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3rd Quarter, Language Arts 11

00.00 Start Here (English 11)

Course Description

The skills and understandings students are expected to demonstrate in this class have wide applicability outside the classroom or workplace.

In this class, students:

  • undertake the close, attentive reading that is at the heart of understanding and enjoying complex works of literature.
  • habitually perform the critical reading necessary to pick carefully through the staggering amount of information available today in print and digitally.
  • actively seek the wide, deep, and thoughtful engagement with high-quality literary and informational texts that builds knowledge, enlarges experience, and broadens worldviews.
  • reflexively demonstrate the cogent reasoning and use of evidence that is essential to both private deliberation and responsible citizenship in a democratic republic.

In short, students who meet the the requirements in this class develop the skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening that are the foundation for any creative and purposeful expression in language.

Class Overview

This is a one quarter (.25 credit) class. You will work on your reading, research, writing, viewing, listening and speaking skills, as specified in the Utah State Core Curriculum for Language Arts.

WHAT THIS CLASS IS: This class is another way for you to earn your English 11 credit instead of attending a class in a physical high classroom. If you can't fit the class into your schedule at your regular school; if you can't attend your regular school because of illness, injury, safe school violations, or participation in activities that require extensive travel; if you failed the class and need to make it up; if you want to get ahead--this class can help you.
Make sure to check with your home high school counselor to find out exactly what credit you need.

This class is an open-entry, open-exit class. That means you can enroll at any time of the year, and finish the class as fast as you can get all the work done. However, you have just ten weeks after enrolling to finish (there may be some exceptions if you have an IEP). Begin as soon as you have enrolled. In order to finish in eight-nine weeks (the length of a regular school quarter) you should plan on spending 6-12 hours a week working on it. The exact amount of time you need to spend will depend on how fast you can read, how much you already know, and how well you focus while you are working.

Read this (Start Here) whole page and the Required Resources page, and then begin reading the course material in the first unit. If you check the syllabus, you will see that each assignment tells you when you should be finished with it, relative to when you started (for instance, by the end of your first week, second week, third week, etc). Plan a schedule for working on your assignments and keep at it!

WHAT THIS CLASS IS NOT: This class is NOT an easy way to get your English credit without doing real work. If that is what you are looking for, you will be disappointed. You may be able to finish this class in fewer weeks than you would spend in a regular class--but only if you put in a lot of hours each week.

PREREQUISITES 

At least 10th grade level reading and writing skills. This is not a remedial course. To take this class, you will need to use a computer with internet access. You will also need:

  • A computer with internet access.
  • A working email address--make sure that correspondence from EHS will not be blocked.
  • Word processing software to type your assignments. Microsoft Word is best.  You must have the ability to submit documents in one of the following file formats: .doc/.docx, .ppt/.pptx, or .pdf.
  • A .pdf converter if your word processing software doesn't allow you to save in one of the above fiile formats. Several are available free online from sources such as adobe, nemopdf, cuteptf, etc. 
  • Acrobat Reader, Quicktime reader, and a PowerPoint reader (all available free online)

SUBMITTING ASSIGNMENTS  Read instructions carefully to make sure you have fulfilled the requirements of each assignment.  Make sure that you do all your work on your own word processing software first. This way you will have access to the spelling and grammar checkers typically offered with this software and you will be able to archive your own copy of each assignment.  On occasion you will be able to use the "edit my submission" window, but most assignments will need to be sent as .doc/docx or .pdf attachments.

How You Will Be Graded

You earn points for doing assignments in this class. Each assignment has a maximum number of points you can earn if you do an excellent job on that assignment. You must do all assignments. You can also submit a revised, improved version of an assignment to get more points for it. Your final grade is determined by your average on assignments, and how you do on the final test. The assignments and quizzes count 75%, and the final test counts 25%.

Grading scale: A 92-100; A- 90-91; B+ 87-89; B 82-86 ; B- 80-81; C+ 77-79; C 72-76; C- 68-71; D+ 66-68; D 62-65; D- 60-61; No credit - below 60.

Final Test

When you have finished all the assignments you need for your credit, you will take the final test under the supervision of a proctor approved by the EHS. You must pass the final with at least 60% to pass the class. If you score below 60% on the final, you will fail the class and not earn credit.

Class plagiarism policy

Plagiarism is copying someone else's writing, either the exact words or copying the general organization and paraphrasing some of the ideas. Copying someone else's sentences, phrases or organization of ideas and failing to give credit to the original author is plagiarism. In some papers it is appropriate to quote a short section of someone else's exact words, but when you do, that section needs to be set off in quotation marks or otherwise set apart, and the author identified either in a sentence, or in a parenthetical note. Plagiarism is unlawful and unethical, and against the EHS Honor Code. If you turn in a plagiarized assignment, you will receive ONE warning. If the problem recurs, you will be dropped from the class with no credit.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • When can I enroll? When there is space available in the class, students can enroll any time. If the class is full (which doesn't happen very often), your name will be added to a waiting list. DON'T submit more requests trying to get in faster. Every time you submit a new request for the class, your previous request is deleted, effectively moving you to the bottom of the list.
  • How do I stay in the class? Submit at least three assignments each week, and finish by the tenth week after you enroll.
  • What does it take to get credit, or a grade? Your final grade will be determined by the percentage you have before you take the final, and how you do on the final. In order to qualify to take the final test, you must have passed all quizzes with at least the listed minimum score, which is usually around 80-85% (you can re-take the quizzes as needed till you get a passing score), AND you must have met the listed minimum score for all assignments (remember, you can revise and resubmit assignments for which you want a higher score). As with all EHS classes, you must pass a proctored final test at the end of the class.
  • Is everything I need on the computer in the class website? No. This is not a totally self-contained class. You will need to get books and videos, and use the internet to complete some assignments.
  • . How fast can I finish? You must begin submitting assignments at least three weeks before you finish. Most students take the full nine to ten weeks to finish the class.
  • How do I finish and get my credit to my school? After you have passed all quizzes and assignments, submit the "Ready" assignment. Then follow the directions given in the "Arranging to take my final proctored test" link (near the bottom of the class topic outline page). The morning after you have entered your proctor's information, and I have put a score of '1' on the Ready assignment, your proctor will receive an e-mail with the password to the final test. After you have passed the final, your school should receive your credit within a couple weeks, although during the May rush it could take longer.
  • Why can't I access anything in Module 3? You need to visit all the pages listed in Module 1 & 2, read that information, and submit your "About Me" assignment before you can start work in Module 3.

00.01.01 Student Software Needs

 

Students need access to a robust internet connection and a modern web browser.

This class may also require the Apple QuickTime plug-in to view media.

For students using a school-issued Chromebook, ask your technical support folks to download the QuickTime plug-in and enable the plug-in for your Chromebook.

$0.00

00.01.02 About Me

teacher-scored 12 points possible 15 minutes

Write a short paragraph to the teacher. Introduce yourself and tell me a little about you. Use proper sentence structure including capitalization, punctuation and spelling. In this paragraph please also include the following information:

  • Name of High School you attend and when you expect to graduate.
  • Your counselor's name and email address.
  • Parent's name and contact information.
  • A contact phone number for you.
  • Any specific information that would help me to understand how best to support you in this class.
  • IMPORTANT:  Click on the "How to review your assignments" link at the bottom of the page.  Review this short video and then include a sentence in your response letting me know that you understand how to see comments and feedback for your assignments.

 

About Me Scoring Rubric 10 Points= adequate response to all 10 questions 2 Points= other relevant information is included 12 Points Total

Very, very important:  By submitting your "About Me" you are agreeing to the stipulations set out in the "start here" section and to abide by the EHS honor code:  "As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers and staff with respect."

Make sure you've reviewed the "start here" section, and let's get to work.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


00.01.03

13.00 Vocabulary and Grammar (English 11)

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language from the Utah Core:

Detail of Bayeux Tapestry, c. 1070: men staring at Halley's Comet: photo by Myrabella, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsDetail of Bayeux Tapestry, c. 1070: men staring at Halley's Comet: photo by Myrabella, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

• To be college and career ready in language, students must have firm control over the conventions of standard English.

• Students must have extensive vocabularies, built through reading and study, enabling them to comprehend complex texts, engage in purposeful writing and have conversations around content.

• Students need to become skilled in determining or clarifying the meaning of words and phrases they encounter, choosing flexibly from an array of writing strategies.

• Students must learn to see an individual word as part of a network of other words--words, for example, that have similar denotations but different connotations.

• The inclusion of Language standards in students' own strand should not be taken as an indication that skills related to conventions, effective language use, and vocabulary are unimportant to reading, writing, speaking, and listening; indeed, they are inseparable from such contexts.

13.01 Vocabulary Activities (English 11)

Students will learn 30 new vocabulary words and be able to use them daily in their writing and speaking Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English: Victor Korniyenko, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsOxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English: Victor Korniyenko, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

The vocabulary section of this quarter is divided into three sections, each with ten words. You will do a writing activity and a quiz for each of the word sets. You do not have to complete them all at once (like everything in this course, you can decide the pace and order in which you work).

Why Study Vocabulary? (from verbalworkout.com)

Words are the tools we use to think and communicate - and this in an age when thinking and communicating are more important than strength and dexterity. At a personal level, a versatile vocabulary helps a man to woo a woman. It helps us to heed the philosophers’ advice to lead a “considered life.” Materially, a large vocabulary helps an artist describe the right shade of blue. It helps a student understand the textbook, and helps a leader manipulate concepts to formulate and share a vision. In words of Sebastian Wren, imagine if your reading required understanding this passage of text: While hortenting efrades the populace of the vaderbee class, most experts concur that a scrivant rarely endeavors to decry the ambitions and shifferings of the moulant class. Deciding whether to oxant the blatantly maligned Secting party, most moulants will tolerate the subjugation of staits, savats, or tempets only so long as the scrivant pays tribute to the derivan, either through preem or exaltation.

In addition, your vocabulary makes an early impression. People judge you by the words you use and understand. It's no surprise that an extensive vocabulary is highly correlated with academic and professional success.

13.01.01 Vocabulary Set 1 (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Vocabulary Assignment

Wedding banquet cornucopia: Jina Lee, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsWedding banquet cornucopia: Jina Lee, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

You will be given three sets of ten words to learn and use in this course.

Personally, when I need to find a definition for a word, I first look to a thesaurus. Sometimes dictionaries are hard to understand, and a single word of the same meaning is sometimes more helpful to develop understanding of a new word. Feel free to use whatever resources you find most helpful. For each set of words, you will complete an activity and a quiz. There will be vocabulary questions on the final test as well.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment and copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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Vocabulary Set 1

1. allocate
2. ardent
3. brash
4. capricious
5. copious
6. exult
7. inkling
8. palatable
9. poignant
10. sophomoric

Set 1 Activity (10 Points):

Find a synonym for each of the above words. Your assignment should include both the vocabulary word and its synonym.

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Assignment Example:

1. happy= jovial

Scoring Rubric

5 points= correct synonym for each vocabulary word (1/2 point each)

3 points= followed the directions and included the vocabulary word, synonym and explanation of the difference

2 points= spelling errors are non-existent

10 points total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


13.02 Vocabulary Set 2 (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

You will be given three sets of ten words to learn and use in this course. Personally, when I need to find a definition for a word, I first look to a thesaurus. Sometimes dictionaries are hard to understand, and a single word of the same meaning is sometimes more helpful to develop understanding of a new word. Feel free to use whatever resources you find most helpful. For each set of words you will complete an activity and a quiz. There will be vocabulary questions on the final test as well.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment and then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

1864 map of a section of the Mississippi River: Public domain via Wikimedia Commons1864 map of a section of the Mississippi River: Public domain via Wikimedia Commons

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Vocabulary Set 2

1. acquiesce
2. allure
3. blithe
4. covet
5. garrulous
6. lamentable
7. misnomer
8. respite
9. sinuous
10. sonorous

Set 2 Activity (10 Points): Using “Google” or a similar search tool*, find an example of each word used in a sentence. Include each sample sentence in your assignment. Using the context clues to guide you, write a definition or synonym for each vocabulary word. Use other resources for help if the context does not make the meaning clear.

(*Note: I clicked on the “News” button in the Google search engine which made it much easier to find a sentence rather than just a plethora of dictionary sites)

IMPORTANT:  Make sure each of your sentences is a complete sentence--with subject and verb.  If the statement you find on-line isn't a complete sentence, turn it into one.  For example, if I found the statement "allure of the Caribbean," I couldn't just put that down.  I would need to turn it into a complete sentence:  The "allure of the Caribbean" was too much to resist.

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Assignment Example

1. The angry customer shouted at the waitress until she burst into tears. Angry means upset or irritated.

Vocabulary Set 2 Rubric

5 Points= each vocabulary word is used in a sentence (1/2 point each)

5 Points= each vocabulary word is defined by the student (1/2 point each)

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


13.02.01

13.03 Vocabulary Set 3 (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

You will be given three sets of ten words to learn and use in this course. Personally, when I need to find a definition for a word, I first look to a thesaurus. Sometimes dictionaries are hard to understand, and a single word of the same meaning is sometimes more helpful to develop understanding of a new word. Feel free to use whatever resources you find most helpful. For each set of words you will complete an activity and a quiz. There will be vocabulary questions on the final test as well.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment and copy and paste it back into the submission box.Mike.lifeguard, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported licenseMike.lifeguard, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license

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Vocabulary Set 3

1. allude
2. clairvoyant
3. disreputable
4. fathom
5. guile
6. placate
7. placid
8. plagiarism
9. protrude
10. superficial

Set 3 Activity (10 Points):

For this assignment find both a synonym for the word and compose your own sentence using the word.  Remember that each sentence must be a complete sentence--with complete subject and verb.

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Vocabulary Set 3 Rubric

5 Points= Each word has been used correctly in a sentence (1/2 point each)

3 Points= Synonym is included

2 Points= Writing contains few mistakes

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


13.04 Sentence Combining (English 11)

Students will practice varying their syntax and structure for better sentence fluency. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

Sentence Combining Activity

Make sure to view all links below in order to fully understand how to combine sentences.  Most students struggle with this, view the links before completing the assignment. 

This activity is designed to help your sentence fluency. Good sentences are the building blocks of your writing.

A.  To start this section, I’d like you to take a few minutes to review the grammar and punctuation basics in the attached PowerPoint*:  Sentence combining-punctuation (found above).  It is important that you select the "slide show" tab from the menu bar and view the presentation "from the beginning." 

After you have viewed the power point, move to section B.

*Free PowerPoint readers are availble online if you don't already have that option on your computer.

B.  When you were first learning to write, you probably wrote very short, simple sentences like these:

Dragon Khan in Universal Port Aventura: Boris23, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsDragon Khan in Universal Port Aventura: Boris23, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Yesterday was my birthday.

I got presents.

I got a mountain bike.

We had cake.

We had ice cream.

Now you would probably combine all these ideas into a single sentence like this one:

Yesterday for my birthday we had cake and ice cream, and my presents included a mountain bike.

As you combine more ideas into a single sentence, one tool for helping your sentences flow smoothly and make sense is parallel structure: similar patterns of words.  The human brain loves patterns and repetition!  Parallel structure involves repeating the same pattern of words when two or more ideas of equal importance are functioning in the same way in the sentence (or paragraph).  Here are some examples and non-examples:

Not parallel:  Spending time with family and to make time for friends are both important.

Parallel:  Spending time with family and making time for friends are both important.

Not Parallel:  Margaret began to wail, begging not to go, shrieking on every drop and curve, and claimed she was never getting on a roller coaster again.

Parallel: Margaret began to wail, begging not to go, shrieking on every drop and curve, and claiming she was never getting on a roller coaster again.

Not Parallel:  My piano teacher told me that I needed to practice harder, pay more attention, and my commitment was lacking.

Parallel:  My piano teacher told me that I needed to practice harder, pay more attention, and give piano 100% of my effort.

Not parallel:  The college recruiter claimed that ASU had the most prestigious chess team, the most agreeable weather, and all the classes I needed were there.

Parallel:  The college recruiter claimed that ASU had the most prestigious chess team, the most agreeable weather, and the best selection of classes.

For more practice with parallel structure, see the link below.

 

13.04.01 Sentence Combining

Please view all websites before completing assignment. 

13.04.01 Sentence Combining Practice (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Keeping in mind everything you have reviewed about sentence combining--parallel structure as well as punctuation rules--combine each set of sentences into a single sentence. When you are finished, you will have ten sentences. 

Example:

1.1 The sun came off the water
1.2 The sun glinted in the green eddies 
1.3 The sun glittered in the green eddies. 

Combined Sentence: The sun came off the water, glinting and glimmering in the green eddies. 

Now complete the following activity. You do not need to submit the sentence "sets" in your submission. Please just include sentences 1-10. Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box or turn it in as a document. 

************************************************************************************ Jok2000, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsJok2000, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons 

1.1 We could hear the storm approaching
1.2 It was way off in the distance
1.3 It was at the far end of the valley
1.4 It was moving toward the mountains
1.5 The mountains were east of town 

2.1 The sound was a far-off rumbling
2.2 It was deep
2.3 It was getting louder
2.4 It was getting more sustained 

3.1 The sun had set
3.2 The first flash of lightning came
3.3 The lightning forked
3.4 The lightning zigzagged across the sky 

4.1 My dog howled
4.2 My dog whined
4.3 My dog scratched at the door
4.4 He wanted to hide in the house 

5.1 The wind had been still
5.2 The wind picked up
5.3 The wind changed direction
5.4 The wind was gusty
5.5 It tossed branches of trees
5.6 It knocked over garbage cans
5.7 It was shaking the house

6.1 The rain started
6.2 At first there were just a few drops
6.3 The drops got bigger
6.4 Suddenly it came down in buckets. 

7.1 The horses turned their tails to the storm
7.2 The horses lowered their heads 

8.1 I watched from a window
8.2 The window was in my bedroom
8.3 I was looking at the cars driving by
8.4 The cars were on the highway 

9.1 It rained hard
9.2 It rained for half an hour
9.3 It rained till the sky was completely dark
9.4 It was dark except for the flashes of lightning
9.5 It was quiet except for the sound of rain.
9.6 It was quiet except for the occasional thunderclaps 

10.1 The wind had died down
10.2 The rain had died down
10.3 The storm was over
10.4 Stars were coming out 

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Sentence Combining Rubric 

4 Points for each completed sentence

3 Points following parallel structure rules

3 Points for correct puncuation & mechanics

10 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


13.05 Language "Work Outs" (English 11)

Students will practice editing for errors focusing on sentence combining, comma use, plural vs. possessive nouns, and homonyms, subject/verb agreement, and pronoun/antecedent agreement. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

Your next two assignments require you to sharpen your editing skills.  You’ve had a review of sentence combining and commas.  Now we’re going to take two topics from the list of most common high school writing errors:  homonym confusion and problems with plural vs. possessive nouns.

There are two links listed below.  Study the information at those links and try your skill with the sentences given here.  The numbers in parentheses show you how many errors you need to find in each sentence.  Remember you are looking for errors in sentence combining and comma use, as well as mistakes with homonyms and noun forms (plural or possessive).

Spelling mistake: Richard Croft, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsSpelling mistake: Richard Croft, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

You need to somehow "highlight" your corrections (underline, bold, different color, number, etc.).

Copy and paste the sentences into a word processing document and correct from there; then copy and paste the changes into the submission box.

13.05.01 Language "Work Out" 1 (English 11)

teacher-scored 12 points possible 30 minutes

Kitesurfing: Mierzeja Helska, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsKitesurfing: Mierzeja Helska, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

Workout 1

Copy and paste the sentences between the asterisk lines into a word processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment and then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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 1. Olympic planner’s have added 3 sport’s to the 2016 Olympic’s:  rugby, kite surfing, and golf. (3)

2. Golf will be making it’s first Olympic appearance in 112 years, rugby was last part of the Olympic’s in 1924. (3)

3. Proposals four several sports such as wakeboarding sport climbing and karate where past over by the committee. (6)

4. Adding the new game’s might effect the older sport’s by drawing away some of they’re viewers.   (4)

5. Two of the new sports are potentially more dangerous then most in the Olympic’s.  (2)

6. Critics claim that injury potential for both rugby and kite surfing competitor’s is to high. (2)

7. Even though their can never be complete agreement spectators can be insured they will not be board with this summers Olympic competition.  (5)

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24 corrections possible.

Scoring Rubric

10 Points= At least 20 mistakes have been found (.5 point each)

2 Points= Changes have been "highlighted" and are easy find in the submission

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


13.06 Language "Work Out" 2 (English 11)

teacher-scored 12 points possible 30 minutes

Workout 2

Now we’re going to add a new review to the mix: “agreement.”  Take a few minutes to review the links below on subject/verb agreement and pronoun/antecedent agreement.  At the end of the short discussion, you will see some practice exercises.  Try them out.

For this assignment you will need to correct the errors in the five sentences below.  For these sentences you will need to remember the rules for commas, sentence combing, homonyms, and plural vs. possessive nouns as well as the rules of “agreement.”  Once, again the number in the parentheses is the number of mistakes in each sentence. 

Immigrant children, Ellis Island, New York, 1908: Brown brothers, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsImmigrant children, Ellis Island, New York, 1908: Brown brothers, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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1. Suspicions about immigrants is nothing knew in the United States.  (2)

2. When emigration first begun to bring in large number’s of foreign-born settlers Irish Welch and German Catholics where looked down on by there protestant native-born neighbors. (7)

3. In 1876 and 1882 the first national immigration law’s were past which denied or limited Asian and Chinese workers access too the United States. (4)

4. Buy the 1920s and 1930s their was quotas to limit the amount of Jews and eastern or southern Europeans who we’re aloud in.  (6)

5. You would often here about an immigrant who was denied their visa and, even if you had a visa, their was no way to assure you’re family members would be allowed into the country. (6)

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24 corrections possible.

Scoring Rubric

10 Points= At least 20 mistakes have been found (.5 point each)

2 Points= Changes have been "highlighted" and are easy find in the submission

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


13.06.01

13.07 ACT Practice (English 11)

teacher-scored 12 points possible 30 minutes

Directions

1. Go to the ACT website (see link below)

2. Scroll down to where it says “Sample Test Questions” (Note: the option for the ACT Online Prep costs money, but you could use it if you want to--you will just have to pay for it)

3. You will see a tab for Reading and English.  The Reading and Enlgish practice questions has five sample selections for the Reading section. Please complete ONE test from the Reading section and one section from the English section. As you answer each question, it will tell you if you are correct or incorrect. If you are incorrect, you will be given an explanation of the correct answer.  Make sure to include for your screen shot for Reading and English.  

The assignment that you will turn in for points for this activity will need the following things for full credit (20 Points Total):

1. Assignment will be completed on a word processing document; please include your name. (2 Points) Also include the following:
2. The number of problems you got correct (on the first attempt) and the total number of questions completed for each test. (3 points each test= 6 points total)
3. Write down one thing you learned from the English test and one thing you learned from the Reading test. (3 points each test= 6 points total)
4. On the word document, also include a screen shot of both tests that you took. (One screen shot of the Reading test and one screen shot of the English test). To do this, use the “Print Screen” key on your keyboard (usually found above the number pad). Push this key when you are in the program and then you just need to paste it into a word processing document. If you are on a Macintosh, you probably have a utility called "Grab" you can use to get a screen shot.  If you have questions about this, please let me know. If you can't get a screen shot, copy and paste the questions into your document. (3 points each test= 6 points total)

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


13.07.01 ACT Practice Site

14.00 Understanding Poetry (English 11)

"Birth of the poet": Carl August Ehrensvärd, 1795, public domain via Wikimedia Commons"Birth of the poet": Carl August Ehrensvärd, 1795, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading from the Utah Core:

• To become college- and career-ready, students must grapple with works of exceptional craft and thought whose range extends across genres, cultures and centuries.

• Such works offer profound insights into the human condition and serve as models for students’ own thinking and writing.

14.01 Literary Devices (English 11)

Students will review and learn about various techniques and literary devices used by writers and will then apply them in the remainder of the course. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

View the PowerPoint and visit at least one of the links below to learn or review various literary devices. You will take a quiz to evaluate your understanding.

The quiz will require knowledge of these 15 literary devices.  It will also be important to have a solid understanding of them in order to complete many of the writing activities and other assignments throughout the course.

Half full or half empty?: LuciaSofo, released into public domain via Wikimedia CommonsHalf full or half empty?: LuciaSofo, released into public domain via Wikimedia Commons

1. Allusion
2. Apostrophe
3. Euphemism
4. Onomatopoeia
5. Symbol
6. Personification
7. Colloquialism
8. Hyperbole
9. Repetition
10. Alliteration
11. Oxymoron
12. Paradox
13. Irony
14. Simile
15. Metaphor

*If you cannot open the PowerPoint file, please let me know and I can send it in another format

 

14.01.01 Literary Device Activity (English 11)

teacher-scored 15 points possible 45 minutes

Find an example involving the concept "light" of each of the literary devices listed below. You can make it up or find it in another media source.

Make sure to review the PowerPoint in the lesson for definitions and examples for help. Obviously, you should not use the examples from there for this assignment. Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box

In the waiting room of the Union Station, Chicago 1943: Jack Delano, Library of Congress, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsIn the waiting room of the Union Station, Chicago 1943: Jack Delano, Library of Congress, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

******************************

1. Allusion
2. Apostrophe
3. Euphemism
4. Onomatopoeia
5. Symbol
6. Personification
7. Colloquialism
8. Hyperbole
9. Repetition
10. Alliteration
11. Oxymoron
12. Paradox
13. Irony
14. Simile
15. Metaphor

*******************************

Scoring Rubric

15 Points= one relevant example for each literary device has been included

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


14.02 Understanding Poetry using SOAPSTone (English 11)

Students will learn how to read and understand poetry using the SOAPSTone method. Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

Triple Archimedean spirals: AnonMoos, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsTriple Archimedean spirals: AnonMoos, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Understanding Poetry

Students often struggle with poems because they seem to think there is a "secret" meaning that can be understood by few people. Here is a method that will help you go through some steps to get a better understanding of a poem's meaning.

Read through the attachment "Understanding Poetry" to start.

*If you cannot open the file, let me know and I can send it in a different format. The slides will outline a method of understanding poetry using the acronym SOAPSTone. After viewing the presentation, take the quiz. You can then get a good understanding of the types of responses you need when you practice on your own.

In the following group of assignments, you will choose three poems for practice. Each will be submitted as a different assignment, but you will be answering the same questions for each. The last section of this unit will require you to write a poem of your own.  Detailed instructions are on the assignment pages.

14.03 Poetry Practice 1 (English 11)

teacher-scored 18 points possible 30 minutes

I-280 in San Jose: Kevin Payravi, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsI-280 in San Jose: Kevin Payravi, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

Do a close reading of the two poems found at the links below.

Choose one, and complete the assignment. Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

******************************************

1. Poem title and author

2. Speaker - hint: not the poet

3. Occasion - What event or situation might have inspired this poem?

4. Audience - What groups of people might the poet be addressing?

5. Purpose - This is point the author is trying to make, the theme.  This is not a "topic," it's what the poet is saying about a topic.

6. Subject - What is the poem basically about?

7. Tone: (also include two words from the poem that show the tone)

8. Literary Device - Give an example of a literary device you found in the poem and an explanation of why you think the author chose to use that device in the poem--what using that particular device does for the tone or meaning in the poem.

9. Short Answer: How does this poem connect to the quarter topic of Culture and Identity? (A short answer must be more than a phrase or a sentence)

10. Short Answer: What personal connection or other insight do you have about this poem?

******************************************

Scoring Rubric

6 Points= Questions 1-6 have been adequately answered and show understanding of poem
2 Points= Question 7 includes tone and two text examples
4 Points= Questions 8 includes the literary device, the text example, and explanation how the device enhances the poem.
6 Points= Each short answer question is answered in complete sentences (more than one sentence) and adequately responds to the question

18 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


14.03.01

14.04 Poetry Practice 2 (English 11)

teacher-scored 18 points possible 30 minutes

Do a close reading of the two poems found at the links below.

ZackClark, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsZackClark, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Choose one, and complete the assignment. Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

**************************************

1. Poem title and author

2. Speaker - hint: not the poet

3. Occasion - What event or situation might have inspired this poem?

4. Audience - What groups of people might the poet be addressing?

5. Purpose - This is point the author is trying to make, the theme.  This is not a "topic," it's what the poet is saying about a topic.

6. Subject - What is the poem basically about?

7. Tone - Explain the tone and in include two words from the poem that show the tone.

8. Literary Device - Give an example of a literary device you found in the poem and an explanation of why you think the author chose to use that device in the poem--what using that particular device does for the tone or meaning in the poem.

9. Short Answer: How does this poem connect to the quarter topic of Culture and Identity? (A short answer must be more than a phrase or a sentence)

10. Short Answer: What personal connection or other insight do you have about this poem?

******************************************

Scoring Rubric

6 Points= Questions 1-6 have been adequately answered and show understanding of poem
2 Points= Question 7 includes tone and two text examples
4 Points= Questions 8 includes the literary device, the text example, and explanation how the device enhances the poem.
6 Points= Each short answer question is answered in complete sentences (more than one sentence) and adequately responds to the question

18 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


14.04.01

14.05 Poetry Practice 3 (English 11)

teacher-scored 18 points possible 30 minutes

Do a close reading of the two poems found at the links below.

Looi, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsLooi, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Choose one, and complete the assignment. Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

**************************************

1. Poem title and author

2. Speaker - hint: not the poet

3. Occasion - What event or situation might have inspired this poem?

4. Audience - What groups of people might the poet be addressing?

5. Purpose - This is point the author is trying to make, the theme.  This is not a "topic," it's what the poet is saying about a topic.

6. Subject - What is the poem basically about?

7. Tone - Explain the tone and in include two words from the poem that show the tone.

8. Literary Device - Give an example of a literary device you found in the poem and an explanation of why you think the author chose to use that device in the poem--what using that particular device does for the tone or meaning in the poem.

9. Short Answer: How does this poem connect to the quarter topic of Culture and Identity? (A short answer must be more than a phrase or a sentence)

10. Short Answer: What personal connection or other insight do you have about this poem?

******************************************

Scoring Rubric

6 Points= Questions 1-6 have been adequately answered and show understanding of poem
2 Points= Question 7 includes tone and two text examples
4 Points= Questions 8 includes the literary device, the text example, and explanation how the device enhances the poem.
6 Points= Each short answer question is answered in complete sentences (more than one sentence) and adequately responds to the question

18 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


14.05.01

14.06 Writing Poetry (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

Groundhog Day 2005: Aaron Silvers, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsGroundhog Day 2005: Aaron Silvers, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

Poetry Practice

Write one original poem (8-28 lines) using the theme of "culture and identity."

You may choose any style or form of poetry you wish, but include at least one literary device. Feel free to model your poem after one you read for the poetry practice.

Scoring Rubric

5 Points= completed poem, includes at least one literary device
2 Points= poem connects to the theme of "culture and identity"
3 Points= poem is creative and original
10 Points total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


15.00 Responding to Literary Texts (English 11)

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading from the Utah Core:

Illustration from Tanglewood Tales by Nathaniel Hawthorne: Virginia Frances Sterrett, 1921, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsIllustration from Tanglewood Tales by Nathaniel Hawthorne: Virginia Frances Sterrett, 1921, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

• To become college and career ready, students must grapple with works of exceptional craft and thought whose range extends across genres, cultures and centuries.

• Such works offer profound insights into the human condition and serve as models for students’ own thinking and writing.

• Through wide and deep reading of literature and literary nonfiction of steadily increasing sophistication, students gain a reservoir of literary and cultural knowledge, references and images; the ability to evaluate intricate arguments; and the capacity to surmount the challenges posed by complex texts.

Understanding Literary Texts 

The focus of this unit is to read a variety of literature focused on a single theme "culture and identity." This unit is similar to the poetry unit in that you will learn techniques for understanding literature and methods that writer's use to enhance their writing. You will then be able to apply what you have learned.

In this unit you will -

1. Study terms relating to the analysis of literature.
2. Take the quiz to get a better understanding of analyzing literature
3. Read three short stories to analyze on your own
4. Choose one of the books to be reading as you complete this quarter. As always, assignments do not have to be completed in order.

Here is the list of books (hopefully, you have already started reading):

 The Help by Kathryn Stockett
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseni
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

15.01 Literary Text (English 11)

Students will read a variety or short stories, excerpts, and a novel to expand their understanding of the quarter theme "culture and identity" Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

Study the attached slide show before you take the quiz.

Publicity shot for 1920 movie Huckleberry Finn: Public domain via Wikimedia CommonsPublicity shot for 1920 movie Huckleberry Finn: Public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Literary terms you will need to understand for this unit:

Diction:  the author's word choices - are the words mostly short and simple, or long and difficult? formal or informal? familiar or unfamiliar?  Other words you might use to talk about diction: 
abstract, concrete, esoteric, obscure, scholarly, sensuous, colloquial, monosyllabic, polysyllabic, sarcastic, crisp, colorful, vague, precise...

Syntax: the author's sentence structure - are the sentences shorter or longer? are sentences mostly simple, compound or complex? do they flow smoothly, or require a lot of concentration?  Other words you might use to talk about syntax:
convoluted, straight-forward, spare, ornate, flowing, stacatto

Tone: what is the author's attitude toward the story or characters? amused, ironic, serious, humorous, reflective, regretful, nostalgic, boastful, detached, fond, gloomy tense, cold, bitter, dramatic, didactic, objective, dreamy, sympathetic ...?

Theme: what is the implied "point" of the story? what life lessons might the author intend you to learn? what general truth?

Point of View: who is telling the story? is it first person or third person?  is the narrator omniscient or limited?

Genre: what kind of story is it? romance, mystery, science fiction, realistic fiction, historical fiction, poetry, drama, western, suspense, horror ...?

Protagonist: the main character

Antagonist: character or entity that opposes the protagonist, creating conflict in the story.

Conflict: what creates problems or obstacles for the protagonist?  Traditionally, most conflicts can be classed as one of the following:

Protagonist vs. him/herself
Protagonist vs. nature
Protagonist vs. society
Protagonist vs. another character

15.02 Reader's Response 1 (English 11)

teacher-scored 19 points possible 45 minutes

Reader’s Response Activity

The Devil and Tom Walker: Charles Deas, 1843, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsThe Devil and Tom Walker: Charles Deas, 1843, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Chose one of the attached stories.  Read through the questions before you start the story, then do a close reading of the story.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

***************************************************************************

1. What are the title and author of the story?

2. Describe the diction of the text:

3. Describe the syntax of the text:

4. What is the tone of the story.  Include phrases from the text that show how the author used language to create that tone.

5. What is the theme or lesson to be learned from the story?

6. What point of view is the story being told from?

7.  What is the genre of the story?

8. Who is the protagonist?

9. Who/ what is the antagonist?

10. Identify a literary device found in the text (remember to state the literary device and the example from the text).

11. Short Answer: Choose one significant quote from the text and discuss its importance to the story.

12. Short Answer: Connect this story to the overall topic of the quarter (culture and identity).

13. Short Answer: Make a personal connection to the story.

*****************************************************************************

Reader's Response Rubric 9 point= Questions 1-9 have been adequately answered

4 points= Question 10 includes an example of a literary device (remember to state the literary device and the example from the text).

2 points= Short answer question 11 responds in more than one sentence and contains a quote from the text

2 points= Short answer question 12 responds in more than one sentence and makes a connection between the story and the theme

2 points= Short answer question 13 responds in more than one sentence and makes a personal connection to the story

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


15.02.01

15.03 Reader's Response 2 (English 11)

teacher-scored 19 points possible 20 minutes

Reader’s Response Activity

Christopher Ziemnowicz, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsChristopher Ziemnowicz, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Do a close reading of one of the stories found at the links below and then respond to the following prompts.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

***********************************************************************************

1. What are the title and author of the story?

2. Describe the diction of the text:

3. Describe the syntax of the text:

4. What is the overall tone of the text:

5. What is the theme or lesson to be learned from the story?

6. What point of view is the story being told from?

7. What is the genre of the story?

8. Who is the protagonist?

9. Who/ what is the antagonist?

10. Identify a literary device found in the text (remember to state the literary device and the example from the text).

11. Short Answer: Choose one significant quote from the text and discuss its importance to the story.

12. Short Answer: Connect this story to the overall theme of the quarter (culture and identity).

13. Short Answer: Make a personal connection to the story.

***********************************************************************************

Reader's Response Rubric

9 point= Questions 1-9 have been adequately answered

4 points= Question 10 includes an example of a literary device

2 points= Short answer question 11 responds in more than one sentence and contains a quote from the text

2 points= Short answer question 12 responds in more than one sentence and makes a connection between the story and the theme

2 points= Short answer question 13 responds in more than one sentence and makes a personal connection to the story

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


15.03.01

15.04 Reader's Response 3 (English 11)

teacher-scored 14 points possible 45 minutes

Reader’s Response Activity

Ignacio Pinazo Camarlench, 1894, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsIgnacio Pinazo Camarlench, 1894, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

This lesson has two parts:  First you will do a close reading of "A Rose for Emily" or "Half a Day" (found at the links below) and then respond to the following prompts.  In either one of these stories, the last few paragraphs are critical.  Make sure you spend a little extra time at the end to make sure you understand the meanings there.  The second portion is a five paragraph essay comparing the two short stories. 

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

*********************************************

1. What are the title and author of the story?

2. Describe the diction of the text:

3. Describe the syntax of the text:

4. What is the overall tone of the text:

5. What is the theme or lesson to be learned from the story?

6. What point of view is the story being told from?

7. Who is the protagonist?

8. Who/ what is the antagonist?

9. Short Answer: Choose one significant quote from the text and discuss its importance to the story.

10. Short Answer: Connect this story to the overall theme of the quarter (culture and identity).

11. Short Answer: Make a personal connection to the story.

*********************************************

Hold on to these responses and move to the next part of the assignment, 15.04.02 Performance Assessment, below in order to write your 5 paragraph essay comparing the two short stories. 

 

Reader's Response Rubric

8 point= Questions 1-8 have been adequately answered

2 points= Short answer question 9 responds in more than one sentence and contains a quote from the text

2 points= Short answer question 10 responds in more than one sentence and makes a connection between the story and the theme

2 points= Short answer question 11 responds in more than one sentence and makes a personal connection to the story

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


15.04.01

15.04.02 Performance Assessment (English 11)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 60 minutes

You just read a short story which, among other things, discusses growing old.  I'd like you to now read another story which addresses the same topic, "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" by James Thurber.

James Thurber: Fred Palumbo, World Telegram staff photographer, Library of Congress via Wikimedia CommonsJames Thurber: Fred Palumbo, World Telegram staff photographer, Library of Congress via Wikimedia Commons

I'm going to ask you to write a comparison/contrast essay on the two stories, so as you read, take some notes and consider the following questions:

  • What is each author is saying about the challenge of growing old.
  • What is the difference in tone in the two stories?
  • How are the protagonists similar; how are they different?
  • What are the conflicts, challenges faced by the protagonists of each story?
  • What comment do these stories make about "culture and identity"?
  • How did you feel about the ending of the stories--were these conflicts resolved adequately for you?
  • What  specific incidents and quotes can you take from the stories to support your conclusions?

In your essay include at least two points of comparision and ample evidence (quotes & specific events from the story) to support your claims.

Rubric

5 points - At least 2 points of comparison made between the two stories.

10 -points - Both points were well supported with evidence--specific events & quotes--from the stories

5 - points - Essay is well organized with an appropriate introduction and satisfying conclusion.

5 - points - Writing has few mechanics, usage, or grammar errors.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


15.04.03

15.05 Book Project (English 11)

teacher-scored 80 points possible 200 minutes

Quarter 3 Book Project

Kite runners waiting: Afghanistan Matters, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsKite runners waiting: Afghanistan Matters, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

Topic: Culture and Identity

Novel Choices- Choose one book to read (if you haven't already) from the following list, then complete the activities.

The Help by Kathryn Stockett
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseni
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

Activities NOTE: These activities should be completed in one single word processing document and turned in all together

1. Choose five quotes from the book. For each quote, write a short paragraph discussing the significance of the quote. Things to consider might be how the quote develops a character, how the quote helps with understanding of theme, personal connections you made, or the writing style of the author. (20 points)

2. Character Identification: Choose four characters from the book. For each character do the following (20 points):

• Descriptive Phrase (something quoted directly from the book)
• Memorable quote (this is also quoted directly from the book; can be something the character said or something said about the character)
• Your first impression of the character
• Three words to describe your character
• Relationship to other characters

3. Theme Discussion (10 Points) Write a paragraph discussion the connection between the novel and the quarter theme (culture and identity).

Questions to consider in your discussion:
• What does this novel say about culture and identity?
• Do you agree or disagree?
• What personal connection did you make to the book?
• What does each character learn about “culture and identity” through the course of the novel?
• What is the lesson to be learned or the theme of the novel?
• How does the theme connect to the topic of “culture and identity”?

4. Essay Question (20 points) In many works of literature, past events can affect, positively or negatively, the present actions, attitudes, or values of a character. In each of the four books from which you could choose, a character must contend with some aspect of the past, either personal or societal. Write an essay in which you show how the character's relationship to the past contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole.  At least five paragraphs.

Essay Question Alternate Assignment: Instead of writing an essay, you can submit a PowerPoint presentation responding to all parts of the essay question. Your presentation must be at least ten slides long and five of the slides need a picture. The focus of the PowerPoint is a response to the essay question--make sure you are answering the question and NOT just giving a summary of the book.

5. Setting (10 Points) Using Google Earth, find the actual spot on the globe of a location in your book. Look around at the setting and even though it will not necessarily look like the setting described in the book, think about the importance of "place" and how it might affect the character. Write a paragraph response considering setting and its importance in the book. How does setting affect the character and make a difference in the story? You need to have a picture from Google Earth of your "place" for full credit. Please include a screen shot of your "place" (use “print screen," then paste it) or save it as a .jpeg and then paste it into your document.

Book Project Scoring Rubric

20 Points=Quote Section
10 points= 2 points for each quote (5 total)
10 points= 2 points for each quote discussion; each discussion is more than one paragraph (5 total)
20 Points= Character Identification For each of the four chosen characters, the five questions have all been answered
10 Points= Theme Discussion
5 points= Discussion is in a complete paragraph
5 points= Discussion incorporates examples from the book
20 Points= Essay Question
5 points=Essay focuses on the question and responds with clarity and examples from the book
3 points= Essay has a clear thesis statement which responds to the question
2 points= Essay is in organized into paragraphs for clarity
3 points= Essay contains few distracting spelling and grammar mistakes
3 points= Essay is long enough to adequately respond to the prompt (4-5 paragraphs)
3 points= Essay has a clear introductory paragraph which sets up the discussion
2 points= Essay has a strong concluding paragraph
2 points= Essay DOES NOT just summarize the book
20 Points= Essay Question Alternative Assignment
5 points= presentation is at least ten slides long
5 points= five of the ten slides contains a picture
3 points= presentation responds to all parts of the prompt
2 points= slides are neat and easy to read with few mistakes
3 points= presentation in NOT a summary of the book but a response to the essay question
2 points= presentation is unique and interesting
10 Points= Setting
5 points= paragraph discussion of the importance of setting
5 points= screen shot or jpeg of the setting found from GoogleEarth or a similar source

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


15.06 Critical Movie Review (English 11)

teacher-scored 13 points possible 20 minutes

Critical Viewing Movie Review

For sale at the Janaki temple: Abhishek Singh, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsFor sale at the Janaki temple: Abhishek Singh, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

Choose a movie (or live play or musical) that fits with the quarter theme and write a one-page response of that viewing.

You will then present your response in one of two ways: use Google Voice (801-317-8401, In the message include:  your name, quarter, assignment #, and the assignment.  Also, submit a comment through Learn with the date and time you left the message; the assignment will NOT be graded unless the date and time are submitted in Learn as well.) to record your response, OR make a short video of your response and submit through Canvas responding to the movie. It is best to have your responses written out before responding to this prompt so your presentation is organized and clear; you may also want to practice before making the phone call or final video.

Respond to the following questions in your review:

1. How does this movie tie into the quarter topic of Culture and Identity?

2. What is the message or theme of the movie?

3. What obstacles did the protagonist have to overcome?

4. What rating (out of five stars) would you give this movie? Why?

Suggested movies for this quarter: The Lion King, The Sandlot, Shrek, Forrest Gump, Footloose, Braveheart, Save the Last Dance, Blind Side, Born into Brothels, The Devil's Playground

*Note: You are not restricted to any of these titles. Any movie that fits within the theme of the quarter will work. If you are not sure if a movie fits with the theme, just send me a message. Honestly, I don't watch many movies so I am not really sure what is out there--use your best judgement.

If you use Google Voice, you can leave up to a three-minute message. Use the questions to guide your response and write out your review in detail before completing the assignment. In the assignment submission box, simply make a note of the day and time you recorded your message. If you make a video, you can upload it there as well. The video does not have to be anything super elaborate; it can be just you talking to the camera and answering the questions about the movie.

Scoring Rubric

8 Points- student responds to each question clearly and adequately

5 Points- student is well spoken during the presentation; it is clear that they have practiced

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


16.00 Narrative Writing (English 11)

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing from the Utah Core:

A narrative of missionary enterprises in the South Sea Islands: Rev. John Williams, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsA narrative of missionary enterprises in the South Sea Islands: Rev. John Williams, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

• For students, writing is a key means of asserting and defending claims, showing what they know about a subject and conveying what they have experienced, imagined, thought and felt.

• To be college- and career-ready writers, students must take task, purpose, and audience into careful consideration, choosing words, information, structures and formats deliberately.

• Students need to be able to use technology strategically when creating, refining and collaborating on writing.

• Students must have the flexibility, concentration and fluency to produce high-quality first-draft text under a tight deadline as well as the capacity to revise a piece of writing over multiple drafts when circumstances encourage or require it.

16.01 Narrative Writing Practice (English 11)

Students will write in response to various prompts incorporating writing skills learned earlier in the quarter. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

So what is a narrative anyway?  Basically it is the telling of a story, usually something from the author's own experience.  But it's more than just the series of events.  It's telling the story in a way that entertains, enlightens, or educates the reader.  It's a story that makes a point. 

In your average 5-paragraph essay, you're taught to state your thesis in the first paragraph and then prove it by the end of the essay.  Well, a narrative has a thesis or a point to make too, but it isn't usually stated outright--and certainly not in the first paragraph.  The point the author wants to make unfolds as the story is told, and somewhere near the end of the narrative, the insights the author wants to share, though usually only implied, become clear. 

Glen Aulin, Yosemite National Park: wayfaring stranger, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic licenseGlen Aulin, Yosemite National Park: wayfaring stranger, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic license

There are a number of techniques an author can use to engage the reader, so to start out with, I'd like you to review some of the more common narrative techniques authors use to bring life to the stories they are telling.

  • dialogue: conversation between two or more characters. Remember that the characters' actual words are enclosed by quotation marks.
     
  • exposition: just telling what happens, often in summary form
     
  • description: creating sensory "images" of places, people or things
     
  • reflection: the character's thoughts, often looking back at events
     
  • point of view: who is telling the story? Is it in first person or third person? Is the narrator a character in the story, limited to knowing what that character knows, or an "omniscient" narrator who knows more than a real person in the story could?
     
  • setting: where and when is the story happening? How does this affect events or characters?
     
  • character development: do the characters seem like real people, with both good and bad qualities? How are the characters changed by events, and how do the characters' changes affect later events?
     
  • parallel plots: does the action shift back and forth between two (or more) different characters or places to show events happening at the same time? (These events may seem unrelated at first.)
     
  • subplots: additional conflicts or stories that are somehow connected to the main plot and characters, but not as important
     
  • pacing: how the author handles time and sequence - does the story skip over weeks or months? Are there flashbacks? or does everything unfold in the same, steady, chronological manner?
     
  • suspense: Is there foreshadowing of future events? Does the author switch back and forth between parallel plots at critical points in the story? Are you kept in doubt about the outcome of events?

16.01.01 Narrative Writing (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

To start off, it helps to see how great authors craft narratives.  Read the short narrative by Rober Benchley at the link given.  Then respond to the questions below:

Heron over Colorado River: Rennett Stowe, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsHeron over Colorado River: Rennett Stowe, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

 

A.  Respond

  1. In at least 3 sentences, respond to the narrative.  What did you think? How did it make you feel?  Were you able to see why the author chose to relate this story?
  2. What was the author's primary purpose in this narrative?
  3. Choose one of the narrative techniques defined above and explain how the author used this technique to make that point.  In that explanation, identify the technique, quote specific lines from the narrative which show the author using that technique, and discuss the effect this had on the narrative, or on you as a reader.

B. Brainstorm: 

This story was written about an everyday occurence, something we don't usually think twice about.  The artistry in this narrative is that the author turned this everyday occurence into entertainment.  He made us look at that event with new eyes and gave it a significance. (Some of his images will probably cross your mind next time you sit in that waiting room listening the the drill whine in the next room).  So for the second part of this assignment, I'd like you to list 10 everyday events or occurrences in your life that seem trivial, but that might make an interesting narrative when described in detail.

Narrative Writing Practice Scoring Rubric

4 points= Reader response is clear and shows thought.

3 points= Theme or point is identified.

3 points= Author's use of a narrative technique is clearly explained.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


16.01.02

16.02 Narrative Writing Practice (English 11)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 55 minutes

Now it's your turn.  For this assignment, I'd like you to choose one of the 10 events/occurrences you listed in the last assignment to turn into your own narrative.  Keep the example narrative you read, as well as your evaluation of it, in the back of your mind as you choose the direction for your essay and the narrative techniques you want to use.

Remember:

  • A narrative relates a story or an event.
  • The story has a point or theme to it.

Eng11Q3.16SchoolLunch: Lance Cheung, USDA, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsEng11Q3.16SchoolLunch: Lance Cheung, USDA, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

With that in mind, review what I'll be looking for in your narrative:

1.  An engaging introduction  Remember you're not writing a 5-paragraph essay here--don't start with your thesis statement and what you want to "show" in your essay.

2.  An intriguing conflict (tension, struggle, question, problem)

3.  A good story - As you write your narrative, you will need to consider things like setting, point of view, character development, dialogue, pacing, exposition format, etc.  Remember to meet the word count of 600-800 words. 

  • Very important:  Before you begin to write your narrative, flip back to the instructions for 16.01 and review the explanation of narrative techniques. 

4.  Satisfying resolution – It will be tempting to revert to your "5-paragraph essay" training here too, but if you start your narrative conclusion with "in conclusion," I may have a panic attack.  The conclusion needs to be a well-crafted resolution to the conflict you've introduced.  Benchley's story ends with the event he's been clearly building toward; however, sometimes the most interesting resolution is one that isn’t expected.  You'll see an example of that type of resolution in the next narrative assignment.

Once you have chosen a topic, and have thought through how you would like your narrative to play out, you can begin to write.  While your ideas do need to be clearly expressed, consider this a rough draft.  What's important here is engaging the reader in the experience.

IMPORTANT:  This assignment needs to be typed on your own word processing software, saved as a .doc, .docx, or .pdf file, and uploaded/attached to submit it.

 

Narrative Writing Practice Scoring Rubric

10 points= response is creative and interesting and writer has made good use of "narrative techniques."

6 points= The ideas are clear, and the point, or thesis, is clear by the end of the narrative.

4 points= Syntax and diction appropriate and contribute to the overall effect of the narrative.

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


16.02.01

16.03 Narrative Writing (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

One of the best ways to learn to write well is to read good writing and then use it as a pattern for your own writing.  Read this excerpt from John Updike's "Hub Fans Bid Kid Adieu."  Once you have read the narrative, respond to the prompts below:

1980's montage: SFCOLLAGE, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons1980's montage: SFCOLLAGE, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

A. Respond:

  1. In a paragraph, respond to the narrative.  What did you think? How did it make you feel?  Were you able to see why the author chose to relate this story?
  2. What was the point, lesson, thesis, theme of the narrative?
  3. Choose one of the narrative techniques defined in 16.01 and explain how the author used this technique to make that point.  In that explanation you should identify the technique, quote specific lines from the narrative which show the author using that technique, and discuss the effect this had on the narrative, or on you as a reader.

B. Pre-write:

Life is full of events that, even if they are small, change our perception of people, of ourselves, of life.  Brainstorm a list of at least 5 events that have been significant for you or have altered your perception somehow.

Narrative Writing Practice Scoring Rubric

4 points= Reader response is clear and shows thought.

3 points= Theme or point is identified.

3 points= Author's use of a narrative technique is clearly explained

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


16.03.02

16.04 Narrative Writing Practice 2 (English 11)

teacher-scored 6 points possible 55 minutes

In the narrative you just read, John Updike’s “Hub Fans Bid Kid Adieu,” look at all the words the author used to describe what happened in only a few short minutes.  The language created such vivid images and suspense, that by the final paragraphs I was actually getting nervous, wondering whether or not he could do it.  That’s effective writing. 

Your turn for another narrative.

Einar Einarsson Kvaran, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsEinar Einarsson Kvaran, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

Once again remember:

1.  An engaging introduction - Look back at the two introductions you have read this unit for some ideas.

2.  An intriguing conflict (tension, struggle, question, problem)

3.  A good story - Review the narrative techniques again and see if you can't do something different with this narrative

4.  Satisfying resolution – The resolution to Updike's narrative essay wasn't completely "resolved" was it?  It finished the story but gave you something extra to "chew on."  That type of resolution is harder to craft, but it can often give your theme, or message, some punch.

Look again at the list of significant events from the previous assignment.  These are events that have been significant for you or have altered your perception somehow.  Choose one of these to develop into a complete essay.  Try to choose descriptive detail which will help the reader clearly visualize the event and comprehend the signficance of it.  Make sure to hit the word count 600-800 words.

Again, this is a rough draft, but tell your story as artfully as you can. 

IMPORTANT:  This assignment needs to be typed on your own word processing software, saved as a .doc, .docx, or .pdf file, and uploaded/attached to submit it.

 

Narrative Writing Practice Scoring Rubric

5 points= response is creative and interesting and writer has made good use of "narrative techniques."

3 points= The ideas are clear, and the point, or thesis, is clear by the end of the narrative.

2 points= Syntax and diction appropriate and contribute to the overall effect of the narrative.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


16.04.01

16.05 Narrative Writing Practice (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

You have written two narrative rough drafts.   Which topic produced the better narrative?  Chose one of your narratives and let's talk about revising.  The purpose of your rough drafts was to get the story out.  Now I want you to evaluate your essay based on 7 key factors.  First access "Tips for Writing a Personal Narrative."  (This is found in both a .pdf or a Microsoft Word format above.) As you read through each  section, mentally evaluate your narrative and make some decisions about how you might revise it. 

Once you have read through the 7 factors and have evaluated your narrative, respond to the questions/requirements below based on the essay you have chosen to revise.

Important:  Indicate which essay you chose to revise--the first (16.02) or second (16.04).

McLoughlin, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsMcLoughlin, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

*********************************

Purpose & Audience - Discuss: Were these clear in your narrative?  Who do you envision your audience to be?  What is the main purpose for telling your story?

Structure - Explain which of these 3 types would work best for your narrative?

Show, don't tell - Re-write one passage from your narrative using more sensory detail.

Let People talk - Write a few lines of dialogue that might fit well in your narrative.

Point of view - Look at the point of view you used--who is doing the speaking?  Is that the point of view that would work best for your narrative or do you think that should be changed?

Tense - Would explaining events in past or present tense work best for your particular narrative?

Tone - What tone would you like to create in this narrative?  What are some words or images that you could add to your narrative to help create that tone?

**********************************

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


16.05.01

16.06 Narrative Writing

Students will write a 600-800 word final draft of one of the two previous essays. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

Now that you have evaluated one of your rough drafts and have got some good revision ideas and strategies in mind, it's time to polish it into a final draft.  After you have revised and then edited for mistakes, submit your final draft to me. 

Please indicate whether this final draft corresponds to your first or second rough draft and underline or bold the revisions in your final paper.

The final paper is worth 40 points.

 

Final Paper Scoring Rubric (review attached rubric)

5 Points= Narrative introduction is engaging and introduces the characters/narrator

5 Points= Narrative follows a logical development and smoothly progresses through the story

5 Points= Writer uses effective narrative techniques (ex: dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, etc.)

5 Points= Writer develops relationships, cohesion, and flow

5 Points= Word choice, style and tone are developed with precise language and literary devices

5 Points= Conclusion of the narrative is satisfying

5 Points= Writing has few or no errors in grammar and spelling

5 Points= Teacher directed revisions have been included and are somehow highlighted in the text

16.07 Narrative Draft 3

teacher-scored 15 points possible 25 minutes

Once you have decided on a topic, review the "Tips for Writing a Personal Narrative" link.  Make sure you plan how to satisfy all 7 of the keys there, and write a rough draft on your topic.

Please complete this activity as a word-processing document that you will upload, not something that you will copy and paste into the submission box. Include the word count at the top of your paper, directly under the title.

Scoring Rubric

Narrative Writing Practice Scoring Rubric

3 points = Narrative focuses on a specific event or experience.

4 points= response is creative and interesting and writer has made good use of "narrative techniques."

4 points= The ideas are clear, and the point, or thesis, is clear by the end of the narrative.

4 points= Syntax and diction appropriate and contribute to the overall effect of the narrative.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


16.08 Final Narrative Paper

teacher-scored 40 points possible 40 minutes

Now choose one of your narrative drafts that you would like to polish into a final draft.  After you have revised and edited for mistakes, submit the narrative to me.  I will make comments and suggestions and return it to you.  Once I have done that, do your final edit--incorporating any revisions I have requested--and then turn both drafts in to me. 

Please underline or bold the revisions in your final paper. The final paper is worth 40 points.

Final Paper Scoring Rubric (review attached rubric)

5 Points= Narrative introduction is engaging and introduces the characters/narrator

5 Points= Narrative follows a logical development and smoothly progresses through the story

5 Points= Writer uses effective narrative techniques (ex: dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, etc.)

5 Points= Writer develops relationships, cohesion, and flow

5 Points= Word choice, style and tone are developed with precise language and literary devices

5 Points= Conclusion of the narrative is satisfying

5 Points= Writing has few or no errors in grammar and spelling

5 Points= Teacher directed revisions have been included and are somehow highlighted in the text

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


17.00 Informative and Explanatory Writing

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing from the Common Core:

• For students, writing is a key means of asserting and defending claims, showing what they know about a subject and conveying what they have experienced, imagined, thought and felt.

• To be college- and career-ready writers, students must take task, purpose and audience into careful consideration, choosing words, information, structures and formats deliberately.

• Students need to know how to combine elements of different kinds of writing--for example, to use narrative strategies within argument and explanation within narrative—to produce complex and nuanced writing.

• Students need to be able to use technology strategically when creating, refining, and collaborating on writing.

• Students have to become adept at gathering information, evaluating sources, and citing material accurately, reporting findings from their research and analysis of sources in a clear and cogent manner.

• Students must have the flexibility, concentration, and fluency to produce high-quality first-draft text under a tight deadline as well as the capacity to revisit and make improvements to a piece of writing over multiple drafts when circumstances encourage or require it.

17.01 Research Review

Students will review research skills and use Pioneer Library to explore topics Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.

Please review the information found in the attached presentations concerning the use of the Pioneer LIbrary (including EBSCO and SIRS) and using MLA documentation. After looking over the information, you will be required to take a short quiz on the material. *If you have trouble opening any of the file attachments, please let me know and I will send it to you in a different format.

17.02 I Search Paper (Attached is an example to help with formatting.)

Students will use research skills to learn about an education or teen topic of their choice. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

I Search Research Review Assignment

*This assignment should be completed in a word processing program and sent as an attachment to the teacher. Your topic needs to be something about education or teenagers.

Section 1: First, write a paragraph describing the topic you have chosen and why you have chosen it. Explain what you already know about the subject, what you think you know, what you assume or what you imagine. (10 points)

Section 2: You need to find four sources on your chosen topic (you can only have 1 Internet sources). Sources found in EBSCO are not considered 'internet' sources. You are going to complete an annotation for each of the sources you have found. To do an annotation, first put the bibliographic information then write a complete paragraph discussing the information in the source. Do not simply copy and paste information--it must be in your own words. (40 Points)

Annotated Bibliography Example:

(Bibliography) McPherson, James. To the Best of My Ability: The American Presidents. Dorling- Kindersley: New York, 2001.

(Descriptive Paragraph) This book is an excellent look at the highlight of each President. It contain nearly 500 pages of amazing information that is detailed enough to avoid triviality yet is simple and easy to read. To the Best of My Ability is an outstanding reference book but also includes little known facts about each president. One of my favorite features of this book is the use of specific quotations stated by each president. This book also contains some great pictures of each president. Another handy feature are the side bars which includes tidbits of information such as date of birth, party affiliation, and the major events of the presidency. Each president’s section details their presidency from beginning to end. I choose to look specifically at Richard Nixon for my report. One interesting thing I learned about Nixon was that “in spite of his known flaws, a lot of Americans obviously did like him" (267). I was also surprised to read a remark by Adlai Stevenson that “this is a man of many masks… who can say they have seen his real face” (269).

Section 3: This section should be between two and three paragraphs. You need to compare what you originally thought about your subject with what you have learned. Include personal commentary and draw conclusions. You should use the information you found in your research. You should at least two textual references in your discussion. (20 Points)

Section 3 Alternate: Instead of writing three paragraphs discussing what you have learned, you can put the information into a PowerPoint presentation or create a video presentation outlining what you have learned in your research.

17.02.01 I Search Research Project

teacher-scored 70 points possible 45 minutes

I Search Scoring Rubric

Section 1= 10 Points 6 Points= complete paragraph outlining what you already know about the topic 4 Points= paragraph is well written and engaging with few errors in spelling and grammar Section 2= 40 Points Each annotation is worth 10 Points 5 Points= complete paragraph summary of the article 3 Points= correct MLA bibliographic information is included 2 Points= paragraph is not copied from the source and is well written with few errors Section 3= 20 Points 9 Points= review paragraphs discuss the topic in detail focusing on the new information acquired 5 Points= paragraphs are well written and engaging with few errors 6 Points= Information from the research is used in the discussion and specific textual references are used. Section 3 Alternate= 20 Points 8 Points= Research is presented thoroughly in a PowerPoint presentation or video; new information learned is clear 6 Points= Presentation of the topic is creative and engaging 6 Points= Specific textual references are used in the presentation and somehow highlighted for emphasis

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


17.02.02 Pioneer Library

Username: Pioneer

Password: [Please ask your local school librarian or your teacher for the password if you don't already have it.]

17.03 Formal Letter

teacher-scored 30 points possible 90 minutes

You have spent some time researching a topic.  For this assignment, I want you to educate someone about that topic in a letter.

Your purpose is to inform and educate.  I want you to choose your audience.  You may choose to write a personal letter, a letter to a senator or congressman, a letter to the editor, or a letter to a company or organization.

In choosing your audience, consider:

  • Who would be most interested in your comments?
  • Who might benefit most from your information?
  • Who is in a position to act on this information?

 

Once you have chosen your audience, view the link below to review how to set up your letter.  Even though, snail mail letters aren’t used as frequently these days, it is still important to understand the basics of a formal letter format.  Follow the guidelines here for setting up your letter, including those for writing your introduction, body and conclusion.

Make sure to submit reworked letter through Learn (where you submit assignments) for grading. 

Review the rubric to see how the letter will be graded.

*You’ll get bonus points if you demonstrate that you actually sent the letter to your intended recipient.

Scoring Rubric:

5 Points = Audience is clear and appropriate for the topic.

10 points = Letter is at least three paragraphs in length and highlights the issues you feel are important surrounding your topic.

5 Points  = Word choice and discussion are appropriate for the audience

5 Points = Letter is formatted correctly.

5 Points = Letter is free from grammar and spelling errors

3 Points = Bonus - letter actually sent.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


17.03.01

18.00 Argumentative Writing and Informational Text

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing from the Common Core:

• For students, writing is a key means of asserting and defending claims, showing what they know about a subject, and conveying what they have experienced, imagined, thought, and felt.

• To be college- and career-ready writers, students must take task, purpose and audience into careful consideration, choosing words, information, structures and formats deliberately.

• Students need to know how to combine elements of different kinds of writing--for example, to use narrative strategies within argument and explanation within narrative and to produce complex and nuanced writing.

• Students need to be able to use technology strategically when creating, refining and collaborating on writing.

• Students have to become adept at gathering information, evaluating sources, and citing material accurately, reporting findings from their research and analysis of sources in a clear and cogent manner.

• Students must have the flexibility, concentration and fluency to produce high-quality first-draft text under a tight deadline as well as the capacity to revise a piece of writing over multiple drafts when circumstances encourage or require it.

18.01 Directed Research Paper

Students will write an argumentative research paper on topic chosen by the teacher. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Directed Research Paper Topic: Are curfew laws that target teens unfair? Beginning in the 1990s, cities and counties in the U.S. that were concerned with rising juvenile crime rates began passing curfew laws. These laws limit the hours that teens under a certain age, usually 18, can be out in public. Most curfew laws apply to evening and night hours. Recently, though, some cities have enacted laws restricting children and teens from being in public unchaperoned during school hours. Some shopping malls have even begun to limit the hours that teens can enter without an adult due to concerns about loitering and fighting. Those in favor of teen curfew laws claim that they help reduce juvenile crime and promote parental responsibility. Opponents of teen curfew laws argue that the laws unfairly discriminate against teens who have done nothing wrong and place an additional burden on police forces that are already stretched thin. (SIRS)

18.01.01 Directed Research Essay

teacher-scored 21 points possible 40 minutes

Activity: Write a five paragraph essay responding to the prompt "Are curfew laws that target teens unfair?" Essay Scoring Rubric 5 points= student uses the five paragraph model to organize the essay. 3 points= student develops a clear thesis statement 5 points= student uses enough discussion and detail to support the thesis 3 points= student avoids statements such as "I believe" and "I think" 3 points= essay has minimal spelling and grammar mistakes 21 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


18.02 Directed Research Paper Articles

teacher-scored 51 points possible 60 minutes

The next section of this project requires you to read three total articles about the topic.  At the links below you will find two "pro" articles and two "con" articles on the topic of curfews. Read the articles at these sites and then find another article on your own (You may use EBSCO or another source).

You will need to accurately cite all three sources for your paper in MLA format. EBSCO has a tool to use for citing sources from there.  If you use another source, you may want to use an online tool such as citationmachine.net to help you accurately generate your citations.  If you need to review the information on citing sources, it can be found in Unit 17.

After reading each article, you will answer the questions below.

*Please use a word-processing program to type your responses in a single document, then turn it in all together as an attachment. Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document to help you complete the requirements for the assignment.

*****************************************************

Respond to each question for each article:

1. What is the author’s argument/ suggestion? (2 points)

2. Give at least two key points the author makes to support his/her argument? (4 points)

3. Do you agree or disagree with the author? Explain your position. (2 points)

4. List one of the author’s points that really made you reconsider your own opinion about this topic. (2 points)

5. Directly quote two sections of the text you could use in your essay. (2 points)

6. Explain why you think this author is a credible source. (2 points)

7. Include the correct MLA documentation for each source. (3 points)

17 Points for each article= 51 Points total

********************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


18.02.01 Pioneer Library

Username: pioneer 

Password: [Please ask your local school librarian or your teacher for the password.]

18.02.02 Issue Researcher: Curfew

18.03 Pro/ Con Chart for Directed Research Paper

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

The next step in this assignment is to create a pro/con chart based on the research you have done. List at least five pros and five cons for each side of the argument. Scoring Rubric: 5 points for each pro argument 5 points for each con argument 10 Points total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


18.04 Directed Research Final Paper

teacher-scored 34 points possible 60 minutes

Now, you get to take your original five paragraph essay and revise it into a complete argumentative research paper. Your final paper should be between 600-800 words. You must also incorporate directly cited text from your articles and include the correct MLA reference. You should have at least five text citations in your final paper. See the attached rubric for details about grading. Below is a simplified version of the rubric. Scoring Rubric

3 Points= Introduces precise, knowledgeable claim and establishes significance 5 Points=Develops claims and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly; supplies most relevant data and evidence 5 Points=Uses words, clauses and phrases, as well as varied syntax, to link major sections of the text, create cohesion and clarify the relationships between claims and reasons 5 Points=Establishes and maintains a smooth, formal style and objective tone; words and phrases such as "I believe" and "I think" are non-existent 3 Points= Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented 5 Points=Has few or no errors in conventions, grammar or usage 5 Points=Lists and appropriately cites credible, relevant, authoritative sources 3 Points= Paper is adequate in length and word count is included

34 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


18.05 Final Research Paper

Students will write a final research paper using the skills they have built through the course. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Your job is to research the following topic: Your principal is considering a new grading policy that replaces letter or number grades on report cards with pass or fail. What is your position concerning this issue?

18.05.01 Final Paper Research

teacher-scored 51 points possible 45 minutes

Prompt: Your principal is considering a new grading policy that replaces letter or number grades on report cards with pass or fail. What is your position concerning this issue?

Research three articles that would help you make a claim on this topic. There are two articles given at the sites below and you will need to find one source on your own.  Make sure you accurately cite all of your sources for your paper. EBSCO is a great resources to use for research.  Remember that EBSCO has a tool to use for citing sources from there. If you need to review this information, it can be found in Unit 17.

After reading each article, you will answer the questions below. Please use a word processing program to type your responses in a single document and then turn in all together as an attachment. Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document to help you complete the assignment.

*****************************************************

Respond to each question for each article:

1. What is the author’s argument/ suggestion? (2 points)

2. Give at least two key points the author makes to support his/her argument? (4 points)

3. Do you agree or disagree with the author? Explain your position. (2 points)

4. List one of the author’s points that really made you reconsider your own opinion about this topic. (2 points)

5. Directly quote two sections of the text you could use in your essay. (2 points)

6. Explain why you think this author is a credible source. (2 points)

7. Include the correct MLA documentation for each source. (3 points)

17 Points for each article= 51 Points total

********************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


18.05.01 Pioneer Library

Username: pioneer 

Password: [Please ask your local school librarian or your teacher for the password.]

18.06 Final Research Paper

teacher-scored 34 points possible 60 minutes

Using your research, write a paper which outlines your claim about the topic Your principal is considering a new grading policy that replaces letter or number grades on report cards with pass or fail. What is your position concerning this issue? Your final paper should be between 500-700 words. You must also incorporate directly cited text from your articles and include the correct MLA reference. You should have at least 5 text citations in your final paper. See the attached rubric for details about grading. Below is a simplified version of the rubric. Scoring Rubric

3 Points= Introduces precise, knowledgeable claim and establishes significance 5 Points=Develops claims and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly; supplies most relevant data and evidence 5 Points=Uses words, clauses and phrases, as well as varied syntax, to link major sections of the text, create cohesion and clarify the relationships between claims and reasons 5 Points=Establishes and maintains a smooth, formal style and objective tone; words and phrases such as "I believe" and "I think" are non-existent 3 Points= Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented 5 Points=Has few or no errors in conventions, grammar or usage 5 Points=Lists and appropriately cites credible, relevant, authoritative sources 3 Points= Paper is adequate in length and word count is included

34 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.