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4th Quarter, Language Arts 11

00.00 Start Here (English 11)

Course Description

The skills and understandings students are expected to demonstrate in this class have wide applicability outside the classroom or workplace.

In this class, students:

  • undertake the close, attentive reading that is at the heart of understanding and enjoying complex works of literature.
  • habitually perform the critical reading necessary to pick carefully through the staggering amount of information available today in print and digitally.
  • actively seek the wide, deep, and thoughtful engagement with high-quality literary and informational texts that builds knowledge, enlarges experience, and broadens worldviews.
  • reflexively demonstrate the cogent reasoning and use of evidence that is essential to both private deliberation and responsible citizenship in a democratic republic.

In short, students who meet the the requirements in this class develop the skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening that are the foundation for any creative and purposeful expression in language.

Class Overview

This is a one quarter (.25 credit) class. You will work on your reading, research, writing, viewing, listening and speaking skills, as specified in the Utah State Core Curriculum for Language Arts.

WHAT THIS CLASS IS: This class is another way for you to earn your English 11 credit instead of attending a class in a physical high classroom. If you can't fit the class into your schedule at your regular school; if you can't attend your regular school because of illness, injury, safe school violations, or participation in activities that require extensive travel; if you failed the class and need to make it up; if you want to get ahead--this class can help you.
Make sure to check with your home high school counselor to find out exactly what credit you need.

This class is an open-entry, open-exit class. That means you can enroll at any time of the year, and finish the class as fast as you can get all the work done. However, you have just ten weeks after enrolling to finish (there may be some exceptions if you have an IEP). Begin as soon as you have enrolled. In order to finish in eight-nine weeks (the length of a regular school quarter) you should plan on spending 6-12 hours a week working on it. The exact amount of time you need to spend will depend on how fast you can read, how much you already know, and how well you focus while you are working.

Read this (Start Here) whole page and the Required Resources page, and then begin reading the course material in the first unit. If you check the syllabus, you will see that each assignment tells you when you should be finished with it, relative to when you started (for instance, by the end of your first week, second week, third week, etc). Plan a schedule for working on your assignments and keep at it!

WHAT THIS CLASS IS NOT: This class is NOT an easy way to get your English credit without doing real work. If that is what you are looking for, you will be disappointed. You may be able to finish this class in fewer weeks than you would spend in a regular class--but only if you put in a lot of hours each week.

PREREQUISITES 

At least 10th grade level reading and writing skills. This is not a remedial course. To take this class, you will need to use a computer with internet access. You will also need:

  • A computer with internet access.
  • A working email address--make sure that correspondence from EHS will not be blocked.
  • Word processing software to type your assignments. Microsoft Word is best.  You must have the ability to submit documents in one of the following file formats: .doc/.docx, .ppt/.pptx, or .pdf.
  • A .pdf converter if your word processing software doesn't allow you to save in one of the above fiile formats. Several are available free online from sources such as adobe, nemopdf, cuteptf, etc. 
  • Acrobat Reader, Quicktime reader, and a PowerPoint reader (all available free online)

SUBMITTING ASSIGNMENTS  Read instructions carefully to make sure you have fulfilled the requirements of each assignment.  Make sure that you do all your work on your own word processing software first. This way you will have access to the spelling and grammar checkers typically offered with this software and you will be able to archive your own copy of each assignment.  On occasion you will be able to use the "edit my submission" window, but most assignments will need to be sent as .doc/docx or .pdf attachments.

How You Will Be Graded

You earn points for doing assignments in this class. Each assignment has a maximum number of points you can earn if you do an excellent job on that assignment. You must do all assignments. You can also submit a revised, improved version of an assignment to get more points for it. Your final grade is determined by your average on assignments, and how you do on the final test. The assignments and quizzes count 75%, and the final test counts 25%.

Grading scale: A 92-100; A- 90-91; B+ 87-89; B 82-86 ; B- 80-81; C+ 77-79; C 72-76; C- 68-71; D+ 66-68; D 62-65; D- 60-61; No credit - below 60.

Final Test

When you have finished all the assignments you need for your credit, you will take the final test under the supervision of a proctor approved by the EHS. You must pass the final with at least 60% to pass the class. If you score below 60% on the final, you will fail the class and not earn credit.

Class plagiarism policy

Plagiarism is copying someone else's writing, either the exact words or copying the general organization and paraphrasing some of the ideas. Copying someone else's sentences, phrases or organization of ideas and failing to give credit to the original author is plagiarism. In some papers it is appropriate to quote a short section of someone else's exact words, but when you do, that section needs to be set off in quotation marks or otherwise set apart, and the author identified either in a sentence, or in a parenthetical note. Plagiarism is unlawful and unethical, and against the EHS Honor Code. If you turn in a plagiarized assignment, you will receive ONE warning. If the problem recurs, you will be dropped from the class with no credit.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • When can I enroll? When there is space available in the class, students can enroll any time. If the class is full (which doesn't happen very often), your name will be added to a waiting list. DON'T submit more requests trying to get in faster. Every time you submit a new request for the class, your previous request is deleted, effectively moving you to the bottom of the list.
  • How do I stay in the class? Submit at least three assignments each week, and finish by the tenth week after you enroll.
  • What does it take to get credit, or a grade? Your final grade will be determined by the percentage you have before you take the final, and how you do on the final. In order to qualify to take the final test, you must have passed all quizzes with at least the listed minimum score, which is usually around 80-85% (you can re-take the quizzes as needed till you get a passing score), AND you must have met the listed minimum score for all assignments (remember, you can revise and resubmit assignments for which you want a higher score). As with all EHS classes, you must pass a proctored final test at the end of the class.
  • Is everything I need on the computer in the class website? No. This is not a totally self-contained class. You will need to get books and videos, and use the internet to complete some assignments.
  • . How fast can I finish? You must begin submitting assignments at least three weeks before you finish. Most students take the full nine to ten weeks to finish the class.
  • How do I finish and get my credit to my school? After you have passed all quizzes and assignments, submit the "Ready" assignment. Then follow the directions given in the "Arranging to take my final proctored test" link (near the bottom of the class topic outline page). The morning after you have entered your proctor's information, and I have put a score of '1' on the Ready assignment, your proctor will receive an e-mail with the password to the final test. After you have passed the final, your school should receive your credit within a couple weeks, although during the May rush it could take longer.
  • Why can't I access anything in Module 3? You need to visit all the pages listed in Module 1 & 2, read that information, and submit your "About Me" assignment before you can start work in Module 3.

00.01.01 Student Software Needs

 

Students need access to a robust internet connection and a modern web browser.

This class may also require the Apple QuickTime plug-in to view media.

For students using a school-issued Chromebook, ask your technical support folks to download the QuickTime plug-in and enable the plug-in for your Chromebook.

$0.00

00.01.02 About Me

teacher-scored 12 points possible 15 minutes

Write a short paragraph to the teacher. Introduce yourself and tell me a little about you. Use proper sentence structure including capitalization, punctuation and spelling. In this paragraph please also include the following information:

  • Name of High School you attend and when you expect to graduate.
  • Your counselor's name and email address.
  • Parent's name and contact information.
  • A contact phone number for you.
  • Any specific information that would help me to understand how best to support you in this class.
  • IMPORTANT:  Click on the "How to review your assignments" link at the bottom of the page.  Review this short video and then include a sentence in your response letting me know that you understand how to see comments and feedback for your assignments.

 

About Me Scoring Rubric 10 Points= adequate response to all 10 questions 2 Points= other relevant information is included 12 Points Total

Very, very important:  By submitting your "About Me" you are agreeing to the stipulations set out in the "start here" section and to abide by the EHS honor code:  "As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers and staff with respect."

Make sure you've reviewed the "start here" section, and let's get to work.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


00.01.03

19.00 Vocabulary and Grammar

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language from the Common Core:

• To be college- and career-ready in language, students must have firm control over the conventions of standard English.

• Students must also have extensive vocabularies, built through reading and study, enabling them to comprehend complex texts and engage in purposeful writing about and conversations around content.

• Students need to become skilled in determining or clarifying the meaning of words and phrases they encounter, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies to aid them.

• Students must learn to see an individual word as part of a network of other words--words, for example, that have similar denotations but different connotations.

• The inclusion of Language standards in students' own strand should not be taken as an indication that skills related to conventions, effective language use and vocabulary are unimportant to reading, writing, speaking, and listening; indeed, they are inseparable from such contexts.

19.01 Vocabulary Activities

Students will learn 30 new vocabulary words and be able to use them daily in their writing and speaking Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

The vocabulary section of this quarter is divided into three sections; each with ten words. You will do a writing activity and a quiz for each of the word sets. You do not have to complete them all at once (like everything in this course, you can decide the pace and order in which you work). Why Study Vocabulary? (from verbalworkout.com) Words are the tools we use to think and communicate. And this in an age when thinking and communicating are more important than strength and dexterity. At a personal level, a versatile vocabulary helps a man to woo a woman. It helps us to heed the philosophers’ advice to lead a “considered life.” Materially, a large vocabulary helps an artist describe the right shade of blue. It helps a student understand the textbook, and helps a leader manipulate concepts to formulate and share a vision. In words of Sebastian Wren, imagine if your reading required understanding this passage of text: While hortenting efrades the populace of the vaderbee class, most experts concur that a scrivant rarely endeavors to decry the ambitions and shifferings of the moulant class. Deciding whether to oxant the blatantly maligned Secting party, most moulants will tolerate the subjugation of staits, savats, or tempets only so long as the scrivant pays tribute to the derivan, either through preem or exaltation. In addition, your vocabulary makes an early impression. People judge you by the words you use and understand. It's no surprise that an extensive vocabulary is highly correlated with academic and professional success.

Quarter four is different from the other quarters for English 11.  I recommend taking the quizzes after completing ALL the vocabulaty activities because they're all from the same question bank.

19.01.01 Vocabulary Set 1

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

Vocabulary Assignment

You will be given three sets of ten words to learn and use in this course. Personally, when I need to find a definition for a word, I first look to a thesaurus. Sometimes dictionaries are hard to understand and a single word of the same meaning is sometimes more helpful to develop understanding of a new word.

Quarter four is different from the other quarters for English 11.  I recommend taking the quizzes after completing ALL the vocabulaty activities because they're all from the same question bank.

Feel free to use whatever resources you find most helpful. For each set of words you will complete an activity and a quiz. There will be vocabulary questions on the final test as well. Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box. ****************************************

Vocabulary Set 1

1. august

2. callous

3. clandestine

4. compunction

5. indelible

6. inveterate

7. quell

8. ruminate

9. tacit

10. tangible

Set 1 Activity (10 Points): Find a synonym for each of the above words. The assignment should include both the vocabulary word and its synonym. ************************************

Assignment Example 1. happy= jovial

Scoring Rubric 5 points= correct synonym for each vocabulary word (1/2 point each) 3 points= followed the directions and included both the vocabulary word and the synonym 2 point= spelling errors are non-existent 10 points total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


19.02 Vocabulary Set 2

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

You will be given three sets of ten words to learn and use in this course. Personally, when I need to find a definition for a word, I first look to a thesaurus. Sometimes dictionaries are hard to understand and a single word of the same meaning is sometimes more helpful to develop understanding of a new word. Feel free to use whatever resources you find most helpful. For each set of words you will complete an activity and a quiz.  Quarter four is different from the other quarters for English 11.  I recommend taking the quizzes after completing ALL the vocabulaty activities because they're all from the same question bank. In other words, you'll need to know all of the vocabulary words before you take the quizzes. There will be vocabulary questions on the final test as well. Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document.

Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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Vocabulary Set 2

1. antipathy

2. beset

3. decorum

4. duress

5. imbibe

6. infinitesimal

7. prowess

8. stentorian

9. stipulate

10. ultimatum

Set 2 Activity (10 Points): Using “Google” or a similar search tool, find an example of each word used in a sentence. Include each sample sentence in your assignment. Using the context clues to guide you, write a definition or synonym for each vocabulary word. Use other resources for help if the context does not make the meaning clear.

(Note* I clicked on the “News” button in the Google search engine which made it much easier to find a sentence rather than just a plethora of dictionary sites)

IMPORTANT:  Make sure each of your sentences is a complete sentence--with subject and verb.  If the statement you find on-line isn't a complete sentence, turn it into one.  For example, if I found the statement "beset by economic woes," I couldn't just put that down.  I would need to turn it into a complete sentence: The interim government was "beset by economic woes."

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Assignment Example 1. The angry customer shouted at the waitress until she burst into tears. Angry means upset or mean

Vocabulary Set 2 Rubric 5 Points= each vocabulary word is used in a sentence (1/2 point each) 5 Points= each vocabulary word is defined by the student (1/2 point each)

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


19.02.01

19.03 Vocabulary Set 3

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

You will be given three sets of ten words to learn and use in this course.

Personally, when I need to find a definition for a word, I first look to a thesaurus. Sometimes dictionaries are hard to understand and a single word of the same meaning is sometimes more helpful to develop understanding of a new word. Feel free to use whatever resources you find most helpful. For each set of words you will complete an activity and a quiz.  Quarter four is different from the other quarters for English 11.  I recommend taking the quizzes after completing ALL the vocabulaty activities because they're all from the same question bank. In other words, you'll need to know all of the vocabulary words before you take the quizzes.  There will be vocabulary questions on the final test as well.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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Vocabulary Set 3

1. alacrity

2. alleviate

3. dissonant

4. droll

5. elucidate

6. laud

7. loquacious

8. nondescript

9. rescind

10. vivacious

Set 3 Activity (10 Points): For this assignment find both a synonym for the word and compose your own sentence using the word.  Remember that each sentence must be a complete sentence--with complete subject and verb.

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Vocabulary Set 3 Rubric

5 Points= Each word has been used correctly in a sentence (1/2 point each)

3 Points= Synonym is indluced

2 Points= Writing contains few mistakes

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


19.04 Sentence Combining

Students will practice varying their syntax and structure for better sentence fluency. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

Sentence Combining Activity

Make sure to view all links below in order to fully understand how to combine sentences.  Most students struggle with this, view the links before completing the assignment. 

This activity is designed to help your sentence fluency. Good sentences are the building blocks of your writing.

A.  To start this section, I’d like you to take a few minutes to review the grammar and punctuation basics in the attached PowerPoint*:  Sentence combining-punctuation (found above).  It is important that you select the "slide show" tab from the menu bar and view the presentation "from the beginning." 

After you have viewed the power point, move to section B.

*Free PowerPoint readers are availble online if you don't already have that option on your computer.

B.  When you were first learning to write, you probably wrote very short, simple sentences like these:

Yesterday was my birthday.

I got presents.

I got a mountain bike.

We had cake.

We had ice cream.

Now you would probably combine all these ideas into a single sentence like this one:

Yesterday for my birthday we had cake and ice cream, and my presents included a mountain bike.

As you combine more ideas into a single sentence, one tool for helping your sentences flow smoothly and make sense is parallel structure: similar patterns of words.  The human brain loves patterns and repetition!  Parallel structure involves repeating the same pattern of words when two or more ideas of equal importance are functioning in the same way in the sentence (or paragraph).  Here are some examples and non-examples:

Not parallel:  Spending time with family and to make time for friends are both important.

Parallel:  Spending time with family and making time for friends are both important.

Not Parallel:  Margaret began to wail, begging not to go, shrieking on every drop and curve, and claimed she was never getting on a roller coaster again.

Parallel: Margaret began to wail, begging not to go, shrieking on every drop and curve, and claiming she was never getting on a roller coaster again.

Not Parallel:  My piano teacher told me that I needed to practice harder, pay more attention, and my commitment was lacking.

Parallel:  My piano teacher told me that I needed to practice harder, pay more attention, and give piano 100% of my effort.

Not parallel:  The college recruiter claimed that ASU had the most prestigious chess team, the most agreeable weather, and all the classes I needed were there.

Parallel:  The college recruiter claimed that ASU had the most prestigious chess team, the most agreeable weather, and the best selection of classes.

For more practice with parallel structure, see the link below.

Please view all websites before completing assignment. 

19.04.01 Sentence Combining Practice 1

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

Sentence Combining Activity 

This activity is designed to help your sentence fluency.

Combine the sets of sentences into single sentences, using parallel structure where possible. When you are finished, you will have ten sentences.

Example

1.1 The sun came off the water
1.2 The sun glinted in the green eddies
1.3 The sun glittered in the green eddies.
Combined Sentence: The sun came off the water, glinting and glimmering in the green eddies.

Now complete the following activity. You do not need to submit the sentence "sets" in your submission. Please just include sentences 1-10.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box or turn it is as a document.

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1.1 Utah has beautiful scenery
1.2 Utah has a wide variety of scenery
1.3 Few other states have so much variety
1.4 Many tourists come to see Utah's natural beauty

2.1 In northern Utah are mountains
2.2 The Uinta mountains run east and west
2.3 Other mountain ranges, like the Wasatch, run north and south
2.4 The highest point in Utah is in the Uinta mountains

3.1 The valleys of the Uinta mountains once held glaciers
3.2 Now the Uintas are the highest range in North America without glaciers
3.3 The Uintas have no glaciers because the climate is too dry
3.4 The Uintas do have many lakes

4.1 The Uintas and the Wasatch have snow-capped peaks
4.2 The forests have many kinds of trees
4.3 They have aspen
4.4 The aspen turn golden in the fall
4.5 They also have evergreens
4.6 The evergreens include lodgepole pine.

4.7 The evergreens include subalpine and Douglas fir

4.8 The evergreens include spruce

5.1 Southern Utah has canyons
5.2 Southern Utah has red rocks
5.3 Southern Utah has deserts
5.4 The canyons are deep
5.5 The canyons were carved by water
5.6 The canyons were carved over millions of years

6.1 Southern Utah has several national parks
6.2 Visitors come from all over the world
6.3 Visitors come from Germany
6.4 Visitors come from Japan
6.5 Visitors come to see the spectacular rock formations

7.1 Arches National Park was named for the rock arches
7.2 The arches are made of sandstone
7.3 The most famous arch is named Delicate Arch
7.4 Delicate Arch is on many Utah license plates

8.1 Delicate Arch's name is a mistake
8.2 It was supposed to be called Landscape Arch
8.3 Someone made a mistake labeling an early map
8.4 The mistake was switching the names of Landscape Arch and Delicate Arch

9.1 Zion National Park is at a lower elevation than most of Utah
9.2 It is often warmer than other parts of the state
9.3 Zion was the first national park in Utah
9.4 Zion is the most-visited national park in Utah

10.1 There are many beautiful features in Zion
10.2 There is Angel's Landing
10.3 There is Weeping Rock
10.4 There are narrow slot canyons
10.5 There are streams and pools of water

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Sentence Combining Rubric

5 Points for each completed sentence (1/2 point each)

3 Points for variety of syntax 2

Points for completeness (all sentence parts are included)

10 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


19.05 Sentence Combining Practice 2 (English 11)

teacher-scored 13 points possible 25 minutes

Sentence Combining Activity This activity is designed to help your sentence fluency.

Make sure to view all links below in order to fully understand how to combine sentences.  Most students struggle with this, view the links before completing the assignment.  See 19.04

Keeping in mind the rules you reviewed on sentence combining in the previous lesson, combine these sets of sentences into single sentences. When you are finished, you will have ten sentences.

Example

1.1 The sun came off the water
1.2 The sun glinted in the green eddies
1.3 The sun glittered in the green eddies.
Combined Sentence: The sun came off the water, glinting and glimmering in the green eddies.

Now complete the following activity. You do not need to submit the sentence "sets" in your submission. Please just include sentences 1-8.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment and then copy and paste it back into the submission box or turn it is as a document.

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1.1 The hunter scanned the hillside
1.2 The hunter scanned the clearing
1.3 He was watching for elk
1.4 He held still
1.5 He stayed hidden in the trees

2.1 The sun was just rising
2.2 The sun was behind him
2.3 The sun felt warm on his back
2.4 The air was cold
2.5 He could see his breath

3.1 He had gotten up before dawn
3.2 He had hiked in the dark
3.3 He had been standing there
3.4 He had been hoping to see a bull elk
3.5 He had seen a bull elk here before

4.1  He heard an elk bugle from above him.
4.2  He heard another elk answer
4.3 The answer came from lower on the hillside
4.4 The second elk might challenge the first
4.5 The elk might pass in front of him

5.1 The elk from lower down bugled again
5.2 It sounded closer
5.3 He didn't hear anything for a few minutes
5.4 Then he thought he saw something.
5.5 He saw a three-point bull.

5.6 The bull emerged from the trees.

6.1 The hunter had wanted at least a four-point.
6.2 He thought while the bull grazed.
6.3 Should he take a shot?
6.4 Should he pass up this bull?

7.1 The bull had not seen him.
7.2 The bull was relaxed.
7.3 It walked uphill.
7.4 It walked across the clearing.
7.5 It stopped and raised its head

8.1 The hunter raised his gun.
8.2 He did it slowly
8.3 He did it carefully
8.4 Suddenly he heard rustling
8.5 Three cows pushed through the bushes
8.6 They were close to him
8.7 One of them smelled him and snorted.
8.8 All four elk bounded away.

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Sentence Combining Rubric

8 Points for completed sentences (1 point each)

3 Points for variety of syntax

2 Points for completeness (all sentence parts are included)

13 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


19.06 Sentence Combining Practice 3

teacher-scored 9 points possible 20 minutes

Sentence Combining Activity - This activity is designed to help your sentence fluency.  

Example

1.1 The sun came off the water

1.2 The sun glinted in the green eddies

1.3 The sun glittered in the green eddies.

Combined Sentence: The sun came off the water, glinting and glimmering in the green eddies.

Make sure to view all links below in order to fully understand how to combine sentences.  Most students struggle with this, view the links before completing the assignment.  See 19.04

Now complete the following activity. You do not need to submit the sentence "sets" in your submission. Please just include your sentences. This time you are not given sentence "sets" but will have to decide how to combine them on your own.  Try to combine the original 36 sentences into 5-8 new sentences.  Use parallel structure where possible.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box or turn it is as a document.

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1.  Getting old is a normal part of life.

2.  Dying is a normal part of life.

3.  We don't like to think about getting old.

4.  We don't like to think about getting weaker.

5.  We don't like to think about losing our memories.

6.  We especially don't like to think about losing our independence.

7.  As children we are dependent on others.

8.  As adults we become independent.

9.  We like making our own decisions.

10.  We like taking care of ourselves.

11.  We like the freedom.

12.  As we age, many of us lose the mental ability to take care of ourselves.

13.  Many of us lose the physical ability to take care of ourselves.

14.  It is frightening to lose memories.

15.  It is frightening to lose control.

16.  In our culture, older people often live alone.

17.  Living alone means there is no one to help them.

18.  Living alone may cause feelings of isolation.

19.  Living alone may cause feelings of depression.

20.  Living alone may be dangerous.

21.  One of the dangers is of falling and being injured.

22.  A person who is injured may not be able to call for help.

23.  A person who is injured may not be discovered for days.

24.  We often encourage the elderly to live in care facilities.

25.  We encourage this for their safety.

26.  Most often, they don't want to leave their homes.

27.  This decision is difficult for everyone.

28.  It is difficult for the older person.

29.  It is difficult for the spouse.

30.  It is difficult for their children.

31.  It is better than what happened in some traditional cultures.

32.  In nomadic cultures, the elderly were sometimes murdered.

33.  In some nomadic cultures, the elderly were left behind to die alone when the tribe moved.

34.  More recently, in some nomadic cultures the older men are taken to a highway.

35.  They are abandoned next to the highway.

36.  Society has not found a good way to handle the elderly who can't care for themselves.

 

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Sentence Combining Rubric

10 Points for completed sentences (should have 5-8 sentences combining all the ideas from the original 36)

 3 Points for variety of syntax and parallel structure

2 Points for completeness (all sentences have been combined somehow)

15 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


19.07 ACT Practice

Students will answer practice questions for the ACT test and become familiar with the ACT Website for future help. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

Directions

1. Go to the ACT website (see link below)

2. Scroll down to where it says “Sample Test Questions” (Note: the option for the ACT Online Prep costs money, but you could use it if you want to--you will just have to pay for it)

3. You will see a tab for Reading and English.  The Reading and Enlgish practice questions has five sample selections for the Reading section. Please complete ONE test from the Reading section and one section from the English section. As you answer each question, it will tell you if you are correct or incorrect. If you are incorrect, you will be given an explanation of the correct answer.  Make sure to include for your screen shot for Reading and English.  

The assignment that you will turn in for points for this activity will need the following things for full credit (20 Points Total):

1. Assignment will be completed on a word processing document; please include your name. (2 Points) Also include the following:
2. The number of problems you got correct (on the first attempt) and the total number of questions completed for each test. (3 points each test= 6 points total)
3. Write down one thing you learned from the English test and one thing you learned from the Reading test. (3 points each test= 6 points total)
4. On the word document, also include a screen shot of both tests that you took. (One screen shot of the Reading test and one screen shot of the English test). To do this, use the “Print Screen” key on your keyboard (usually found above the number pad). Push this key when you are in the program and then you just need to paste it into a word processing document. If you are on a Macintosh, you probably have a utility called "Grab" you can use to get a screen shot.  If you have questions about this, please let me know. If you can't get a screen shot, copy and paste the questions into your document. (3 points each test= 6 points total)

 

19.07.01 ACT Practice Instructions

teacher-scored 20 points possible 40 minutes

Directions:

1. Go to the ACT website (see link below)

2. Click on the link that says “Sample Test Questions" (FREE) (Note: the option for the ACT Online Prep costs money but you could use that if you want to, you will just have to pay for it)

3. When you click on the link, you will be directed to a page with each subject area listed at the top.

You need to choose English or Reading for this class but feel free to visit this site again for help in the other areas. There are five sample selections from the English test and four for the Reading section. Please complete ONE test in each category. As you answer each question, it will tell you if you are correct or incorrect. If you are incorrect, you will be given an explanation of the correct answer.

 

The assignment that you will turn in for points for this activity will need the following things for full credit (20 Points Total):

1. Assignment will be completed on a word processing document; please include your name. (2 Points) Also include the following:

2. The number of problems you got correct (on the first attempt) and the total number of questions completed for each test. (3 points each test= 6 points total)

3. Write down one thing you learned from the English test and one thing you learned from the Reading test. (3 points each test= 6 points total)

4. On the word document, also include a screen shot of both tests that you took. (One screen shot of the Reading test and one screen shot of the English test). To do this, use the “Print Screen” key on your keyboard (usually found above the number pad). Push this key when you are in the program and then you just need to paste it into a word processing document. If you have questions about this, please let me know. (3 points each test= 6 points total).  If you don't have a "print screen" option for some reason, you can always take "jing" pictures or pictures with your cell phone and attach/upload those with your assignment.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


19.07.02 ACT Practice Site

20.00 Understanding Poetry

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading from the Common Core:

• To become college- and career-ready, students must grapple with works of exceptional craft and thought whose range extends across genres, cultures and centuries.
• Such works offer profound insights into the human condition and serve as models for students’ own thinking and writing.

20.01 Literary Devices

Students will review and learn about various techniques and literary devices used by writers and will then apply them in the remainder of the course. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

Literary Devices View the PowerPoint to review/learn various literary devices. After viewing the PowerPoint, you will take a quiz to evaluate your understanding. The literary devices listed here will be used throughout the course in writing activities and other assignments. *If you cannot open the PowerPoint file, please let me know and I can send it in another format

20.01.01 Literary Device Activity

teacher-scored 15 points possible 45 minutes

Find an example of each of the literary devices listed below. You can make it up or find it in another media source. Make sure to review the PowerPoint in the lesson for definitions and examples for help. Obviously, you should not use the examples from there for this assignment.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box

***********************************

1. Allusion

2. Apostrophe

3. Euphemism

4. Onomatopoeia

5. Symbol

6. Personification

7. Colloquialism

8. Hyperbole

9. Repetition

10. Alliteration

11. Oxymoron

12. Paradox

13. Irony

14. Simile

15. Metaphor

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Scoring Rubric 15 Points= one relevant example for each literary device has been included

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


20.02 Understanding Poetry using SOAPSTone

Students will learn how to read and understand poetry using the SOAPSTone method. Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

Understanding Poetry Students often struggle with poems because they seem to think there is a 'secret' meaning that can only be understood by few people. Here is a method that will help you go through some steps to get a better understanding of a poem's meaning. Read through the attachment "Understanding Poetry" to start. *If you cannot open the file, let me know and I can send it in a different format. The slides will outline a method of understanding poetry using the acronym SOAPSTone. After viewing the presentation, take the quiz. You can then get a good understanding of the types of responses you need when you practice on your own. You will then choose three of the poems below for practice. Each will be submitted as a different assignment but you will be answering the same questions for each. The last section of this unit will require you to write a poem of your own.

20.03 Poetry Practice 1

teacher-scored 18 points possible 25 minutes

Choose one of the poems at the links below and complete the assignment. Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

*************************************
1. Poem Title
2. Speaker
3. Occasion
4. Audience
5. Purpose
6. Subject
7. Tone: (Include two words that identify tone from the poem):
8. Literary Device 1 (quote example from the poem and say what literary device is being used):
9. Literary Device 2:
10. Short Answer: How does this poem connect to the quarter theme of Home and Family?
11. Short Answer: What personal connection or other insight do you have about this poem?
************************************

Scoring Rubric 6 Points=

Questions 1-6 have been adequately answered and show understanding of poem 2 Points=

Question 7 includes tone and two text examples 4 Points=

Questions 8 and 9 include the literary device and the text example 6 Points=

Each short answer question is answered in complete sentences (more than one sentence) and adequately responds to the question

18 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


20.03.01

20.04 Poetry Practice 2

teacher-scored 18 points possible 25 minutes

Choose one of the poems at the links below and complete this assignment.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

*************************************
1. Poem Title
2. Speaker
3. Occasion
4. Audience
5. Purpose
6. Subject
7. Tone: (Include two words that identify tone from the poem):
8. Literary Device 1 (quote example from the poem and say what literary device is being used):
9. Literary Device 2:
10. Short Answer: How does this poem connect to the quarter theme of Home and Family?
11. Short Answer: What personal connection or other insight do you have about this poem?
************************************

Scoring Rubric
6 Points= Questions 1-6 have been adequately answered and show understanding of poem
2 Points= Question 7 includes tone and two text examples
4 Points= Questions 8 and 9 include the literary device and the text example
6 Points= Each short answer question is answered in complete sentences (more than one sentence) and adequately responds to the question
18 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


20.04.01

20.05 Poetry Practice 3

teacher-scored 18 points possible 25 minutes

Choose one of the poems at the links below and complete this assignment.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

****************************************
1. Poem Title
2. Speaker
3. Occasion
4. Audience
5. Purpose
6. Subject
7. Tone: (Include two words that identify tone from the poem):
8. Literary Device 1 (quote example from the poem and say what literary device is being used):
9. Literary Device 2:
10. Short Answer: How does this poem connect to the quarter theme of Home and Family?
11. Short Answer: What personal connection or other insight do you have about this poem?
****************************************

Scoring Rubric
6 Points= Questions 1-6 have been adequately answered and show understanding of poem
2 Points= Question 7 includes tone and two text examples
4 Points= Questions 8 and 9 include the literary device and the text example
6 Points= Each short answer question is answered in complete sentences (more than one sentence) and adequately responds to the question
18 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


20.05.01

20.06 Writing Poetry

teacher-scored 10 points possible 35 minutes

Poetry Practice

Write one poem modeling the style of "FIfth Grade Autobiography" which uses a photograph to share a memory. The poem is attached below. Your poem can be in any style or form you choose, but the content should talk about a memories that come back upon looking at a certain picture.

Scoring Rubric
4 Points= completed poem
3 Points= poem is modeled after "Fifth Grade Autobiography" which uses a photograph to share a memory
3 Points= poem is creative and original

10 Points total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


20.06.01

21.00 Responding to Literary Texts

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading from the Common Core:

• To become college- and career-ready, students must grapple with works of exceptional craft and thought whose range extends across genres, cultures and centuries.

• Such works offer profound insights into the human condition and serve as models for students’ own thinking and writing.

• Through wide and deep reading of literature and literary nonfiction of steadily increasing sophistication, students gain a reservoir of literary and cultural knowledge, references, and images; the ability to evaluate intricate arguments; and the capacity to surmount the challenges posed by complex texts.

21.01 Literary Text

Students will read a variety or short stories, excerpts, and a novel to expand their understanding of the quarter theme "home and family" Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

Understanding Literary Texts The focus of this unit is to read a variety of literature focused on a single theme "home and family." This unit is similar to the poetry unit in that you will learn techniques for understanding literature and methods that writer's use to enhance their writing. You will then be able to apply what you have learned. 1. Read and understand the information in the "Understanding Literary Texts" PowerPoint 2. Take the quiz to get a better understanding of analyzing literature 3. Choose three short stories to analyze on your own 4. Choose one of the books to be reading as you complete this quarter. As always, assignments do not have to be completed in order. Here is the list of books. Hopefully, you have already started reading. A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry Peace Like a River by Leif Enger The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

21.02 Reader's Response 1

teacher-scored 19 points possible 35 minutes

Reader’s Response Activity

Choose one of the four stories to read, then respond to the following prompts.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.
**************************************************
1. What story did you read?
2. Describe the diction of the text:
3. Describe the syntax of the text:
4. What is the overall tone of the text:
5. What is the theme or lesson to be learned from the story?
6. What point of view is the story being told from?
7. What is the genre of the story?
8. Who is the protagonist?
9. Who/ what is the antagonist?
10. Identify two literary devices found in the text (remember to state the literary device and the example from the text).
11. Short Answer: Choose one significant quote from the text and discuss its importance to the story.
12. Short Answer: Connect this story to the overall theme of the quarter (home and family).
13. Short Answer: Make a personal connection to the story.
**************************************************

Reader's Response Rubric
9 point= Questions 1-9 have been adequately answered
4 points= Question 10 includes two examples of two literary devices (can be the same one)
2 points= Short answer question 11 responds in more than one sentence and contains a quote from the text
2 points= Short answer question 12 responds in more than one sentence and makes a connection between the story and the theme
2 points= Short answer question 13 responds in more than one sentence and makes a personal connection to the story

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


21.02.01

21.03 Reader's Response 2

teacher-scored 19 points possible 35 minutes

Reader’s Response Activity

Choose one of the four stories to read, then respond to the following prompts.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.
**************************************************
1. What story did you read?
2. Describe the diction of the text:
3. Describe the syntax of the text:
4. What is the overall tone of the text:
5. What is the theme or lesson to be learned from the story?
6. What point of view is the story being told from?
7. What is the genre of the story?
8. Who is the protagonist?
9. Who/ what is the antagonist?
10. Identify two literary devices found in the text (remember to state the literary device and the example from the text).
11. Short Answer: Choose one significant quote from the text and discuss its importance to the story.
12. Short Answer: Connect this story to the overall theme of the quarter (home and family).
13. Short Answer: Make a personal connection to the story.
**************************************************

Reader's Response Rubric
9 point= Questions 1-9 have been adequately answered
4 points= Question 10 includes two examples of two literary devices (can be the same one)
2 points= Short answer question 11 responds in more than one sentence and contains a quote from the text
2 points= Short answer question 12 responds in more than one sentence and makes a connection between the story and the theme
2 points= Short answer question 13 responds in more than one sentence and makes a personal connection to the story

If “A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings ” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez link isn't working, try the one below.
 

http://www.jonescollegeprep.org/ourpages/auto/2014/1/29/42934518/A_Very_Old_Man_with_Enormous_Wings_pdf.pdf

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


21.04 Reader's Response 3

teacher-scored 19 points possible 35 minutes

Reader’s Response Activity

Choose one of the four stories to read, then respond to the following prompts.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.
**************************************************
1. What story did you read?
2. Describe the diction of the text:
3. Describe the syntax of the text:
4. What is the overall tone of the text:
5. What is the theme or lesson to be learned from the story?
6. What point of view is the story being told from?
7. What is the genre of the story?
8. Who is the protagonist?
9. Who/ what is the antagonist?
10. Identify two literary devices found in the text (remember to state the literary device and the example from the text).
11. Short Answer: Choose one significant quote from the text and discuss its importance to the story.
12. Short Answer: Connect this story to the overall theme of the quarter (home and family).
13. Short Answer: Make a personal connection to the story.
**************************************************

Reader's Response Rubric
9 point= Questions 1-9 have been adequately answered
4 points= Question 10 includes two examples of two literary devices (can be the same one)
2 points= Short answer question 11 responds in more than one sentence and contains a quote from the text
2 points= Short answer question 12 responds in more than one sentence and makes a connection between the story and the theme
2 points= Short answer question 13 responds in more than one sentence and makes a personal connection to the story

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


21.04.01

21.05 Book Project

teacher-scored 80 points possible 150 minutes

Quarter 4 Book Project
Theme: Home and Family

Novel Choices- Choose one book to read from the following list and then complete the activities.
A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry
Peace Like a River by Leif Enger
The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

Activities

NOTE: These activities should be completed in one single word processing document and turned in all together

1. Choose five quotes from the book. For each quote, write a short paragraph discussing the significance of the quote. Things to consider might be how the quote develops a character, how the quote helps with understanding of theme, personal connections you made, or the writing style of the author. (20 points)

2. Character Identification: Choose four characters from the book. For each character do the following (20 points):
• Descriptive Phrase (something quoted directly from the book)
• Memorable quote (this is also quoted directly from the book; can be something the character said or something said about the character)
• Your first impression of the character
• Three words to describe your character
• Relationship to other characters

3. Theme Discussion (10 Points)
Write a paragraph discussion the connection between the novel and the quarter theme (Home and Family).
Questions to consider in your discussion:
• What does this novel say about home and family?
• Do you agree or disagree?
• What personal connection did you make to the book?
• What does each character learn about “home and family” through the course of the novel?
• What is the lesson to be learned or the theme of the novel?
• How does the theme connect to the topic of “home and family”?

4. Essay Question
Choose a novel or play that depicts a conflict between a parent (or a parental figure) and a son or daughter. Write an essay in which you analyze the sources of the conflict and explain how the conflict contributes to the meaning of the work. Avoid plot summary. At least five paragraphs.  (20 points)

Essay Question Alternate Assignment: Instead of writing an essay, you can submit a PowerPoint presentation responding to all parts of the essay question. Your presentation must be at least 10 slides long and 5 of the slides need a picture. The focus of the PowerPoint is a response to the essay question-- make sure you are answering the question and NOT just giving a summary of the book.

5. Setting (10 Points)
Using Google Earth, find the actual spot on the globe of a location in your book. Look around at the setting and even though it will not necessarily look like the setting described in the book, think about the importance of 'place' and how it might affect the character. Write a paragraph response considering setting and its importance in the book. How does setting affect the character and make a difference in the story? You need to have a picture from Google Earth of your 'place' for full credit. Please include a screen shot of your 'place' (use “print screen” and then paste it) or save it as a .jpeg and then paste it into your document.

Book Project Scoring Rubric

20 Points=Quote Section
10 points= 2 points for each quote (5 total)
10 points= 2 points for each quote discussion; each discussion is more than one paragraph (5 total)

20 Points= Character Identification
For each of the four chosen characters, the five questions have all been answered

10 Points= Theme Discussion
5 points= Discussion is in a complete paragraph
5 points= Discussion incorporates examples from the book

20 Points= Essay Question
5 points= Essay focuses on the question and responds with clarity and examples from the book
3 points= Essay has a clear thesis statement which responds to the question
2 points= Essay is in organized into paragraphs for clarity
3 points= Essay contains few distracting spelling and grammar mistakes
3 points= Essay is long enough to adequately respond to the prompt (4-5 paragraphs)
3 points= Essay has a clear introductory paragraph which sets up the discussion
2 points= Essay has a strong concluding paragraph
2 points= Essay DOES NOT just summarize the book

20 Points= Essay Question Alternative Assignment
5 points= presentation is at least ten slides long
5 points= five of the ten slides contains a picture
3 points= presentation responds to all parts of the prompt
2 points= slides are neat and easy to read with few mistakes
3 points= presentation in NOT a summary of the book but a response to the essay question
2 points= presentation is unique and interesting

10 Points= Setting
5 points= paragraph discussion of the importance of setting
5 points= screen shot or jpeg of the setting found from GoogleEarth or a similar source

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


21.06 Critical Movie Review

teacher-scored 13 points possible 45 minutes

Critical Viewing Movie Review Choose a movie (or live play or musical) that fits with the quarter theme and write a one-page response of that viewing. You will then present your response in one of two ways: using Google Voice (See the "Teacher - Contact Information" section for my phone number) or make a short video of you responding to the movie.

It is best to have your responses written out before responding to this prompt so your presentation is organized and clear; you may also want to practice before making the phone call or final video.

Respond to the following questions in your review:

1. How does this movie tie into the quarter theme of Home and Family?

2. What is the message or theme of the movie?

3. What obstacles did the protagonist have to overcome?

4. What rating (out of five stars) would you give this movie? Why?

Suggested movies for this quarter: The Incredibles, Sleepless in Seattle, Pay it Forward, Legends of the Fall, Billy Elliot, Father of the Bride, Cheaper by the Dozen, A Home of Our Own, The Blind Side *Note: You are not restricted to any of these titles. Any movie that fits within the theme of the quarter will work. If you are not sure if a movie fits with the theme, just send me a message. Honestly, I don't watch many movies so I am not really sure what is out there--use your best judgement.

If you use Google Voice, you can leave up to a three minute message. Use the questions to guide your response and write out your review in detail before completing the assignment. In the assignment submission box, simply make a note of the day and time you recorded your message. (801-317-8401, In the message include:  your name, quarter, assignment #, and the assignment.  Also, submit a comment through Learn with the date and time you left the message; the assignment will NOT be graded unless the date and time are submitted in Learn as well.) OR  If you make a video, you can upload it to Canvas as well. The video does not have to be anything super elaborate; it can be just you talking to the camera and answering the questions about the movie.

Scoring Rubric 8 Points- student responds to each question clearly and adequately 5 Points- student is well spoken during the presentation; it is clear that they have practiced

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


22.00 Narrative Writing

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing from the Common Core:

• For students, writing is a key means of asserting and defending claims, showing what they know about a subject, and conveying what they have experienced, imagined, thought, and felt.
• To be college- and career-ready writers, students must take task, purpose and audience into careful consideration, choosing words, information, structures and formats deliberately.
• Students need to be able to use technology strategically when creating, refining and collaborating on writing.
• Students must have the flexibility, concentration and fluency to produce high-quality first-draft text under a tight deadline as well as the capacity to revise a piece of writing over multiple drafts when circumstances encourage or require it.

22.01 Narrative Writing Practice

Students will evaluate narrative selections and to respond to writing prompts incorporating skills learned earlier in the quarter. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

Narrative writing is the telling of a story, usually something from the author's own experience.  But it's more than just the series of events.  It's telling the story in a way that entertains, enlightens, or educates the reader.  It's a story that makes a point. 

In your average 5-paragraph essay, you're taught to state your thesis in the first paragraph and then prove it by the end of the essay.  Well, a narrative has a thesis or a point to make too, but it isn't usually stated outright--and certainly not in the first paragraph.  The point the author wants to make unfolds as the story is told, and somewhere near the end of the narrative, the insights the author wants to share, though usually only implied, become clear. 

Take a few minutes to review the narrative techniques below.  Practicing these techniques can help you improve your writing style.

Exposition –Is the story told as it is happening or is it reflective?  Are there parallel plots or subplots that the author shifts to in the narrative? From what point of view is the narrative told?  Is dialogue used to help tell the story?

Imagery – What are the sensory details and description the author uses to “paint” the picture for the reader?

Setting – What details give you a sense of the time and place the action of the narrative happens?

Conflict – How is this set up and how is it resolved?

Characterization – How does the author make the characters come alive, make sense, entice you to care about their outcomes?

Pacing -  How the author handles time and sequence - does the story skip over weeks or months? Are there flashbacks or does everything unfold in the same, steady, chronological manner?

Suspense -  Is there foreshadowing of future events? Does the author switch back and forth between parallel plots at critical points in the story? Are you kept in doubt about the outcome of events?

Literary Devices -  How does the author use literary devices to add interest and depth to the theme of the narrative? (These are same devices you have studied in the units on poetry and literature.)

22.01.01 Narrative Writing Practice 1

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

Because one of the best ways to improve your writing style is to evaluate how great authors craft narratives, I’d like you to read the short narrative by Richard Wright at the link given.  Then respond to the questions below:

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1.  In at least 3 sentences, respond to the narrative.  What did you think? How did it make you feel?  Were you able to see why the author chose to relate this story?

      In this response, go beyond telling me things like "it was well written"--I know that.  Be specific and detailed in your response to the piece and to your evaluation of the author's purpose.

2.  Talk about the exposition and pacing.

3.  Talk about why is the mother willing to risk losing the money rather than go to the store herself?  What does the stick symbolize for the boy?

4.  Talk about the tone and level of intensity.

5.  Talk about the syntax in the sentences below – What do you see in those sentences that works well?

  •  "The hunger I had known before this had been no grim, hostile stranger; it had been a normal hunger that had made me beg constantly for bread, and when I ate a crust or two I was satisfied."
  •  “As the days slid past, the image of my father became associated with the pangs of hunger and whenever I felt hunger, I thought of him with a deep biological bitterness.”

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Narrative Writing Practice Scoring Rubric

7 points= Thoughtful response to each question.

3 points= Responses are clear and well supported.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


22.01.02

22.02 Narrative Writing Practice 2

teacher-scored 20 points possible 15 minutes

Now it's your turn.  I want you to keep the example narrative you read in the previous assignment in the back of your mind as you choose your topic, but before you choose a narrative topic, consider what you read in the Narrative Writing Practice lesson (16.01)

A.  Brainstorm a list of 10 narrative topics

Consider things such as an events that was particularly significant, the first time for something, an experience that tested your character or resolve, or something that made you wonder, fear, overcome, laugh, or despair.

The links below have lists of possible topics that might help you come up with ideas as well.

B.  Review the narrative techniques reviewed in 22.01.

Keeping in mind that a narrative relates a story or an event, and that a narrative has a point or theme to it, consider what I'll be looking for in your narrative:

1.  An engaging introduction - Remember you're not writing a 5-paragraph essay here--don't start with your thesis statement and what you want to "show" in your essay.

2.  An intriguing conflict (tension, struggle, question, problem)

3.  A good story - As you write your narrative, you will need to consider things like setting, point of view, character development, dialogue, pacing, exposition format, etc.  

4.  Satisfying resolution – An appropriate, well-timed, ending

Once you have chosen a topic, and have thought through how you would like your narrative to play out, you can begin to write.  While your ideas do need to be clearly expressed, consider this a rough draft.  What's important here is the telling of your story. 

IMPORTANT:  This assignment needs to be typed on your own word processing software, saved as a .doc, .docx, or .pdf file, and uploaded/attached to submit it.

 

Narrative Writing Practice Scoring Rubric

10 points= response is creative and interesting and writer has made good use of "narrative techniques."

6 points= The ideas are clear, and the point, or thesis, is clear by the end of the narrative.

4 points= Syntax and diction appropriate and contribute to the overall effect of the narrative

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


22.02.01

22.03 Narrative Writing Practice 3

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

One of the keys to good narrative writing is the ability to great vivid images through description and detail. 

An exellent example of the use of detail is found in a passage from Mary Antin's The Promised Land (pg. 4-5, scroll down to start on page 4).

If the site isn't working, click on the PDF or Word document version. 

Access this narrative at the link below.  As you read it pay attention to the creative use of descriptive detail. Notice the details she includes, and consider, too, those she may have left out.   After you have read it, respond to the prompts below.

*******************

1.  Talk about the opening lines.  What is good about the first sentence?

2.  Talk about characterization – What are some of the surprising/non-standard details do you get about one of the characters.

3.  Talk about the setting – What details stood out for you?  What details created the most vivid picture?

4.  What point, idea or theme does this short narrative leave you with?

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Narrative Writing Practice Scoring Rubric

8 points= Thoughtful response to each question.

2 points= Responses are clear and well supported.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


22.03.01

22.04 Narrative Writing Practice 4

teacher-scored 20 points possible 15 minutes

Your turn to practice again.  For this exercise, I’d like you to describe your introduction to a particular place or a person that is, or became, significant to you. 

To start out, make a list of at least 5 people and 5 places on which you might base your narrative. In making your topic choice, consider whether or not the choice will lend itself to vivid description and whether or not you will be able to demonstrate the significance or importance of this individual or place.

As you did before consider the need for an engaging introduction, solid idea development, and a satisfying resolution.

Once you have chosen a topic and have thought through how you would like your narrative to play out, you can begin to write.  While your ideas do need to be clearly expressed, consider this a rough draft.  What's important here is the telling of your story.  Turn in your brainstorming list with your rough draft as well.  Remember to meet the word count of 600-800 words. You will need to hit this word count for the final draft. 

IMPORTANT:  This assignment needs to be typed on your own word processing software, saved as a .doc, .docx, or .pdf file, and uploaded/attached to submit it.

Narrative Writing Practice Scoring Rubric

10 points= response is creative and interesting and writer has made good use of "narrative techniques."

6 points= The ideas are clear, and the point, or thesis, is clear by the end of the narrative.

4 points= Syntax and diction appropriate and contribute to the overall effect of the narrative

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


22.05 Narrative Writing Practice 5

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

You have written two narrative rough drafts.   Which topic produced the better narrative?  Chose one of your narratives and let's talk about revising.  The purpose of your rough drafts was to get the story out.  Now I want you to evaluate your essay based on 7 key factors.  First access "Tips for Writing a Personal Narrative."  (This is found in both a .pdf or a Microsoft Word format above.) As you read through each  section, mentally evaluate your narrative and make some decisions about how you might revise it. 

Once you have read through the 7 factors and have evaluated your narrative, respond to the questions/requirements below based on the essay you have chosen to revise.

Important:  Please indicate which rough draft you chose to revise--the first (22.02) or the seond (22.04)

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Purpose & Audience - Discuss: Were these clear in your narrative?  Who do you envision your audience to be?  What is the main purpose for telling your story?

Structure - Explain which of these 3 types would work best for your narrative?

Show, don't tell - Re-write one passage from your narrative using more sensory detail.

Let People talk - Write a few lines of dialogue that might fit well in your narrative.

Point of view - Look at the point of view you used--who is doing the speaking?  Is that the point of view that would work best for your narrative or do you think that should be changed?

Tense - Would explaining events in past or present tense work best for your particular narrative?

Tone - What tone would you like to create in this narrative?  What are some words or images that you could add to your narrative to help create that tone?

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


22.06 Narrative Writing

Students will write a 600-800 word narrative final draft. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

Now that you have evaluated one of your rough drafts and have got some good revision ideas and strategies in mind, it's time to polish it into a final draft.  After you have revised and then edited for mistakes, submit your final draft to me. 

Students will write a 600-800 word narrative final draft.

Important:  Please indicate which rough draft you chose to revise--the first (22.02) or the seond (22.04)--and please underline or bold the revisions in your final paper.

The final paper is worth 40 points.

 

Final Paper Scoring Rubric (review attached rubric)

5 Points= Narrative introduction is engaging and introduces the characters/narrator

5 Points= Narrative follows a logical development and smoothly progresses through the story

5 Points= Writer uses effective narrative techniques (ex: dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, etc.)

5 Points= Writer develops relationships, cohesion, and flow

5 Points= Word choice, style and tone are developed with precise language and literary devices

5 Points= Conclusion of the narrative is satisfying

5 Points= Writing has few or no errors in grammar and spelling

5 Points= Teacher directed revisions have been included and are somehow highlighted in the text

22.07 Narrative Draft 1

teacher-scored 15 points possible 60 minutes

Once you have decided on a topic, please write approximately two pages (600-800 words) in narrative form.

Definition of narrative: a story or account of events, experiences, or the like, whether true or fictitious. (15 points for the submission)

Please complete this activity as a word processing document that you will upload, not something that you will copy and paste into the submission box.

Include the word count at the top of your paper, directly under the title

Draft 1 Scoring Rubric
5 points= narrative is creative and well written with a narrow focus
4 points= word count and title are included
3 points= required word count has been met
3 points= narrative contains few mistakes

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


22.08 Final Narrative Paper

teacher-scored 40 points possible 45 minutes

Final Paper

After submitting your first draft, the teacher will send you a list of revisions to include in the final draft.

Please underline or bold the revisions in your final paper.

The final paper is worth 40 points.

Final Paper Scoring Rubric (review attached rubric)
5 Points= Narrative introduction is engaging and introduces the characters/narrator
2 Points= Narrative follows a logical development and smoothly progresses through the story
5 Points= Writer uses effective narrative techniques (ex: dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, etc.)
3 Points= Writer develops relationships, cohesion, and flow
5 Points= Word choice, style and tone are developed with precise language and literary devices
5 Points= Conclusion of the narrative is satisfying
5 Points= Writing has few or no errors in grammar and spelling
2 Points= Paper has met the length requirements
8 Points= Teacher directed revisions have been included and are somehow highlighted in the text

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


23.00 Informative and Explanatory Writing

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing from the Common Core:

• For students, writing is a key means of asserting and defending claims, showing what they know about a subject, and conveying what they have experienced, imagined, thought, and felt.

• To be college- and career-ready writers, students must take task, purpose, and audience into careful consideration, choosing words, information, structures and formats deliberately.

• Students need to know how to combine elements of different kinds of writing--for example, to use narrative strategies within argument and explanation within narrative to produce complex and nuanced writing.

• Students need to be able to use technology strategically when creating, refining and collaborating on writing.

• Students have to become adept at gathering information, evaluating sources, and citing material accurately, reporting findings from their research and analysis of sources in a clear and cogent manner.

• Students must have the flexibility, concentration, and fluency to produce high-quality first-draft text under a tight deadline as well as the capacity to revise a piece of writing over multiple drafts when circumstances encourage or require it.

23.01 Research Review

Students will review research skills and use Pioneer Library to explore topics Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.

Please review the information found in the attached presentations concerning the use of the Pioneer LIbrary (including EBSCO) and using MLA documentation. After looking over the information, you will be required to take a short quiz on the material. *If you have trouble opening any of the file attachments, please let me know and I will send it to you in a different format.

23.01.01 Pioneer Library

Username: pioneer 

Password: [Please ask your local school librarian or your teacher for the password.]

23.02 Compare/Contrast Paper

Students will use research skills to learn how to write a compare/contrast research paper Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

Compare/ Contrast College Assignment 1. Please choose two colleges you are interested in attending.
 2. Find their sites on the internet by doing a search (example: Utah State University homepage)
 3. After you have located each site, consider the following criteria: cost, location, programs of interest to you, entrance requirements 4. You will then choose two other criteria to consider when picking a college (examples: family loyalty, scholarship opportunities, athletics, etc.) 5. When you have finished your research, you are to write a two-page comparison paper on the colleges you have researched. (600-800 words) 5. The first paragraph or section should introduce the two colleges and then you should list your criteria for comparing the two. The body paragraphs should focus on your criteria for comparison (you will have at least six categories). Your last paragraph should indicate which college you would prefer attending and an explanation.

23.02.01 Compare/ Contrast Essay Examples

23.03 Compare/ Contrast Final Paper

teacher-scored 32 points possible 150 minutes

Compare/Contrast Final Paper

Now that you have done a bit of research on your colleges, you are ready to write the final paper.

The key to a good compare/contrast is to have solid criteria for your discussion.

You will be talking about the following criteria: cost, location, programs of interest to you, entrance requirements and then adding two additional criteria of your own.

You will be using six criteria to use to make your comparison.

Your paper should be organized as follows:
The first paragraph or section should introduce the things you are comparing and then you should list your criteria for comparing the two.
The body paragraphs should focus on your criteria for comparison (you will have six body paragraphs--one for each criteria).
Your last paragraph should indicate which of the two things you prefer.

This paper should be between 600-800 words.

You will complete this assignment on word processing document and upload it in the assignment section.

Attached is a detailed scoring rubric but here is a summary:
3 Points=Opening paragraph introduces the compare/contrast elements and organizes ideas, concepts, and information.
8 Points= Each body paragraph discusses a chosen criteria in detail and develops the compare/contrast thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information
5 Points= Use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships
5 Points=Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone; uses precise language and content-specific vocabulary
3 Points=Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented
5 Points=Has few or no errors in conventions, grammar or usage
3 Points= Paper is between 500-700 words; word count is included

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


24.00 Argumentative Writing and Informational Text

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing from the Common Core:

• For students, writing is a key means of asserting and defending claims, showing what they know about a subject, and conveying what they have experienced, imagined, thought and felt.

• To be college- and career-ready writers, students must take task, purpose and audience into careful consideration, choosing words, information, structures and formats deliberately.

• Students need to know how to combine elements of different kinds of writing--for example, to use narrative strategies within argument and explanation within narrative to produce complex and nuanced writing.

• Students need to be able to use technology strategically when creating, refining and collaborating on writing.

• Students have to become adept at gathering information, evaluating sources, and citing material accurately, reporting findings from their research and analysis of sources in a clear and cogent manner.

• Students must have the flexibility, concentration, and fluency to produce high-quality first-draft text under a tight deadline as well as the capacity to revise a piece of writing over multiple drafts when circumstances encourage or require it.

24.01 Editorial Writing

Students will explore argumentative writing with a study of editorial and opinion examples Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Editorial Writing For this assignment, you will be required to complete three tasks. 1. You will read an editorial supplied by the teacher and answer questions 2. You will read an editorial of your choice and respond to questions 3. You will write an editorial in response to your chosen article

24.01.01 Editorial Practice

teacher-scored 25 points possible 45 minutes

Editorial/ Letter to the Editor Response

Read the attached article from the Deseret News about paying kids for good grades. Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment; then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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1. What problem does the author present in the article?

2. What is the author's opinion about this issue?

3.  List all the arguments/statements that show evidence or support for that opinion.

4.  What solutions (if any) does the author present in the article? Are the solutions presented reasonable?  Do you have another idea for a possible solution?

5.  Write a paragraph response to the article.  Include your evaluation of the effectiveness of the article--whether or not the author presented enough support to make a valid argument--and explain why you were persuaded to agree or to disagree with the claims in the article.

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


24.01.02 Editorial Practice Article

24.02 Choice Editorial Article

teacher-scored 25 points possible 60 minutes

Your assignment is to find a letter to the editor or an editorial on a topic that interests you. You will answer the same set of questions for the previous article. Make sure you include the link to the article or a picture of the article. Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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1. Article Title (1 point):

2. Article Source (1 point):

3. Author (1 point):

1. What problem does the author present in the article?

2. What is the author's opinion about this issue?

3.  List all the arguments/statements that show evidence or support for that opinion.

4.  What solutions (if any) does the author present in the article? Are the solutions presented reasonable? 

5.  What other solutions so see for this problem?

6.  In a paragraph or two, respond to the article.  Include your evaluation of the effectiveness of the article--whether or not the author presented enough support to make a valid argument--and explain why you were persuaded to agree or to disagree with the claims in the article.

7.  Article Link (4 points):

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*You need to turn in a copy of the letter or a link to the letter to the teacher along with this assignment. You can send the link if it is an online source or take a picture of the article and email it to me.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


24.02.01 Editorial Sources

24.03 Letter to the Editor

teacher-scored 33 points possible 60 minutes

Letter to the Editor

After answering questions about a letter to the editor or editorial of your choice, you are going to write a response to that letter. Your letter should be between 450 and 550 words (if you were going to send it to a newspaper, there is usually a strict word count limit). Please address it to the appropriate audience by using suitable word choices. You should incorporate the information found in the letter you are responding to to make your argument. This assignment will be completed as a word- processing document and turned in as an attachment.

Make sure to submit reworked letter through Learn (where you submit assignments) for grading. 

Letter to the Editor Rubric
5 Points= Letter is within the word count guidelines of 450 and 550 words (please include your word count at the top of your document)
8 Points= Letter responds to the letter chosen by the student in the previous assignment. In the student's letter, there are at least two direct citations of the letter chosen by the student.
6 Points= Letter uses examples and outside information for support (can use outside sources; please cite any outside sources used)
6 Points= Word choice and language are appropriate for the audience
4 Points= Student uses argument instead of persuasion in responding to the letter. Student avoids statements such as "I believe" or "I think"
4 Points= Letter has few or no spelling and grammar errors

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


24.04 Directed Research Paper

Students will write an argumentative research paper on topic chosen by the teacher. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Directed Research Paper Topic: Do the positive aspects of social networking sites outweigh the negatives? Cybersocializing involves using the Internet to build social networks. MySpace, one of the earliest social networks, was founded in 2003 and became very popular with young people. The following year, several students at Harvard University founded Facebook and offered it to select universities. Facebook soon expanded its reach to include all university students, then all high school students, and later all people over the age of 13. Facebook now has more than 400 million users worldwide. People who think positively about social networking sites claim that they allow people to easily develop new relationships, stay connected to friends and family, and bring people with common interests together. Others say the time spent on social networks is wasted time that could be better spent building face-to-face relationships. They warn that young people on these sites are more likely to be the victims of cyberbullying and that they are also vulnerable to predators who mask their identities. Young people are often naïve to the fact that information and photos they post on these sites can come back to haunt them when they apply for college or jobs. (SIRS)

24.04.01 Directed Research Essay

teacher-scored 21 points possible 45 minutes

Activity: Write a five-paragraph essay responding to the prompt about Cybersocializing

Essay Scoring Rubric
5 points= student uses the five-paragraph model to organize the essay.
3 points= student develops a clear thesis statement
5 points= student uses enough discussion and detail to support the thesis
3 points= student avoids statements such as "I believe" and "I think"
3 points= essay has minimal spelling and grammar mistakes
21 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


24.05 Directed Research Paper Articles

teacher-scored 48 points possible 150 minutes

The next section of this project requires you to read three total articles about the topic of social networkng.  At the links below you will find "pro" and "con" articles on this topic. You will need to pick two of the articles  at these sites and then find another article on your own. (You may use EBSCO or another source).

You will need to accurately cite all three sources for your paper in MLA format. EBSCO has a tool to use for citing sources from there.  If you use another source, you may want to use an online tool such as citationmachine.net to help you accurately generate your citations.  If you need to review the information on citing sources, it can be found in Unit 23.

After reading each article, you will answer the questions below.

*Please use a word-processing program to type your responses in a single document, then turn it in all together as an attachment. Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document to help you complete the requirements for the assignment.

 

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Respond to each question for each article:

1. What is the author’s argument/ suggestion? (2 points)
2. What key points does the author make to support his/her argument? (2 points)
3. Do you agree or disagree with the author? Explain your position. (3 points)
4. List three of the author’s points that really made you reconsider your own opinion about this topic. (3 points)
5. Directly quote two sections of the text you could use in your essay. (4 points)
6. Explain why you think this author is a credible source. (2 points)
7. Include the correct MLA documentation for each source. (3 points)

16 Points for each article= 48 Points total
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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


24.05.01 Pioneer Library

24.05.02 SIRS Issue Researcher: Cybersocializing

24.06 Pro/ Con Chart for Directed Research Paper

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

The next step in this assignment is to create a pro/con chart based on the research you have done. List at least five pros and five cons for each side of the argument. Scoring Rubric: 5 points for each pro argument 5 points for each con argument 10 Points total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


24.07 Directed Research Final Paper

teacher-scored 34 points possible 150 minutes

Now, you get to take your original five paragraph essay and revise it into a complete argumentative research paper. Your final paper should be between 600-800 words. You must also incorporate directly cited text from your articles and include the correct MLA reference. You should have at least 5 text citations in your final paper. See the attached rubric for details about grading. Below is a simplified version of the rubric. Scoring Rubric

3 Points= Introduces precise, knowledgeable claim and establishes significance 5 Points=Develops claims and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly; supplies most relevant data and evidence 5 Points=Uses words, clauses and phrases, as well as varied syntax, to link major sections of the text, create cohesion and clarify the relationships between claims and reasons 5 Points=Establishes and maintains a smooth, formal style and objective tone; words and phrases such as "I believe" and "I think" are non-existent 3 Points= Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented 5 Points=Has few or no errors in conventions, grammar or usage 5 Points=Lists and appropriately cites credible, relevant, authoritative sources 3 Points= Paper is adequate in length and word count is included

34 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


24.08 Final Research Paper

Students will write a final research paper using the skills they have built through the course. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Your job is to research the following topic: A well-known football coach once said, "Winning isn't everything, it's the only thing." Do you agree or disagree with this statement? Write an essay in which you state your position and support it with convincing evidence.

24.08.01 Final Paper Research

teacher-scored 48 points possible 100 minutes

Prompt: A well-known football coach once said, "Winning isn't everything, it's the only thing." Do you agree or disagree with this statement? Write an essay in which you state your position and support it with convincing evidence.

Research three articles that would help you make a claim on this topic. You will need to accurately cite all of your sources for your paper. SIRS and EBSCO are great resources to use for research. SIRS includes the citation at the bottom of each article and EBSCO has a tool to use for citing sources from there. If you need to review this information, it can be found in Unit 23.

After reading each article, you will answer the questions below. Please use a word-processing program to type your responses in a single document, then turn in all together as an attachment.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document to help you complete the assignment. *****************************

Respond to each question for each article:

1. What is the author’s argument/ suggestion? (2 points)

2. What key points does the author make to support his/her argument? (2 points)

3. Do you agree or disagree with the author? Explain your position. (3 points)

4. List three of the author’s points that really made you reconsider your own opinion about this topic. (3 points)

5. Directly quote two sections of the text you could use in your essay. (4 points)

6. Explain why you think this author is a credible source. (2 points) 7. Include the correct MLA documentation for each source. (3 points)

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16 Points for each article= 48 Points total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


24.08.02

24.08.03 Pioneer Library

24.09 Final Research Paper

teacher-scored 34 points possible 60 minutes

Using your research, write a paper which outlines your claim about the topic A well-known football coach once said, "Winning isn't everything, it's the only thing." Do you agree or disagree with this statement? Write an essay in which you state your position and support it with convincing evidence. Your final paper should be between 500-700 words. You must also incorporate directly cited text from your articles and include the correct MLA reference. You should have at least five text citations in your final paper. See the attached rubric for details about grading. Below is a simplified version of the rubric. Scoring Rubric

3 Points= Introduces precise, knowledgeable claim and establishes significance 5 Points=Develops claims and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly; supplies most relevant data and evidence 5 Points=Uses words, clauses and phrases, as well as varied syntax, to link major sections of the text, create cohesion and clarify the relationships between claims and reasons 5 Points=Establishes and maintains a smooth, formal style and objective tone; words and phrases such as "I believe" and "I think" are non-existent 3 Points= Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented 5 Points=Has few or no errors in conventions, grammar or usage 5 Points=Lists and appropriately cites credible, relevant, authoritative sources 3 Points= Paper is adequate in length and word count is included

34 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


Clone of 21.03.01