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2nd Quarter, Language Arts 11

0.00 Start Here (English 11)

Course Description

The skills and understandings students are expected to demonstrate in this class have wide applicability outside the classroom or workplace. 

In this class, students:

  • undertake the close, attentive reading that is at the heart of understanding and enjoying complex works of literature. 
  • habitually perform the critical reading necessary to pick carefully through the staggering amount of information available today in print and digitally. 
  • actively seek the wide, deep, and thoughtful engagement with high-quality literary and informational texts that builds knowledge, enlarges experience, and broadens worldviews.
  • reflexively demonstrate the cogent reasoning and use of evidence that is essential to both private deliberation and responsible citizenship in a democratic republic. 

In short, students who meet the the requirements in this class develop the skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening that are the foundation for any creative and purposeful expression in language.

Class Overview

This is a one quarter (.25 credit) class. You will work on your reading, research, writing, viewing, listening and speaking skills, as specified in the Utah State Core Curriculum for Language Arts.

WHAT THIS CLASS IS: This class is another way for you to earn your English 11 credit instead of attending a class in a physical high classroom. If you can't fit the class into your schedule at your regular school; if you can't attend your regular school because of illness, injury, safe school violations, or participation in activities that require extensive travel; if you failed the class and need to make it up; if you want to get ahead--this class can help you.
Make sure to check with your home high school counselor to find out exactly what credit you need.

This class is an open-entry, open-exit class. That means you can enroll at any time of the year, and finish the class as fast as you can get all the work done. However, you have just ten weeks after enrolling to finish (there may be some exceptions if you have an IEP). Begin as soon as you have enrolled. In order to finish in eight-nine weeks ( the length of a regular school quarter) you should plan on spending 6-12 hours a week working on it. The exact amount of time you need to spend will depend on how fast you can read, how much you already know, and how well you focus while you are working.

Read this (Start Here) whole page and the Required Resources page, and then begin reading the course material in the first unit. If you check the syllabus, you will see that each assignment tells you when you should be finished with it, relative to when you started (for instance, by the end of your first week, second week, third week, etc). Plan a schedule for working on your assignments and keep at it!

WHAT THIS CLASS IS NOT: This class is NOT an easy way to get your English credit without doing real work. If that is what you are looking for, you will be disappointed. You may be able to finish this class in fewer weeks than you would spend in a regular class--but only if you put in lots of hours each week.

PREREQUISITES

At least 10th grade level reading and writing skills. This is not a remedial course. To take this class, you will need to use a computer with internet access. You will also need:

  • A working e-mail address which you check regularly (Make sure you give us the correct, exact e-mail address; and make sure the "Reply-to" settings in your e-mail are set up correctly, or you will not get information the teacher tries to send you.)
  • Word processing software to type your assignments. Microsoft Word is best. Some other programs (such as the free Open Office) will let you save your work as .rtf files (rich text format), .doc or .txt, which also work. Microsoft Works is not compatible with my computer or programs.
  • Books (which you may buy, or borrow from a library near you) - see the lists in the Student Supplies section for the titles of books you will need for the term; remember, if you don't want to buy a book, and your local library doesn't have it, most public libraries will order a book for you on interlibrary loan, for just the cost of postage.
  • 1- 2 video/DVD's (which you may buy, rent, or borrow from a library)
  • you will need the time and motivation to do quite a bit of reading, studying and writing
  • Acrobat Reader, QuickTime reader, and a PowerPoint reader (all available free online) You might want to get a copy of the book Writer's Inc published by Great Source to use as a reference book. You will find this book useful in your other high school and college English classes, or whenever you need to write a paper.

How You Will Be Graded

You earn points for doing assignments in this class. Each assignment has a maximum number of points you can earn if you do an excellent job on that assignment. You must do all assignments. You can also submit a revised, improved version of an assignment to get more points for it. Your final grade is determined by your average on assignments, and how you do on the final test. The assignments and quizzes count 75%, and the final test counts 25%.

Grading scale

A 92-100; A- 90-91; B+ 87-89; B 82-86 ; B- 80-81; C+ 77-79; C 72-76; C- 68-71; D+ 66-68; D 62-65; D- 60-61; No credit - below 60.

As with all EHS classes, you must also pass a proctored final test at the end of the class. If you score below 60% on the final, you will fail the class and not earn credit. You may not re-take just the final test, although you may re-take the whole class. If you score at least 60% on the final test, your score on the final will be averaged with your scores for class assignments and quizzes to determine your grade in the class. Note that you can't retake the final to try to raise your grade. If you do the bare minimum on assignments, you can expect to get scores around 70-80% (that's C to B range, for those of you who are used to letters); if you want to get maximum points (A's), you need to 'go the extra mile': show me some creativity and depth of understanding, as well as being meticulous about proofreading your work to make it correct.
 

Final Test

When you have finished all the assignments you need for your credit, you will take the final test under the supervision of a proctor approved by the EHS. You must pass the final with at least 60% to pass the class.

About Homework

Writing Assignments For the shorter writing assignments (such as the sentence workshops), you will get full points if you have followed the directions accurately and completely. For longer assignments (essays, stories, etc), rubrics specify how you will be graded. My goal is to have your assignments scored within two working days or less. If it has been more than three working days since you sent an assignment, and you haven't received a score or message from me, I may not have gotten it. E-mail me or use the class message tool to ask about it. On writing assignments, I will usually send you scores (based on a rubric) and a general comment or two. If you want more detailed comments and corrections so that you can more easily revise the piece and re-submit it to try to raise your score, put a double star (**) on the title, or just send me a request with the assignment.

Class plagiarism policy

Plagiarism is copying someone else's writing, either the exact words or copying the general organization and paraphrasing some of the ideas. Copying someone else's sentences, phrases or organization of ideas and failing to give credit to the original author is plagiarism. In some papers it is appropriate to quote a short section of someone else's exact words, but when you do, that section needs to be set off in quotation marks or otherwise set apart, and the author identified either in a sentence, or in a parenthetical note. Plagiarism is unlawful and unethical, and against the EHS Honor Code. If you turn in a plagiarized assignment, you will receive ONE warning. If the problem recurs, you will be dropped from the class with no credit.

How to turn in homework

IMPORTANT: always put your first and last name, and the quarter, on all your homework. Send in each assignment as you finish it. DO NOT save up all your work and send it all at once. It is OK to send two or three assignments together. It is not OK to send fifteen or twenty assignments together. Do your homework in a simple word processor on your computer. Paste in the directions from the assignment, complete the work in your document, and save it to your computer. THEN copy and paste it into the "edit my submission" window on the assignment page or into an e-mail. If you type your homework on a computer, you can turn it in one of three ways: 1) For most assignments, you will copy and paste your work into the window provided in the assignment section, or, in a few cases, attach it there. OR 2) E-mail it to me OR 3) As a last resort, you can also mail your homework the old-fashioned way (remember it will take about four days to get to me)

IMPORTANT: However you turn in your homework, always, always save and keep a copy yourself.
Please review my comments on your homework or quizzes before you re-write or re-take and re-submit them.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • When can I enroll? When there is space available in the class, students can enroll any time. If the class is full (which doesn't happen very often), your name will be added to a waiting list. DON'T submit more requests trying to get in faster. Every time you submit a new request for the class, your previous request is deleted, effectively moving you to the bottom of the list.
  • How do I stay in the class? Submit at least three assignments each week, and finish by the tenth week after you enroll.
  • What does it take to get credit, or a grade? Your final grade will be determined by the percentage you have before you take the final, and how you do on the final. In order to qualify to take the final test, you must have passed all quizzes with at least the listed minimum score, which is usually around 80-85% (you can re-take the quizzes as needed till you get a passing score), AND you must have met the listed minimum score for all assignments (remember, you can revise and resubmit assignments for which you want a higher score). As with all EHS classes, you must pass a proctored final test at the end of the class.
  • Is everything I need on the computer in the class website? No. This is not a totally self-contained class. You will need to get books and videos, and use the internet to complete some assignments.
  • . How fast can I finish? You must begin submitting assignments at least three weeks before you finish. Most students take the full nine to ten weeks to finish the class.
  • How do I finish and get my credit to my school? After you have passed all quizzes and assignments, submit the "Ready" assignment. Then follow the directions given in the "Arranging to take my final proctored test" link (near the bottom of the class topic outline page). The morning after you have entered your proctor's information, and I have put a score of '1' on the Ready assignment, your proctor will receive an e-mail with the password to the final test. After you have passed the final, your school should receive your credit within a couple weeks, although during the May rush it could take longer.
  • What if I don't finish, or want to drop the class? We really want you to finish the class and earn credit! However, if you no longer need the class and want to be dropped, we understand. E-mail me and I will remove you from the class.
  • Why can't I access anything in Module 3? You need to visit all the pages listed in Module 1 & 2, read that information, and submit your "About Me" assignment before you can start work in Module 3.

00.00 Start Here (English 11)

00.01 About Me (English 11)

teacher-scored 12 points possible 15 minutes

About Me Questions

Copy and Paste the questions between the asterisks into a word processing document; complete the assignment, save it, and then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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1. What is the first book you remember reading?

2. Do you understand and agree to abide by the EHS Honor Code:   "As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers, and staff with respect." ?

3. How many EHS classes have you taken (not counting this one)?

4. What high school do you attend?

5. What do you want to be when you grow up?

6. Who is your favorite band/ musician?

7. Are you committed to finishing this class within ten weeks (take your final test in the ninth week after you enroll)?

8. What is your favorite color?

9. What was the last restaurant that you ate at?

10. What is your favorite day of the week?

11.  Now, tell me three things about yourself that you think I need to know…

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About Me Scoring Rubric

10 Points= adequate response to all 10 questions

2 Points= other relevant information is included

12 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


00.01.01 Student Software Needs

 

Students need access to a robust internet connection and a modern web browser.

This class may also require the Apple QuickTime plug-in to view media.

For students using a school-issued Chromebook, ask your technical support folks to download the QuickTime plug-in and enable the plug-in for your Chromebook.

$0.00

07.00 Vocabulary and Grammar (English 11)

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language from the Utah Core:

US Navy image, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsUS Navy image, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

• To be college and career-ready in language, students must have firm control over the conventions of standard English.

• Students must also have extensive vocabularies, built through reading and study, enabling them to comprehend complex texts and engage in purposeful writing about and conversations around content.

• Students need to become skilled in determining or clarifying the meaning of words and phrases they encounter, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies to aid them.

• Students must learn to see an individual word as part of a network of other words—words, for example, that have similar denotations but different connotations.

• The inclusion of Language standards in students' own strand should not be taken as an indication that skills related to conventions, effective language use, and vocabulary are unimportant to reading, writing, speaking, and listening; indeed, they are inseparable from such contexts.

07.01 Vocabulary Activities (English 11)

Students will learn 30 new vocabulary words and be able to use them daily in their writing and speaking. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

Waterlilies: Claude Monet, 1908, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsWaterlilies: Claude Monet, 1908, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

The vocabulary section of this quarter is divided into three sections, each with ten words. You will do a writing activity and a quiz for each of the word sets. You do not have to complete them all at once (like everything in this course, you can decide the pace and order in which you work).

Why Study Vocabulary? (from verbalworkout.com)

Words are the tools we use to think and communicate. And this in an age when thinking and communicating are more important than strength and dexterity. At a personal level, a versatile vocabulary helps a man to woo a woman. It helps us to heed the philosophers’ advice to lead a “considered life.”

Materially, a large vocabulary helps an artist describe the right shade of blue. It helps a student understand the textbook, and helps a leader manipulate concepts to formulate and share a vision.

In the words of Sebastian Wren, imagine if your reading required understanding this passage of text: While hortenting efrades the populace of the vaderbee class, most experts concur that a scrivant rarely endeavors to decry the ambitions and shifferings of the moulant class. Deciding whether to oxant the blatantly maligned Secting party, most moulants will tolerate the subjugation of staits, savats, or tempets only so long as the scrivant pays tribute to the derivan, either through preem or exaltation.

In addition, your vocabulary makes an early impression. People judge you by the words you use and understand. It's no surprise that an extensive vocabulary is highly correlated with academic and professional success.

07.01 Vocabulary Set 1 (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Vocabulary Assignment 

Personally, when I need to find a definition for a word, I first look to a thesaurus. Sometimes dictionaries are hard to understand and a single word of the same meaning is sometimes more helpful to develop understanding of a new word. Feel free to use whatever resources you find most helpful. For each set of words you will complete an activity and a quiz. There will be vocabulary questions on the final test as well.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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1856 U.S. political cartoon: Louis Maurer and Nathaniel Currier, public domain via Wikimedia Commons1856 U.S. political cartoon: Louis Maurer and Nathaniel Currier, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Vocabulary Set 1

1. augment
2. bereft
3. dour
4. guise
5. insidious
6. opulent
7. reiterate
8. stolid
9. unkempt
10. warily

Set 1 Activity (10 Points): Find a synonym for each of the above words. The assignment should include both the vocabulary word and its synonym, along with a brief explanation of how the connotations of the two words differ.

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Assignment Example

1. happy= jovial

 Happy is a more general word. Jovial is most often used about extroverted adults, especially large or authoritative men, and suggests laughing (outward appearance of happiness) rather than a feeling.

Scoring Rubric

5 points= correct synonym for each vocabulary word (1/2 point each)

3 points= followed the directions and included both the vocabulary word,  synonym and explanation of the difference 

2 points = spelling errors are non-existent

10 points total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


07.01.02 Vocabulary Set 1 Quiz (English 11)

computer-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

Go to Module 3 on the main class page to find the link to take this quiz.  You may take it multiple times, but you must score at least 70%.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


07.02 Vocabulary Set 2 (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

Feel free to use whatever resources - dictionaries or thesaurus - you find most helpful. For each set of words you will complete an activity and a quiz. There will be vocabulary questions on the final test as well.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

Malham Tarn - its existence is due to the underlying impervious Silurian slate: Gordon Hatton, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsMalham Tarn - its existence is due to the underlying impervious Silurian slate: Gordon Hatton, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

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Vocabulary Set 2

1. adroit
2. amicable
3. averse
4. cursory
5. duplicity
6. impervious
7. impetus
8. quintessence
9. retrogress
10. tepid

Set 2 Activity (10 Points): Using “Google” or a similar search tool*, find an example of each word used in a sentence. Include each sample sentence in your assignment. Using the context clues to guide you, write a definition/ synonym for each vocabulary word. Use other resources for help if the context does not make the meaning clear.

(Note* I clicked on the “News” button in the Google search engine which made it much easier to find a sentence rather than just a plethora of dictionary sites)

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Assignment Example 1. The angry customer shouted at the waitress until she burst into tears. Angry means upset or annoyed.

Vocabulary Set 2 Rubric

5 Points= each vocabulary word is used in a sentence (1/2 point each)

5 Points= each vocabulary word is defined by the student (1/2 point each)

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


07.02.01

07.02.02 Vocabulary Set 2 Quiz (English 11)

computer-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

Go to Module 3 on the main class page to find the link to take this quiz.  You may take it multiple times, but you must score at least 70%.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


07.03 Vocabulary Set 3 (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

Statue of King Richard Lionheart brandishing his sword: Carlo Marochetti, Tagishsimon, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported licenseStatue of King Richard Lionheart brandishing his sword: Carlo Marochetti, Tagishsimon, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license

 Feel free to use whatever resources - dictionaries, thesaurus - you find most helpful. For each set of words you will complete an activity and a quiz. There will be vocabulary questions on the final test as well.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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Vocabulary Set 3

1. accede
2. brandish
3. deft
4. destitute
5. explicit
6. inopportune
7. officious
8. ominous
9. rampant
10. supple

Set 3 Activity (10 Points): Write a short, creative story using all of the ten vocabulary words in one story.  Please highlight the vocabulary words in your story.  If the meaning of the word is not clear in its usage, you will lose points. Please do not use sentences like “I don’t know what the word corpulent means.”

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Vocabulary Set 3 Rubric

5 Points= Each word has been used correctly in a sentence (1/2 point each)

3 Points= Story is in paragraph form

2 Points= Writing contains few mistakes

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


07.03.02 Vocabulary Set 3 Quiz (English 11)

computer-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

Go to Module 3 on the main class page to find the link to take this quiz.  You may take it multiple times, but you must score at least 70%.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


07.04 Editing Practice (English 11)

Students will practice editing for various spelling and grammar mistakes. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

You are going to be given five sets of editing exercises to practice the following skills:

End Punctuation

Commas

Apostrophes

Capitalization

Word Differences

07.04.01 Editing for Commas (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

Commas: Place the commas where necessary in the following sentences. At the end of each sentence is the number of commas that you should have when you are finished.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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NRMA Motoring and Services, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic via Wikimedia CommonsNRMA Motoring and Services, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic via Wikimedia Commons

1. Yesterday during English class we learned about parallel structure a way of improving our sentences. (2 or 3)

2. The polite young therapist who visited the hospital said “Kindness not force will make lasting changes.” (4)

3. Unless you can pay cash don't order a pizza. (1)

4. When buying a car decide on your budget make a list of important features and don't let the sales people pressure you into something you can't afford. (3)

5. My niece Stacy who just graduated from college got married on June 17 2012 in Nevada. (3 or 4)

6. Small objects like marbles coins or buttons can be choking hazards for young children. (2 or 4)

7. Our coach said “It is important for everyone especially diabetics to exercise regularly and eat healthy meals.” (3)

8. Whenever you finish your assignments early you should have a book to read. (1)

9. After completing the drivers ed class make sure you have picture ID proof of insurance your birth certificate and a parent or guardian to sign for you. (4)

10. Remember if you want to go on the field trip you must sign up before Friday. (2)

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Scoring Rubric

Each sentence is worth 1 point:

1 point if you get all required corrections

1/2 point for partial corrections

0 point for no corrections

10 Points total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


07.05 Editing for Apostrophes (English 11)

teacher-scored 14 points possible 15 minutes

Apostrophes: Place the apostrophes where they are needed. At the end of each sentence is the number of apostrophes in each sentence.

Baptiste twins Ian and Deon: USNIH, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsBaptiste twins Ian and Deon: USNIH, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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1. Dont waste time on the wouldves, couldves, and shouldves; focus on the I cans and the I wills. (6)

2. Michael Stokes sister is Jesss wifes best friend. (3)

3. Theyre going to the Maceys parade. (2)

4. The class of 72 started the schools community gardening program. (2)

5. The light rails new airport line helps cut down on traffic on one of the citys busiest streets. (2)

6. My grandmothers favorite saying was dont forget to mind your ps and qs. (4)

7. The twins pictures are hard to tell apart, but when you meet them, its not that difficult. (2)

8. The sisters bowling teams scorecard was filled with Xs since they rolled lots of strikes and scored in the 600s. (sisters is plural - 4)

9. All of the students cars were parked on the lower level, but the teachers, administrators and maintenance staffs cars were up above. (all are plural- 4)

10. Marcus job application included his schools phone number and all of his bosses contact information. (3)

11. My brothers-in-laws wives, plus all their cousins children, came to last years reunion. (3)

12. PCBs are considered to be persistent organic pollutants, and their production isnt legal in the US. (2)

13. The lead drivers car hit the wall and the yellow flags came out . (1)

14. Somebodys car has the lights on in the parking lot. (1)

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Scoring Rubric

1 point for each sentence with every correction made

1/2 point for each sentence with partial corrections made

0 points for each sentence with no corrections

14 Points total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


07.06 Word Differences (English 11)

Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

Dessert or desert?: Wikimedia Commons: Hannes Grobe pie image, CC Attribution 3.0 Unported; Santryl Sonora Desert image, Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedDessert or desert?: Wikimedia Commons: Hannes Grobe pie image, CC Attribution 3.0 Unported; Santryl Sonora Desert image, Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Word Differences

Know and understand the difference between the following pairs of words well enough to pass the quiz.

1. affect/ effect
2. accept/ except
3. among/ between
4. can/ may
5. capital/ capitol
6. complement/ compliment
7. desert/ dessert
8. good/ well
9. immigrate/ emigrate
10. lay/ lie
11.set/ sit
12. principal/ principle
13. their/ there/ they’re

 

07.06 Word Differences Quiz (English 11)

computer-scored 13 points possible 8 minutes

Take the quiz.  You may take this quiz multiple times, but you must score at least 9 for credit.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


07.07 Editing for Capitalization (English 11)

teacher-scored 9 points possible 25 minutes

Jon Huntsman, Jr: Gage Skidmore, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsJon Huntsman, Jr: Gage Skidmore, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

 

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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Capitalization: Change the incorrectly used lowercase letters to capital letters. At the end of each sentence is the number of changes that should have been made.

1. The country of mexico is between the atlantic ocean on the east and the gulf of mexico on the west. (5)

2. The year 2012 marked the 40th anniversary of the skyline high school class of 1972; the reunion was held in the falls room at the snake river inn in idaho falls, idaho. (11)

3. Thomas jefferson was a member of the democratic-republican party when he ran for u.s. president against the federalist candidate. (7)

4. President abraham lincoln proclaimed the last thursday in november to be thanksgiving, hoping to create a sense of unity between the north and the south. (7)

5. U.s highway 20 is the longest road in the united states, starting in boston, massachusets and passing through sioux city, iowa and yellowstone national park on its way to newport, oregon just a mile from the pacific ocean. (16)

6.  The most famous case brought before the inquisition, part of the judicial system of the roman catholic church, was that of seventeenth century italian astronomer galileo galilei, who announced that the earth revolves around the sun; at the time, the church's opinion was that the earth was the center of creation. (9)

7. The chevrolet, ford, coke, pepsi, hollywood movies, apple computer and windows operating system are all well-known american products. (8)

8. Before his election as governor of utah, jon huntsman, jr. was an eagle scout; keyboard player in a rock band called wizard; a white house staff assistant in president ronald reagan's administration; and us ambassador to singapore. (17)

9.  alfred lord tennyson, poet laureate of great britain under queen victoria, wrote "ulysses", a poem about odysseus' feelings after returning home to ithaca. (12)

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Scoring Rubric

1 point for each sentence with every correction made

1/2 point for each sentence with partial corrections made

0 points for each sentence with no corrections

9 Points total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


07.08 Editing for Punctuation (English 11)

teacher-scored 18 points possible 25 minutes

End and dialogue punctuation: Add the correct punctuation and capitalization to the following dialogue.

There are about 40 corrections; you need to find at least 30.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

Sklmsta, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsSklmsta, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

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"Hey, wait up" martha called to her friends as they headed for the bus "do you have plans for this weekend"

"i'm not sure yet" aubrey said "why what's up"

"i thought it would be fun to go swimming and then to a movie tomorrow"

rustin said "that sounds great.  i bet my sister and i could go"

"i'll check with my mom" said aubrey "what time were you thinking"

"the movie starts at 3:30 or 6:15" said martha "so if we got to the pool at one, we could swim for at least an hour and then walk to the theater"

"i'll call you tonight" said aubrey

"me, too" said rustin

"ok, don't forget" martha told them

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Scoring Rubric

15 Points- 30 or more corrections have been found (1/2 point each)

3 Points- Corrections are somehow highlighted within the submission

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


08.00 Understanding Poetry (English 11)

Robert Frost, 1941: Fred Palumbo, Library of Congress, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsRobert Frost, 1941: Fred Palumbo, Library of Congress, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading from the Utah Core:

• To become college and career ready, students must grapple with works of exceptional craft and thought whose range extends across genres, cultures, and centuries.

• Such works offer profound insights into the human condition and serve as models for students’ own thinking and writing.

In this unit, you will review literary devices, learn a technique for analyzing poetry, and do a close reading of six poems, choosing three to analyze.

08.01 Literary Devices (English 11)

Students will review and learn about various techniques and literary devices used by writers and will then apply them in the remainder of the course. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

Literary Devices

View the attached PowerPoint* and visit the links below to review and learn various literary devices. Then take the quiz to evaluate your understanding.

The literary devices listed here will be used throughout the course in writing activities and other assignments.

*Let me know if you can't view the PowerPoint, and I will send it to you in another format

The quiz will cover the following terms:

Allusion
Byzantine mosaic: the bird in the cage is a metaphor for the human soul trapped inside the body: Ken and Nyetta photo, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsByzantine mosaic: the bird in the cage is a metaphor for the human soul trapped inside the body: Ken and Nyetta photo, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons Apostrophe
Euphemism
Onomatopoeia
Personification
Symbol
Colloquialism
Hyperbole
Repetition
Alliteration
Oxymoron
Paradox
Irony
Simile
Metaphor

 

08.01.01 Literary Device Activity (English 11)

teacher-scored 15 points possible 30 minutes

Find or write an example that has to do with sound (noise, music, sounds of people, nature, machinery, etc) of each of the literary devices listed below. You can make it up or find it in another media source.

Make sure to review the PowerPoint in the lesson for definitions and examples for help. Obviously, you should not use the examples from there for this assignment.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box. 

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Open Clip Art Library, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsOpen Clip Art Library, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Example: Here is a phrase that uses the literary device "assonance" (repetition of vowel sounds) and has to do with a sound (the sound of the train whistle):
The wailing of the freight train siren in the night (Notice the repetition of the long "a" sound in wail, freight, and train; and the long "i" sound in siren and night.)

1. Allusion
2. Apostrophe
3. Euphemism
4. Onomatopoeia
5. Symbol (include the symbol and a brief explanation of what it symbolizes)
6. Personification
7. Colloquialism
8. Hyperbole
9. Repetition
10. Alliteration (highlight or underline the words that create alliteration)
11. Oxymoron
12. Paradox
13. Irony
14. Simile
15. Metaphor

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Scoring Rubric

7.5 Points= one correct example for each literary device has been included

7.5 points = each example has something to do with sound

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


08.01.02 Literary Devices Quiz (English 11)

teacher-scored 15 points possible 15 minutes

Take the quiz on literary devices.  You may take it three times, but you must score over 70%.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


08.02 Understanding Poetry using SOAPSTone (English 11)

Students will learn how to read and understand poetry using the SOAPSTone method. Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

2nd century Greek poem by Sappho: Public domain via Wikimedia commons2nd century Greek poem by Sappho: Public domain via Wikimedia commons

Understanding Poetry

Students often struggle with poems because they seem to think there is a 'secret' meaning that can only be understood by few people. Here is a method that will help you go through some steps to get a better understanding of a poem's meaning.  Most poems are relatively short, making every count.  It is even more important to practice "close reading" with poems than with longer forms.

Read through the attachment "Understanding Poetry" to start. *If you cannot open the file, let me know and I can send it in a different format.

The slides will outline a method of understanding poetry using the acronym SOAPSTone. After viewing the presentation, take the quiz. You can then get a good understanding of the types of responses you need when you practice on your own.

You will then choose three of the poems in the following assignments for practice. Each will be submitted as a different assignment, but you will be answering the same questions for each. The last section of this unit will require you to write a poem of your own.

Terms you will need to understand for this unit (in addition to the literary devices in the previous lesson), as used in the assignments based on the SOAPSTone method:

Speaker:  who is doing the talking in the poem?  This is similar to the idea of "narrator" in fiction.  Don't say "the author" unless you have evidence to support the idea that the poet meant this as personal.  You will rarely know the speaker's name, but try to identify what sort of person is speaking in the poem.

Occasion:  what is going on here?  Give a short, simple summary of the situation the speaker finds him/herself in - when, what, where, why?

Audience:  who is the speaker talking to?  In some cases, the speaker will address "you" or "thee", or speak in the imperative, which implies "you" (remember, the imperative is a sentence like "Come home as soon as you're finished", in which the subject of the sentence is understood to be "You").  In that case, you will need to try to infer what sort of person is being addressed, or what the relationship between the author and the audience seems to be - is the audience the speaker's wife, girlfriend, boyfriend, son, daughter, friend, enemy, God, student? In other poems, there is no indication of a particular audience, or the subject matter or language of the poem may suggest an audience of a certain age, gender, or interests.

Purpose:  why did the poet write this poem?  What is the point?  What main idea or truth does the poem imply or state?  This is related to the idea of "theme," and you may need to infer this either from what the poem says, or from how it is said.

Subject:  what is the poem about?  what is the general topic?  What search terms might you use if you were looking for more about the same subject?

Tone:  what mood or feeling does the poem create?  What is the poet's or speaker's attitude toward the subject?  Most often, this will NOT be explicitly stated.  Describe tone with adjectives - words like sad, angry, nostalgic, wistful, longing, joyful, anguished, objective, sarcastic, ironic, reverent, spooky, humorous ...  You will usually be asked to identify what particular words or phrases in the poem help create that tone.

08.02 Understanding Poetry using SOAPSTone: Another Example (English 11)

Students will learn how to read and understand poetry using the SOAPSTone method. Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

Let's look at this poem by William Wordsworth, apply the SOAPStone method and then look for literary devices:

By the Sea

It is a beauteous evening, calm and free;
The holy time is quiet as a nun
Breathless with adoration; the broad sun
Is sinking down in its tranquillity;

The gentleness of heaven is on the sea:
Listen! the mighty Being is awake,
And doth with his eternal motion make
A sound like thunder -everlastingly.

Dear child! dear girl! that walkest with me here,
If thou appear untouched by solemn thought
Thy nature is not therefore less divine:

Thou liest in Abraham's bosom all the year,
And worshipp'st at the Temple's inner shrine,
God being with thee when we know it not.

Speaker?
In the first two stanzas, it could be almost anyone, but in the third stanza, we see that the point of view is first person.  By the end of the poem, it is clear that the speaker is an adult - possibly a parent or grandparent of the girl in the poem - who believes in God.

Occasion?
A person is walking along an ocean beach with a little girl.

Audience?
 The speaker is addressing the little girl.

Purpose?
 One possibility is "The beauty of nature is an expression of God's presence with us." The first two stanzas support this - "holy time", "gentleness of heaven is on the sea", "the mighty Being is awake".
 Another, which may be better, is "Innocent young children have a divine nature even before they can or do think rationally about God."  The last two stanzas support this - with pretty much every line and word.

Subject?
On a concrete level, this poem is about the ocean, and enjoying the beauty of the natural world.  On a more abstract level, it is about humankind's divine nature.

Tone?
 Worshipful and calm.  Words or phrases from the poem that help create this tone include calm, holy, quiet, nun, tranquillity, gentleness, liest in Abraham's bosom, worshipp'st at the Temple, God being with thee.

What literary devices can we notice?

  • "The holy time is quiet as a nun" - simile
  • "sun/is sinking down in its tranquillity" - personification (tranquillity is an emotion felt by people and maybe animals, but not by an inanimate object like the sun)
  • "...with his eternal motion make/ a sound like thunder" - OK, we see "like" but what is the comparison being made?  Thunder is, literally, a sound, so "a sound like thunder" isn't a simile.  You could argue, though, that in the context of the poem, the sound is the sound of the waves breaking on the beach.  "Waves breaking on the beach are like thunder" could be a simile.
  • "... gentleness of heaven..." is an example of assonance (the repetition of the same vowel sound) - the "short e" sound is repeated four times.
  • "... liest in Abraham's bosom" and "worshipp'st at the Temple's inner shrine" are also literary devices.  They certainly aren't literally true (Abraham having been many centuries dead, and the Temple destroyed, long before Wordsworth's day.  Also, the Temple's inner shrine could only be entered by the high priest, and never by a child or female).  We might think of them as metaphors for the girl being in the presence of God.

08.02.01 Poetry Quiz (English 11)

teacher-scored 15 points possible 15 minutes

Take the quiz on analyzing poetry.  You may take it three times, but you must score at least 69%.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


08.03 Poetry Practice 1 (English 11)

teacher-scored 18 points possible 30 minutes

Do a close reading of the two poems at the links below. Choose one and complete the assignment.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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John Doubleday statue of Dylan Thomas: Stu Phillips photo, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsJohn Doubleday statue of Dylan Thomas: Stu Phillips photo, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

1. Poem title and author
2. Speaker
3. Occasion
4. Audience
5. Purpose/Theme
6. Subject (in one or two words)

7. Tone
(a) Tone (in one or two words):
(b) Two words or phrases from the poem that help identify or create that tone:

8. Literary Device 1:
(a) quote the phrase or line containing the device:
(b) identify the name of the kind of device:

9. Literary Device 2:
(a) quote the phrase or line containing the device:
(b) identify the name of the kind of device:

10. Short Essay: How does this poem connect to the quarter topic of conformity and rebellion?

11. Short Essay: What personal connection or other insight do you have about this poem? (How does it remind you of your own experiences, or other things you have read or watched?)

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Scoring Rubric

6 Points= Questions 1-6 have been adequately answered and show understanding of poem

2 Points= Question 7 includes tone and two text examples

4 Points= Questions 8 and 9 include the literary device and the text example

6 Points= Each short answer question is answered in complete sentences (more than one sentence) and adequately responds to the question

18 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


08.04 Poetry Practice 2 (English 11)

teacher-scored 18 points possible 30 minutes

Do a close reading of the two poems at the links below. Choose one and complete the assignment.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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W.H. Auden, 1941: Carl Van Vechten, Library of Congress, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsW.H. Auden, 1941: Carl Van Vechten, Library of Congress, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

1. Poem title and author
2. Speaker
3. Occasion
4. Audience
5. Purpose/Theme
6. Subject (in one or two words)

7. Tone
(a) Tone (in one or two words):
(b) Two words or phrases from the poem that help identify or create that tone:

8. Literary Device 1:
(a) quote the phrase or line containing the device:
(b) identify the name of the kind of device:

9. Literary Device 2:
(a) quote the phrase or line containing the device:
(b) identify the name of the kind of device:

10. Short Essay: How does this poem connect to the quarter topic of conformity and rebellion?

11. Short Essay: What personal connection or other insight do you have about this poem? (How does it remind you of your own experiences, or other things you have read or watched?)

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Scoring Rubric

6 Points= Questions 1-6 have been adequately answered and show understanding of poem

2 Points= Question 7 includes tone and two text examples

4 Points= Questions 8 and 9 include the literary device and the text example

6 Points= Each short answer question is answered in complete sentences (more than one sentence) and adequately responds to the question

18 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


08.05 Poetry Practice 3 (English 11)

teacher-scored 18 points possible 30 minutes

Do a close reading of the two poems at the links below. Choose one and complete the assignment.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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1. Poem title and author
2. Speaker
3. Occasion
4. Audience
5. Purpose/Theme
6. Subject (in one or two words)

7. Tone
(a) Tone (in one or two words):
(b) Two words or phrases from the poem that help identify or create that tone:

8. Literary Device 1:
(a) quote the phrase or line containing the device:
(b) identify the name of the kind of device:

9. Literary Device 2:
(a) quote the phrase or line containing the device:
(b) identify the name of the kind of device:

10. Short Essay: How does this poem connect to the quarter topic of conformity and rebellion?

11. Short Essay: What personal connection or other insight do you have about this poem? (How does it remind you of your own experiences, or other things you have read or watched?)

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Scoring Rubric

6 Points= Questions 1-6 have been adequately answered and show understanding of poem

2 Points= Question 7 includes tone and two text examples

4 Points= Questions 8 and 9 include the literary device and the text example

6 Points= Each short answer question is answered in complete sentences (more than one sentence) and adequately responds to the question

18 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


08.06 Writing Poetry (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

Langston Hughes, 1936: Carl Van Vechten, Library of Congress, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsLangston Hughes, 1936: Carl Van Vechten, Library of Congress, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Poetry Practice

Write one poem mimicking Langston Hugh’s poem, "I, Too" (see attachment).

Begin with the phrase "I, too" and continue from there using a personal connection.

Scoring Rubric

5 Points= completed poem

2 Points= poem mirrors Hugh's poem in style

3 Points= poem is creative and original

10 Points total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


09.00 Responding to Literary Texts (English 11)

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading from the Utah Core:

• To become college and career ready, students must grapple with works of exceptional craft and thought whose range extends across genres, cultures, and centuries.

Mona Lisa: Leonardo Da Vinci, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsMona Lisa: Leonardo Da Vinci, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

• Such works offer profound insights into the human condition and serve as models for students’ own thinking and writing.

• Through wide and deep reading of literature and literary nonfiction of steadily increasing sophistication, students gain a reservoir of literary and cultural knowledge, references, and images; the ability to evaluate intricate arguments; and the capacity to surmount the challenges posed by complex texts.

In this unit, you will review terms used in discussing narrative text, take a quiz on those terms, and analyze the four short stories or excerpts from essays.

09.01 Literary Text (English 11)

Students will read a variety or short stories, excerpts, and a novel to expand their understanding of the quarter theme "conformity and rebellion" Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

Understanding Literary Texts

The focus of this unit is to read a variety of literature focused on the topic of "conformity and rebellion."

This unit is similar to the poetry unit in that you will learn techniques for understanding literature and methods that writers use to enhance their writing. You will then be able to apply what you have learned.

 Read and understand the information in the "Understanding Literary Texts" PowerPoint. If you have any problems opening the file, please let me know and I can email it in another format.  You may also want to visit one or more of the links below for help.

Ray Bradbury: NASA image, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsRay Bradbury: NASA image, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Choose one of the books (if you have't already) to be reading as you complete this quarter. As always, assignments do not have to be completed in order.

Here is the list of books. Hopefully, you have already started reading.

The Crucible by Arthur Miller
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
Brave New World by Auldous Huxley
Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson
Shadows by Robin McKinley
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

Literary terms you will need to understand for this unit:

Diction:  the author's word choices - are the words mostly short and simple, or long and difficult? formal or informal? familiar or unfamiliar?  Other words you might use to talk about diction: 
abstract, concrete, esoteric, obscure, scholarly, sensuous, colloquial, monosyllabic, polysyllabic, sarcastic, crisp, colorful, vague, precise...

Syntax: the author's sentence structure - are the sentences shorter or longer? are sentences mostly simple, compound or complex? do they flow smoothly, or require a lot of concentration?  
Other words you might use to talk about syntax:
convoluted, straight-forward, spare, ornate, flowing, stacatto

Tone: what is the author's attitude toward the story or characters? amused, ironic, serious, humorous, reflective, regretful, nostalgic, boastful, detached, fond, gloomy tense, cold, bitter, dramatic, didactic, objective, dreamy, sympathetic ...?

Theme: what is the implied "point" of the story? what life lessons might the author intend you to learn? what general truth?

Point of View: who is telling the story? is it first person or third person?  is the narrator omniscient (knows what many characters are thinking), limited (knows only what one character is thinking), or objective (simply reports what can be seen)?

Genre: what kind of story is it? romance, mystery, science fiction, realistic fiction, historical fiction, poetry, drama, western, suspense, horror ...?

Protagonist: the main character

Antagonist: character or entity that opposes the protagonist, creating conflict in the story.

Conflict: what creates problems or obstacles for the protagonist?  Traditionally, most conflicts can be classed as one of the following:

Protagonist vs. him/herself
Protagonist vs. nature
Protagonist vs. society
Protagonist vs. another character

09.01 Literature Quiz (English 11)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 15 minutes

Take the quiz on analyzing literature.  You may take it three times, but you must score at least 70%.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


09.02 Reader's Response 1 (English 11)

teacher-scored 19 points possible 15 minutes

Reader’s Response Activity 

Do a close reading of the story "The White Heron", and then respond to the following prompts.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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Ben Schumin, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsBen Schumin, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

Refer back to the lesson at the beginning of this unit for help with describing diction, syntax and tone.

1. What are the title and author of the story?

2. Describe the diction of the text, and give an example:

3. Describe the syntax of the text, and give an example:

4. What is the overall tone of the text?  Give an example of phrases from the text that help create this tone.

5. What is the theme or lesson to be learned from the story?

6. What point of view is the story being told from?

7. What is the genre of the story?  How can you tell?

8. Who is the protagonist?

9. Who/ what is the antagonist, and how does s/he oppose the protagonist?

10. Identify two literary devices found in the text (remember to state the literary device and the example from the text).

11. Short Answer: Choose one significant quote from the text and discuss its importance to the story.

12. Short Answer: Connect this story to the overall theme of the quarter (conformity and rebellion).

13. Short Answer: Make a personal connection to the story.  Be specific, and use an example from your life or other stories/books/movies that you are familiar with that something in the story reminds you of.

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Reader's Response Rubric

9 point= Questions 1-9 have been adequately answered

4 points= Question 10 includes two examples and correctly identifies the literary devices (can be the same one)

2 points= Short answer question 11 responds in more than one sentence and contains a quote from the text

2 points= Short answer question 12 responds in more than one sentence and makes a connection between the story and the theme

2 points= Short answer question 13 responds in more than one sentence and makes a personal connection to the story

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


09.03 Reader's Response 2 (English 11)

teacher-scored 19 points possible 15 minutes

Reader’s Response Activity

Do a close reading of the story at the link below, and then respond to the following prompts.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

************************************************************ 

Hemingway driving a WW I Red Cross ambulance in 1918: Public domain via Wikimedia CommonsHemingway driving a WW I Red Cross ambulance in 1918: Public domain via Wikimedia Commons

 

Refer back to the lesson at the beginning of this unit for help with describing diction, syntax and tone.

1. What are the title and author of the story?

2. Describe the diction of the text, and give an example:

3. Describe the syntax of the text, and give an example:

4. What is the overall tone of the text?  Give an example of phrases from the text that help create this tone.

5. What is the theme or lesson to be learned from the story?

6. What point of view is the story being told from?

7. What is the genre of the story?  How can you tell?

8. Who is the protagonist?

9. Who/ what is the antagonist, and how does s/he oppose the protagonist?

10. Identify two literary devices found in the text (remember to state the literary device and the example from the text).

11. Short Answer: Choose one significant quote from the text and discuss its importance to the story.

12. Short Answer: Connect this story to the overall theme of the quarter (conformity and rebellion).

13. Short Answer: Make a personal connection to the story.  Be specific, and use an example from your life or other stories/books/movies that you are familiar with that something in the story reminds you of.

************************************************************ 

Reader's Response Rubric

9 point= Questions 1-9 have been adequately answered

4 points= Question 10 includes two examples and correctly identifies the literary devices (can be the same one)

2 points= Short answer question 11 responds in more than one sentence and contains a quote from the text

2 points= Short answer question 12 responds in more than one sentence and makes a connection between the story and the theme

2 points= Short answer question 13 responds in more than one sentence and makes a personal connection to the story

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


09.04 Reader's Response 3 (English 11)

teacher-scored 19 points possible 15 minutes

Reader’s Response Activity

Do a close reading of the story at the link below, and then respond to the following prompts.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

***************************************************************** 

1856 portrait of Thoreau: Benjamin D. Maxham, public domain via Wikimedia Commons1856 portrait of Thoreau: Benjamin D. Maxham, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Refer back to the lesson at the beginning of this unit for help with describing diction, syntax and tone.

1. What are the title and author of the piece?

2. Describe the diction of the text, and give an example:

3. Describe the syntax of the text, and give an example:

4. What is the overall tone of the text?  Give an example of phrases from the text that help create this tone.

5. What is the theme or lesson to be learned from this piece?

6. What point of view is this written from?

7. What is the genre of this piece?  How can you tell?

8. Who is the speaker?

9. In what year was this written?  What is another important historical event or work of literature from around this time? (You may need to do a little quick research to find these answers.)

10. Identify two literary devices found in the text (remember to state the literary device and the example from the text).

11. Short Answer: Choose one significant quote from the text and discuss its importance to the piece as a whole.

12. Short Answer: Connect this excerpt to the overall theme of the quarter (conformity and rebellion).

13. Short Answer: Make a personal connection to the piece.  Be specific, and use an example from your life or other stories/books/movies that you are familiar with that something in this one reminds you of.

************************************************************

Reader's Response Rubric

9 point= Questions 1-9 have been adequately answered

4 points= Question 10 includes two examples and correctly identifies the literary devices (can be the same one)

2 points= Short answer question 11 responds in more than one sentence and contains a quote from the text

2 points= Short answer question 12 responds in more than one sentence and makes a connection between the story and the theme

2 points= Short answer question 13 responds in more than one sentence and makes a personal connection to the story

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


Read from the beginning down to the end of the third paragraph ("Let every man make known what kind of government would command his respect, and that will be one step toward obtaining it. ")

09.04.01 Performance Assessment (English 11)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 40 minutes

Reader’s Response Activity

Do a close reading of the excerpt below, and then respond to the following prompts, which will ask you to look at commonalities between this reading and the others in this unit. I encourage you to ask someone else to read the selections and discuss them with you before you compose your answers.

from "Self Reliance" by Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson's study, 1888: Library of Congress, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsRalph Waldo Emerson's study, 1888: Library of Congress, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

There is a time in every man's education when he arrives at the conviction that envy is ignorance; that imitation is suicide; that he must take himself for better, for worse, as his portion; that though the wide universe is full of good, no kernel of nourishing corn can come to him but through his toil bestowed on that plot of ground which is given to him to till. The power which resides in him is new in nature, and none but he knows what that is which he can do, nor does he know until he has tried. Not for nothing one face, one character, one fact, makes much impression on him, and another none. This sculpture in the memory is not without preestablished harmony. The eye was placed where one ray should fall, that it might testify of that particular ray. We but half express ourselves, and are ashamed of that divine idea which each of us represents. It may be safely trusted as proportionate and of good issues, so it be faithfully imparted, but God will not have his work made manifest by cowards. A man is relieved and gay when he has put his heart into his work and done his best; but what he has said or done otherwise, shall give him no peace. It is a deliverance which does not deliver. In the attempt his genius deserts him; no muse befriends; no invention, no hope.

Trust thyself: every heart vibrates to that iron string. Accept the place the divine providence has found for you, the society of your contemporaries, the connection of events. Great men have always done so, and confided themselves childlike to the genius of their age, betraying their perception that the absolutely trustworthy was seated at their heart, working through their hands, predominating in all their being. And we are now men, and must accept in the highest mind the same transcendent destiny; and not minors and invalids in a protected corner, not cowards fleeing before a revolution, but guides, redeemers, and benefactors, obeying the Almighty effort, and advancing on Chaos and the Dark…

A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines. With consistency a great soul has simply nothing to do. He may as well concern himself with his shadow on the wall. Speak what you think now in hard words, and to-morrow speak what to-morrow thinks in hard words again, though it contradict every thing you said to-day. — 'Ah, so you shall be sure to be misunderstood.' — Is it so bad, then, to be misunderstood? Pythagoras was misunderstood, and Socrates, and Jesus, and Luther, and Copernicus, and Galileo, and Newton, and every pure and wise spirit that ever took flesh. To be great is to be misunderstood.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

**************************************************************** 

1.  Which of the following are claims made by Emerson in this excerpt? (1 pt)

 a.  Believe in your own ideas.
 b.  Once you have made up your mind, don't change your position.
 c.  Pay attention to what others think and base your decisions on that.
 d.  We are only happy when we have acted in accordance with what we believe.
 e.  Be guided by tradition and the majority opinion.

2.  Choose one claim Emerson makes in this excerpt. You may use one of the claims from question 1, or you may choose another from the passage.  State that claim.(1 pt)

3.  Give three examples of evidence from the passage supporting the claim you chose. (6 pts)

4.  Consider the three earlier stories or excerpts you read for the unit ("A&P," from "Civil Disobedience," and "In Another Country").  Choose one of those to compare with the Emerson excerpt, bearing in mind that you will need to find commonalities between the two.  Which story will you use? (1 pt)

5. List three commonalities between the two texts. (3 pts)

6.  For each of the three commonalities, explain evidence from each of the texts supporting them. (6 pts)

7.  Identify another book you've read, movie you've watched OR experience you've had that shares one of the three commonalities.  Explain, with evidence from that book, movie or experience, how it shares that commonality. (2 pts)

*************************************************************** 

 

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


09.05 Book Project (English 11)

teacher-scored 80 points possible 60 minutes

Oliver Castaño Mallorca, GNU Free Documentation License via Wikimedia CommonsOliver Castaño Mallorca, GNU Free Documentation License via Wikimedia Commons

Quarter 2 Book Project

Topic: Conformity and Rebellion

Novel Choices- Choose one book to read from the following list and then complete the activities.

The Crucible by Arthur Miller
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
Shadows by Robin McKinley

Activities
NOTE: These activities should be completed in one single word processing document and turned in all together. Remember the EHS Honor Code - all of your answers, other than the direct quotes from the book, must be your own, original work in your own words, not copied from other sources.

1. Choose five quotes from the book. For each quote, write a short paragraph discussing the significance of the quote. Things to consider might be how the quote develops a character, how the quote helps with understanding of theme, personal connections you made or the writing style of the author. (20 points)

2. Character Identification: Choose four characters from the book. For each character do the following (20 points):

• Descriptive Phrase (something quoted directly from the book)
• Memorable quote (this is also quoted directly from the book; can be something the character said or something said about the character)
• Your first impression of the character
• Three words to describe your character
• Relationship to other characters

3. Theme Discussion (10 Points) Write a paragraph discussion the connection between the novel and the quarter topic (Conformity and Rebellion).
Questions to consider in your discussion:

• What does this novel say about conformity and rebellion?
• Do you agree or disagree?
• What personal connection did you make to the book?
• What does each character learn about “conformity and rebellion” through the course of the novel?
• What is the lesson to be learned or the theme of the novel?
• How does the theme connect to the topic of “conformity and rebellion”?

4. Essay Question: In Kate Chopin’s The Awakening (1899), protagonist Edna Pontellier is said to possess “that outward existence which conforms, the inward life which questions.” In the book you studied for English 11 Quarter 2, identify a character who conforms outwardly while questioning inwardly. Then write an essay in which you analyze how this tension between outward conformity and inward questioning contributes to the meaning of the work. Avoid mere plot summary. At least five paragraphs. (20 Points)

Essay Question Alternate Assignment: Instead of writing an essay, you can submit a PowerPoint presentation responding to all parts of the essay question. Your presentation must be at least ten slides long, and five of the slides need a picture. The focus of the PowerPoint is a response to the essay question--make sure you are answering the question and NOT just giving a summary of the book.

The topic for part 4 asks you to look at one of the main characters (probably the protagonist) and consider in what ways s/he acts like a conformist (going along with what most of the other characters expect and behaving like a "normal" person of that society) and in what ways s/he feels or thinks like a rebel (questioning or pushing against expectations or limitations).  Start by explaining that, and how the tension between outside pressure to conform and inner desire for something different affect (a) the character, (b) the conflict in the story, and (c) a theme (message/lesson/meaning) of the story.  You could also compare this aspect of the story to another book/movie you are familiar with, or to something in your own life.

5. Setting (10 Points) Using Google Earth, find the actual spot on the globe of a location in your book. Look around at the setting and even though it will not necessarily look like the setting described in the book, think about the importance of 'place' and how it might affect the character. Write a paragraph response considering setting and its importance in the book. How does setting affect the character and make a difference in the story? You need to have a picture from Google Earth of your 'place' for full credit. Please include a screen shot of your 'place' (use “print screen,” then paste it) or save it as a .jpeg and paste it into your document. NOTE: In this quarter there are two 'futuristic' books that have no place, so locate the place the author lived. You will still need to do the discussion of the importance of setting in the book.

Book Project Scoring Rubric

20 Points=Quote Section
10 points= 2 points for each quote (5 total)
10 points= 2 points for each quote discussion; each discussion is more than one paragraph (5 total)

20 Points= Character Identification
For each of the four chosen characters, the five questions have all been answered

10 Points= Theme Discussion
5 points= Discussion is in a complete paragraph
5 points= Discussion incorporates examples from the book

20 Points= Essay Question
5 points= Essay focuses on the question and responds with clarity and examples from the book
3 points= Essay has a clear thesis statement which responds to the question
2 points= Essay is in organized into paragraphs for clarity
3 points= Essay contains few distracting spelling and grammar mistakes
3 points= Essay is long enough to adequately respond to the prompt (4-5 paragraphs)
3 points= Essay has a clear introductory paragraph which sets up the discussion
2 points= Essay has a strong concluding paragraph
2 points= Essay DOES NOT just summarize the book

20 Points= Essay Question Alternative Assignment
5 points= presentation is at least 10 slides long
5 points= 5 of the 10 slides contains a picture
3 points= presentation responds to all parts of the prompt
2 points= slides are neat and easy to read with few mistakes
3 points= presentation is NOT a summary of the book but a response to the essay question
2 points= presentation is unique and interesting

10 Points= Setting
5 points= paragraph discussion of the importance of setting
5 points= screen shot or jpeg of the setting found from GoogleEarth or a similar source

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


09.06 Critical Movie Review (English 11)

teacher-scored 13 points possible 35 minutes

Critical Viewing Movie Review

lumaxart, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commonslumaxart, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

Choose a movie (or live play or musical) that fits with the quarter topic, and write a one page response of that viewing.

You will then present your response in one of two ways: use Google Voice (801-317-8401, In the message include:  your name, quarter, assignment #, and the assignment.  Also, submit a comment through Learn with the date and time you left the message; the assignment will NOT be graded unless the date and time are submitted in Learn as well.) to record your response, OR make a short video of your response and submit through Canvas responding to the movie. It is best to have your responses written out before responding to this prompt so your presentation is organized and clear; you may also want to practice before making the phone call or final video.

Respond to the following questions in your review:

1. How does this movie tie into the quarter theme of Conformity and Rebellion?
2. What is the message or theme of the movie?
3. What obstacles did the protagonist have to overcome?
4. What rating (out of five stars) would you give this movie? Why?

Suggested movies for this quarter: The Crucible, The Incredibles, Pride and Prejudice, Jane Eyre, Remember the Titans, The Power of One, The Patriot

*Note: You are not restricted to any of these titles. Any movie that fits within the theme of the quarter will work. If you are not sure if a movie fits with the theme, just send me a message. Honestly, I don't watch many movies so I am not really sure what is out there--use your best judgement.

If you use Google Voice, you can leave up to a three-minute message. Use the questions to guide your response and write out your review in detail before completing the assignment. In the assignment submission box, simply make a note of the day and time you recorded your message. If you make a video, you can upload it there as well. The video does not have to be anything super elaborate; it can be just you talking to the camera and answering the questions about the movie.

Scoring Rubric

8 Points- student responds to each question clearly and adequately

5 Points- student is well spoken during the presentation; it is clear that they have practiced

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


09.07 Unit 09 Book Quiz (English 11)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 20 minutes

Take the quiz on the book you read.  You may take it three times, but you must score at least 70%.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


10.00 Narrative Writing (English 11)

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing from the Utah Core:

• For students, writing is a key means of asserting and defending claims, showing what they know about a subject, and conveying what they have experienced, imagined, thought and felt.

• To be college and career-ready writers, students must take task, purpose, and audience into careful consideration, choosing words, information, structures and formats deliberately.

• Students need to be able to use technology strategically when creating, refining and collaborating on writing.

• Students must have the flexibility, concentration and fluency to produce high-quality first-draft text under a tight deadline. They must also exercise the capacity to revisit and make improvements to a piece of writing using multiple drafts when circumstances encourage or require it.

19th century tiled floor: Giovanni Dall'Orto, released for any purpose via Wikimedia Commons19th century tiled floor: Giovanni Dall'Orto, released for any purpose via Wikimedia Commons

10.01 Narrative Writing Practice (English 11)

Students will write in response to various prompts incorporating writing skills learned earlier in the quarter. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

Georgiana's Journal (1841-1865): Georgiana McCrae, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsGeorgiana's Journal (1841-1865): Georgiana McCrae, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

This set of assignments is a warm up for a longer narrative.

The thought questions presented will give you a chance to write about things that are important to you and will also give you a chance to use various techniques in your writing.

There are up to ten journal options, and you will choose five to complete. Each journal is worth 10 points and requires you to incorporate some different literary devices.

Quick review of common narrative techniques (used mainly in fiction, but may also apply in some narrative nonfiction)

dialogue: conversation between two or more characters. Remember that the characters' actual words are enclosed by quotation marks.
exposition: just telling what happens, often in summary form
description: creating sensory "images" of places, people or things
reflection: the character's thoughts, often looking back at events
point of view: who is telling the story? Is it in first person or third person? Is the narrator a character in the story, limited to knowing what that character knows, or an "omniscient" narrator who knows more than a real person in the story could?
setting: where and when is the story happening? How does this affect events or characters?
character development: do the characters seem like real people, with both good and bad qualities? How are the characters changed by events, and how do the characters' changes affect later events?
parallel plots: does the action shift back and forth between two (or more) different characters or places to show events happening at the same time? (These events may seem unrelated at first.)
subplots: additional conflicts or stories that are somehow connected to the main plot and characters, but not as important
pacing: how the author handles time and sequence - does the story skip over weeks or months? Are there flashbacks? or does everything unfold in the same, steady, chronological manner?
suspense: Is there foreshadowing of future events? Does the author switch back and forth between parallel plots at critical points in the story? Are you kept in doubt about the outcome of events?

10.01.01 Narrative Writing Practice 1 (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

You will choose one of the following journal prompts to respond to. Include the prompt at the beginning of your submission (including any special instructions).

Each should be at least 300 words in length. Pay attention to all parts of the prompt, and highlight, bold or underline the techniques required.

M.D.Vaden with one of the largest known coastal redwoods: Mdvaden, CC Attribution 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsM.D.Vaden with one of the largest known coastal redwoods: Mdvaden, CC Attribution 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

• I wish I could be like.... (Include a simile and description)

• I wish to be a ________ when I grow up. Then I will... (include a hyperbole and description)

Narrative Writing Practice Scoring Rubric

3 points= response is at least 300 words in length and on topic; includes word count

2 points= response is creative and interesting as well as descriptive and clear

2 points= any special instructions have been followed and somehow highlighted in the submission

1 point= prompt is included at the beginning of the submission

2 points= writing is relatively error free; spelling and grammar mistakes are minimal

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


10.02 Narrative Writing Practice 2 (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

You will choose one of the following journal prompts to respond to. Include the prompt at the beginning of your submission (including any special instructions).

Michael Gäbler, CC Attribution 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsMichael Gäbler, CC Attribution 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

Each should be at least 300 words in length. Pay attention to all parts of the prompt, and highlight, bold or underline the techniques required.

• I wish I could forget the time I ... because...
(include an alliteration and reflection)

• I wish I could learn... because...
(include a metaphor and reflection)

Narrative Writing Practice Scoring Rubric

3 points= response is at least 300 words in length and on topic; includes word count

2 points= response is creative and interesting as well as descriptive and clear

2 points= any special instructions have been followed and somehow highlighted in the submission

1 point= prompt is included at the beginning of the submission

2 points= writing is relatively error free; spelling and grammar mistakes are minimal

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


10.03 Narrative Writing Practice 3 (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

You will choose one of the following journal prompts to respond to. Include the prompt at the beginning of your submission (including any special instructions).

Virginia Tech's Main Eggleston Hall: UserB, GNU Free Documentation License version 1.2 via Wikimedia CommonsVirginia Tech's Main Eggleston Hall: UserB, GNU Free Documentation License version 1.2 via Wikimedia Commons

Each should be at least 300 words in length. Pay attention to all parts of the prompt, and highlight, bold or underline the techniques required.

• I wish I never...
(include an oxymoron and reflection)

• I wish I had one more chance to... Then I would... (include personification and reflection)

Narrative Writing Practice Scoring Rubric

3 points= response is at least 300 words in length and on topic; includes word count

2 points= response is creative and interesting as well as descriptive and clear

2 points= any special instructions have been followed and somehow highlighted in the submission

1 point= prompt is included at the beginning of the submission

2 points= writing is relatively error free; spelling and grammar mistakes are minimal

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


10.04 Narrative Writing Practice 4 (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

Eng11Q2.10Money: US Govt. image, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsEng11Q2.10Money: US Govt. image, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

You will choose one of the following journal prompts to respond to. Include the prompt at the beginning of your submission (including any special instructions).

Each should be at least 300 words in length. Pay attention to all parts of the prompt, and highlight, bold or underline the techniques required.

• I wish I had enough money to...
(include an allusion and description)

• I wish there were no more...
 (include a euphemism and description)

Narrative Writing Practice Scoring Rubric

2 points= response is at least 300 words in length and on topic

2 points= response is creative and interesting as well as descriptive and clear

3 points= any special instructions have been followed and somehow highlighted in the submission

1 point= prompt is included at the beginning of the submission

2 points= writing is relatively error free; spelling and grammar mistakes are minimal

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


10.05 Narrative Writing Practice 5 (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

You will choose one of the following journal prompts to respond to. Include the prompt at the beginning of your submission (including any special instructions).

Donald Emmerich, NARA, public domain via WIkimedia CommonsDonald Emmerich, NARA, public domain via WIkimedia Commons

Each should be at least 300 words in length. Pay attention to all parts of the prompt, and highlight, bold or underline the techniques required.

• Something I overheard at my high school or in my neighborhood (include dialogue and a simile)

• Something you would NEVER overhear at my school or in my neighborhood (include dialogue and hyperbole)

Narrative Writing Practice Scoring Rubric

3 points= response is at least 300 words in length and on topic; includes word count

2 points= response is creative and interesting as well as descriptive and clear

2 points= any special instructions have been followed and somehow highlighted in the submission

1 point= prompt is included at the beginning of the submission

2 points= writing is relatively error free; spelling and grammar mistakes are minimal

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


10.06 Narrative Writing (English 11)

Students will write a 600-800 word narrative on a topic related to "Conformity and Rebellion" Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

Marshall Astor, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsMarshall Astor, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

In this set of assignments, you will brainstorm on ideas about conformity and rebellion and write the first draft of a narrative. After that paper has been turned in, the teacher will give you a set of revision instructions that must be completed for you to be awarded the final grade for this paper.  You will find detailed instructions with each assignment.

 Attached is the scoring rubric for the final paper.

10.06.01 Narrative Brainstorming (English 11)

teacher-scored 5 points possible 8 minutes

Old Non-Conformist Church: Betty Longbottom, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsOld Non-Conformist Church: Betty Longbottom, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

The first assignment for this section is to brainstorm a list of at least 25 things that come to mind about “conformity and rebellion.”

Make a list of things you could write about, then narrow down your topic. Your brainstorm can be in any form: freewriting, mindwebs, lists, etc.

Narrowing down a topic can be the hardest part of writing. The key to a good narrative is a good idea and one that is manageable. Don't try to tell about your entire first date, telling every step of the day. Instead try focusing on a single moment with all the details and showing your experience. Don't overwhelm the reader with too much 'fluff'--focus on the details and be creative.

You may submit this as text, or upload an image or document.

Narrative Brainstorm Scoring Rubric

4 points= includes a list of  at least 25 possible topics/ideas 

1 point= chosen topic is somehow highlighted in the 'brainstorm'

5 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


10.07 Narrative Draft 1 (English 11)

teacher-scored 15 points possible 60 minutes

Once you have decided on a topic, please write approximately two pages (600-800 words) in narrative form.

Paul Revere's ride: from Montgomery's The Beginner's American History (1904), public domain via Wikimedia CommonsPaul Revere's ride: from Montgomery's The Beginner's American History (1904), public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Definition of narrative: a story or account of events, experiences, or the like, whether true or fictitious.  A narrative should include description, exposition, dialogue and reflection.  Remember, a story has characters, conflict and dialogue.  You are NOT writing an argument essay - you are writing a story.

Please complete this activity as a word processing document that you will upload, not something that you will copy and paste into the submission box. Include the word count at the top of your paper, directly under the title.

Draft 1 Scoring Rubric

6 points= narrative is creative and well written with a narrow focus; fits within assigned topic 

3 points= word count and title are included

4 points= required minimum word count has been met

2 points= narrative contains few conventions mistakes

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


10.08 Final Narrative Paper (English 11)

teacher-scored 40 points possible 60 minutes

From A Psalm of Life, 1892: H. Winthrop Pierce, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsFrom A Psalm of Life, 1892: H. Winthrop Pierce, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Final Paper

After you submit your first draft, the teacher will send you a list of revisions to include in the final draft. Please underline or bold the revisions in your final paper.

The final paper is worth 40 points.

Final Paper Scoring Rubric (review attached rubric)

5 Points= Narrative introduction is engaging and introduces the characters/narrator

2 Points= Narrative follows a logical development and smoothly progresses through the story

5 Points= Writer uses effective narrative techniques (ex: dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, etc.)

3 Points= Writer develops relationships, cohesion, and flow

5 Points= Word choice, style and tone are developed with precise language and literary devices

5 Points= Conclusion of the narrative is satisfying

5 Points= Writing has few or no errors in grammar and spelling

2 Points= Paper has met the minimum length requirements

8 Points= Teacher directed revisions have been included and are somehow highlighted in the text

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


11.00 Informative and Explanatory Writing (English 11)

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing from the Utah Core:

Manhattan Bridge construction, 1909: Irving Underhill, Library of Congress, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsManhattan Bridge construction, 1909: Irving Underhill, Library of Congress, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

• For students, writing is a key means of asserting and defending claims, showing what they know about a subject, and conveying what they have experienced, imagined, thought, and felt.

• To be college- and career-ready writers, students must take task, purpose, and audience into careful consideration, choosing words, information, structures and formats deliberately.

• Students need to know how to combine elements of different kinds of writing--for example, to use narrative strategies within argument and explanation within narrative—to produce complex and nuanced writing. 

• Students need to be able to use technology strategically when creating, refining, and collaborating on writing.

• Students have to become adept at gathering information, evaluating sources, and citing material accurately, reporting findings from their research and analysis of sources in a clear and cogent manner.

• Students must have the flexibility, concentration, and fluency to produce high-quality first-draft text under a tight deadline as well as the capacity to revisit and make improvements to a piece of writing over multiple drafts when circumstances encourage or require it.

11.01 Research Quiz (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

Take the research review quiz.  You may take it three times, but you must score at least 70%.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


11.02 Compare/Contrast Paper (English 11)

Students will use research skills to learn how to write a compare/contrast research paper Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

Compare/ Contrast Assignment

Mimi & Eunice, “Compare”: Nina Paley, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsMimi & Eunice, “Compare”: Nina Paley, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

In this set of assignments, you will be researching and writing a comparison/contrast essay in which you will evaluate the two things being compared based on criteria you choose.  Here are the steps you will follow.  Specific instructions are in each of the two assignments.

1. Please choose two things you are interested in comparing. You may want to consider something you would like to purchase in the near future (car, electronics) or something that just interests you (sports teams, bands, places to vacation).

2. Next, find four articles or informative pieces that can help you discuss your topics with more authority.

3. Make an annotation for each article. An annotation includes the bibliographic information and a short summary of the information found in the source.

4. After you have read and annotated the articles, consider the criteria you will use to make the comparison. 

5. When you have finished your research, you are to write a two-page comparison paper. (500-700 words) The first paragraph or section should introduce the things you are comparing and then you should list your criteria for comparing the two. The body paragraphs should focus on your criteria for comparison (you will have at least four body paragraphs--one for each criteria). Your last paragraph should indicate which of the two things you prefer.

These sites have suggestions for how to write a comparison/contrast essay.

11.02.01 Compare/ Contrast Essay Examples (English 11)

11.03 Compare/Contrast Research (English 11)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 60 minutes

You need to find four references for your Compare/ Contrast paper and then make an annotation for each.

Tomasz Sienicki, CC Attribution 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsTomasz Sienicki, CC Attribution 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

An annotation includes the correct bibliographic information and a short summary of what you read. Include the page numbers for any quotations, or for facts or statistics.

Each annotation is worth 5 points.

Please complete this assignment on a word processing document and turn in all four annotations together in one document. You will upload the file in the assignment section.

Example:

(Bibliographic information) McPherson, James. To the Best of My Ability: The American Presidents. Dorling- Kindersley: New York, 2001.

(Descriptive Paragraph) This book is an excellent look at the highlight of each President. It contain nearly 500 pages of amazing information that is detailed enough to avoid triviality yet is simple and easy to read. To the Best of My Ability is an outstanding reference book but also includes little known facts about each president. One of my favorite features of this book is the use of specific quotations stated by each president. This book also contains some great pictures of each president. Another handy feature are the side bars which includes tidbits of information such as date of birth, party affiliation, and the major events of the presidency. Each president’s section details their presidency from beginning to end. I choose to look specifically at Richard Nixon for my report. One interesting thing I learned about Nixon was that “in spite of his known flaws, a lot of Americans obviously did like him (267). I was also surprised to read a remark by Adlai Stevenson that “this is a man of many masks… who can say they have seen his real face” (269).

Scoring Rubric

5 Points for each annotation= 20 points

2 points for correction bibliographic information

3 points for summary paragraph

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


11.04 Compare/ Contrast Final Paper (English 11)

teacher-scored 32 points possible 100 minutes

Orange, clementine, and mini-mandarin: Ericpware CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported licenseOrange, clementine, and mini-mandarin: Ericpware CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license

Now that you have done a bit of research on your topics, you are ready to write the final paper.

The key to a good compare/contrast is to have solid criteria for your discussion. There are many examples of criteria for comparing cars: cost, availability, insurance premiums, fuel efficiency, stereo system, passenger seating, safety, appearance. Likewise, there are many examples of criteria for comparing sports teams: players, mascot, past success, current records, host city, stadium, budget. You should have at least four criteria to use to make your comparison, but probably not more than five or six.

Your paper should be organized as follows:

The first paragraph or section should introduce the things you are comparing and list your criteria for comparing the two.
The body paragraphs should focus on your criteria for comparison (you will have at least four body paragraphs--one for each criteria).
Your last paragraph should indicate which of the two things you prefer, based on the criteria.

Of course, you should cite your sources.
This paper should be between 500-700 words. You will complete this assignment on a word processing document and upload it in the assignment section.

Rubric:
3 Points=Opening paragraph introduces the compare/contrast elements (four to five criteria) and organizes ideas, concepts, and information.
8 Points= Each body paragraph discusses a chosen criteria in detail and develops the compare/contrast thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information
5 Points= Use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships
5 Points=Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone; uses precise language and content-specific vocabulary
3 Points=Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented
5 Points=Has few or no errors in conventions, grammar or usage
3 Points= Paper is between 500-700 words; word count is included; MLA style citations

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


11.05 Letter to Representative (English 11)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 45 minutes

 

Former Utah legislator and governor Olene Walker: Public domain via Wikimedia CommonsFormer Utah legislator and governor Olene Walker: Public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Every year your local, state and national elected representatives vote on laws that will affect everyone in your area.  For this assignment, choose an issue that affects you and on which you have an opinion, and write a letter to the appropriate elected official.  The instructions below will help you find Utah state legislators, but you may choose your local school board member, city council, or county commission instead, or write to one of our national representatives in Congress. 

Please choose an issue that directly pertains to you or your family, and write to an official who is in a position to affect that.  For example:

 If you are planning to enter the military, or you have a family member in the military, and you want to write about the wars in Iraq or Afghanistan, write to one of your national senators or representatives, not to a state or local official.  If you want to write in support of the opportunities EHS has given you, write to your state representative.  If you want to write about a local recreation program for teens, write to a member of your city council (or whatever body governs your city).

1. Write a first draft of your letter and submit the assignment. Your teacher will then give you feedback and suggestions for improvement. (This is worth 10 of the 30 total points for the assignment)

2. After you get feedback and make the changes, find the email address for your elected representative. You should address him or her by office (Representative, Senator, Mayor, Commissioner, or other official title) and last name. 

3. Create an email message to representative. You should put your letter in the body of the email rather than as an attachment. Email addresses for Utah legislators can be found at (le.utah.gov). Click on the top link on the left side title, legislators, and then "find by address or map" to find yours. If you cannot find your legislator, email me, and I will help you, or ask your parents; they should know who your local legislator is.

4. As you create your message, make sure to include your teacher’s email address in the BCC address box. You will not get the additional 20 points for this assignment if you neglect this step in the process.  Make sure to resubmit your letter through Canvas/Learn (where assignments are submitted) in order to receive credit for this assignment. 

Scoring Rubric
10 Points= Letter is at least three paragraphs in length and includes a main idea about the issue and specific evidence (reasons, statistics, quotes, etc). (Draft 1). Teacher will give editing suggestions and you may have to resubmit the draft of the letter again before sending it.
Final Letter* (20 Points) :
7 Points= Letter is at least three paragraphs in length and includes a constructive suggestion and/or specific reasons.
3 Points= Word choice and discussion are appropriate for the audience
3 Points= Letter correctly addresses the representative
2 Points= Letter is sent to appropriate level of government to deal with the issue
2 Points= Your name is included at the end of the letter
3 Points= Letter is free from grammar and spelling errors
*Note: You cannot get the remaining points unless the letter is received by the teacher as a BCC through email.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


12.00 Argumentative Writing and Informational Text (English 11)

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing from the Utah Core:

Artist's logarithmic scale conception of the observable universe, from Earth: Pablo Carlos Budassi, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsArtist's logarithmic scale conception of the observable universe, from Earth: Pablo Carlos Budassi, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

• For students, writing is a key means of asserting and defending claims, showing what they know about a subject and conveying what they have experienced, imagined, thought and felt.

• To be college- and career-ready writers, students must take task, purpose, and audience into careful consideration, choosing words, information, structures, and formats deliberately.

• Students need to know how to combine elements of different kinds of writing--for example, to use narrative strategies within argument and explanation within narrative—to produce complex and nuanced writing.

• Students need to be able to use technology strategically when creating, refining, and collaborating on writing.

• Students have to become adept at gathering information, evaluating sources, and citing material accurately, reporting findings from their research and analysis of sources in a clear and cogent manner.

• Students must have the flexibility, concentration, and fluency to produce high-quality first-draft text under a tight deadline as well as the capacity to revisit and make improvements to a piece of writing over multiple drafts when circumstances encourage or require it.

12.01 Reading Informational Text: Editorial (English 11)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 35 minutes

Editorial/ Letter to the Editor Response

Serena Williams, US Open 2009: Christian Mesiano, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic licenseSerena Williams, US Open 2009: Christian Mesiano, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license

Read the article from USA Today: "Billie Jean King: Keep successful Title IX strong" about women and sports equality (see link below).

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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1. What problem does the author present in the article? What is her main claim?(2 points)
2. How could this problem potentially affect you? (2 points)
3. Who else does the problem affect? (2 points)
4. What is the cause of the problem? (2 points)
5. What is the effect of the problem? (2 points)
6. Who is the audience? (2 points)
7. What solutions (if any) does the author present in the article? (2 points)
8. What other solutions can you come up with for the problem presented by the author? (2 points)
9. Does the author make a valid statement? Why or why not? (2 points)
10. Write a one-paragraph response to the author of the article stating your opinion. (7 points)

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Scoring Rubric

2 Points each= Questions 1-9

7 Points= Question 10

25 Points total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


12.02 Reading Informational Text (English 11)

teacher-scored 18 points possible 35 minutes

2012 Division II Far East Soccer Tournament: Public domain, USMC image via Wikimedia Commons2012 Division II Far East Soccer Tournament: Public domain, USMC image via Wikimedia Commons

Read the article from the Deseret News "Popularity of club soccer among girls still climbing--but not without a price"

Respond to the questions below.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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Respond to each question for the article:
1. What is the author’s argument/ suggestion? (5 points)
2. What key points (include 3) does the author make to support his/her argument? (6 points)
3. Do you agree or disagree with the author? Explain your position. (4 points)
4. List three of the author’s points that really made you reconsider your own opinion about this topic. (3 points)

18 Points Total

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


12.03 Reading Informational Text (English 11)

teacher-scored 18 points possible 35 minutes

19th World Military Wrestling Championships: Staff Sergeant Larry A. Simmons, USAF, public domain via Wikimedia Commons19th World Military Wrestling Championships: Staff Sergeant Larry A. Simmons, USAF, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Read the article from USA Today "Title IX Defeats Male Athletes"

Respond to the questions below.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

************************************************************************************

Respond to each question for the article:

1. What is the author’s argument/ suggestion? (5 points)
2. What key points (include three) does the author make to support his/her argument? (6 points)
3. Do you agree or disagree with the author? Explain your position. (4 points)
4. List three of the author’s points that really made you reconsider your own opinion about this topic. (3 points)

18 Points Total

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


12.04 Directed Research Paper (English 11)

Students will write an argumentative research paper on topic chosen by the teacher. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Directed Research Paper Topic: Does Title IX discriminate against male athletes?

Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 states that "No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance."

Equestrian events, the only Olympic competition where men and women compete together (Beezie Madden and Will Simpson, gold medalists): Craig Maccubbin, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsEquestrian events, the only Olympic competition where men and women compete together (Beezie Madden and Will Simpson, gold medalists): Craig Maccubbin, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

Since its passing, the law has greatly impacted high school and college sports and significantly increased opportunities for female athletes. There has always been controversy about the interpretation and enforcement of Title IX. Colleges could show they were compliant with Title IX in one of three ways: demonstrate that women's participation in sports is proportional to their enrollment, show that the school is expanding the number of sports teams for women, or show that the school is meeting the interests and abilities of women. Schools were allowed to use emailed surveys to satisfy the requirement that they were meeting the interests of female students.

In April 2010, the Department of Education modified the compliance rules so that schools can no longer rely solely on a survey of female students to meet Title IX requirements. While opportunities for women have increased under Title IX, many feel that its requirements have led to fewer opportunities for male athletes and a reduction in the number of sports teams for men.(SIRS)

In this set of assignments, first you will write an essay based on your opinion after reading the previous assigned articles. Then you will do additional research, develop a pro/con chart, and finally, revise your essay into a more complete research paper.

12.04.01 Directed Research Essay (English 11)

teacher-scored 19 points possible 60 minutes

Activity: Write a five paragraph essay responding to the prompt "Does Title IX discriminate against male athletes?"

Senator Bayh exercises with Title IX athletes, c. 1970's: Senate Office, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsSenator Bayh exercises with Title IX athletes, c. 1970's: Senate Office, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Base your essay on your own experiences and  opinions after reading the previously assigned articles.

Essay Scoring Rubric

5 points= student uses the five paragraph model to organize the essay.

3 points= student develops a clear thesis statement

5 points= student uses enough discussion and detail to support the thesis

3 points= student avoids statements such as "I believe" and "I think"

3 points= essay has minimal spelling and grammar mistakes

(21 Points Total)

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


12.05 Directed Research Paper Articles (English 11)

teacher-scored 51 points possible 150 minutes

The next section of this project requires you to read three more articles about the topic.

High school football: Rick Dikeman, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsHigh school football: Rick Dikeman, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

Choose one pro article and one con article from the links below and then find one article on your own.  You may use Pioneer Library or other credible sources.

You will need to accurately cite all of your sources for your paper using MLA format.  EBSCO has a tool to use for citing sources from there. For other sources, you may want to use a site such as citationmachine.net to help you with accurate citations.  If you need to review this information, it can be found in Unit 5.

After reading each article, you will answer the questions below. Please use a word processing program to type your responses in a single document and then turn in all together as an attachment. Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document to help you complete the requirements for the assignment.

************************************************************************************

Respond to each question for each article:

1. What is the author’s argument/ suggestion? (2 points)
2. What key points does the author make to support his/her argument? (2 points)
3. Do you agree or disagree with the author? Explain your position. (3 points)
4. List three of the author’s points that really made you reconsider your own opinion about this topic. (3 points)
5. Directly quote two sections of the text you could use in your essay. (4 points)
6. Explain why you think this author is a credible source. (2 points)
7. Include the correct MLA documentation for each source. (3 points)

16 Points for each article= 48 Points total

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


12.06 Pro/ Con Chart for Directed Research Paper (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

Mysid, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsMysid, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

The next step in this assignment is to create a pro/con chart based on the research you have done.

List at least five pros and five cons for this issue. 

Scoring Rubric:

1 point for each pro argument

1 point for each con argument

10 Points total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


12.07 Directed Research Final Paper (English 11)

teacher-scored 34 points possible 100 minutes

Now, you get to take your original five-paragraph essay and revise it into a complete argumentative research paper.

Lacrosse: Daniel Steger, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic licenseLacrosse: Daniel Steger, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license

Your final paper should be between 600-800 words. You must also incorporate directly cited text from your articles and include the correct MLA references and a works cited list. You should have at least five text citations in your final paper.

See the attached rubric for details about grading. Below is a simplified version of the rubric.

Scoring Rubric

3 Points= Introduces precise, knowledgeable claim and establishes significance
5 Points=Develops claims and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly; supplies most relevant data and evidence
5 Points=Uses words, clauses and phrases, as well as varied syntax, to link major sections of the text, create cohesion and clarify the relationships between claims and reasons
5 Points=Establishes and maintains a smooth, formal style and objective tone; words and phrases such as "I believe" and "I think" are non-existent
3 Points= Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented
5 Points=Has few or no errors in conventions, grammar or usage
5 Points=Lists and appropriately cites credible, relevant, authoritative sources
3 Points= Paper is adequate in length and word count is included

34 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


12.08 Final Research Paper (English 11)

Students will write a final research paper using the skills they have built through the course. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Stephen Hawking: NASA image, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsStephen Hawking: NASA image, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

 

For the last set of assignments, your job is to research the following topic:

Perseverance is a steady effort to maintain a course of action, purpose or belief, often in spite of difficulty. Write a speech for a school assembly about the meaning of perseverance as it applies to personal success.

Wing-Chi Poon, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsWing-Chi Poon, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

 

You may use any of the following quotations as well as your own experiences, observations, and readings.

 

"The greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time you fall." Source: Nelson Mandela

"Pain is temporary. It may last a minute, or an hour, or a day, or a year, but eventually it will subside and something else will take its place. If I quit, however, it lasts forever." Source: Lance Armstrong

"I would go and look at a stone cutter hammering away at his rock perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred and first blow it would split in two, and I knew it was not that blow that did it, but all that had gone before." Source: Jacob A. Riis

"Do not think of today's failures, but of the success that may come tomorrow. Remember no effort that we make to attain something beautiful is ever lost. Sometime, somewhere, somehow we shall find that which we seek." Source: Helen Keller

"It’s not that I’m so smart; it’s just that I stay with problems longer." Source: Albert Einstein

"If you run into a wall, don’t turn around and give up. Figure out how to climb it, go through it, or work around it." Source: Michael Jordan

12.08.01 Final Paper Research (English 11)

teacher-scored 51 points possible 90 minutes

Leafcutter ant carrying a piece of a leaf: Adrian Pingstone, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsLeafcutter ant carrying a piece of a leaf: Adrian Pingstone, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Prompt: Perseverance is a steady effort to maintain a course of action, purpose, or belief, often in spite of difficulty. Write a speech for a school assembly about the meaning of perseverance as it applies to personal success.

Research three articles that would help you make a claim on this topic.  You may use the article listed below, Pioneer Library, or other sources for your research.

You will need to accurately cite all of your sources for this assignment using MLA format.  EBSCO has a tool to use for citing sources from there. For other sources, you may want to use a site such as citationmachine.net for help with accurately citing sources.  If you need to review this information, it can be found in Unit 5.

After reading each article, you will answer the questions below.

Please use a word processing program to type your responses in a single document and then turn in all together as an attachment. Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document to help you complete the assignment.

*********************************************************************

 

Respond to each question for each article:

1. What is the author’s main claim?  Summarize it in your own words. (2 points)
2. What evidence or key points does the author use to support his/her argument? (2 points)
3. Do you agree or disagree with the author? Explain your position. (3 points)
4. List  three of the author’s points that really made you think about your own opinion about this topic. These can be ideas that support or conflict with your initial opinion. If there weren't any, you should probably choose a different article. (3 points)
5. Directly quote two sections of the text you could use in your essay (to support either your claim or a counter claim). (4 points)
6. Explain why you think this author is a credible source. (2 points)
7. Include the correct MLA documentation for each source. (3 points)

16 Points for each article= 48 Points total

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


12.09 Final Research Paper (English 11)

teacher-scored 34 points possible 100 minutes

Using your research, write a paper which outlines your claim about the topic Perseverance is a steady effort to maintain a course of action, purpose, or belief, often in spite of difficulty. Write a speech for a school assembly about the meaning of perseverance as it applies to personal success.

Your final paper should be between 500-700 words. You must incorporate directly cited text from your research and include the correct MLA reference. You should have at least five text citations in your final paper. See the attached rubric for details about grading. Below is a simplified version of the rubric.

Scoring Rubric

Swimmers at Mittelmosel Triathlon 2012: Winzerboy, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsSwimmers at Mittelmosel Triathlon 2012: Winzerboy, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

3 Points= Introduces precise, knowledgeable claim and establishes significance
5 Points=Develops claims and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly; supplies most relevant data and evidence
5 Points=Uses words, clauses and phrases, as well as varied syntax, to link major sections of the text, create cohesion and clarify the relationships between claims and reasons
5 Points=Establishes and maintains a smooth, formal style and objective tone; words and phrases such as "I believe" and "I think" are non-existent
3 Points= Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented
5 Points=Has few or no errors in conventions, grammar or usage
5 Points=Lists and appropriately cites credible, relevant, authoritative sources
3 Points= Paper is adequate in length and word count is included

34 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.