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2nd Quarter, Language Arts 10

0.00 Start Here - English 10

Course Description

The skills and understandings students are expected to demonstrate in this class have wide applicability outside the classroom or workplace.

In this class, students will:

  • undertake the close, attentive reading that is at the heart of understanding and enjoying complex works of literature and language mediums
  • perform the critical reading necessary to be able to carefully analyze and understand the available information in literature and media
  • actively seek the wide, deep, and thoughtful engagement with high-quality literary and informational texts that builds knowledge, enlarges experience, and broadens worldviews
  • demonstrate reasoning and use of evidence that is essential in deliberations

In short, students who meet the the requirements in this class will develop the skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening that are the foundation for any creative and purposeful expression in language.

Class Overview - HOW TO COMPLETE THIS CLASS

It will be necessary for you to read the course lessons to complete the assignments, master the material, and finish the class in a timely manner. If you try to complete the course by using the "assignments" link, you will not be successful. Please view the power point presentation, above, for clarification on how to view and complete the course through the course modules.

REMEMBER TO SCROLL DOWN, ON THE COURSE PAGE, TO VIEW ALL OF THE LESSONS.

WHAT THIS CLASS IS: A .25 credit class to fulfill the English 10 requirement, according to the Utah core graduation requirements.

WHAT THIS CLASS IS NOT: This class is NOT an easy way to get your English credit without doing any real work.

PREREQUISITES

1. 9th grade level reading and writing skills

2. A computer with Internet access

3. A working e-mail address, that does not block our messages with your spam filter

4. Word processing software to type your assignments

5. Course supplies listed at the beginning of each quarter

6. Acrobat Reader, QuickTime reader, and a PowerPoint reader (all available free online)

HOW YOU WILL BE GRADED

Each assignment has a maximum number of points you can earn. You can revise all assignments until you are satisfied with your scores. When you have completed all of the course assignments with 70% accuracy or better, you can take the final exam. Your final grade is determined by the average between the course assignments and the final test. The assignments count as 50% of your final score, and the final exam counts as 50%. If you score below 60% on the final exam, you will not earn credit for the class.

GRADING SCALE

A 90-100

B 80-89

C 70-79

D 60-69

No credit - below 60

FINAL EXAM

When you have finished all the assignments you need for your credit, you will take the final exam under the supervision of an EHS approved proctor.

ABOUT HOMEWORK

Please complete assignments according to the instructions given in each class section. Revise assignments, as necessary, to ensure you are mastering the material and earning the best grade possible.

CLASS PLAGIARISM POLICY

Copying someone else's sentences, phrases or organization of ideas and failing to give credit to the original author is plagiarism. In some papers it is appropriate to quote a short section of someone else's exact words, but when you do, that section needs to be set off in quotation marks or otherwise set apart, and the author identified either in a sentence, or in a parenthetical note. You also need to provide an internal citations to allow readers of your writing to know where facts, figures, and/or ideas, presented in your writing, were learned if you are not the original source of that information. Plagiarism is unlawful and unethical, and against the EHS Honor Code. If you turn in a plagiarized assignment, recourse will be taken by your teacher.

HOW TO TURN IN HOMEWORK

Save all of your work on your own hard drive and in the submission sections of the class. When you turn in your homework, ALWAYS save and keep a copy of it for yourself on your hard drive.

00.01.01 Student Software Needs

 

Students need access to a robust internet connection and a modern web browser.

This class may also require the Apple QuickTime plug-in to view media.

For students using a school-issued Chromebook, ask your technical support folks to download the QuickTime plug-in and enable the plug-in for your Chromebook.

$0.00

00.02 About Me - English 10

teacher-scored 5 points possible 15 minutes

Getting to know you! Copy and paste the following questions between the rows of asterisks below into a word document and answer them accordingly. *******************************************************************

In a numbered LIST, provide the following information:

1. What is your first and last name, parent(s) name(s), and contact information for both you and your parent(s)?

2. Where do you go to school?

3. What is your counselor's full name and email address/contact information?

4. What year will you graduate and have you read the EHS Honor Code and understand that this class needs to be finished within the 10 week limit?

In a few sentences, tell me about yourself being sure to answer the following questions in the process:

          a. Tell me something about yourself.

          b. Why are you taking this class and what do you expect to get out of it?

          c. What is one word that best describes you?

By the way, here is the EHS honor code: "As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers, and staff with respect."

*******************************************************************

I am excited to get to know you! Grading Criteria:

1. Writing mechanics

2. All requested information is included in your numbered list.

3. You have written the pertinent information (a.b.c.) in your final sentences.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.00 RESEARCH WRITING - English 10

Experimenting with the facts: renjith krishnan / FreeDigitalPhotos.netExperimenting with the facts: renjith krishnan / FreeDigitalPhotos.netResearch Writing

You are now entering the research realm. There is no need to be intimidated by the formality of the concept. The process of researching will enable you to learn how to process and utilize large quantities of information so as to find answers to questions that are not readily available to you.

Grading Criteria:

Please refer to the criteria provided with each assignment to understand how you will be graded and the level of proficiency that is expected on all of your work.

Course Overview:

"The Good Earth" - Research Writing
Uncovering the facts and background.

For this quarter you will be graded on your depth of reading of “The Good Earth” as well as your work on a final research paper about a selected Chinese topic and the corresponding writing process.

It will be a fact-finding mission using historical perspectives.

Here we go!

MATERIALS NEEDED:

1. Novel: "The Good Earth" by Pearl S. Buck
2. Strong desire to learn
3. Research materials (you will find these per my instructions)
4. Internet access

*This lesson was adapted, with permission, from a lesson plan presented at the 2003 Core Knowledge® National Conference, The Good Earth

04.00.01 Independent Study - A Writing Sample - English 10

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

Show Me What You Can Do - Consider this a pre-test of your writing skills

In order for me to get an idea of your writing skills, I would like you to complete the following writing assignment, employing all of the language skills you have gleaned in your education thus far.

Read and analyze the following poem. Isolate the theme by drawing out contextual clues and ideas, and compare them to your own life experiences about the topic. As you decipher the meaning and purpose of this piece of literature, back your explanations with evidence, referential material, and notes. Please avoid the use of "I" and other personal pronouns in your explication.

Baca, Jimmy Santiago. "I Am Offering This Poem to You." Immigrants in Our Own Land and Selected Early Poems. New York:New Directions, 1977.(1977)

I am offering this poem to you,
since I have nothing else to give.
Keep it like a warm coat
when winter comes to cover you,
or like a pair of thick socks
the cold cannot bite through,

I love you,

I have nothing else to give you,
so it is a pot full of yellow corn
to warm your belly in winter,
it is a scarf for your head, to wear
over your hair, to tie up around your face,

I love you,

Keep it, treasure this as you would if you were lost, needing direction,
in the wilderness life becomes when mature;
and in the corner of your drawer,
tucked away like a cabin or hogan
in dense trees, come knocking,
and I will answer, give you directions,
and let you warm yourself by this fire,
rest by this fire, and make you feel safe

I love you,

It's all I have to give,
and all anyone needs to live,
and to go on living inside,
when the world outside
no longer cares if you live or die;
remember,

I love you

By Jimmy Santiago Baca, from IMMIGRANTS IN OUR OWN LAND, copyright 1979 by Jimmy Santiago Baca. Reprinted by permission of New Directions Publishing Corp.

* All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

04.01 Who Was Pearl S. Buck? - English 10

Read for understanding to make logical inferences. Determine the central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. Read and comprehend informational texts independently and proficiently.

Pearl S. Buck (1892 - 1973): flicker.com photos Pearl S. Buck (1892-1973) by BDGymPearl S. Buck (1892 - 1973): flicker.com photos Pearl S. Buck (1892-1973) by BDGym

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

Throughout this course we will be studying Pearl Buck’s Book "The Good Earth" and learning how to complete a research paper that deals with some aspect of China.

We will cover all of the pertinent research steps to ensure that you are learning how to create a knowledgeable, comprehensive, paper. You will be an "expert" in your topic of choice by the end of this quarter!

Assignment:

Please read through the following historical information and view the attached picture files, about Pearl S. Buck, to better understand who she was, what she wrote about, and why.

Make notes about any important events that you feel may have directly influenced her perspective on China, the world, and people in general.

*Save these notes in a document to be referred to in future assignments.

Pearl Sydenstricker Buck Biography Pearl S. Buck was born on June 26, 1892 in her grandmother’s West Virginia home. She was the fourth of seven children to Caroline and Absalom Sydenstricker.

When she was only three months old, the family moved to China so her missionary parents could pursue their work. While in China, Pearl grew up among farming peasants in the small village of Chinkiang.

Pearl’s first language was Chinese, and she grew up with the customs and traditions of China surrounding and influencing her. Pearl had a Chinese nurse that told her the Buddhist and Taoist legends. These were some of her first literary influences.Pearl was also strongly influenced by her mother, who taught her the English language and told her stories of America. There were many influential moments and experiences in China that helped to mold Pearl into the person she later became. As a child, Pearl studied Confucian philosophy and Chinese history.

Later, when she was older, she had the opportunity to work in an institution to rehabilitate slave girls who had fled from cruel owners. At one point she and her family even had to flee from their village to the seacoast during the Boxer Rebellion because of Western imperialism. At that tenuous time, militias were formed. The motto they served under was “Protect the country, destroy the foreigners.” The fact that the Buck family were "foreigners" made them targets for the violence. The Militia groups were persecuting Christians, so the family had to stay in hiding for a while. At one point, her father was made to witness a woman, whom he had converted, get stoned to death for her beliefs. Pearl was well aware of the implications inherent in these childhood experiences.

In 1910, at the age of 18, Pearl returned to the U.S. to earn a degree at Randolf-Macon Women’s College in Lynchburg, VA. The adjustment to American life for her was significant. Initially, she found American girls to be "frivolous to a fault," but she soon came to admire them for their freedom and spontaneity. This was in direct contrast to the culture and life she had led and seen, growing up in China.

Pearl studied Philosophy and graduated in 1914. She stayed in America to teach but eventually had to leave after one semester to go back to China and her ill mother. She took her mother’s place as a counselor to Chinese women. She spent her time listening to the women's viewpoints and helping them to solve their problems.

In 1917, at the age of 25 years, Pearl met and married John Lossing Buck, an agricultural missionary. They led a very unhappy life together. She admitted later that she married him because she felt that it was expected of girls her age at the time. From 1920-1933 the Bucks lived in Nanking where they were both employed at the University.

In 1921 Pearl gave birth to her only natural child, Carol. Carol was afflicted with the disease, PKU, which resulted in mental disabilities. Pearl came back to the U.S. to put Carol in a full-time care facility in New Jersey. Pearl also adopted and raised six other children.

In 1930, Buck began to focus more heavily on her writing. She started writing short articles and then graduated to novels.

Pearl made the decision to move back to the U.S. permanently in 1934. After moving to the US Pearl met Richard Walsh and fell in love. This led to her divorce at the age of 43 yrs to John Buck in 1935.

Richard and Pearl bought a home in Pennsylvania and lived at Green Hills Farm with her six adopted children. It was at this residence that she wrote over 100 works before her death. The Good Earth was published in 1931 and was one of her first novels. It was on the best seller’s list for 21 months and won the Pulitzer and the Nobel Prizes. It was banned in China because of its controversial content, exposing the unfair treatment of women in China.

Pearl died of lung cancer on March 6, 1973.

FURTHER READINGS CAN BE FOUND @ english.upenn.edu/Projects/Buck/biography.html & oprah.com/oprahsbookclub/Biography-of-Pearl-S-Buck-Author-of-The-Good-Earth

* All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

04.01.01 SIDE NOTES #1

To help you better understand the country and culture that you are studying, read the following noted section of Chinese history found in the URL link above and take notes on it for future reference and to help you with your research efforts.

The Origins of Chinese Civilization: c. 2200 - 221 BC

Xia: c. 2200 - c. 1750 BC
Shang: c. 1750 - c. 1040 BC
Western Zhou: c. 1100 - 771 BC
Eastern Zhou, The Spring & Autumn Period, and the Warring States: 771 - 221 BC

* All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

04.02 Laying the Ground Work - English 10

Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

Cultural contrast: pagoda with Hong Kong sky scrapers behind it Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.netCultural contrast: pagoda with Hong Kong sky scrapers behind it Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net *All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

 

Research Writing and “The Good Earth”

The objectives for you writing this research on China are the following:

1. To familiarize you with an aspect of China’s culture during the time period in which The Good Earth was written.

2. To gain an overall knowledge of where Wang Lung, the main character in the book, obtains his ancestry in an effort to better understand the story as a whole.

3. To research a topic and then be able to apply your new knowledge in a well written research paper and become an "expert" in your topic of choice.

4. To help you read “The Good Earth” with a specific purpose in mind.

 

1st Assignment:

Please choose a topic that relates to China in some way. Be sure to keep it simple. This will help you with your research. I have provided some options below but you are welcome to choose one of your own. Keep in mind that your paper will be four to five pages long, so make sure you are jazzed about your topic of choice.  You will be researching your chosen topic with the idea that you are becoming an expert on the subject and its relationship to China. You can choose the direction of your research as well as its purpose.

Research Topic Choices:

1. Traditional Food

2. Religious temples, rites, and devotions

3. Superstitions or customs

4. Architecture

5. The clothing of the wealthy and the poor

6. The Rice Harvest

7. The writing of characters

8. Rickshaws and other modes of transportation

9. Sports

10. Games

11. Entertainment

12. Medicine and Health

13. History of the government

14. Two or three main customs

15. Foot binding

16. Geography/topography of China

17. Living quarters of the affluent and poor people

18. The influence of people from other countries etc.

19. Family heritage

20. The role of women

21. The role of children

22. The role of men

23. Class system

24. Symbols of prosperity

25. Work and industry

26. The arts (two or three focus areas)

Poetic coupling: Farmers Working In Rice Field Image: sakhorn38 / FreeDigitalPhotos.netPoetic coupling: Farmers Working In Rice Field Image: sakhorn38 / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

2nd Assignment:

Geospatial Application - Hands On Learning

Using a search engine of your choice, find a location in your area that has ties, connections, or relation to China or your chosen research topic. Provide me with the URL link to the map of the location. Visit the place and write a detailed description of what it is like, what you experienced there, and whether or not it will be a useful source of research for your chosen topic.

 

* All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

04.02.01 SIDE NOTES #2

To help you better understand the country and culture that you are studying, read the following noted section of Chinese history, found in the URL link above, and take notes on it for future reference and to help you with your research efforts.

The Early Empire: 221 BC - AD 589

Qin: 221 - 206 BC
Earlier Han, the Wang Man Interregnum, and the Later Han
The Three Kingdoms and the Dynasties of the North and South

* All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

04.03 A Guided Tour of "The Good Earth" - English 10

Read to make logical inferences from texts, citing specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. Analyze how and why individuals, events and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media. Conduct a sustained research project based on focused questions and explanatory/expository writing, demonstrating an understanding of the subject under investigation. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism. Write routinely over extended time frames. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

Hello world!: digitalart / FreeDigitalPhotos.netHello world!: digitalart / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

Begin Reading The Novel Keep in mind that this is a fictitious novel but the material and ideas came from Buck’s personal experiences that compelled her to depict the conditions, beliefs, and realities of China.

Assignment 1:

While you are reading create the following 3 documents.

1. Responses to the reading guide prompts, below.

2. Research notes on any information from the novel that you feel would benefit your research paper, keeping in mind your topic of choice.

BE SURE TO INCLUDE REFERENCES AND PAGE NUMBERS TO BACK UP ANY AND ALL OF YOUR CLAIMS, OBSERVATIONS, ANSWERS, AND NOTES.

*Copy and paste the information between the rows of asterisks below into a word document. Answer the questions and prompts accordingly. ****************************************************************************************************

Reader’s Journal For The Good Earth

Chapter 1

1.What was prepared for the anticipated wedding and why?

2.How does Wang Lung compare to the people in the city?

3.What is the significance of Wang Lung’s braid?

4.Why didn't Wang Lung want his new bride to be pretty?

5. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 2

1. Describe “the good life” according to Wang Lung.

2. What is the “woman’s role” as shown in this chapter?

4. What is the good news in this chapter?

5. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 3

1. Analyze Olan’s approach to giving birth.

2. What was done to celebrate the birth and why?

3. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 4

1. What superstition is tied to being “too fortunate”?

2. Do noodles symbolize something?

3. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 5

1. Describe a good luck tradition for the new year?

2. What was done to avoid bad luck?

3. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 6

1. How was the land negotiated and what does this mean?

2. What does the land symbolize and why?

3. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 7

1. What is inferred about the beliefs regarding “destiny”?

2. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 8

1. What did Olan tell Wang Lung about the girl-child and what does this say about the standing of women in this society?

2. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 9

1.How has Wang Lung’s social standing changed and why?

2. How do these changes reflect the Chinese society at large, at this time?

3. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 10

1. What is a fire wagon?

2. What is the significance of the silver that Wang Lung obtained?

3. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 11

1. Describe the peasant street life that Olan’s family experiences in this chapter.

2. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 12

1. Describe the differences between the two cities of Anhwei and Kiangsu as well as the street peasants and the rich Americans.

2. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 13

1. Describe the differences and similarities between Wang Lung and the rich man on the other side of the wall.

2. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 14

1. Describe the significance of the rickshaw in this chapter. What position does it put Wang Lung in?

2. What unspoken messages were shared between three or more different characters in this chapter and what did they mean?

3. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 15

1. Name three ways in which characters showed change in this chapter and explain why each happened.

2. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 16

1. What is the hidden treasure? Name three ways the treasure influences the characters?

2. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 17

1. What is the significance of hired help?

2. How is Olan’s role, as a woman, changing and why?

3. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 18

1. What factors are affecting the traditional familial roles? (Give three examples and explain why)

2. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 19

1. The hidden treasure plays a key role in this chapter. What is this role and the far reaching implications? (Include at least 3 detailed observations)

2. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 20

1. How has wealth had a role in the change of powers and perceptions in Olan’s house?

2. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 21

1. Describe three internal struggles with self that are depicted in this chapter.

2. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 22

1. Trace the roots of three negative changes depicted in this chapter.

2. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 23

1. How is the “match making” being used for power?

2. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 24

1. Name three examples of characters hiding or trying to hide and explain why this is happening.

2. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 25

1. What is the significance of family ties depicted in this chapter? (Give three examples with explanations)

2. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 26

1. How do the negative experiences bring a full circle perspective on life to Wang Lung?

2. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 27

1. How does wealth cause contradictions in Wang Lung’s life experiences? (Three examples with details & references)

2. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 28

1. How is Wang Lung handling the differences in life philosophies around him?

2. How many characters are dependent on Wang Lung and why?

3. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 29

1. How is the humble peasant farmer becoming the old wealthy lord?

2. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 30

1. How has Wang Lung set his children up for failure?

2. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 31

1. What are the roles of the women in the house now and why? (Three examples)

2. How do the roles of the women in the house compare to Olan’s role in Wang Lung’s house?

3. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 32

1. Why was Wang Lung happy that the nephew’s woman had a girl?

2. Why is the birth of the girl baby joyous occasion?

3. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 33

1. How do Wang Lung’s choices affect 3 or more of his family members in a negative way?

2. Information pertinent to my research topic.

Chapter 34

1. Describe the full circle journey of Wang Lung.

2. Information pertinent to my research topic.

**************************************************************************************************** Assignment 2 Final analysis: Write as much as you need to in order to thoroughly explain the prompts and question below.

Copy and paste the prompts between the rows of asterisks below into a word document, and respond to them accordingly. ****************************************************************************************************

a. Choose three characters from "The Good Earth" that have multiple and/or conflicting motivations throughout the story. (either consistently conflicting or periodically conflicting).

b. Explain how these characters develop individually over the course of the story and how they interact with the other characters.

c. How do the conflicts of these three characters advance the plot or help to develop the overall theme of the story?

**************************************************************************************************** * All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

04.03.01 SIDE NOTES #3

To help you better understand the country and culture that you are studying, read the following noted section of Chinese history found in the URL link above and take notes on it for future reference and to help you with your research efforts.

The Second Empire: 589 - 1644

Sui: 589 - 618
Tang: 618 - 907
Northern and Southern Song: 960 - 1279
Yuan (Mongol): 1279 - 1368
Ming: 1368 - 1644

* All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

04.04 The Research Process - English 10

teacher-scored 600 points possible 360 minutes

Show me what you know.: Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.netShow me what you know.: Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Further Study, Research, and Writing: You have already begun your research for this paper through taking notes on the previous assignments. Using these notes let’s further investigate your chosen topic to prepare you for the additional research required for this class.

Research Steps:

Research Parameters/Requirements -

Part 1 -A minimum of 4 sources :

a. Two sources should come from outside of the internet.

b. Use the local library.

c. Consider using magazines, books, encyclopedias, interviews, films, or people that have a direct connection/authority on your topic.

d. Your four sources need to all be different types.

Part 2 - Determine if your sources are credible using the following:

a. Is the author an expert in this field and do they site their sources?

b. How old is the source and how does that date help or hinder the accuracy of the information being presented?

c. What purpose did the source have?

d. What type of source does your reader require?

e. Verify the internet sources are being produced by named and qualified individuals, reputable universities, official government agencies, and not simply opinion blogs or collaborative sites or chat rooms. (owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/588/02/)

f. Make sure you number each source in the list.

g. MLA documentation style - Please view the included MLA tutorial links, in the URL links below. They will walk you through how to use this method of documentation. Note Taking

Part 3 -Think of at least five questions about your topic that you would like answered:

a. Number each question.

b. Begin reading your sources.

c. When you find a fact, information, or quote that relates to one of your questions; write it down under the corresponding question.

d. Be sure to include your source title, list number, and page reference to correspond back to your list of sources.

Writing Steps

Begin The Writing Now

Part 1 - The Title Page

a. Title of paper, centered and in the middle of the page.

b. Your full name, class and quarter all in the bottom right-hand corner.

Part 2 - Outline and Drafting

a. Organize your questions and notes from the exercises above in any order that makes sense to you.    (chronological, linear, logical, etc.)

b. Rephrase the questions into statements in order to create good topic sentences.

c. Use the facts you have learned as the supporting evidence in each paragraph in the body of your paper.

d. Figure out the order that you want to present your information.

e. Make sure the topic and paragraph ideas transition well.

Part 3 - Write your rough draft

Notes To Remember

-You should now have your paper starting to form. It will be VERY rough at this point, but it should include the sources and main ideas that you will want included. This may change a bit as you clean it up, but for now get it written down.

-Any information that you include from a particular source needs to be documented, even in the rough draft. Neglecting to do this at this point will make a lot more work for you in the future. Final Submission Inclusions: a. poem writing sample

- overview 04.0 "Research Writing" "Independent Study

- A Writing Sample" b. Pearl S. Buck notes and timeline

- lesson 04.01 "Who Was Pearl S. Buck?" c. topic choice and geospatial experience

- lesson 04.02 "Laying the Ground Work" d. reading notes, timeline, and final analysis

- lesson 04.03 "A Guided Tour . . ." e. four sources listed in MLA documentation style

- "Research Parameters/Requirements"

- Part 1 f. five source questions and answers, documented to source list

- "Note Taking"

- Part 2 g. title page, outline, and draft

- "Begin The Writing Now"

- Part 3 All parts above must be completed and included for full credit.

Grading Criteria: 1. All parts listed above are included and clearly labeled. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.05 Draft - It Pretty Much Writes Itself - English 10

teacher-scored 300 points possible 360 minutes

Putting pencil to paper.: Image- digitalart / FreeDigitalPhotos.netPutting pencil to paper.: Image- digitalart / FreeDigitalPhotos.netThe Hard Part is Over! The Fun Begins! Before you take on the final drafts--yes, I said DRAFTS (plural)--consider the following . . .

I.Questions to consider:

1. Who is your audience?

2. What structure are you going to follow?

3. What does the audience want to learn? (Surprises and details!)

4. How is your audience going to understand? (Clarification)

2nd Draft Outline - Using Your Rough Draft:

II.Writing the opening paragraph:

1. The opening paragraph must include your thesis statement for the paper.

     a. This should be the best sentence you’ve ever written!

     b. It should be clear, concise, and to the point.

     c. It will state the main purpose of your paper.

2. Start with something interesting and catchy.

     a. Just because this is a research paper doesn’t mean it has to be boring!

     b. As with any paper, your lead should pull your reader in and make them want to continue reading.

3. Introduce the points you will be using to support the thesis of your paper. These points will be elaborated upon in the body. II. Writing the body of your paper.

     a. When writing, follow your outline from your research, your rough draft and your thesis statement.

     b. Each main idea to be addressed in the body of the paper should be included in the topic paragraph of your paper or the thesis statement.

     c. Main topics in the introduction should lead the details in your body paragraphs.

     d. Make sure the facts, presented in the body of the paper, tie back into the thesis and that they all transition and flow easily from one paragraph to another. Each paragraph should address a supporting detail of the thesis.

III. Writing the closing paragraph (are we done already?)

1. Summarize the main points in a fresh way.

2. Use a strong closing sentence –NO “so in conclusion . . .” or "I have just shown you . . ."

Submit this 2nd draft for an initial score and feedback for revision. Revisions Complete your draft writing, from above, following the steps below.

Assignment Parts:

1. Submit your 3rd draft of your research paper.

2. Receive feedback from me and make the needed revisions.

3. Submit your 4th draft of your research paper.

4. Receive feedback from me and make the needed revisions.

5. Submit your 5th draft of your research paper.

6. Receive feedback from me and make the needed revisions.

7. Have a friend read your paper and give feedback to you.

8. Submit your friend's revision suggestions and your paper with the included changes from the feedback.

9. Make the needed revisions and prepare your final draft.

10. Submit your final draft.

Final Submission Inclusions: a. The four drafts and revisions from this assignment. Grading Criteria:

Category Standards
Introduction, organization, format & media Topic is introduced & each element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; includes formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
Development of ideas and content Topic is thoroughly developed with significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other necessary information and examples using credible sources
Development of relationships, cohesion and flow Uses appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
Word choice, style and tone Uses precise language, topic-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic. Establishes and maintains a formal style and objective tone while attending to norms and conventions.
Conclusion Provides a concluding statement or section that illustrates the importance of the topic discussed, follows and supports the information or explanations presented, and provides a sense of confident closure, beyond just repetition of earlier statements
Conventions and language skills Has few or no errors in conventions, grammar or usage; uses parallel structure and variety in sentences, phrases and clauses

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.05.01 SIDE NOTES #4

To help you better understand the country and culture that you are studying, read the following noted section of Chinese history found in the URL link above and take notes on it for future reference and to help you with your research efforts.

The Birth of Modern China: 1644 - present

Qing (Manchu): 1644 - 1911
Republican China: 1911 - 1949
The People's Republic of China: 1949 - present

* All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

04.06 Thesis My Thesis . . . - English 10

teacher-scored 50 points possible 60 minutes

What question are you answering?: Image: Michelle Meiklejohn / FreeDigitalPhotos.netWhat question are you answering?: Image: Michelle Meiklejohn / FreeDigitalPhotos.netTips For Writing A Thesis Statement Now that you have investigated and written about your topic, in depth, it is time to finalize your thesis statement. You have discovered what truly interests you about your subject through your research and writing. You now need to review your writing and your previous thesis statement to ensure that it states what you have presented in your paper. This statement serves as the main idea for your paper. It should express what you believe your research proves. An effective thesis statement tells readers specifically what you plan to tell them in your paper. It serves as a guide to keep your ideas on track as you present your research. Make sure your thesis does the following . . . -makes a statement of importance, takes a stand of some sort, or expresses a specific perspective or feature of the subject being researched. -briefly presents the most important point(s) of the paper in a effort to set a specific approach/direction and or purpose for your writing. The following formula and examples could be used to form your finalized thesis statement:

A specific subject THE GREAT WALL OF CHINA + a particular stand, feeling, or feature WAS SPECIFICALLY BUILT AS A DEFENSE SYSTEM = an effective thesis statement of purpose Sample Thesis Statements: 1. What is the Great Wall of China and why was it built? OR 2. Certain political forces were at work when the Great Wall of China was being developed as a defense system.

Refine your thesis statement according to the following checklist

Thesis Checklist Make sure your thesis statement… _____ identifies a limited, specific subject _____ focuses on a particular stand, feature, or feeling about the subject _____ is stated in a clear, direct sentence (or sentences) _____ can be supported with the convincing facts and details you have researched and included in your drafts _____ meets the requirements of the assignments and explains what you are wanting to present or prove to your readers

Write your finalized thesis statement.

You can use your original thesis phraseology, if it seems to meet the stated requirements, but make sure you have included the main idea that you have formulated throughout the research process of your topic.

Final Submission Inclusions: a. copy of the original thesis, labeled as thesis 1 b. copy of the new thesis, pasted below the old one and labeled as thesis 2 c. the body of the research paper needs to be attached below the two thesis statements Grading Criteria:

Category Standards
The student chooses a topic for research and formulates a thesis statement The student chooses a topic for research and makes modifications to the topic as information is gathered, then formulates a thesis statement that can be proven by the research. THESIS STATEMENT is clear, obvious, and outlines the (at least) three topics discussed in the BODY of the paper.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.07 Revision… ooooh, that nasty word! - English 10

teacher-scored 50 points possible 120 minutes

Thinking it through.: digitalart / FreeDigitalPhotos.netThinking it through.: digitalart / FreeDigitalPhotos.netTake your time and do this part right! These are some of the most important steps in the writing process. Here is where you will catch mistake, remove unnecessary verbiage, and add new information you might have forgotten etc. Using the latest version of your research paper, with the new finalized thesis statement (you can remove the old thesis statement now), make sure it includes each of the following sections, below, and that they all fit together and work to make your thesis points clear. Copy and paste the section between the rows of asterisks, below, into a word document. Check that each section of your paper is complete by comparing it to the standards listed. Make notes in the lettered sections on how you have included each of the parts using explanations and direct quotes from your paper when necessary. If you have missed any parts, include them now and make a note as to what you missed and what you had to do to accommodate that step. ****************************************************************************************************

Introduction – Check for:

1. Attention getter

2. Introduction of topic (Cut and paste your finalized thesis statement here)

 Body Paragraphs – Check for:

          1. Clarity 

          2. One main point per paragraph and supporting details

          3. Paragraphs arranged in logical order

          4. Logical transitions between paragraph and topics

          5. Clear ties to the thesis 

          6. Feel free to cut and paste information from some of your previous drafts if you find sections that fit together better

Conclusion – Check for:

          1. Summarization of main points

          2. A closing statement that is new and unique but should have the same tone and purpose as your thesis statement

          3. Remember to always write a research paper in 3rd person (no you’s, me’s or I’s. Your opinion is NOT important here, only the substantiated facts!) 

Editing - Check for:

          1. Accuracy

               a. Make sure that if you write it, you can prove it and support it. a.

               b. Double check and clean up mechanical errors and awkward sentences (this usually takes at least 3 reads at 3 different times as well as the reading and critiquing of friends and family members) a.

          2. Giving Credit

               a. You must cite your sources a.

               b. Using quotations properly a.

               c. Referencing of ideas

Final Copy - Check for:

          1. Typed – Doubled spaced, 4-5 pages (usually). a.

          2. No spelling or grammar mistakes (use spell and grammar check!) a.

*************************************************************************************************************************************************************** Make all of the necessary revisions, based on your notes above. Final Submission Inclusions: a. Revision notes b. The most recent final copy of your paper with the new thesis and revisions completed Grading Criteria:

Category Standards
Introduction, organization, format and media Topic is introduced and each element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; includes formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
Development of ideas and content Topic is thoroughly developed with significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other necessary information and examples using credible sources
Development of relationships, cohesion and flow Uses appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
Word choice, style and tone Uses precise language, topic-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic. Establishes and maintains a formal style and objective tone while attending to norms and conventions.
Conclusion Provides a concluding statement or section that illustrates the importance of the topic discussed, follows and supports the information or explanations presented, and provides a sense of confident closure, beyond just repetition of earlier statements
Conventions and language skills Has few or no errors in conventions, grammar or usage; uses parallel structure and variety in sentences, phrases and clauses

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER *You now are ready to turn your attention back to your sources to ensure that your paper is complete and ready for readers to learn and research from.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.08 The Crowning Jewel - English 10

teacher-scored 200 points possible 120 minutes

Accuracy matters.: Elwood W. McKay III / FreeDigitalPhotos.netAccuracy matters.: Elwood W. McKay III / FreeDigitalPhotos.netDocumenting Sources:

The list of your sources is called a "Works Cited" page, and you will need to include one with your research paper. You will also need to include internal citations of your sources. There are a few steps to documenting material references. Using your final copy of this paper, check off that you have a complete works cited page and that your internal citations are properly documented, using the following criteria.

Internal Citations (parenthetical notation)

1. When you use sources, books, encyclopedias, websites, etc., you are using someone else's ideas. Even if you rewrite those ideas in your own words, they are still not your ideas. So, you must give the author credit for what he originally wrote.

2. It is very simple to give credit when using information or ideas belonging to someone else. When you paraphrase, summarize, or quote ideas and or material from another source, include, at the end of the last quoted, paraphrased, or summarized material, two pieces of information in parentheses:

          1. The last name of the author and

          2. The page number of the document where the material was written.

Example: “I love to grade papers as soon as I receive them” (Mortensen, 2). [Notice that the period comes after the citation in parenthesis] This is called parenthetical notation.

          3. Keep a detailed list of all of the sources used in your internal citations to ensure they   are included in your works cited page.

Works Cited

1. Each citation in a works cited page requires specific punctuation, indentation, and abbreviation.

2. Alphabetize your list of citations by authors' last names.

3. Do not indent the first line but indent all of the other lines in the citation, if it is long enough to create more than one line.

4. The information must be listed on a separate page and must be labeled as "Works Cited" with this title centered at the top of the page. For information regarding the specific punctuation and formatting needed for various types of sources please visit the following website listed in the URL links below.

Save your works cited page and internal citations in your paper. GIVE YOUR PAPER A FORMAL TITLE! Submit your paper for final grading. Grading Criteria: 1. Complete works cited page is correctly formatted 2. Internal citations are well documented 3. The paper has a clear and interesting title 4. Final version of the paper is submitted with the above inclusions completed SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.08 The Crowning Jewel English 10

04.09 Independent Study - A Writing Sample - English 10

teacher-scored 25 points possible 60 minutes

How has your writing developed?: "Young Girl" by anekoho FreeDigitalPhotos.netHow has your writing developed?: "Young Girl" by anekoho FreeDigitalPhotos.net9-10RL10 Show Me What You Have Learned Let me see how your writing has improved this quarter. Using the material we have covered in this course, read and analyze the following poem. Make sure you refer to and draw out the contextual ideas and themes from this class and compare and relate them to the following poem in an effort to decipher the meaning and purpose of this new piece of literature backed with evidence and referential material and notes.

Tan, Amy. The Joy Luck Club. New York: Ballantine, 1989. (1989) From "Jing-Mei Woo: Two Kinds"

My mother believed you could be anything you wanted to be in America. You could open a restaurant. You could work for the government and get good retirement. You could buy a house with almost no money down. You could become rich. You could become instantly famous. "Of course you can be prodigy, too," my mother told me when I was nine. "You can be best anything. What does Auntie Lindo know? Her daughter, she is only best tricky."

America was where all my mother's hope lay. She had come here in 1949 after losing everything in China: her mother and father, her family home, her first husband , and two daughters, twin baby girls. But she never looked back with regret.

There were so many ways for things to get better. We didn't immediately pick the right kind of prodigy. At first my mother thought I could be a Chinese Shirley Temple. We'd watch Shirley's old movies on TV as though they were training film. My mother would poke my arm and say."Ni kan"-You watch. And I would see Shirley tapping her feet, or singing a sailor song, or pursing her lips into a very round O while saying, "O my goodness." "Ni kan," said my mother as Shirley's eyes flooded with tears. "You already know how. Don't need talent for crying!"

Grading Criteria:

Category Standards
Introduction, organization, format and media Topic is introduced and each element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; includes formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
Development of ideas and content Topic is thoroughly developed with significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other necessary information and examples using credible sources
Development of relationships, cohesion and flow Uses appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
Word choice, style and tone Uses precise language, topic-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic. Establishes and maintains a formal style and objective tone while attending to norms and conventions.
Conclusion Provides a concluding statement or section that illustrates the importance of the topic discussed, follows and supports the information or explanations presented, and provides a sense of confident closure, beyond just repetition of earlier statements
Conventions and language skills Has few or no errors in conventions, grammar or usage; uses parallel structure and variety in sentences, phrases and clauses

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.10 Side Notes Submissions

teacher-scored 25 points possible 25 minutes

SIDE NOTES Combine the following note-taking exercises from the course, and submit them together in one document below. 04.01.01 - SIDE NOTES #1 04.02.01 - SIDE NOTES #2 04.03.01 - SIDE NOTES #3 04.05.01 - SIDE NOTES #4 Final Submission Inclusions: a. All notes are labeled and completed from each section listed above. Grading Criteria: 1. The information is complete, free of mechanical errors, and labeled to reflect each of the sections with a title and full content represented in the notes. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.