each narrative, save it in your narrative file and set it aside.

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* All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

05.04.01 STORY BREAK #4 - English 10

STORY BREAK COURTESY OF "STORYCORPS"

Listen to the story above. . .

“If just one of them gets through, they may save us all.”

Write down how you can and can't relate to these people. Save your response in its own document/file to be submitted separate from the rest of the assignments.

*All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

05.05 A Bit of Antonia/Cather Background - English 10

Watch media closely to determine what is being said. Cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from sources. Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric.

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

Copy and paste the information between the rows of asterisks below into a word document and complete the task accordingly.

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Historical Context:

Understanding a bit about the author of a narrative can help the reader appreciate what and why something is being expressed. Watch the documentary and then the trailer of scenes from Illusion Theater's world premiere adaptation of the classic Willa Cather novel, "My Antonia," found in the URL links below.

Write down ten points of interest from both of the short films below.

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Crossroads Grave Site, located northwest of Red Cloud, Nebraska. The site is listed in the National Register of Historic Places because of its connection with Willa Cather's novel My Antonia: Wikimedia commons - AmmodramusCrossroads Grave Site, located northwest of Red Cloud, Nebraska. The site is listed in the National Register of Historic Places because of its connection with Willa Cather's novel My Antonia: Wikimedia commons - AmmodramusBegin Your Reading of "My Antonia"

* All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

05.05.01 A Bit of Antonia/Cather Background - English 10

05.06 Here is how it is going to work! - English 10

Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text. Analyze the structure of a text, including how specific portions of the text relate to each other and the whole. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. Use the reading of a text to help determine style and approach to narrative writing. Read narrative writing to determine an appropriate approach to the writing of narratives. Include stylistic elements, from the study of a narrative text, in narrative writing.

Fitting it all together.: Wikimedia, Creative Commons, Jigsaw PuzzleFitting it all together.: Wikimedia, Creative Commons, Jigsaw Puzzle

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

The Plan

You will now be working in tandem between your reading assignments and your narrative writing assignments. The reading will help you to find expressive writing techniques. Many writers practice by copying the text of some of their favorite authors as a way to develop their own style of written expression. The object of these next few assignments is to help you find your voice and write it for others to enjoy.

Keep your reading assignments together in a separate document from your writing assignments. Everything you save in these files will be handed in and graded.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

*Parts of this unit have been used and adapted from the following site/course. neabigread.org/books/myantonia/readers02.php.
There are many resources and much information found there that could help you with your study of this book (and possibly other books you may be reading). Feel free to browse it at your leisure.*

05.06.01 STORY BREAK #5 - English 10

STORY BREAK COURTESY OF "STORYCORPS"

Listen to the following story . . .

“Everybody would come to the house to see my mama...”

Write down how you can and can't relate to these people. Save your response in its own document/file to be submitted separate from the rest of the assignments.

*All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

05.07 My Antonia (Intro., Book One, Chapters) - English 10

Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text. Analyze the structure of a text, including how specific portions of the text relate to each other and the whole. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. Use the reading of a text to help determine style and approach to narrative writing. Read narrative writing to determine an appropriate approach to the writing of narratives. Include stylistic elements, from the study of a narrative text, in narrative writing.

Designed as a social network, this picture shows a detailed overview of the characters found in Willa Cather's novel 'My Ántonia: Wikimedia, Creative Commons, Bernhard WenzlDesigned as a social network, this picture shows a detailed overview of the characters found in Willa Cather's novel 'My Ántonia: Wikimedia, Creative Commons, Bernhard Wenzl

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

Reading assignment:

Read My Ántonia,
the Introduction (pp.3-6)
and Book One,Chapters 1-7
(pp.9-42).

Respond to the following prompts in note form for this reading section.

Copy and paste the information between the rows of asterisks below into a word document and complete the assignment accordingly. Save this information in your reading notes document.

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Comparing Jim Burden & Antonia Shimerda

*Ten-year-old Jim Burden arrives in Nebraska at the same time as 14-year-old Ántonia Shimerda.

1. Make a chart that describes several similarities and differences about their arrivals to the new land.

2. Note ten characteristics from these sections of the book that make this a narrative and who is telling the story.

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Back to your narrative writing.

Drafting: This activity will allow you to think about what ideas, from your brainstorming, are the most important to share with your readers.

Copy and paste the information between the rows of asterisks below into your narrative writing document. Label and complete it accordingly.

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Your Personal Narratives Continue

1. Using the two experience lists that you have created for your narratives, isolate the ten most important details from each list to write about.

2. Before you draft these essays, answer the following questions for each essay topic and list the questions and answers above the essay draft:

a. What ideas, feelings, traits, and impressions do you want to convey through your writing?

b. What particular thoughts and emotions do you want to emphasize?

c. How do you want this essay to influence and affect your reader?

d. Make sure you provide specific details that serve to satisfy your purpose.

3. Using the chosen topics' previous brainstorming information, and the listed details above, write at least five paragraphs for each experience. Please title and write these paragraphs on two separate pages to avoid confusion. Present each essay draft directly after the corresponding answer list from above.

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Something to keep in mind:

"A good story creates a dramatic effect, makes us laugh, gives us pleasurable fright, and/or gets us on the edge of our seats. A story has done its job if we can say, 'Yes, that captures what living with my father feels like,' or 'Yes, that’s what being cut from the football team felt like.'"
teacher.sduhsd.k12.ca.us/kburke/tips_for_writing_a_personal_narr.htm

* All of the above information and work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

05.08 Informed Reading (My Antonia chpts. 8-16) - English 10

Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text. Analyze the structure of a text, including how specific portions of the text relate to each other and the whole. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. Use the reading of a text to help determine style and approach to narrative writing. Read narrative writing to determine an appropriate approach to the writing of narratives. Include stylistic elements, from the study of a narrative text, in narrative writing.

Traditional Sod House: A Saskatchewan sod house courtesy of Wikimedia Creative CommonsTraditional Sod House: A Saskatchewan sod house courtesy of Wikimedia Creative Commons

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

Now back to our reading . . .

Copy and paste the following assignment between the rows of asterisks below into your reading document and complete it accordingly.

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Assignment 1

Additional historical background of the country and author will enrich your reading experience. Read the following documents. Once this is complete, move on to complete the guided reading assignment. ENJOY!
neabigread.org/books/myantonia/readers02.php
cather handout 1 (above)
cather handout 2 (above)

Assignment 2

1. Name ten facts that you feel you learned from these documents that will help you better understand the story, "My Antonia."

2. Describe the town of Black Hawk.

Assignment 3:

Read My Ántonia, Book One, Chapters 8-16 (pp.43-91).

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What is your narrative perspective?: Wikimedia, category:USNPS map symbolsWhat is your narrative perspective?: Wikimedia, category:USNPS map symbols
Narrative and Point of View

A narrator tells their story with a specific perspective created by their 'reality.' They can be a major or minor character in the story weaving her or his point of view, including ignorance and bias, into the telling of the tale.

View Point Options

1. A first-person narrator participates in the events of the novel, using “I.”
2. A distanced narrator (often not a character) does not participate in the events of the story and uses third person (he, she, and they) to narrate the story. The distanced narrator can be omniscient, able to read the minds of all characters within the novel.

My Antonia point of view

Willa Cather begins My Ántonia with an “Introduction” from an unnamed female acquaintance of Jim Burden’s. After this, the novel functions as a manuscript by Jim Burden, which he titles “My Ántonia.”

Jim records his childhood memories as an adult, reflecting more than twenty years later upon his past. In addition to Jim’s narration, there are several stories narrated by minor characters, and Book Four is told almost entirely from the perspective of Widow Stevens. The point of view often changes as Jim moves and grows.

Copy and paste the following assignment between the rows of asterisks below into your reading document and complete it accordingly.

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Assignment 4:

Answer the following question:

How does the author's choice concerning the structure of this story outlined above affect the general feeling of the text, such as the affect of mystery, tension, surprise, anticipation, interest, etc.?

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* All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

05.08.01 STORY BREAK #6 - English 10

STORY BREAK COURTESY OF "STORYCORPS"

Listen to the story above. . .

“I felt like a walking star in the hallway.”

Write down how you can and can't relate to these people. Save your response in its own document/file to be submitted separate from the rest of the assignments.

*All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

05.09 Applying your reading . . . "My Antonia" (Chpts. 17-19, & Book Two - Chpts. 1-5) - English 10

Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text. Analyze the structure of a text, including how specific portions of the text relate to each other and the whole. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. Use the reading of a text to help determine style and approach to narrative writing. Read narrative writing to determine an appropriate approach to the writing of narratives. Include stylistic elements, from the study of a narrative text, in narrative writing.

Writer: Wikimedia, Creative Commons, Thomas Nast (1840 - 1902)Writer: Wikimedia, Creative Commons, Thomas Nast (1840 - 1902) *All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading. Reading assignment: Read My Ántonia, Book One,Chapters 17-19 (pp.92-106),and Book Two, Chapters 1-5 (pp.109-130). Copy and paste the following assignment between the rows of asterisks below into your reading document and complete it accordingly. ***********************************************************************************************************************************************

How is the land a character in this novel? (Use specific examples and include reference page numbers.)

*********************************************************************************************************************************************** Back to YOUR writing: Organization: You want your narratives to help your readers live through the experience you are sharing. To do this you will need to employ writing methods that differ from traditional research or persuasive writing. You do not need to include a thesis and proof but rather you will want to use a structure that is based on methods designed to evoke emotional ties between you and your reader. Copy and paste the information between the rows of asterisks below into your narrative document and complete it accordingly. ***********************************************************************************************************************************************

Narrative Structure *Decide how you will address the following areas of focus to organize what you have written into a more intriguing narrative story. For each of your narratives, explain how you will use every organizational technique explained below.

A. Structure: choose from the following options for each of your narratives:

     1. chronological approach: following the event in the order of the action

     2. flashback sequence: thinking back and reminiscing about an event

     3. reflective mode: contemplating the deeper meaning, analyzing the feelings, and/or focusing in on internal experience evoked from the event.

B. Show, Don’t Tell: Don’t tell the reader what he or she is supposed to think or feel. Let the reader see, hear, smell, feel, and taste the experience directly, and let the sensory experiences lead him or her to your intended thought or feeling. Showing is harder than telling. It’s easier to say, "It was incredibly funny," than to write something that is incredibly funny. The rule of 'show, don’t tell' means that your job as a storyteller is not to interpret--it’s to select revealing details. You’re a sifter, not an explainer. An easy way to accomplish showing and not telling is to avoid the use of "to be" verbs. teacher.sduhsd.k12.ca.us/kburke/tips_for_writing_a_personal_narr.htm

C. Point of view: Usually narratives are shared from a first person point of view. Many times that person is a part of the action. For your two narratives, I would like you to use the first person view, but you can choose whether or not you are a part of the action or just an observer.

D. Tense: When is your narrative happening? Past, present or future or maybe a combination of all three.

E. Tone: What feelings do you want your readers to experience on their journey through your narratives? Make sure the words you use accomplish your objectives with the tone of the essay. If you are wanting changes to occur with the tone, choose words that will make that happen. What nuances in the meaning of words change the overall feeling of a piece despite the possible similarities in the denotations.

F. Literary functions: Don’t be afraid to include similes, sensory details, metaphors, symbols, alliteration, and personification in the writing of your narratives. Go beyond the literal description of the event, time, feelings, place, etc.

*********************************************************************************************************************************************** Reading Application: Copy and paste the information between the rows of asterisks below into your reading document and complete it accordingly. ***********************************************************************************************************************************************

Give examples, from your reading in “My Antonia,” of how Willa Cather employs each of the organizational techniques above. Provide the page number, the direct quote, and which technique you feel is being used.

*********************************************************************************************************************************************** Writing Application: Copy and paste the information between the rows of asterisks below into your narrative document and complete it accordingly. ***********************************************************************************************************************************************

Drafting: Use the information you have put together for your stories so far and write a draft for grading. In parenthesis, after each organizational technique used in your narratives, include the corresponding title of the technique you are using, so I can readily see your understanding of how to use them to your writing advantage. Make sure you use each of the organizational techniques at least once. WRITE YOUR DRAFT NOW.

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* All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

05.09.01 STORY BREAK #7 - English 10

STORY BREAK COURTESY OF "STORYCORPS" Listen to the story above. . . “I'd heard lines like this before, but this time it was different.” Write down how you can and can't relate to these people. Save your response in its own document/file to be submitted separate from the rest of the assignments. *All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

05.10 The Phraseology of Phrases

Read the material and play the games on all five of the websites above before moving on to the next assignment.

05.10.01 The Phraseology of Phrases

teacher-scored 21 points possible 60 minutes

Read and play the games on all five of the websites above, before moving on to the next assignment. Grammatical Application Now that you have read and played the games from the websites above, move on to the assignment below. Copy and paste the following assignment between the rows of asterisks below into your narrative document and complete it accordingly. ***********************************************************************************************************************************************

What did you learn? 1. Paraphrase (Tell the same information in your own words--this is different than a summary) what you learned and completed in each website above. Number and label each of your submissions with the same numbering and titles shown in the URLs. Test yourself and others 2. Create a bank of ten exam questions that will test ALL of the phrase knowledge you acquired from the exercises above. Be sure to include questions about EACH type of phrase you learned about.

*********************************************************************************************************************************************** Grading Criteria: 1. Five URL links' information is paraphrased 2. Ten exam questions that include information from each type of phrase *Submit this assignment now but save a copy for future reference as well. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.11 Drafts - English 10

teacher-scored 610 points possible 360 minutes

Making sense of your writing.: Fillster.com “Cool Pictures for Myspace”Making sense of your writing.: Fillster.com “Cool Pictures for Myspace”Revision Please complete and hand in your first drafts of your narratives now. Follow the instructions below to understand the completion steps for this assignment.

Assignment Steps

1. Submit your 1st drafts of both narratives.

2. Receive feedback from me and make the needed revisions.

3. Submit your 2nd draft of both narratives.

4. Receive feedback from me and make the needed revisions.

5. Submit your 3rd draft of both narratives.

6. Receive feedback from me and make the needed revisions.

7. Have a friend read the narratives and give feedback to you.

8. Submit your friend's revision suggestions and your paper with the included changes from the feedback.

9. Make the needed revisions and prepare your final draft.

10. Use the information you learned about phrases in lesson 05.10 and properly include and identify, by name (in parentheses directly after each word or phrase), five different types of phrases and five transitional words, in each of your narratives. You may find that they are already in your writing or they may need to be added.

11. Submit your final draft.

12. Along with your narratives, compile all of the reading and narrative sections of this unit together for grading and label them according to the following checklist.

Final Submission Inclusions:

a. Narrative brainstorming - lesson 05.04 "Brainstorming With A Purpose"

b. Begin your reading - lesson 05.05 "A Bit of Antonia/Cather Background"

c. Tandem reading and writing - lesson 05.07 "My Antonia"

d. Reading notes - lesson 05.08 "Informed Reading"

e. Reading & writing combined - lesson 05.09 "Applying you reading"

f. Final draft (include the identified phrases) - This is the final document created from the steps above.

g. Submission steps, from above, are completed All parts, above, must be completed and included for full credit. Grading Criteria:

Category Standards
Introduction & organization Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth, natural progression of experiences or events.
Development of ideas and content Use the most effective narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
Development of relationships, cohesion and flow Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).
Word choice, style and tone Use precise words and phrases, telling details, figurative language, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
Conclusion Provide a satisfying conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.
Conventions and language skills Has few or no errors in conventions, grammar or usage; uses parallel structure and variety in sentences, phrases and clauses

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.12 Let the writing rest for a bit - "My Antonia" (Book Two, Chapters 6-12 & Book Two, Chapters 13-15) - English 10

Read the information found in the URL link above before moving on to the next lesson.

05.12.01 Let the writing rest for a bit - "My Antonia" (Book Two, Chapters 6-12 & Book Two, Chptrs 13-15) - English 10

Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text. Analyze the structure of a text, including how specific portions of the text relate to each other and the whole. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. Use the reading of a text to help determine style and approach to narrative writing. Read narrative writing to determine an appropriate approach to the writing of narratives. Include stylistic elements, from the study of a narrative text, in narrative writing.

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

Figurative Language

Carefully read the information found in the URL link about Figurative Language, listed above.

Copy and paste the following assignment between the rows of asterisks below into your reading document and complete it accordingly.

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Answer the question about figurative language, below.

1. How important is figurative language to Willa Cather’s writing style?

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Reading assignment:

Read My Ántonia, Book Two, Chapters 6-12 (pp.131-169).

Copy and paste the following assignment between the rows of asterisks below into your reading document and complete it accordingly.

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Provide contextual evidence to answer the following prompts and include the corresponding page numbers.

1. Describe the changing social situation between Jim and Ántonia as she becomes a “hired girl” in town.
2. Why were “hired girls” “considered a menace to the social order”?
3. How do the different ways Lena and Ántonia dance highlight their contrasting personalities?

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Reading assignment:

Read My Ántonia, Book Two, Chapters 13-15 (pp.170-189).

Copy and paste the following assignment between the rows of asterisks below into your reading document and complete it accordingly.

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Answer the following questions listed below about the above reading assignment.

1. What happens to Jim when he spends the night at Wick Cutter’s?
2. Why does Jim respond with hatred for Ántonia?

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Symbols

Symbols are interpretive keys to the text. The craft of storytelling depends on symbols that present ideas and point toward new meanings. Most frequently, a specific object will be used to reference (or symbolize) a more abstract concept. The repeated appearance of an object suggests a non-literal or figurative meaning attached to the object––above and beyond face value. Symbols are often found in the novel’s title, at the beginning and end of the novel, within a profound action, or captured by the name or personality of a character. Symbols can be seen as the "thesis" of a narrative. The life of a novel is perpetuated by generations of readers interpreting and re-interpreting the main symbols of the novel. By decoding symbols, any reader can reveal a new interpretation of the novel.

Copy and paste the following assignment between the rows of asterisks below into your reading document and complete it accordingly.

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Find symbols in your reading of "My Antonia" by completing the following exercises.

1. Based on your last reading assignments, name and provide the referential page number for three symbols you observed.

2. Interpret these symbols and justify your interpretation in a paragraph for each.

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*All of the above information and work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

05.13 Reading & Writing; mostly writing (Book Three, Chapters 1-4) - English 10

Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

Reading, reading, and more reading to help your writing.: Bookwheel, from Agostino Ramelli's "Le diverse et artifiose machine," 1588 WikimediaReading, reading, and more reading to help your writing.: Bookwheel, from Agostino Ramelli's "Le diverse et artifiose machine," 1588 Wikimedia

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

Reading Assignment:

Read My Ántonia, Book Three, Chapters 1-4 (pp.191-218).

And the Writing Continues:

It should be your goal to write about your experiences in such a way that your audience empathizes with your experience because of its "relatable" quality. In other words, you are trying to get your readers to relate to your experiences through your words. Focus on the details that make it universally appealing.

Copy and paste the following assignment between the rows of asterisks below into your narrative document and complete it accordingly.

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Revising:

Revise your last drafts of each narrative according to the criteria mentioned above. Be sure to save and label each of your old and revised versions of these stories, in your personal narrative document.

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*All of the above information and work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

05.13.01 STORY BREAK #8 - English 10

STORY BREAK COURTESY OF "STORYCORPS"

Listen to the following story . . .

“We didn't really hit it off that first day.”

Write down how you can and can't relate to these people. Save your response in its own document or file to be submitted separate from the rest of the assignments.

*All of the above information and work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

05.14 The reading of a Classic (Book Four, Chapters 1-4 & Book Five, Chapters 1-3) - English 10

teacher-scored 250 points possible 360 minutes

Reading Assignment:

Read My Ántonia, Book Four,Chapters 1-4 (pp. 221-238). The Plot Unfolds The author artfully builds a plot structure to create expectations, increase suspense, and inform character development by:

a. A plot, propelled by a crisis, will reach a climax, and close with a resolution.

b. Foreshadowing and flashbacks allow the author to defy time while telling the story.

c. Clever pacing or appropriate timing of the events, helps to keep the reader interested in the story. According to Betty Kort, there are three levels to My Ántonia:

    1. First, the obvious plot line of Jim’s and Ántonia’s friendship;

    2. Second, the development of the Nebraskan land;

    3. Third, the “story-scape,” which includes the retelling of myths and stories Cather integrates throughout her novel.

Revising Reminder: Continue revising your narratives with the above information in mind.

Reading Assignment:

Finish My Ántonia, Book Five, Chapters 1-3 (pp. 241-272).

Read handout 3 (attachment above) and complete the following activity. Copy and paste the following assignment between the rows of asterisks below into your reading notes document and complete it accordingly. ***********************************************************************************************************************************************

A Theory Some of Cather’s contemporary readers criticized "My Ántonia" for its lack of plot and structure.

Do you agree with this opinion? Why or why not? Answer this question in a short, organized, essay of three to four paragraphs, label and save your answer to this question in your reading notes.

*********************************************************************************************************************************************** Final Submission Inclusions:

a. Reading notes - lesson 05.12.01 "Let the writing rest for . . ."

b. Final narrative drafts - lesson 05.13 "Reading and Writing; . . ."

c. Responding to the theory - lesson 05.14 (above) "The reading of a Classic . . . "

Grading Criteria: Completion of the final submissions listed above according to the directions given in each of the assignments.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER *Congratulations! You have just read an American Literary Classic!

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.14.01 STORY BREAK #9 - English 10

STORY BREAK COURTESY OF "STORYCORPS"

Listen to the following stories . . .

“In my old school, I never went to class.”

--And--

“I was working for the state of Colorado...”

Write down how you can and can't relate to these people.

* All of the above information and work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

05.15 Let's Finish This Thing! - English 10 - English 10

teacher-scored 200 points possible 90 minutes

Let’s Finish This Thing! Okay the crowning jewel of any paper is what English teacher’s live for! Well, not really--but I know that students sometimes think so.

Pull out your red pens, people! It is that dreaded time. We are going to make your narratives bleed (wink)--at least figuratively. You need to make sure that your final version, your crowning jewel, is free from errors in conventional writing rules.

Copy and paste the following assignment between the rows of asterisks into your narrative document and complete it accordingly. Indicate with an asterisk after each listed task to show you have completed it. below ***********************************************************************************************************************************************

COMPLETE THE FOLLOWING FOR BOTH OF YOUR NARRATIVES Follow the steps below to see what and how to go about the revision process in a systematic way . . .

1. Run a spell check and make the needed corrections.

2. Make sure a grammar check was included in the spelling check

3. Make the needed corrections.

4. Keep in mind that if you are trying to depict a type of language or grammar structure that is not the norm (as far as formal 'rules' go), but consistent with the character you are representing in your story, feel free to do so, but make sure it is obvious and used infrequently enough as to not confuse your readers.

5. Read your narratives out loud to ensure the sentences flow and make sense. This is the easiest way to catch awkward, incomplete, or run-on sentences. If a sentence does not 'sound' right, mark it and come back to clean it up after you have read the entire narrative. This will give you time to think about how to go about correcting it.

6. Once your own corrections are in place, present your stories to two to three trusted friends for reading and critique. Please do not take their suggestions personally. Allow them to tell you their true feelings about your “masterpieces.” It is the only way to know how you are communicating, or not, to your readers.

7. Take all of the corrections to heart and apply those that make sense in the final draft.

8. Remove all 'phrase' identifications (in the parentheses).

9. Submit your final papers. BRAVO! I CAN’T WAIT TO SEE IT!

*********************************************************************************************************************************************** Final Submission Inclusions:

a. A copy of the check list, above, with indications that each task has been completed

b. Final copy of both narratives without the phrase identifications

Grading Criteria:

Category Standard
Introduction & organization Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth, natural progression of experiences or events.
Development of ideas and content Use the most effective narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
Development of relationships, cohesion and flow Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).
Word choice, style and tone Use precise words and phrases, telling details, figurative language, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
Conclusion Provide a satisfying conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.
Conventions and language skills Has few or no errors in conventions, grammar or usage; uses parallel structure and variety in sentences, phrases and clauses

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

*Students that complete this with exceptional talent will have their narratives selected for use in our school paper to be 'published' in the Creative Minds section. You will be notified if yours is selected for this purpose.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.16 Telling Your Story - English 10

teacher-scored 100 points possible 120 minutes

9-10SLa Verbal and/or Visual Representation Assignment

Practice reading both of your narratives in front of people or at least the mirror, until you can do so without hesitations or stumbling. Include the title of each narrative in the readings. Be aware of your inflection. Remember, you are telling a story, and it needs emotion to keep it engaging.

Use ONE of the options below to present your verbal portrayal of your stories. If you choose option b you will need to film yourself presenting your narratives. Either presentation will require a dramatic flare.

a. Call my Google number and present your narratives verbally to me.

b. Post your narrative readings to YouTube and send me the URL. If you choose this route you may want to post it with an unlisted URL setting and send me the link; let me know if this is the route you want to take and if you need help with the settings. Once you have posted your verbal/visual presentation and sent me the link or note, I would also like you to submit a short paragraph below explaining how you felt about this experience.

Grading Criteria:

1. Narrative title is included.

2. Voice tone is natural and appropriate for the subject matter being presented.

3. There are no hesitations or stumbling.

4. Your voice has inflection to add interest.

5. Paragraph explaining how you felt about and your experience with this assignment is posted. NICE WORK!

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.17 Story Break Submissions

teacher-scored 100 points possible 90 minutes

Submit all of your responses to the Story Corps narratives. Grading Criteria: 1. All nine 'Story Breaks' are included, titled, and responded to.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.18 Independent Study - English 10

teacher-scored 50 points possible 90 minutes

9-10RL10 Show Me What You Have Learned

Using the material we have covered in this course, read and analyze the following poem using narrative principles and writing. Referring to and drawing out contextual ideas and themes from the poem below, pretend you experienced what is happening in this poetic expression.

Write a short narrative using this poem as the backdrop for your imagined experience of the same vein.

Houseman, A. E. "Loveliest of Trees." A Shropshire Lad. New York: Penguin, 1999. (1896)

Loveliest of Trees, the cherry now Is hung with bloom along the bough, And stands about the woodland ride Wearing white for Eastertide.

 

Now, of my threescore years and ten,Twenty will not come again, And take from seventy springs a score, It only leave me fifty more.

 

An since to look at things in bloom

Fifty springs are little room, About the woodlands I will go To see the cherry hung with snow.

 

Write your narrative and submit it for grading now. Be sure to revise this before you submit it.

Grading Criteria:

Category Standard
Introduction & organization Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth, natural progression of experiences or events.
Development of ideas and content Use the most effective narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
Development of relationships, cohesion and flow Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).
Word choice, style and tone Use precise words and phrases, telling details, figurative language, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
Conclusion Provide a satisfying conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.
Conventions and language skills Has few or no errors in conventions, grammar or usage; uses parallel structure and variety in sentences, phrases and clauses

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.