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1st Quarter, Language Arts 10

0.00 Start Here - English 10

Course Description

The skills and understandings students are expected to demonstrate in this class have wide applicability outside the classroom or workplace.

In this class, students will:

  • undertake the close, attentive reading that is at the heart of understanding and enjoying complex works of literature and language mediums
  • perform the critical reading necessary to be able to carefully analyze and understand the available information in literature and media
  • actively seek the wide, deep, and thoughtful engagement with high-quality literary and informational texts that builds knowledge, enlarges experience, and broadens worldviews
  • demonstrate reasoning and use of evidence that is essential in deliberations

In short, students who meet the the requirements in this class will develop the skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening that are the foundation for any creative and purposeful expression in language.

Class Overview - HOW TO COMPLETE THIS CLASS

It will be necessary for you to read the course lessons to complete the assignments, master the material, and finish the class in a timely manner. If you try to complete the course by using the "assignments" link, you will not be successful. Please view the power point presentation, above, for clarification on how to view and complete the course through the course modules.

REMEMBER TO SCROLL DOWN, ON THE COURSE PAGE, TO VIEW ALL OF THE LESSONS.

WHAT THIS CLASS IS: A .25 credit class to fulfill the English 10 requirement, according to the Utah core graduation requirements.

WHAT THIS CLASS IS NOT: This class is NOT an easy way to get your English credit without doing any real work.

PREREQUISITES

1. 9th grade level reading and writing skills

2. A computer with Internet access

3. A working e-mail address, that does not block our messages with your spam filter

4. Word processing software to type your assignments

5. Course supplies listed at the beginning of each quarter

6. Acrobat Reader, QuickTime reader, and a PowerPoint reader (all available free online)

HOW YOU WILL BE GRADED

Each assignment has a maximum number of points you can earn. You can revise all assignments until you are satisfied with your scores. When you have completed all of the course assignments with 70% accuracy or better, you can take the final exam. Your final grade is determined by the average between the course assignments and the final test. The assignments count as 50% of your final score, and the final exam counts as 50%. If you score below 60% on the final exam, you will not earn credit for the class.

GRADING SCALE

A 90-100

B 80-89

C 70-79

D 60-69

No credit - below 60

FINAL EXAM

When you have finished all the assignments you need for your credit, you will take the final exam under the supervision of an EHS approved proctor.

ABOUT HOMEWORK

Please complete assignments according to the instructions given in each class section. Revise assignments, as necessary, to ensure you are mastering the material and earning the best grade possible.

CLASS PLAGIARISM POLICY

Copying someone else's sentences, phrases or organization of ideas and failing to give credit to the original author is plagiarism. In some papers it is appropriate to quote a short section of someone else's exact words, but when you do, that section needs to be set off in quotation marks or otherwise set apart, and the author identified either in a sentence, or in a parenthetical note. You also need to provide an internal citations to allow readers of your writing to know where facts, figures, and/or ideas, presented in your writing, were learned if you are not the original source of that information. Plagiarism is unlawful and unethical, and against the EHS Honor Code. If you turn in a plagiarized assignment, recourse will be taken by your teacher.

HOW TO TURN IN HOMEWORK

Save all of your work on your own hard drive and in the submission sections of the class. When you turn in your homework, ALWAYS save and keep a copy of it for yourself on your hard drive.

00.01.01 Student Software Needs

 

Students need access to a robust internet connection and a modern web browser.

This class may also require the Apple QuickTime plug-in to view media.

For students using a school-issued Chromebook, ask your technical support folks to download the QuickTime plug-in and enable the plug-in for your Chromebook.

$0.00

00.02 About Me - English 10

teacher-scored 5 points possible 15 minutes

Getting to know you! Copy and paste the following questions between the rows of asterisks below into a word document and answer them accordingly. *******************************************************************

In a numbered LIST, provide the following information:

1. What is your first and last name, parent(s) name(s), and contact information for both you and your parent(s)?

2. Where do you go to school?

3. What is your counselor's full name and email address/contact information?

4. What year will you graduate and have you read the EHS Honor Code and understand that this class needs to be finished within the 10 week limit?

In a few sentences, tell me about yourself being sure to answer the following questions in the process:

          a. Tell me something about yourself.

          b. Why are you taking this class and what do you expect to get out of it?

          c. What is one word that best describes you?

By the way, here is the EHS honor code: "As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers, and staff with respect."

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I am excited to get to know you! Grading Criteria:

1. Writing mechanics

2. All requested information is included in your numbered list.

3. You have written the pertinent information (a.b.c.) in your final sentences.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.00 EXPOSITORY WRITING - English 10

Expository Writing

Most writing that you encounter in your daily life is exposition. This type of writing is meant to inform you and others about a specific topic.

Expository Writing: A writing style meant to explain, inform, and/or educate readers about a particular idea, thought, and/or experience.

Grading Criteria:

Please refer to the criteria provided with each assignment, to understand how you will be graded and the level of proficiency that is expected on all of your work.

Course Overview:

Expository Writing - A World View

Materials Needed:

• Audio book & book form novel, “Seedfolks,” by Paul Fleischman: audio book from Itunes $4.95, and/or borrow the novel from the library
• Audio book or book form novel, “The House on Mango Street,” by Sandra Cisneros: audio book from Itunes $9.95, and/or borrow the novel from library.
• Film: "Small Voices: The Story of Cambodia’s Children," by Heather E. Connell (see reference URL link below)
• Internet access

Expectations:

• Weekly participation and hard work!

01.00.01 EXPOSITORY WRITING - English 10

01.00.02 Exploring: My World – Personal & Family - English 10

An Anthropological Approach

Anthropologists use the term “EMIC perspective” to depict the internal purpose of a culture from the perspective of a person that is living it. It is the “insider’s perspective.” This allows one to understand a culture the way the members understand and experience it.

The following activities will help you to explore the cultural climate of your internal world. You will be dissecting and documenting the thoughts, beliefs, experiences, perceptions, and influences that give you identity.

01.01 Mind Mapping - English 10

Present information and supporting evidence for a particular line of reasoning. Use the the appropriate organization, development, and style.

What is your internal make-up?: Fillster.com “Weird Pictures for Myspace”What is your internal make-up?: Fillster.com “Weird Pictures for Myspace”

Things aren't always as they appear.

With thought and effort you can organize your views and perspectives on life to make them more readily understood and useable.

Write a list using the template provided in the mind map document above. List three words under each of the headings in the document to show who you are and what makes up your internal world. Save the completed document and keep it for future submission.

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

01.02 Saving Your Thoughts - English 10

Use digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance the understanding of presentations. Adapt speech/writing to a variety of contexts.

Hold that thought!: Fillster.com “Nature Pictures for Myspace”Hold that thought!: Fillster.com “Nature Pictures for Myspace”

You will be creating a blog, keynote document, newsletter, powerpoint presentation, OR other presentation project to house all of your future assignments. Please set up the project now so it is ready to house your assignments when you have completed them. I have included blogging sites in the URLs below, if that is the route you wish to go.

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading. Be sure to title your project. Once you have your project up and running with a title or theme, go on to the next assignment.  Below you will find several options for blog-hosting sites.  Set up your presentation project at this time so you have it ready for future assignments.

01.02.01 Saving Your Thoughts - English 10

01.03 Let The Research Begin - English 10

Participate in conversations and collaborations with different people. Integrate and evaluate information from diverse formats. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view and reasoning.

Are you ready to get to work?: fotopedia by Ed YourdonAre you ready to get to work?: fotopedia by Ed Yourdon *All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

THE CHALLENGE

It is fairly easy to analyze and define your own thoughts but moving out of your own world can sometimes be a challenging pursuit. To do so, let's first contemplate your family and the impact they have had on your personal views, habits, beliefs, and outlook on life.

For this activity, you need to do a bit of research that will help you to explain who you are and how you have been affected by the people in your life. To better understand your history and your background, interview three members of your family using the following format.

01.04 Let The Research Begin, Again - English 10

Write so readers can follow a particular line of reasoning. Participate in a range of conversations with different people. Integrate and evaluate information presented in an oral format. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks.

What is your family history?: Fillster.com "Funny Pictures for Myspace"What is your family history?: Fillster.com "Funny Pictures for Myspace" *All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

Your Task

1. Copy and paste the list of questions between the rows of asterisks below, three times, into a word document. 

2. Choose three family members and have them EACH answer ALL of the questions below. 

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Interview Prompts

1. What is their name, birth place, and family relationship information?

2. What was their childhood like?

3. What schools did they attend and what did they do for fun?

4. What was dating and courtship like for them, and did they get married?

5. Do they have children and, if so, when were they born? What is their general philosophy about raising children?

6. What has their health been like? Have they had any accidents or illnesses?

7. How is the world different today than it was when they were little?

8. What friends did they have growing up?

9. What places have they visited?

10. What are their favorite things: hobbies, interests, adventures, experiences, etc.?

* Listen! Record the interview, if you need to, but be sure to also write down their information.

* Thank them.

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* All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

01.05 Family Essay - DESCRIPTIVE, SEQUENTIAL, PURPOSEFUL Writing - English 10

Write informative/explanatory texts. Examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly. Strengthen writing with planning and revising. Use technology, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.

Writing a family tree.: commons.wikimedia.org Fraktalträd.jpgWriting a family tree.: commons.wikimedia.org Fraktalträd.jpg

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

Your Assignment

Using ALL of the information you have gathered in the Mind Mapping and Interview assignments, write an essay that talks about yourself, each interviewed family member, and the important connections between all of you.

You're essay should outline who each family member is and how they each have had an affect on your life. Make sure there is a logical order and organization to this essay.

Outline Examples - Order of Events 

*Introduction - statement of purpose and general ideas to come in the essay

*1st body paragraph - describe the first person and explain how they have influenced you. 

*2nd body paragraph - describe the second person and explain how they have influenced you.

*3rd body paragraph - describe the third person and explain how they have influenced you.

*Conclusion - restate the significance and relation of all the people, experiences, and relevance to you.

Write your essay now.

* All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

01.06 DOL Refresher Course

teacher-scored 7 points possible 45 minutes

Do You Remember DOLs?

Before you start revising your own writing, let's practice some of the skills of revision by completing the following "Daily Oral Language" exercise.

This will get you in the mindset of finding mistakes that can make writing confusing. You will, in turn, need to employ these same skills when you are reading, re-reading, and revising your own writing.

Copy and paste the DOL practice below, between the rows of asterisks, into a word document.

Make a list of the needed corrections and explain why those corrections are needed, then place your work into the assignment submission area after you have saved it to your hard drive. (DOL obtained and modified from W.O.W. and D.O.L. - Wolfe County Schools wolfe.k12.ky.us)

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DOL Practice *Correct seven errors in the following paragraph:

My Brother and Me sing in a chorus, and every December we sing the Messiah by George F Handel. This piece was first performed in Dublin, Ireland in 1,742. My brother Ray doesn’t sing, but he do play the trumpet. This yere he will have the pleaseure of performing the famous trumpet solo.

List the mistakes and their needed corrections (explain) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

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Grading Criteria:

1. Find seven mistakes in the paragraph above and explain the grammar rule behind each of the corrections.

Submit this assignment in the next section of this course.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.07 Grammar Break

 

Listen to and read the above URLs before moving onto the next assignment.

01.07.01 Grammar Break Assignment (English 10)

teacher-scored 6 points possible 45 minutes

Once you have viewed/listened to the URLs above, read the information below and complete the attached exercise for grading. (Adapted worksheet from evergreen.edu/home.htm)

Keep Parallel Structure In Mind When writing, it is important to keep your thoughts and key points "parallel." This aids in maintaining an organized train of thought and communication of ideas to your readers.

Parallel structure creates word patterns that readers can easily follow. Parallel writing structure is simply the repetition of particular grammar structures in a sentence.

*Simple Example: The verbs agree.

Not Parallel- Sue likes biking, the circus, and to take afternoon strolls.

Parallel- Sue likes biking, attending the circus, and taking afternoon strolls. OR Sue likes to bike, attend the circus, and take afternoon strolls.

*Coordinating Conjunction Examples: Clauses or phrases joined with for, and, nor, but, or, yet, or so.

Not Parallel- My boy friend took me dancing and to a movie.

Parallel- My boy friend took me to a dance and a movie.

*Correlative Conjunction Examples: Clauses or phrases joined with not only…but also, either…or, neither…nor, if…then, etc.

Not Parallel- My dog not only likes to play fetch, but also chase cars.

Parallel- My dog not only likes to play fetch, but he also likes to chase cars. OR My dog likes not only to play fetch, but also to chase cars.

*Phrases or Clauses of Comparison Examples: Clauses or phrases joined with a word of comparison, such as than or as.

Not Parallel: I would rather pay for my college education than financial aid.

Parallel I would rather pay for my college education than receive financial aid.

*List Examples:Items in a list follow the same grammar structure. Each item in the list could stand as its own sentence without the other items listed.

Not Parallel Sam Stant criticizes public libraries because they are disorganized, funded by the government, and destroy the public's sense of self discovery.

Parallel Sam Stant criticizes public libraries because they are disorganized, government-funded, and normalizing. OR Sam Stant criticizes public libraries because they require the public to attend, receive money from the government, and destroy the public's individuality.

Copy and paste the exercise between the rows of asterisks below, into a word document and complete it as directed before submitting it for grading. Be sure to save all of your work on your hard drive as well.

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Read the following example sentences and revise them so they use parallel structure.

1. I would rather eat pasta than to eat rice.

2. Global warming affects humans, the environment, and is scary.

3. It's harder to do long division than dividing with a calculator.

4. Thieves ransacked the mansion, but they didn’t steal all the silver.

5. Merchants receive either money or trade goods with their clients.

6. Spider-Man enjoys donning his Spider costume, photographing for The Daily Bugle, and always saves his city from cruel villains like Doctor Octopus.

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Grading Criteria: 1. Write each sentence in parallel structure. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.08 Drafts - English 10

teacher-scored 100 points possible 360 minutes

Making sense of your writing.: Fillster.com “Cool Pictures for Myspace”Making sense of your writing.: Fillster.com “Cool Pictures for Myspace”STRAIGHTENING OUT THE MESS

Revision:

Please complete and hand in your "Family Relations" essay from lesson 01.05, now.

Follow the instructions below to understand what is required for this assignment. 

Assignment Requirements

1. Submit your "family relations" essay. (You will receive feedback from me and an opportunity(ies) to make revisions if it is needed.)

2. Post your final draft to your presentation. (Whichever one you have chosen to create)

3. Include and identify three parallel structures within your writing in the final draft of your essay. Label them as "parallel structures," directly after they appear in the essay, within parenthesis.

4. Once you have completed your essay, compile all of the research sections of this unit for grading and label them with their corresponding lesson name and number and submit them according to the following checklist. Submit them with the essay.

Final Submission Inclusions:

a. mind mapping words - lesson 01.01 "Cultural Mind Mapping"

b. interviewing questions and answers - lesson 01.04 "Let The Research Begin, Again"

c. post essay in the presentation of your choice - Make sure your story is posted in your chosen presentation per the instructions above.

d. final draft (include the identified parallel structures) - This is the final document created from the steps above.

e. submission steps, from above, are completed All parts above must be completed and included for full credit. Grading Criteria:

Category Standards
Introduction, organization, format & media Topic is introduced and the essay is explained with a unified whole purpose.
Development of ideas and content Topic is thoroughly developed with relevant facts, definitions, details, quotations, and other necessary information and examples using credible sources.
Development of relationships, cohesion and flow Uses appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections and concepts of the text.
Word choice, style and tone Uses precise language, topic-specific vocabulary, and techniques to manage the complexity of the topic.
Conclusion Provides a concluding statement that illustrates the importance and purpose of the topic discussed. Provides a sense of confident and purposeful closure.
Conventions and language skills Has few or no errors in conventions, grammar or usage.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.09 Personal Cultural Evaluation - Explanatory Writing - English 10

Conduct a short research project based on focused questions. Demonstrate understanding of the subject under investigation. Use technology, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.

Cultural exploration: Karneval der Kulteren by Andre Kisitz FotopediaCultural exploration: Karneval der Kulteren by Andre Kisitz Fotopedia

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

WHAT IS CULTURE?

Culture is the combination of where you come from, who you are at present, and where you are going. Contemplating our own culture helps us to better understand our place in the world at large.

As part of your study, please reflect upon what you have researched in the previous assignments regarding your personal and familial cultures.

Watch and take notes on the video prompts below, labeling each one accordingly and explaining what you observe in each. Follow the included link to read the formalized definition of culture and write your own brief, general, definition of what culture is.

Once you have completed these exercises, move on to the instructions for completing the next assignment.

Supporting Videos

See below the listed PDF and URL links

01.09.01 Personal Cultural Evaluation - English 10

01.10 An Analytical Approach - English 10

Read closely to determine what the text says and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in literature.

Pay attention to the details!: Fillster.com “Cool Pictures for Myspace”Pay attention to the details!: Fillster.com “Cool Pictures for Myspace” *All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

TAKING A CLOSER LOOK

Copy and paste the information found between the asterisks, below. Read each of the cultural analysis sections and write down three examples of how that view of culture is found in your own life. Save your completed worksheet in a word document for future submission and reference.

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How do sociologists define culture?

"Culture is the values, norms, language, tools and other shared products of society that provide a plan for social life."

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What do functionalists see as the functions of culture?

"Functionalists suggest that culture provides for continuing social order by handing down prescribed ways of behaving in specific situations and allows people to benefit from the achievements of previous generations."

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What are norms and why are they important?

"Norms are shared rules or guidelines for behavior in specific situations. The strongest norms are taboos or rules that prohibit certain behavior and carry severe punishment for violators. Norms carry sanctions or rewards for behavior that conform to a norm and punishment for behavior that violates a norm. Institutions are organized sets of norms, values, statuses and roles that are centered on the basic needs of society. The five basic institutions of most societies are: the family, religion, the state, the economic system and education."

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How do values underlie norms?

"Values are shared ideas about what is right and wrong, good and bad, desirable and undesirable. Values are the general concepts on which our specific norms are built."

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How do norms vary between cultures? "Many norms are specific to one society or to one group in a society." Norms are not always seen as acceptable or even desirable between differing cultures.

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What are the symbolic elements of culture?

"A symbol is that which represents something else. Norms and values are often transmitted within a culture or to other cultures through symbolic elements such as language, gesture and stance, style of clothing, hairstyle, social distance, time use or symbolic representation such as flags."

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What is the importance of language in transmitting culture?

"Most social scientists see a strong connection between a society's language and the rest of its culture. Society's language reflects what is important to its new members and those outside of the culture. Our silent language or nonverbal space and time messages are also tied to our culture."

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How do cultures vary?

"Cultures differ in the degree of complexity whether they are focused around kinship or institutions and the pace of change. In simple societies kinship organizes people's lives around families and relatives. Such societies might change rather slowly compared to modern postindustrial society."

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How do subcultures and counter cultures differ from the dominant culture?

"A subculture is the culture of a subgroup of society that adopts norms that set them apart from the dominant group: for instance, persons who live in a Chinatown but are integrated into the life of the city as a whole. A counterculture is a subculture whose norms and values are not just different from but in conflict with those of the dominant culture."

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How does ethnocentrism affect one's viewpoint?

"Ethnocentrism is the tendency to use one's own cultural values in evaluating the beliefs and customs of other cultures with different values. It can be useful to a society in that it bonds members together, but can also lead to conflict with people from other cultures."

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*The above information and quotes were found and adapted from the following web location sociologyguide.com/questions/culture.php

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 * All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

01.11 Personal Cultural Definition: based on the descriptive sequencing of your research and observation - English 10

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas accurately through the effective organization of information. Develop and strengthen writing by planning, revising, and editing. Use technology to produce and publish writing.

Making connections: Spirit in Education by Suriya Thonawanik FotopediaMaking connections: Spirit in Education by Suriya Thonawanik Fotopedia

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

Writing Your Own Cultural Definition"

You will now begin writing your own definition of culture. This essay will explain how the ties and connections to your family have created your internal culture and defined who you are as an individual. How have the interpersonal connections in your family defined who you are personally?

Your observations and thoughts could incorporate casual matters of your daily life as well as features, activities, and/or facts that are more formal in nature. You might want to discuss favorite foods, as well as descriptions of what makes you comfortable and happy in life. Activities such as favorite sports, games, movies, church or other religious activities, vacations and leisure activities could also be included.

You will be using this information and study session to create an essay that explains your definition of your own cultural existence.

HOW TO WRITE YOUR PERSONAL CULTURAL DEFINITION ESSAY

1. Introduction: a general statement that characterizes your personal culture or rather who you are. (for example, you might think of your personal culture as “laid back,” “intense,” “romantic,” “idealistic,” “pragmatic,” or some other characteristic).

2. Supporting Details: the general statement should be followed by specific examples, focusing on the most important aspects of your personal culture, separate from your family. The body of your essay should include, but not be limited to, the following writing techniques.
a. reflection: thoughts and feelings
b. analysis: values and significances
c. composition: a carefully organized, clearly focused, and
appropriately expressed statement of the thoughts, feelings, and
related experiences

3. Conclusion: a brief conclusive statement that sums up your
definition of culture.

Outline & write your personal culture definition now.

*All of the above information and work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

01.12 DOL Refresher Course

teacher-scored 8 points possible 45 minutes

Do You Remember DOLs?

Before you start revising your own writing, let's practice some revision skills by completing the following "Daily Oral Language" exercise.

This will get you in the mindset of finding mistakes that can make writing confusing. You will, in turn, need to employ these same skills when you are reading, re-reading and revising your own writing.

Copy and paste the practice between the rows of asterisks below into a word document.

Make a list of the needed corrections and explain why those corrections are needed, then place your work into the assignment submission area after you have saved it to your hard drive. (DOL obtained from W.O.W. and D.O.L. - Wolfe County Schools wolfe.k12.ky.us)

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DOL Practice *Correct eight errors in the following paragraph:

The Kansas state historical society has a poster about Nicodemus. It begin, “All colored people that want to go to kansas, on September 5th, 1877 can do so for $5.00.” That poster probably responsible for my familys involvment in this new community. The town has few people in it today but someday I hope, it may become a historic site.

List the mistakes and their needed corrections (explain) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

**************************************************************************** Grading Criteria: 1. Find all eight mistakes in the paragraph above and explain the grammar rule behind the corrections. Submit this assignment now. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.13 Grammar Break

 

Listen to all of the grammar and character presentations.

Take notes on at least five rules that are 'new' to you before moving on to the next assignment.

01.13.01 Grammar Break

teacher-scored 10 points possible 60 minutes

Teach Me Grammar Teach me the five 'new' grammar skills that you learned and took note of in the lessons presented in the above URL.

Label your lessons with the following titles:

Lesson 1: Lesson 2: Lesson 3: Lesson 4: Lesson 5:

Grading Criteria: 1. Each lesson is 'taught' clearly and concisely. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.14 DRAFTS - English 10

teacher-scored 100 points possible 360 minutes

Making sense of your writing.: Fillster.com “Cool Pictures for Myspace”Making sense of your writing.: Fillster.com “Cool Pictures for Myspace”STRAIGHTENING OUT THE MESS

Revision:

Complete and label each of the drafts of the essay from above, following the steps below. Please complete and hand in your first draft of your essay now.

Follow the instructions below to understand the completion steps for this assignment.

Assignment Parts:

1. Submit your 1st draft of your personal cultural definition essay.

2. Receive feedback from me and make the needed revisions.

3. Submit your 2nd draft of your personal cultural definition essay.

4. Receive feedback from me and make the needed revisions.

5. Submit your 3rd draft of your personal cultural definition essay.

6. Receive feedback from me and make the needed revisions.

7. Have a friend read your paper and give feedback to you.

8. Submit your friend's revision suggestions and your paper with the included changes from the feedback.

9. Make the needed revisions and prepare your final draft.

10. Submit your final draft.

11. Once I have approved your final draft above, post your final draft to your blog.

12. Include the usage and identification of each of the five of the grammar rules that you learned and taught in the previous URL and assignment 01.13. Identify and label them in parenthesis directly after their use.

13. Once you have completed and submitted at least five drafts of your essay with my approval, compile all of the research sections of this unit for grading and label them according to the following checklist.

Final Submission Inclusions: a. cultural evaluation notes - lesson 01.09 "Personal Cultural Evaluation" b. analytical responses - lesson 01.10 "Analytical Approach" c. blog URL link - Make sure your definition is posted per the instructions above. d. final draft (include the identified grammar rules) - This is the final document created from the steps above. e. submission steps from above are completed All parts above must be completed and included for full credit. Grading Criteria:

Category Standards
Introduction, organization, format & media Topic is introduced and each element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; includes formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
Development of ideas and content Topic is thoroughly developed with significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other necessary information and examples using credible sources
Development of relationships, cohesion and flow Uses appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
Word choice, style and tone Uses precise language, topic-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic. Establishes and maintains a formal style and objective tone while attending to norms and conventions.
Conclusion Provides a concluding statement or section that illustrates the importance of the topic discussed, follows and supports the information or explanations presented, and provides a sense of confident closure, beyond just repetition of earlier statements
Conventions and language skills Has few or no errors in conventions, grammar or usage; uses parallel structure and variety in sentences, phrases and clauses

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.00 We Are Seedfolks - English 10

How do you view others?: usermedia community media bigolinks.comHow do you view others?: usermedia community media bigolinks.comAnthropologists use the term “ETIC perspective” to depict the external view of a culture from a person that is NOT living it. It is the 'outsider’s perspective.' These types of cultural observations seek to explain the comparative relationship between elements of different cultures. These comparisons help to derive the meaning of a culture that is separate from the meanings the members of the culture may provide.

In this unit, you will be experiencing life through the eyes and feelings of "A Haitian boy, a pregnant Mexican teen, a British nurse, and 10 other characters [that] tell the story of the founding and first year of a neighborhood garden in an immigrant area of Cleveland. [It is] A hymn to the sense of community." paulfleischman.net/works.htm.

If you have not already done so, purchase a copy of I-tunes Audiobook of "Seedfolks," and obtain a copy of the book "Seedfolks" from your local library. This book is by Paul Fleischman. Listen to the I-tunes Audiobook and read the book of “Seedfolks” to complete the following, related activities for a deeper and broader understanding of the communities and cultures found within the story.

02.01 What are "Seedfolks"? - English 10

Read for understanding making logical inferences from pieces of writing; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text. Interpret words and phrases as they are used and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone in a text. Analyze how the structure, specific sentences; paragraphs; and larger portions of the text, relate to each other and the whole. Use technology to produce and publish your writing and to interact with others.

 

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading. Copy and paste the following questions and assignments, between the asterisks below, into a word document and complete them accordingly. ***************************************************************************************************************************************************************

Seedfolks Reading & Listening Guide/Assignment

1. List all of the names and nationalities presented through the characters in this book.

2. Write a detailed character sketch of each of the book's characters. Include the title and number of each chapter in the book from which each of your detailed entries comes from.

3. Be sure to follow information guidelines below, for each entry--

          a. each character’s name and country or nationality of origin (if they are ancestors of immigrants).

          b. present them in the order they are presented in the story.

4. Find a map, online, that illustrates the country of origin for each character and include the link.

5. Document piece of evidence, from the book, that demonstrates that each character is a member of a cultural subgroup separate from the garden. Include page references for where you got the information from the book and any applicable quotes that substantiate your claim.

6. Document one piece of evidence from the book that demonstrates that each character is a part of a whole new culture in the garden. Include page references for where you got the information from the book and any applicable quotes that substantiate your claim.

7. Explain the theme or central idea of "Seedfolks" and outline its development over the course of the text. Use specific details with quotes and page number references from the book to illustrate this development. 8. Provide a summary of the book as a whole.

*************************************************************************************************************************************************************** * All of the above information and work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

02.02 "Seedfolks" - Compare and Contrast - English 10

Assess how text purpose shapes its content and style. Determine the central ideas and themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. Read and analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics and compare the approaches the authors take.

What is the difference, after all?: Urucum (bixa orellana) seeds by Leonardo Aguiar FotopediaWhat is the difference, after all?: Urucum (bixa orellana) seeds by Leonardo Aguiar Fotopedia

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

One Perspective

As you can see from the activity above, each character in the book has a distinct background and reasons for coming to the garden. Select THREE characters from the book and consider and answer the questions below. Copy and paste the questions between the rows of asterisks below into a word document and complete them accordingly.

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*Title each entry appropriately and make a note of the page from which you found each piece of information. Answer the list of questions for each of the THREE chosen characters and be sure to label each list with the character's name at the top. You will have a total of THREE lists in the end.

1. What is the character’s ethnicity?
2. What plant does the character choose to grow, and why?
3. What brings this character to the garden?
4. What does the character gain from participating in the planting of the garden?
5. Identify the steps that led each of your three chosen characters to this unexpected outcome.

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Another Perspective

Read the following article, from the New York Times, about a community garden. You can access the article through the URL link, listed below.

Using similar questions, shown below, analyze the “Growing Together” New York Times article you just read.

Copy and paste the questions between the rows of asterisks below into a word document. Answer the questions, then place your work into the assignment submission area after you have saved it to your hard drive.

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*Title your entries appropriately and make notes of where each piece of information was found in the article.
Address the questions below in the form of a short numbered list.

1. Who are the characters involved in the gardens from “Growing Together”?
2. What plants do they grow, and why?
3. What brings the characters to the garden?
4. What do the characters gain from participating in the planting of the garden?
5. How does the garden affect the communities involved? Identify the steps that led each expected or unexpected outcome.

***************************************************************************************************************************************************************

You will now begin writing a comparative essay using “Seedfolks” and “Growing Together.” The following lessons will walk you through this process.

* All of the above information and your work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

02.02.01 "Seedfolks" - Compare and Contrast - English 10

02.03 Let's Chat - Comparative Writing - English 10

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. Develop, revise, and strengthen writing as needed. Use technology, to produce and publish writing, drawing supportive evidences from literary or informational texts.

How do cultures compare?: fillster.com/images/pictures "Funny Pictures for Myspace"How do cultures compare?: fillster.com/images/pictures "Funny Pictures for Myspace"Up close and personal.: I’m talking to you! by Ilya Khamushkin FotopediaUp close and personal.: I’m talking to you! by Ilya Khamushkin Fotopedia“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed, citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”
― Margaret Mead

HOW DO THESE CULTURES COMPARE?

Write an essay using the answers you have provided about the two community garden reading experiences from above and the outlining activity below.

Your writing must have a purpose and be supported with references from the texts. Use the lists of information that you have gathered from these readings as your points of comparison.

Your comparisons should be focused on the idea of “Community Influence” or “Community Affects” using your study notes and any additional information you choose to document and include as supporting evidence.

Use the following "Grammar Girl" podcast found in the URL listed below to learn the difference between "effect" and “affect.” Use this distinction to improve your writing.

How to Write a Compare-and-Contrast Essay

A compare-and-contrast essay may sound like an easy type of paper to write but it can be a bit of a challenge once you get into the process. It is more than simply stating what is alike and what is different. It is up to you to argue and explain why those similarities and differences matter.

The following steps will guide you through the process of writing an effective compare-and-contrast essay in order to ensure that it has something valuable to say.

Copy and paste the outlining activity between the rows of asterisks below into a word document. Address the questions, then place your work into the assignment submission area after you have saved it to your hard drive.

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Steps of Comparative Writing

Complete the following steps and outline of comparative writing by answering each of the prompts below, in relation to the information you have compiled thus far from “Seedfolks” and “Growing Together”.

1) Why does comparison matter? A good paper will not simply offer a summary of themes, characters, or plot. Your job is to think about how the comparisons and contrasts, of similarities and differences, create meaningful connections to larger issues.

What are three meaningful connections to larger issues that can be seen in both stories?

a.

b.

c.

2) Present a thesis statement. Why is the comparison and contrast noteworthy? What is a reason for your efforts and a compelling case for your audience’s attention.

List three important issues to compare and/or prove using these stories.

a.

b.

c.

3) Select a pattern. There are two ways you can write a compare-and-contrast paper. You can present your arguments in a "tandem" pattern or an "alternating" pattern.

• Tandem

Separate your pros and cons/likenesses and differences, for each story, into two camps. Once you have your lists, the body of your paper will address everything you have discovered about one topic/issue then everything about the other topic/issue.

Create contrasting lists for each story, below.

Pro./Likenesses

a.

b.

c.

Con./Differences

a.

b.

c.

• Alternating

This option aligns the pros and cons/likenesses and differences side by side in the same body of text in each part of the essay. Creating the list of likenesses and differences will be handy here as well, but in using this method, you will continually address two ideas, “back and forth”, as you compose the body of your paper.

Provide three sets of comparisons below from both of the community garden stories together.

Contrasting Comparisons

a.

b.

c.

4) How to decide on a pattern. A good rule for selecting one method over another is length. For longer papers with multiple pages, you should probably go with the alternating pattern to help your readers retain all of the important information about each side of your argument. For shorter papers, the tandem pattern will probably be the best option.

5) Support your facts and comparisons with primary text. Provide primary textual support; in this case, the primary sources are the “Seedfolks” and the New York Times article “Growing Together”.

For each point you address, offer textual evidence for your positions either by directly quoting from the text or by paraphrasing it. Be sure to properly cite each one. Include at least one direct quote, with its reference, from each text. All other paraphrased information should be cited accordingly.

Below, provide at least two of the paraphrased references and one direct quote from each text that you will be using in you paper. Be sure to provide the proper citation for each one.

Text 1

a.

b.

c.

Text 2

a.

b.

c.

6) Include your own interpretation of the thesis you are writing about. Your view of the topic will enable your paper to have your voice.

Include your interpretation of three topics from each text that you wish to compare. DO NOT USE PERSONAL PRONOUNS LIKE "I" TO EXPRESS THIS PERSPECTIVE.

a.

b.

c.

7) Conclusion

Provide three options for a conclusion that summarize the points of comparison you have made in your paper and restate your thesis from the beginning of your paper.

a.

b.

c.

8) Review. Revise. Repeat. To avoid having your compare-and-contrast essay become convoluted, a tight check must be kept on your writing. Review your work often to make sure you have not digressed into plot summarizing, soap-boxing, or wandering pointlessly in a writer's wilderness. Move or delete text if you have to; don’t keep trying to pound a piece of evidence into the essay puzzle if it clearly doesn’t fit.

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Write

Use your reading notes and outline of your essay above, write the first draft of your comparison/contrast paper.

* All of the above information and work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

The above writing steps provided by:
enotes.com/topics/how-write-compare-contrast-essay

02.03.01 Let's Chat - Comparative Writing - English 10

02.04 Drafts - English 10

teacher-scored 100 points possible 360 minutes

Making sense of your writing.: Fillster.com “Cool Pictures for Myspace”Making sense of your writing.: Fillster.com “Cool Pictures for Myspace”Revision Complete and label each of the drafts of the essay from above, following the steps below. Please complete and hand in your first draft of your essay now. Follow the instructions below to understand the completion steps for this assignment.

Assignment Parts:

1. Submit your 1st draft of your comparison contrast essay.

2. Receive feedback from me and make the needed revisions.

3. Submit your 2nd draft of your comparison contrast essay.

4. Receive feedback from me and make the needed revisions.

5. Submit your 3rd draft of your comparison contrast essay.

6. Receive feedback from me and make the needed revisions.

7. Have a friend read your paper and give feedback to you.

8. Submit your friend's revision suggestions and your paper with the included changes from the feedback.

9. Make the needed revisions and prepare your final draft.

10. Submit your final draft, with appropriate citations and notes.

11. Once I have approved your final draft, above, post your final draft to your blog.

12. Once you have completed and submitted at least five drafts of your essay with my approval, compile all of the research sections of this unit for grading and label them according to the following checklist.

Keep your fingers nimble.: MacBook writing by Hakan Dahlstrom FotopediaKeep your fingers nimble.: MacBook writing by Hakan Dahlstrom Fotopedia Final Submission Inclusions: a. reading and listening guide - lesson 02.01 "What are Seedfolks?" b. compare and contrast - lesson 02.02 "Seedfolks" c. steps of comparative writing - lesson 02.03 "Let's Chat" d. blog URL link with final draft of comparative essay posted e. final draft - This is the final document created from the steps above. f. submission steps, from above, are completed All parts, above, must be completed and included for full credit. Grading Criteria:

Category Standards
Introduction, organization, format and media Topic is introduced and each element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; includes formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
Development of ideas and content Topic is thoroughly developed with significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other necessary information and examples using credible sources
Development of relationships, cohesion and flow Uses appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
Word choice, style and tone Uses precise language, topic-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic. Establishes and maintains a formal style and objective tone while attending to norms and conventions.
Conclusion Provides a concluding statement or section that illustrates the importance of the topic discussed, follows and supports the information or explanations presented, and provides a sense of confident closure, beyond just repetition of earlier statements
Conventions and language skills Has few or no errors in conventions, grammar or usage; uses parallel structure and variety in sentences, phrases and clauses

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.05 Yes, a speech actually is an expository essay. - English 10

Clearly present information, findings, and evidence. Organization, development, and style are appropriate to the task, purpose and audience. Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Hear my voice!: Telling her story by Julien Harneis FotopediaHear my voice!: Telling her story by Julien Harneis Fotopedia

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

"Expository Speech"

The purpose of expository (informative) speech is to describe, clarify, explain and/or define an object, idea, concept, social institution or process." iowa-city.k12.ia.us/west/library/CLassLinks/LA/Expository.htm

You have successfully completed a comparative essay using the texts provided in the sections of the class above. You will now turn your last essay into a speech.

The Plan

You will now have the opportunity to prepare and deliver a speech using and expanding upon your previous work. Have your comparative essay ready to be used as a reference while you read the following essay.

Listen to and read the podcast, listed in the URL links below, of “This I Believe.” The essay you will be reading and listening to is one by Margaret Mead called “A New Control of Destiny.” Once you have read it, listen to the audio track attached to the same document.

Creating the Speech

You have been preparing your "Seedfolks" speech from your first day of reading and writing for this unit and story. You will now create a speech that you will be delivering to me, at your leisure, via my Google voice mail. Write the speech from the thesis you developed for your last essay and use the above essay by Margaret Mead as a secondary source of support.

Copy and paste the instructions between the rows of asterisks below into a word document. Complete the assignment, then place your work into the submission area after you have saved it to your hard drive.

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Outlining

Document the main points of Mead's essay using the following outline.

Introduction:

Main Points:

Conclusion:

Using the above outline of Mead's essay, make a comparison between her essay and yours using the following comparative constructs:

1. different
2. in contrast
3. alike
4. same as
5. on the other hand

Your main objective is to tell me how these essays explain the EFFECT cultures and communities have on individuals.

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Steps For Creating An Oral Presentation

1. Get Organized: Organize the material you will be using in your speech and make sure it is focused on one or two points so you don't get too scattered.

2. Simplify: Once you have your material, it is easy to include too much detail. Make sure you tell what is needed to inform your listeners, but not so much that you overwhelm them.

3. Brevity: Get to the point and finish it when you have stated your point clearly. You will be required to have at least two minutes worth of content to cover and no more than five minutes. Any less or more will cause you to loose points.

4. Conclude: Help your audience remember what you have spoken about by concluding with the most important message from the speech.

Important Parts Of The Speech

Copy and paste the outline between the rows of asterisks below into a word document. Fill it in, then place your work into the assignment submission area after you have saved it to your hard drive.

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INTRODUCTION: Always start with the message that you want to deliver. Just like an essay, don't give full detail as to what it is that you will be speaking on, keep it a tad bit vague.

1.

MAIN POINTS: This is what you are talking about. This is where you can mix and match your ideas in whatever order you prefer but be sure not to jumble it too much; some order is necessary. This is where the details, that were left vague in the introduction, are included. Make sure the ideas are tied together with a natural flow. Include at least 3 points you want to express. You are welcome to include more points but remember your time constraints and the narrowness of the topic. It is easy to get things jumbled and confused in this section, if you go off onto tangents.

1.

2.

3.

CONCLUSION: Again share what it is that you want done or whatever message you are trying to send to your listeners. Finish strong and include a phrase or two that ties all of your ideas together, as a reminder to your listeners. Remember, you told them what you wanted them to hear, you elaborated on what you wanted them to hear, and now you are restating what you want them to remember about what you have said.

1.

***************************************************************************************************************************************************************

Note:

The video "How to Give a Speech," listed in the URL links below, will also give you some helpful additional information about preparing, writing, and delivering a speech.

Grading Criteria:

1. organization and clear speech
2. flow, and intonation of your voice
3. quality of information shared

Assignment

Using the notes from the above exercises; write your first draft of your speech now.

* All of the above information and work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

02.05.01 Yes, a speech actually is an expository essay. - English 10

02.06 Drafts & Speech Delivery - English 10

teacher-scored 150 points possible 180 minutes

Share the dream: Martin Luther King Jr. - I Have A Dream Speech fotopediaShare the dream: Martin Luther King Jr. - I Have A Dream Speech fotopediaRevision Complete the draft of the speech from above to be handed in now. Follow the instructions below to understand the completion steps for this assignment.

Assignment Parts:

1. Submit your 1st draft of your speech.

2. Receive feedback from me and make the needed revisions.

3. Submit your 2nd draft of your speech.

4. Receive feedback from me and make the needed revisions.

5. Submit your 3rd draft of your speech.

6. Receive feedback from me and make the needed revisions.

7. Have a friend and listen to you deliver your speech and give you feedback.

8. Make the needed changes from your friend feedback.

9. Submit your friend's revision suggestions.

10. Make the needed revisions and prepare your final draft.

11. Submit your final draft

12. Post the written version of your speech on your blog.

13. Practice reading your speech at least ten times, then deliver it to yourself in the mirror and again to a friend. Get their feedback on your delivery, intonation, expression, etc. and make the needed changes and practice it again ten more times.

14. Call me on my Google voice mail to deliver your speech on a voice message. You will find my voice mail number in the "Teacher Contact" section at the top of the course content page.

15. Submit your written response of your feelings about this process/experience

16. Prepare assignment submissions by following the check list below.

Final Submission Inclusions: a. answers & notes - lesson 02.05 "Yes, a speech . . ." b. blog URL with speech posted in it c. final draft - This is the final document created from the steps above. d. speech delivered to my voice mail e. your feelings about the process documented f. submission steps, from above, are completed Grading Criteria:

1. Introduction - The first few lines of the speech command attention.

2. Content - The speech is focused on one or two major issues and it describes those issues clearly and thoroughly.

3. Delivery - The speaker spoke in a clear and expressive voice.

4. Conclusion - The end of the speech was exciting, lively, and summarizing.

5. Overall - The speech was exciting and informative with supportive evidence stated clearly.

*All of these parts must be included for full credit. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.00 "The House On Mango Street" - Cause & Effects - English 10

The scene is set.: The Ikon Building Google imagesThe scene is set.: The Ikon Building Google imagesThis is not about fruit, BUT it is about some interesting people and their problems.

"The House On Mango Street" is a delightful and easy to relate to story about a diverse Chicago neighborhood. It is told through the eyes of a young girl who is just becoming aware of her world.

03.01 "The House On Mango Street" mmmmm, the sweet taste of cultural diversity! - English 10

Read closely to determine text meaning and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

A mix of many flavors.: Peggy Greb, U.S. Department of AgricultureA mix of many flavors.: Peggy Greb, U.S. Department of Agriculture

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

Let the reading begin!

"The House On Mango Street" by: Sandra Cisneros

Obtain a copy of the book either through your local library or purchase it through a book store.

Read the introduction and purpose to this book found listed in the URL link below.

Choices, choices, choices . . .: Fruit & Vegetable Box photo by karimian on FlickrChoices, choices, choices . . .: Fruit & Vegetable Box photo by karimian on Flickr

03.01.01 "The House On Mango Street" mmmmm, the sweet taste of cultural diversity! - English 10

03.02 Mango Tango - English 10

Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings. Analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

Shall we dance?: Image: FreeDigitalPhotos.netShall we dance?: Image: FreeDigitalPhotos.net

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading. Read "The House On Mango Street" Assignment As you read “The House on Mango Street,” complete the following writing response tasks. Copy and paste the task instructions, found below between the asterisks, into a word document and complete them accordingly. ********************************************************************************************************************************************************

Task A:

1. Respond to each vignette and title each of your responses with the same name as the vignette being addressed. Write about a problem presented in each vignette and the effects or consequences of that problem (this will make up a type of 'cause and effect' list). Keep each entry to three or four sentences.

Using the evidences, from your 'causes and effects' list above, connect them to the themes below that seem to relate best.

a.Women’s role(s) in society, as defined by women’s goals vs.expectations of society

b.Double standards in society, based on race, gender, age, or social status

c.Unattained Dreams (both of the narrator and other characters)

d.Curiosity and fear in relation to maturing and growing up (both the narrator’s and other characters’)

Task B:

3. In a brief statement, discuss how Sandra Cisneros develops the above themes in "The House on Mango Street." You may want to use the lists you created above, of the problems and the effects of those problems, to help you point out evidentiary material, from the story, to support each of the themed problems.

********************************************************************************************************************************************************

* All of the above information and work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

03.03 "The House On Mango Street"-The Same Differences - Cause and Effect Writing - English 10

03.03.01 "The House On Mango Street"-The Same Differences - Cause and Effect Writing - English 10

Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media. Evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

"One of these things is not like the other . . .": Mantas Ruzveltas  Mantas Ruzveltas / FreeDigitalPhotos.net"One of these things is not like the other . . .": Mantas Ruzveltas Mantas Ruzveltas / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

Read and watch the stories found in the website or movie, above.

You will see many of the same life struggles from the children of Cambodia & the migrant workers in America that are depicted in “The House on Mango Street.” These life circumstances may surprise and shock you a bit but you should also be able to relate to the people's stories on a very human level.

Look for additional evidences that relate to the themes in the last assignment. As you encounter these bits of thematic support, include and label them in your reference information. Include at least three examples, from each of these sources. Label whether they come from the Cambodia film or the migrant worker stories.

If you have a hard time finding this site or video, let me know. The links are above.

Save all of your work from the last two assignments in the same document for future reference and grading.

*All of the above information and work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

03.04 Changing Perspectives - English 10

Conduct a short research project based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

"Slow and steady . . .": myspaceantics.com/images/myspace-graphics/funny-pictures/turtle_riding.jpg"Slow and steady . . .": myspaceantics.com/images/myspace-graphics/funny-pictures/turtle_riding.jpg

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

The Cause & Effect

Using the thematic information and evidences you have gathered in the last two sections, craft a cause and effect essay to shed light on one of the themes you have been gathering information about.

A cause and effect essay provides the author the opportunity to explain why something may happen and it establishes a line of evidence that supports the effect being presented in the essay.

Choose one of the explored themes and evidences on your list of notes and begin your essay by using the following outline.

Introduction

•Introduce your topic-What is your theme or argument?
•Briefly state the causes that lead to this effect.
1.
2.

Body

•Show logical progression of arguments leading from cause to effect.
•Keep the thought process simple and direct, too much detail can become confusing.
•Provide ample evidences, from the sources we have studied above in this section, to show thought process.
1.
2.
3.

Conclusion

•Restate key points.
•Restate how the causes bring about the effect presented at the beginning of the essay.
1.
2.

A cause or effect essay doesn't give solutions to the problem it is presenting. It simply examines some of the possible reasons for it.

Once you have outlined your essay, begin writing it.

* All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

03.05 Final Draft - English 10

teacher-scored 150 points possible 360 minutes

Try, try, again.: graur codrin graur codrin / FreeDigitalPhotos.netTry, try, again.: graur codrin graur codrin / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Revision Complete and label the essay from above.

You will be responsible for the drafts and revisions on your own this time.

I would suggest that you enlist the help of trusted friends to proofread your work and make any needed revisions before submitting it as a final draft to me and posting it to your blog site.

Compile all of the research sections of this unit for grading and label them according to the following checklist.

Final Submission Inclusions:

a. writing response tasks - lesson 03.02 "Mango Tango"

b. comparative notes - lesson 03.03 "The Same Differences"

c. cause and effects - lessons 03.04 "Changing Perspectives"

d. final draft e. blog URL with essay posted in it *All of these parts must be included for full credit. Grading Criteria:

Category Standards
Introduction, organization, format & media Topic is introduced & each element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; includes formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
Development of ideas and content Topic is thoroughly developed with significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other necessary information and examples using credible sources
Development of relationships, cohesion and flow Uses appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
Word choice, style and tone Uses precise language, topic-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic. Establishes and maintains a formal style and objective tone while attending to norms and conventions.
Conclusion Provides a concluding statement or section that illustrates the importance of the topic discussed, follows and supports the information or explanations presented, and provides a sense of confident closure, beyond just repetition of earlier statements
Conventions and language skills Has few or no errors in conventions, grammar or usage; uses parallel structure and variety in sentences, phrases and clauses

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.