Skip navigation.

1st Quarter, Language Arts 11

0.00 Start Here (English 11)

Course Description

The skills and understandings students are expected to demonstrate in this class have wide applicability outside the classroom or workplace. 

In this class, students:

  • undertake the close, attentive reading that is at the heart of understanding and enjoying complex works of literature. 
  • habitually perform the critical reading necessary to pick carefully through the staggering amount of information available today in print and digitally. 
  • actively seek the wide, deep, and thoughtful engagement with high-quality literary and informational texts that builds knowledge, enlarges experience, and broadens worldviews.
  • reflexively demonstrate the cogent reasoning and use of evidence that is essential to both private deliberation and responsible citizenship in a democratic republic. 

In short, students who meet the the requirements in this class develop the skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening that are the foundation for any creative and purposeful expression in language.

Class Overview

This is a one quarter (.25 credit) class. You will work on your reading, research, writing, viewing, listening and speaking skills, as specified in the Utah State Core Curriculum for Language Arts.

WHAT THIS CLASS IS: This class is another way for you to earn your English 11 credit instead of attending a class in a physical high classroom. If you can't fit the class into your schedule at your regular school; if you can't attend your regular school because of illness, injury, safe school violations, or participation in activities that require extensive travel; if you failed the class and need to make it up; if you want to get ahead--this class can help you.
Make sure to check with your home high school counselor to find out exactly what credit you need.

This class is an open-entry, open-exit class. That means you can enroll at any time of the year, and finish the class as fast as you can get all the work done. However, you have just ten weeks after enrolling to finish (there may be some exceptions if you have an IEP). Begin as soon as you have enrolled. In order to finish in eight-nine weeks ( the length of a regular school quarter) you should plan on spending 6-12 hours a week working on it. The exact amount of time you need to spend will depend on how fast you can read, how much you already know, and how well you focus while you are working.

Read this (Start Here) whole page and the Required Resources page, and then begin reading the course material in the first unit. If you check the syllabus, you will see that each assignment tells you when you should be finished with it, relative to when you started (for instance, by the end of your first week, second week, third week, etc). Plan a schedule for working on your assignments and keep at it!

WHAT THIS CLASS IS NOT: This class is NOT an easy way to get your English credit without doing real work. If that is what you are looking for, you will be disappointed. You may be able to finish this class in fewer weeks than you would spend in a regular class--but only if you put in lots of hours each week.

PREREQUISITES

At least 10th grade level reading and writing skills. This is not a remedial course. To take this class, you will need to use a computer with internet access. You will also need:

  • A working e-mail address which you check regularly (Make sure you give us the correct, exact e-mail address; and make sure the "Reply-to" settings in your e-mail are set up correctly, or you will not get information the teacher tries to send you.)
  • Word processing software to type your assignments. Microsoft Word is best. Some other programs (such as the free Open Office) will let you save your work as .rtf files (rich text format), .doc or .txt, which also work. Microsoft Works is not compatible with my computer or programs.
  • Books (which you may buy, or borrow from a library near you) - see the lists in the Student Supplies section for the titles of books you will need for the term; remember, if you don't want to buy a book, and your local library doesn't have it, most public libraries will order a book for you on interlibrary loan, for just the cost of postage.
  • 1- 2 video/DVD's (which you may buy, rent, or borrow from a library)
  • you will need the time and motivation to do quite a bit of reading, studying and writing
  • Acrobat Reader, QuickTime reader, and a PowerPoint reader (all available free online) You might want to get a copy of the book Writer's Inc published by Great Source to use as a reference book. You will find this book useful in your other high school and college English classes, or whenever you need to write a paper.

How You Will Be Graded

You earn points for doing assignments in this class. Each assignment has a maximum number of points you can earn if you do an excellent job on that assignment. You must do all assignments. You can also submit a revised, improved version of an assignment to get more points for it. Your final grade is determined by your average on assignments, and how you do on the final test. The assignments and quizzes count 75%, and the final test counts 25%.

Grading scale

A 92-100; A- 90-91; B+ 87-89; B 82-86 ; B- 80-81; C+ 77-79; C 72-76; C- 68-71; D+ 66-68; D 62-65; D- 60-61; No credit - below 60.

As with all EHS classes, you must also pass a proctored final test at the end of the class. If you score below 60% on the final, you will fail the class and not earn credit. You may not re-take just the final test, although you may re-take the whole class. If you score at least 60% on the final test, your score on the final will be averaged with your scores for class assignments and quizzes to determine your grade in the class. Note that you can't retake the final to try to raise your grade. If you do the bare minimum on assignments, you can expect to get scores around 70-80% (that's C to B range, for those of you who are used to letters); if you want to get maximum points (A's), you need to 'go the extra mile': show me some creativity and depth of understanding, as well as being meticulous about proofreading your work to make it correct.
 

Final Test

When you have finished all the assignments you need for your credit, you will take the final test under the supervision of a proctor approved by the EHS. You must pass the final with at least 60% to pass the class.

About Homework

Writing Assignments For the shorter writing assignments (such as the sentence workshops), you will get full points if you have followed the directions accurately and completely. For longer assignments (essays, stories, etc), rubrics specify how you will be graded. My goal is to have your assignments scored within two working days or less. If it has been more than three working days since you sent an assignment, and you haven't received a score or message from me, I may not have gotten it. E-mail me or use the class message tool to ask about it. On writing assignments, I will usually send you scores (based on a rubric) and a general comment or two. If you want more detailed comments and corrections so that you can more easily revise the piece and re-submit it to try to raise your score, put a double star (**) on the title, or just send me a request with the assignment.

Class plagiarism policy

Plagiarism is copying someone else's writing, either the exact words or copying the general organization and paraphrasing some of the ideas. Copying someone else's sentences, phrases or organization of ideas and failing to give credit to the original author is plagiarism. In some papers it is appropriate to quote a short section of someone else's exact words, but when you do, that section needs to be set off in quotation marks or otherwise set apart, and the author identified either in a sentence, or in a parenthetical note. Plagiarism is unlawful and unethical, and against the EHS Honor Code. If you turn in a plagiarized assignment, you will receive ONE warning. If the problem recurs, you will be dropped from the class with no credit.

How to turn in homework

IMPORTANT: always put your first and last name, and the quarter, on all your homework. Send in each assignment as you finish it. DO NOT save up all your work and send it all at once. It is OK to send two or three assignments together. It is not OK to send fifteen or twenty assignments together. Do your homework in a simple word processor on your computer. Paste in the directions from the assignment, complete the work in your document, and save it to your computer. THEN copy and paste it into the "edit my submission" window on the assignment page or into an e-mail. If you type your homework on a computer, you can turn it in one of three ways: 1) For most assignments, you will copy and paste your work into the window provided in the assignment section, or, in a few cases, attach it there. OR 2) E-mail it to me OR 3) As a last resort, you can also mail your homework the old-fashioned way (remember it will take about four days to get to me)

IMPORTANT: However you turn in your homework, always, always save and keep a copy yourself.
Please review my comments on your homework or quizzes before you re-write or re-take and re-submit them.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • When can I enroll? When there is space available in the class, students can enroll any time. If the class is full (which doesn't happen very often), your name will be added to a waiting list. DON'T submit more requests trying to get in faster. Every time you submit a new request for the class, your previous request is deleted, effectively moving you to the bottom of the list.
  • How do I stay in the class? Submit at least three assignments each week, and finish by the tenth week after you enroll.
  • What does it take to get credit, or a grade? Your final grade will be determined by the percentage you have before you take the final, and how you do on the final. In order to qualify to take the final test, you must have passed all quizzes with at least the listed minimum score, which is usually around 80-85% (you can re-take the quizzes as needed till you get a passing score), AND you must have met the listed minimum score for all assignments (remember, you can revise and resubmit assignments for which you want a higher score). As with all EHS classes, you must pass a proctored final test at the end of the class.
  • Is everything I need on the computer in the class website? No. This is not a totally self-contained class. You will need to get books and videos, and use the internet to complete some assignments.
  • . How fast can I finish? You must begin submitting assignments at least three weeks before you finish. Most students take the full nine to ten weeks to finish the class.
  • How do I finish and get my credit to my school? After you have passed all quizzes and assignments, submit the "Ready" assignment. Then follow the directions given in the "Arranging to take my final proctored test" link (near the bottom of the class topic outline page). The morning after you have entered your proctor's information, and I have put a score of '1' on the Ready assignment, your proctor will receive an e-mail with the password to the final test. After you have passed the final, your school should receive your credit within a couple weeks, although during the May rush it could take longer.
  • What if I don't finish, or want to drop the class? We really want you to finish the class and earn credit! However, if you no longer need the class and want to be dropped, we understand. E-mail me and I will remove you from the class.
  • Why can't I access anything in Module 3? You need to visit all the pages listed in Module 1 & 2, read that information, and submit your "About Me" assignment before you can start work in Module 3.

00.00 Start Here (English 11)

00.01 About Me (English 11)

teacher-scored 12 points possible 10 minutes

About Me Questions

Copy and Paste the questions between the asterisks into a word processing document; complete the assignment, save it, and then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

******************************************************************************************

1.What city do you live in?

2. What is your favorite book?

3. What high school do you attend?

4. How many siblings do you have?

5. What is the last movie you saw?

6. What is your favorite flavor of ice cream?

7. Do you understand and agree to abide by the EHS Honor Code:   "As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers, and staff with respect." ?

8. What is your favorite school subject?

9. How many EHS classes have you taken (not counting this one)?

10. Are you committed to finishing this class within ten weeks (take your final test in the ninth week after you enroll)?

11.  Now, tell me three things about yourself that you think I need to know…

***************************************************************************************

About Me Scoring Rubric

10 Points= adequate response to all 10 questions

2 Points= other relevant information is included

12 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


00.01.01 Student Software Needs

 

Students need access to a robust internet connection and a modern web browser.

This class may also require the Apple QuickTime plug-in to view media.

For students using a school-issued Chromebook, ask your technical support folks to download the QuickTime plug-in and enable the plug-in for your Chromebook.

$0.00

01.00 Vocabulary and Grammar

Students work on robots at Cañada College: Hoodr image, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsStudents work on robots at Cañada College: Hoodr image, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language from the Utah Core:

• To be college and career ready in language, students must have firm control over the conventions of Standard English.

• Students must also have extensive vocabularies, built through reading and study, enabling them to comprehend complex texts and engage in purposeful writing about and conversations around content.

• Students need to become skilled in determining or clarifying the meaning of words and phrases they encounter, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies to aid them.

• Students must learn to see an individual word as part of a network of other words—words, for example, that have similar denotations but different connotations.

• The inclusion of Language standards in students' own strand should not be taken as an indication that skills related to conventions, effective language use, and vocabulary are unimportant to reading, writing, speaking, and listening; indeed, they are inseparable from such contexts.

01.01 Vocabulary Activities (English 11)

Students will learn 30 new vocabulary words and be able to use them daily in their writing and speaking Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

 

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English: Victor Korniyenko, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsOxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English: Victor Korniyenko, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

The vocabulary section of this quarter is divided into three sections, each with ten words. You will do a writing activity and a quiz for each of the word sets. You do not have to complete them all at once (like everything in this course, you can decide the pace and order in which you work).

Why Study Vocabulary? (from verbalworkout.com)

Words are the tools we use to think and communicate - and this in an age when thinking and communicating are more important than strength and dexterity. At a personal level, a versatile vocabulary helps a man to woo a woman. It helps us to heed the philosophers’ advice to lead a “considered life.” Materially, a large vocabulary helps an artist describe the right shade of blue. It helps a student understand the textbook, and helps a leader manipulate concepts to formulate and share a vision. In words of Sebastian Wren, imagine if your reading required understanding this passage of text: While hortenting efrades the populace of the vaderbee class, most experts concur that a scrivant rarely endeavors to decry the ambitions and shifferings of the moulant class. Deciding whether to oxant the blatantly maligned Secting party, most moulants will tolerate the subjugation of staits, savats, or tempets only so long as the scrivant pays tribute to the derivan, either through preem or exaltation.

In addition, your vocabulary makes an early impression. People judge you by the words you use and understand. It's no surprise that an extensive vocabulary is highly correlated with academic and professional success.

01.01.01 Vocabulary Set 1 (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Four Dancing Muses: Zoan Andrea, circa 1497, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsFour Dancing Muses: Zoan Andrea, circa 1497, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Vocabulary Assignment

You will be given three sets of ten words to learn and use in this course.

Personally, when I need to find a definition for a word, I first look to a thesaurus. Sometimes dictionaries are hard to understand, and a single word of the same meaning is sometimes more helpful to develop understanding of a new word. Feel free to use whatever resources you find most helpful. For each set of words you will complete an activity and a quiz. There will be vocabulary questions on the final test as well.  I recommend taking the quizzes after completing the activities because they're all from the same question bank.  In other words, you'll need to know all of the vocabulary words before you take the quizzes. 

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment and copy and paste it back into the submission box.

*************************************************************************** 

Vocabulary Set 1

1. artifice
2. craven
3. exhilarate
4. inclement
5. muse
6. negligible
7. perpetuate
8. punitive
9. redress (hint:  revenge, avenge or retaliate are not good synonyms)
10. sojourn

Set 1 Activity (10 Points): Find a synonym for each of the above words. Your assignment should include both the vocabulary word and its synonym.

*********************************************************************************** 

Assignment Example:

1. happy= jovial

Scoring Rubric

5 points= correct synonym for each vocabulary word (1/2 point each)

3 points= followed the directions and included both the vocabulary word and the synonym

2 points= spelling errors are non-existent

10 points total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.01.01 Vocabulary Set 1 Quiz (English 11)

computer-scored 10 points possible 4 minutes

Complete the quiz on this vocabulary set.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.02 Vocabulary Set 2 (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

The house skulks behind a beech hedge.: Ben Harris, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsThe house skulks behind a beech hedge.: Ben Harris, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

You will be given three sets of ten words to learn and use in this course. Personally, when I need to find a definition for a word, I first look to a thesaurus. Sometimes dictionaries are hard to understand, and a single word of the same meaning is sometimes more helpful to develop understanding of a new word. Feel free to use whatever resources you find most helpful. For each set of words you will complete an activity and a quiz. There will be vocabulary questions on the final test as well.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment and then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

***************************************************************************************

Vocabulary Set 2

1. ascertain
2. cogent
3. expunge
4. finite
5. nonchalant
6. omniscient
7. scrupulous
8. skulk
9. supercilious
10. uncanny

Set 2 Activity (10 Points): Using “Google” or a similar search tool*, find an example of each word used in a sentence. Include each sample sentence in your assignment. Using the context clues to guide you, write a definition or synonym for each vocabulary word. Use other resources for help if the context does not make the meaning clear.

(*Note: I clicked on the “News” button in the Google search engine which made it much easier to find a sentence rather than just a plethora of dictionary sites)

*****************************************************************************************

Assignment Example

1. The angry customer shouted at the waitress until she burst into tears. Angry means upset or irritated.

Vocabulary Set 2 Rubric

5 Points= each vocabulary word is used in a sentence (1/2 point each)

5 Points= each vocabulary word is defined by the student (1/2 point each)

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.02.01

01.02.01 Vocabulary Quiz 2 (English 11)

computer-scored 10 points possible 4 minutes

Complete the quiz on this vocabulary set.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.03 Vocabulary Set 3 (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Raw garlic has a pungent odor.: Donovan Govan, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons.Raw garlic has a pungent odor.: Donovan Govan, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons.

You will be given three sets of ten words to learn and use in this course. Personally, when I need to find a definition for a word, I first look to a thesaurus. Sometimes dictionaries are hard to understand, and a single word of the same meaning is sometimes more helpful to develop understanding of a new word. Feel free to use whatever resources you find most helpful. For each set of words you will complete an activity and a quiz. There will be vocabulary questions on the final test as well.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment and copy and paste it back into the submission box.

*******************************************************

Vocabulary Set 3

1. altruistic
2. clemency
3. dearth
4. diffident
5. discrepancy
6. infallible
7. pungent
8. repose
9. temerity
10. unfeigned

Set 3 Activity (10 Points):

Write a short, creative story using each of the vocabulary words in one story.  Please highlight the vocabulary words in your story.  If the meaning of the word is not clear in its usage, you will lose points. Please do not use sentences like “I don’t know what the word corpulent means.”   

******************************************************* 

Vocabulary Set 3 Rubric

5 Points= Each word has been used correctly in a sentence (1/2 point each)

3 Points= Story is in paragraph form

2 Points= Writing contains few mistakes

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.03.01 Vocabulary Quiz 3 (English 11)

computer-scored 10 points possible 4 minutes

Complete the quiz on this vocabulary set.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.04 Sentence Combining (English 11)

Students will practice varying their syntax and structure for better sentence fluency. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

Metayel image, released by author into public domain via Wikimedia CommonsMetayel image, released by author into public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Make sure to view all links below in order to fully understand how to combine sentences.  Most students struggle with this, view the links before completing the assignment. 

Good sentences are the building blocks of your writing.

When you were first learning to write, you probably wrote very short, simple sentences like these:

Yesterday was my birthday.

I got presents.

I got a mountain bike.

We had cake.

We had ice cream.

Now you would probably combine all these ideas into a single sentence like this one:

Yesterday for my birthday we had cake and ice cream, and I got presents, including a mountain bike.

As you combine more ideas into a single sentence, one tool for helping your sentences flow smoothly and make sense is parallel structure: similar patterns of words.  The human brain loves patterns and repetition!

 Parallel structure involves repeating the same pattern of words when two or more ideas of equal importance are functioning in the same way in the sentence (or paragraph).

 Here are some examples and non-examples:

Parallel:  

Spending time with family and making time for friends are both important. [Both ideas use a gerund modified by a prepositional phrase.]

It's important both to spend time with family and to make time for friends. [Both ideas use an infinitive modified by a prepositional phrase.]

Most teens enjoy their first relationship and survive their first break-up in high school. [Both ideas use a verb and direct object.]

Margaret, first begging not to go and then shrieking on every drop and curve, claimed she was never getting on a roller coaster again. [Both ideas use an adverb, then a participle phrase.]

I checked off the items on my list:  finishing my homework, weeding the garden, and baking cookies. [All three ideas use a gerund phrase.]

Not parallel:

Spending time with family and to make time for friends are both important. [One idea uses a gerund, and the other uses an infinitive.]

I checked off the items on my list:  finishing my homework, to weed the garden, and baking cookies. [A gerund, an infinitive, and another gerund.]

For more about parallel structure, see the link below.

Please view all websites before completing assignment. 

01.04.01 Sentence Combining Practice (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

AcromegalyAcromegaly

Sentence Combining Activity

This activity is designed to help your sentence fluency. Combine each set of sentences into a single sentence that uses parallel structure where possible. When you are finished, you will have ten sentences.

Example

1.1 The sun came off the water
1.2 The sun glinted in the green eddies
1.3 The sun glittered in the green eddies.

Combined Sentence: The sun came off the water, glinting and glimmering in the green eddies.

Now complete the following activity. You do not need to submit the sentence 'sets' in your submission. Please just include sentences 1-10.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document.

Complete the requirements for the assignment and then copy and paste it back into the submission box or turn it is as a document.

 

**********************************************************

Pumped Up

1.1 Anabolic steroids are synthetic.

1.2 Steroids are similar to testosterone.

1.3 Testosterone is the natural male hormone.

1.4 Testosterone promotes male characteristics.

1.5  Male characteristics are things like facial hair and increased muscle bulk.

 

2.1 Some athletes abuse steroids.

2.2 Some athletes believe they need steroids.

2.3 They believe steroids will help them bulk up.

2.4 They believe steroids will improve their athletic performance.

 

3.1 Teens may be interested in bodybuilding.

3.2 Bodybuilding has its own subculture.

3.3 Many believe they must use steroids to succeed.

3.4 That belief may be true or not.

 

4.1 Steroids have legitimate medical uses.

4.2 Abusers use much larger doses.

4.3 Abusers may use two or more kinds of steroids at the same time.

4.4 They may believe this will minimize side effects.

4.5 They may believe this will improve effectiveness.

 

5.1 Human growth hormone causes effects similar to steroids.

5.2 Abuse of human growth hormone can cause acromegaly.

5.3 Acromegaly is a rare condition.

5.4 This condition causes bulging eyebrow ridges.

5.5 This condition causes other deformities of the face and limbs.

 

6.1 Abuse of steroids causes serious physical symptoms.

6.2 Symptoms in boys can include acne and stunted growth.

6.3  Symptoms in girls can include increased facial and body hair, and baldness.

 

7.1 Steroid use often causes mental symptoms.

7.2 Mental symptoms include depression.

7.3 Mental symptoms include irritability and aggression.

7.4 These symptoms are sometimes called "roid rage".

 

8.1 When steroid users stop taking the drug, they may experience depression.

8.2 The depression may be serious enough to result in suicide.

8.3 The depression may lead them to take more steroids.

 

9.1 Steroids often induce irritability and anger.

9.2 Users may lash out at friends or family.

9.3 The anger can lead even to murder.

9.4 The anger can lead to physical abuse.

9.5 It is sometimes fueled by paranoia or delusions.

 

10.1 Most teenagers believe steroids are harmless.

10.2 Their friends may suggest that they should try steroids.

10.3. Their coach may suggest that they should try steroids.

10.4 They may believe the risk is worth the possible gain in muscle mass.

**********************************************************

Sentence Combining Rubric

5 Points for each completed sentence (1/2 point each)

3 Points for parallel structure and variety of syntax

2 Points for completeness (all sentence parts are included)

10 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.05 Language "Work Outs"

Students will practice editing for spelling and grammar mistakes in a short paragraph. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

You will edit three paragraphs in the next three assignments.

There are spelling mistakes, punctuation mistakes, missing punctuation, word usage problems, etc. Your job is to correct as many conventions problems as you can. You need to find and correct at least ten mistakes (most of the paragraphs have between 15 and 20 errors).

You need to somehow 'highlight' your corrections (underline, bold, different color, number, etc.).

Copy and paste the paragraph into a word processing document and correct from there, then copy and paste the changes into the submission box.

01.05 Language "Work Outs" (English 11)

01.05.01 Language "Work Out" 1 (English 11)

teacher-scored 12 points possible 15 minutes

Mark Twain, 1874: public domain via Wikimedia CommonsMark Twain, 1874: public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Workout 1: Mark Twain

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment and then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

************************************************************************************

Mark Twain whose real name was Samuel Clemens was a popular american author and lecturer.  He worked as a printer in Missouri a riverboat pilot on the Missippi River and a gold minor in California, before he became a succesful journalist.  Twain was known for his humor and satire; but he didn't manage his money well.  He past up on the chance to invest in the telephone but chose to invest in other inventions that failed so that he had gone bankrupt.  However he worked hard and payed his creditors back all there money. Twains books and short stories are still popular today and his book Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is considered the first, great, American novel.

************************************************************************************

18 corrections possible; you need to find at least 10 for full credit

Scoring Rubric

10 Points= At least 10 mistakes have been found (1 point each)

2 Points= Changes have been 'highlighted' and are easy to find in the submission

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06 Language "Work Out" 2

teacher-scored 12 points possible 30 minutes

Gold laurel wreath: Andreas Praefcke, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsGold laurel wreath: Andreas Praefcke, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Workout 2:

Gold

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document.

Complete the requirements for the assignment and copy and paste it back into the submission box.

************************************************************************************

Gold has been valued threw out human history. Unlike silver it doesn't tarnish and it has a bright, yellow color and shine making it atractive.  Because it is nonreactive it is often found in pure form as nuggets or veins within rock.  Because it is very malleable it can be beaten into gold leaf or worked into jewlry or coins.  Kings and Queens of many cultures wore crowns of gold.  it has been associated with marriage for centuries first as a bridle crown and now as the traditional material for wedding rings.  The top prize at the Olympic games is the gold metal. Much early knowledge of chemistry came from alchemists attempts to turn lead into gold.  What they did not realize? Was that gold is an element. There attempts to create it from another element were doomed to failure.

************************************************************************************

15 Corrections Possible; you need to find at least 10 for full credit 

Scoring Rubric

10 Points= At least 10 mistakes have been found (1 point each)

2 Points= Changes have been "highlighted" and are easy find in the submission

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.07 Language "Work Out" 3 (English 11)

teacher-scored 12 points possible 25 minutes

Workout 3: What is Love? 

Cupid, detail from Guido Durantino plate, 1550: public domain via Wikimedia CommonsCupid, detail from Guido Durantino plate, 1550: public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document.

Complete the requirements for the assignment and then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

************************************************************************************

Their are many kinds of love; the love between parents and children, the love between freinds, the love between husband and wife, and the unselfish love that makes us want to help other's in need.  Many cultures have developed ideas about love.  The roman goddess Venus and her son Cupid who went around shooting people with his arrows to make them fall in love still around today.  Pop music is full of Love songs such as the Beatles All You Need is Love.  However love is not just the wonderful feeling you get when you see that special someone.  Real love involves action and committment.  A well-known quote by Gibran says Work is love made visible.  If you love someone you should be willing to work for there welfare.

************************************************************************************

17  corrections possible; you need to find 10

Scoring Rubric

10 Points= At least 10 mistakes have been found (1 point each)

2 Points= Changes have been "highlighted" and are easy find in the submission

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.08 ACT Practice (English 11)

Students will answer practice questions for the ACT test and become familiar with the ACT Website for future help. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

The ACT test is a required college entrance exam and is a test that is best taken during your junior year in high school. WMC, public domainWMC, public domain This test is very important and can really boost your opportunity to get scholarships. As part of the English 11 course, you will be required to take a practice test in both the English and Reading sections.

01.08.01 ACT Practice Instructions (English 11)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 60 minutes

Directions

1. Go to the ACT website (see link below)

2. Scroll down to where it says “Sample Test Questions” (Note: the option for the ACT Online Prep costs money, but you could use it if you want to--you will just have to pay for it)

3. You will see a tab for Reading and English.  The Reading and Enlgish practice questions has five sample selections for the Reading section. Please complete ONE test from the Reading section and one section from the English section. As you answer each question, it will tell you if you are correct or incorrect. If you are incorrect, you will be given an explanation of the correct answer.  Make sure to include for your screen shot for Reading and English.  

The assignment that you will turn in for points for this activity will need the following things for full credit (20 Points Total):

1. Assignment will be completed on a word processing document; please include your name. (2 Points) Also include the following:
2. The number of problems you got correct (on the first attempt) and the total number of questions completed for each test. (3 points each test= 6 points total)
3. Write down one thing you learned from the English test and one thing you learned from the Reading test. (3 points each test= 6 points total)
4. On the word document, also include a screen shot of both tests that you took. (One screen shot of the Reading test and one screen shot of the English test). To do this, use the “Print Screen” key on your keyboard (usually found above the number pad). Push this key when you are in the program and then you just need to paste it into a word processing document. If you are on a Macintosh, you probably have a utility called "Grab" you can use to get a screen shot.  If you have questions about this, please let me know. If you can't get a screen shot, copy and paste the questions into your document. (3 points each test= 6 points total)

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.00 Understanding Poetry (English 11)

Starry Night: Van Gogh, public domainStarry Night: Van Gogh, public domain

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading from the Common Core:

• To become college and career ready, students must grapple with works of exceptional craft and thought whose range extends across genres, cultures, and centuries.

• Such works offer profound insights into the human condition and serve as models for students’ own thinking and writing.

02.01 Literary Devices (English 11)

Students will review and learn about various techniques and literary devices used by writers and will then apply them in the remainder of the course. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

 

View the PowerPoint and visit at least one of the links below to learn or review various literary devices. You will take a quiz to evaluate your understanding.

The literary devices listed here will be used throughout the course in writing activities and other assignments.

The quiz will cover the following terms:

Half full or half empty?: LuciaSofo, released into public domain via Wikimedia CommonsHalf full or half empty?: LuciaSofo, released into public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Allusion

Apostrophe (the literary device, not the punctuation mark)

Euphemism

Onomatopoeia

Personification

Symbol

Colloquialism

Hyperbole

Repetition

Alliteration

Oxymoron

Paradox

Irony

Simile

Metaphor

*If you cannot open the PowerPoint file, please let me know and I can send it in another format

02.01.01 Literary Devices Activity (English 11)

teacher-scored 15 points possible 30 minutes

Find an example of each of the literary devices listed below. You can make it up or find it in another media source.

Make sure to review the PowerPoint in the lesson for definitions and examples for help. Obviously, you should not use the examples from there for this assignment.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment and copy and paste it back into the submission box

***********************************************************************************

Frosty burn: Alasdair MacDonald, CC Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 license via Wikimedia CommonsFrosty burn: Alasdair MacDonald, CC Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 license via Wikimedia Commons

1. Allusion (include the example, and explain to what it is alluding)
2. Apostrophe
3. Euphemism
4. Onomatopoeia
5. Symbol (include the symbol and a brief explanation of what it symbolizes)
6. Personification
7. Colloquialism
8. Hyperbole
9. Repetition
10. Alliteration (highlight or underline the words that create alliteration)
11. Oxymoron
12. Paradox
13. Irony
14. Simile
15. Metaphor

************************************************************************************

Scoring Rubric

15 Points= one relevant example for each literary device has been included

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.01.01 Literary Terms Quiz (English 11)

computer-scored 15 points possible 4 minutes

Complete the quiz on literary terms.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.02 Understanding Poetry using SOAPSTone (English 11)

Students will learn how to read and understand poetry using the SOAPSTone method. Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

Understanding Poetry

Students often struggle with poems because they seem to think there is a 'secret' meaning that can be understood by few people. Here is a method that will help you go through some steps to get a better understanding of a poem's meaning.  Poems tend to be short, so every word counts, and "close reading" is even more important than it is in longer works.

Mining for soapstone: Mike Beauregard, Attribution 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsMining for soapstone: Mike Beauregard, Attribution 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

Read through the attachment "Understanding Poetry" to start.

*If you cannot open the file, let me know and I can send it in a different format. The slides will outline a method of understanding poetry using the acronym SOAPSTone. After viewing the presentation, take the quiz. You can then get a good understanding of the types of responses you need when you practice on your own. You will then choose three of the poems below for practice. Each will be submitted as a different assignment but you will be answering the same questions for each. The last section of this unit will require you to write a sonnet of your own.

Terms you will need to understand for this unit (in addition to the literary devices in the previous lesson), as used in the assignments based on the SOAPSTone method:

Speaker:  who is doing the talking in the poem?  This is similar to the idea of "narrator" in fiction.  Don't say "the author" unless you have evidence to support the idea that the poet meant this as personal.  You will rarely know the speaker's name, but try to identify what sort of person is speaking in the poem.

Occasion:  what is going on here?  Give a short, simple summary of the situation the speaker finds him/herself in - when, what, where, why?

Audience:  who is the speaker talking to?  In some cases, the speaker will address "you" or "thee", or speak in the imperative, which implies "you" (remember, the imperative is a sentence like "Come home as soon as you're finished", in which the subject of the sentence is understood to be "You").  In that case, you will need to try to infer what sort of person is being addressed, or what the relationship between the author and the audience seems to be - is the audience the speaker's wife, girlfriend, boyfriend, son, daughter, friend, enemy, God, student? In other poems, there is no indication of a particular audience, or the subject matter or language of the poem may suggest an audience of a certain age, gender, or interests.

Purpose:  why did the poet write this poem?  What is the point?  What main idea or truth does the poem imply or state?  This is related to the idea of "theme," and you may need to infer this either from what the poem says, or from how it is said.

Subject:  what is the poem about?  what is the general topic?  What search terms might you use if you were looking for more about the same subject?

Tone:  what mood or feeling does the poem create?  What is the poet's or speaker's attitude toward the subject?  Most often, this will NOT be explicitly stated.  Describe tone with adjectives - words like sad, angry, nostalgic, wistful, longing, joyful, anguished, objective, sarcastic, ironic, reverent, spooky, humorous ...  You will usually be asked to identify what particular words or phrases in the poem help create that tone.

02.02 Understanding Poetry Using SOAPStone Quiz (English 11)

computer-scored 15 points possible 4 minutes

Complete the quiz on poetry.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.03 Poetry Practice 1 (English 11)

teacher-scored 18 points possible 30 minutes

Do a close reading of the two poems in the links below. Choose one and complete the assignment.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

************************************************************

Lord Byron: Public domain via Wikimedia CommonsLord Byron: Public domain via Wikimedia Commons

1. Poem title and author
2. Speaker
3. Occasion
4. Audience
5. Purpose/Theme
6. Subject (in one or two words)

7. Tone
(a) Tone (in one or two words):
(b) Two words or phrases from the poem that help identify or create that tone:

8. Literary Device 1:
(a) quote the phrase or line containing the device:
(b) identify the name of the kind of device:

9. Literary Device 2:
(a) quote the phrase or line containing the device:
(b) identify the name of the kind of device:

10. Short Essay: How does this poem connect to the quarter topic of Love and Relationships?

11. Short Essay: What personal connection or other insight do you have about this poem? (How does it remind you of your own experiences, or other things you have read or watched?)

****************************************************************

Scoring Rubric

6 Points= Questions 1-6 have been adequately answered and show understanding of poem

2 Points= Question 7 includes tone and two text examples

4 Points= Questions 8 and 9 include the literary device and the text example

6 Points= Each short answer question is answered in complete sentences (more than one sentence) and adequately responds to the question

18 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.04 Poetry Practice 2 (English 11)

teacher-scored 18 points possible 30 minutes

Do a close reading of the two poems at the links below. Choose one and complete the assignment.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

************************************************************************************

Illustration for Grimm's fairy tale "The Frog Prince": Paul Meyerheim, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsIllustration for Grimm's fairy tale "The Frog Prince": Paul Meyerheim, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

1. Poem title and author
2. Speaker
3. Occasion
4. Audience
5. Purpose/Theme
6. Subject (in one or two words)

7. Tone
(a) Tone (in one or two words):
(b) Two words or phrases from the poem that help identify or create that tone:

8. Literary Device 1:
(a) quote the phrase or line containing the device:
(b) identify the name of the kind of device:

9. Literary Device 2:
(a) quote the phrase or line containing the device:
(b) identify the name of the kind of device:

10. Short Essay: How does this poem connect to the quarter topic of Love and Relationships?

11. Short Essay: What personal connection or other insight do you have about this poem? (How does it remind you of your own experiences, or other things you have read or watched?)

****************************************************************

Scoring Rubric

6 Points= Questions 1-6 have been adequately answered and show understanding of poem

2 Points= Question 7 includes tone and two text examples

4 Points= Questions 8 and 9 include the literary device and the text example

6 Points= Each short answer question is answered in complete sentences (more than one sentence) and adequately responds to the question

18 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.05 Poetry Practice 3 (English 11)

teacher-scored 18 points possible 30 minutes

Do a close reading of the sonnets at the links below  and pick one of them.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment and then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

************************************************************************************

Louis-François Roubiliac bust of William Shakespeare: Yair Haklai, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsLouis-François Roubiliac bust of William Shakespeare: Yair Haklai, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

1. Poem title and author
2. Speaker
3. Occasion
4. Audience
5. Purpose/Theme
6. Subject (in one or two words)

7. Tone
(a) Tone (in one or two words):
(b) Two words or phrases from the poem that help identify or create that tone:

8. Literary Device 1:
(a) quote the phrase or line containing the device:
(b) identify the name of the kind of device:

9. Literary Device 2:
(a) quote the phrase or line containing the device:
(b) identify the name of the kind of device:

10. Short Essay: How does this poem connect to the quarter topic of Love and Relationships?

11. Short Essay: What personal connection or other insight do you have about this poem? (How does it remind you of your own experiences, or other things you have read or watched?)

****************************************************************

Scoring Rubric

6 Points= Questions 1-6 have been adequately answered and show understanding of poem

2 Points= Question 7 includes tone and two text examples

4 Points= Questions 8 and 9 include the literary device and the text example

6 Points= Each short answer question is answered in complete sentences (more than one sentence) and adequately responds to the question

18 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.06 Writing Poetry (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

Poetry Practice

  Write one poem in the form of a sonnet on a topic of your choice. A true sonnet uses iambic pentameter (see the link below).  If you find that too difficult, aim for each line to have about 6-8 words.

Illustration to Shakespeare's Sonnet 144: Isac Friedlander, c. 1931, Copyleft Free Art license via Wikimedia CommonsIllustration to Shakespeare's Sonnet 144: Isac Friedlander, c. 1931, Copyleft Free Art license via Wikimedia Commons

Examples: Sonnet 18 and Sonnet 130, from the previous assignment

Shakespearean Sonnet Rhyme Scheme: abab, cdcd, efef, gg

14 Lines, 3 quatrains (poetry “paragraphs”) 

Scoring Rubric

4 Points= 14 lines of mostly iambic pentameter (3 points for 14 lines of about 6-8 words each)

4 Points= correct rhyme scheme is used

3 Points= poem is creative and original

10 Points total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.00 Responding to Literary Texts

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading from the Common Core:

• To become college and career ready, students must grapple with works of exceptional craft and thought whose range extends across genres, cultures, and centuries.

• Such works offer profound insights into the human condition and serve as models for students’ own thinking and writing.

• Through wide and deep reading of literature and literary nonfiction of steadily increasing sophistication, students gain a reservoir of literary and cultural knowledge, references, and images; the ability to evaluate intricate arguments; and the capacity to surmount the challenges posed by complex texts.

 

Understanding Literary Texts

The focus of this unit is to read a variety of literature focused on a single theme, "Love and Relationships." This unit is similar to the poetry unit in that you will learn techniques for understanding literature and methods that writer's use to enhance their writing.

You will then be able to apply what you have learned.

1. Read and understand the information in the "Understanding Literary Texts" PowerPoint.

Illustration from Jane Eyre: F. H. Townsend, 1847 public domain via Wikimedia CommonsIllustration from Jane Eyre: F. H. Townsend, 1847 public domain via Wikimedia Commons

2. Take the quiz to check your understanding of analyzing literature.

3. Read the three given short stories to analyze on your own

4. Choose one of the books to be reading as you complete this quarter. As always, assignments do not have to be completed in order. Here is the list of books. Hopefully, you have already started reading.

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Shaffer and Annie Barrows

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Peony by Pearl S. Buck

03.01 Literary Text (English 11)

Students will read a variety or short stories, excerpts, and a novel to expand their understanding of the quarter theme "love and relationships" Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

Sistine Chapel: Creation of Adam: Michaelangelo, c. 1511, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsSistine Chapel: Creation of Adam: Michaelangelo, c. 1511, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

The following are literary terms you will need to understand as you work on this unit:

Diction:  the author's word choices - are the words mostly short and simple, or long and difficult? formal or informal? familiar or unfamiliar?  Other words you might use to talk about diction: 
abstract, concrete, esoteric, obscure, scholarly, sensuous, colloquial, monosyllabic, polysyllabic, sarcastic, crisp, colorful, vague, precise...

Syntax: the author's sentence structure - are the sentences shorter or longer? are sentences mostly simple, compound or complex? do they flow smoothly, or require a lot of concentration?  
Other words you might use to talk about syntax:
convoluted, straight-forward, spare, ornate, flowing, stacatto

Tone: what is the author's attitude toward the story or characters? amused, ironic, serious, humorous, reflective, regretful, nostalgic, boastful, detached, fond, gloomy tense, cold, bitter, dramatic, didactic, objective, dreamy, sympathetic ...?

Theme: what is the implied "point" of the story? what life lessons might the author intend you to learn? what general truth?

Point of View: who is telling the story? is it first person or third person?  is the narrator omniscient (knows what many characters are thinking), limited (knows only what one character is thinking), or objective (simply reports what can be seen)?

Genre: what kind of story is it? romance, mystery, science fiction, realistic fiction, historical fiction, poetry, drama, western, suspense, horror ...?

Protagonist: the main character

Antagonist: character or entity that opposes the protagonist, creating conflict in the story.

Conflict: what creates problems or obstacles for the protagonist?  Traditionally, most conflicts can be classed as one of the following:

Protagonist vs. him/herself
Protagonist vs. nature
Protagonist vs. society
Protagonist vs. another character

 

03.01 Literature Quiz (English 11)

computer-scored 18 points possible 4 minutes

Complete the quiz on literature.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.02 Reader's Response 1 (English 11)

teacher-scored 19 points possible 30 minutes

Reader’s Response Activity

Do a close reading of the story at the link below and then respond to the following prompts.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

Old Woman in Bed: Gamle Ole Eriksens, 1906 (WMC, public domain)Old Woman in Bed: Gamle Ole Eriksens, 1906 (WMC, public domain)

***********************************************************************************

Refer back to the lesson at the beginning of this unit for help with describing diction, syntax and tone.

1. What are the title and author of the story?

2. Describe the diction of the text, and give an example:

3. Describe the syntax of the text, and give an example:

4. What is the overall tone of the text?  Give an example of phrases from the text that help create this tone.

5. What is the theme or lesson to be learned from the story?

6. What point of view is the story being told from?

7. What is the genre of the story?  How can you tell?

8. Who is the protagonist?

9. Who/ what is the antagonist, and how does s/he oppose the protagonist?

10. Identify two literary devices found in the text (remember to state the literary device and the example from the text).

11. Short Answer: Choose one significant quote from the text and discuss its importance to the story.

12. Short Answer: Connect this story to the overall theme of the quarter (love and relationships).

13. Short Answer: Make a personal connection to the story.  Be specific, and use an example from your life or other stories/books/movies that you are familiar with that something in the story reminds you of.

***********************************************************************************

Reader's Response Rubric

9 point= Questions 1-9 have been adequately answered

4 points= Question 10 includes two examples and correctly identifies the literary devices (can be the same one)

2 points= Short answer question 11 responds in more than one sentence and contains a quote from the text

2 points= Short answer question 12 responds in more than one sentence and makes a connection between the story and the theme

2 points= Short answer question 13 responds in more than one sentence and makes a personal connection to the story

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.03 Reader's Response 2 (English 11)

teacher-scored 19 points possible 20 minutes

Reader’s Response Activity

Do a close reading of the story at the link below and then respond to the following prompts.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box. Au Cafe: Jean Béraud (WMC, public domain)Au Cafe: Jean Béraud (WMC, public domain)
***********************************************************************************

Refer back to the lesson at the beginning of this unit for help with describing diction, syntax and tone.

1. What are the title and author of the story?

2. Describe the diction of the text, and give an example:

3. Describe the syntax of the text, and give an example:

4. What is the overall tone of the text?  Give an example of phrases from the text that help create this tone.

5. What is the theme or lesson to be learned from the story?

6. What point of view is the story being told from?

7. What is the genre of the story?  How can you tell?

8. Who is the protagonist?

9. Who/ what is the antagonist, and how does s/he oppose the protagonist?

10. Identify two literary devices found in the text (remember to state the literary device and the example from the text).

11. Short Answer: Choose one significant quote from the text and discuss its importance to the story.

12. Short Answer: Connect this story to the overall theme of the quarter (love and relationships).

13. Short Answer: Make a personal connection to the story.  Be specific, and use an example from your life or other stories/books/movies that you are familiar with that something in the story reminds you of.

***********************************************************************************

Reader's Response Rubric

9 point= Questions 1-9 have been adequately answered

4 points= Question 10 includes two examples and correctly identifies the literary devices (can be the same one)

2 points= Short answer question 11 responds in more than one sentence and contains a quote from the text

2 points= Short answer question 12 responds in more than one sentence and makes a connection between the story and the theme

2 points= Short answer question 13 responds in more than one sentence and makes a personal connection to the story

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.03 Reader's Response 2 (English 11)

03.04 Reader's Response 3 (English 11)

teacher-scored 19 points possible 20 minutes

Reader’s Response Activity

Do a close reading of the story at the link below and then respond to the following prompts.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

1907 Train wreck: WMC, public domain1907 Train wreck: WMC, public domain

***********************************************************************************

Refer back to the lesson at the beginning of this unit for help with describing diction, syntax and tone.

1. What are the title and author of the story?

2. Describe the diction of the text, and give an example:

3. Describe the syntax of the text, and give an example:

4. What is the overall tone of the text?  Give an example of phrases from the text that help create this tone.

5. What is the theme or lesson to be learned from the story?

6. What point of view is the story being told from?

7. What is the genre of the story?  How can you tell?

8. Who is the protagonist?

9. Who/ what is the antagonist, and how does s/he oppose the protagonist?

10. Identify two literary devices found in the text (remember to state the literary device and the example from the text).

11. Short Answer: Choose one significant quote from the text and discuss its importance to the story.

12. Short Answer: Connect this story to the overall theme of the quarter (love and relationships).

13. Short Answer: Make a personal connection to the story.  Be specific, and use an example from your life or other stories/books/movies that you are familiar with that something in the story reminds you of.

***********************************************************************************

Reader's Response Rubric

9 point= Questions 1-9 have been adequately answered

4 points= Question 10 includes two examples and correctly identifies the literary devices (can be the same one)

2 points= Short answer question 11 responds in more than one sentence and contains a quote from the text

2 points= Short answer question 12 responds in more than one sentence and makes a connection between the story and the theme

2 points= Short answer question 13 responds in more than one sentence and makes a personal connection to the story

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.04.01 Performance Assessment Reading (English 11)

Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

Do a close reading of the following excerpt:

Andreas Capellanus, The Art of Courtly Love (1184-6)

Andreas "the Chaplain" writes this essay in three parts and addresses it to his young male friend, Walter, who apparently has asked for instruction.  The first part discusses what love is and how love may be obtained.  The second part discusses how love may be preserved.  The third part discusses why love should be avoided and attempts to undo the work of the first two parts.  The book is notable for its embedded dialogues purporting to describe "courts of love" held by queens and duchesses, trials at which men and women debated the behaviors of lovers from various stations of society and evaluated them.  It also contains an important definition of love and two sets of rules for love, the longer of which is reproduced below.

    According to Andreas,

"Love is an inborn suffering proceeding from the sight and immoderate thought upon the beauty of the other sex,
for which cause above all other things one wishes to embrace the other and, by common assent, in this embrace
to fulfill the commandments of love. . . ."

Love was not considered essential to marriage because Christian doctrine associated it with lust, a deadly sin, and indeed one could commit that sin with one's own spouse if one loved immoderately and had sex for reasons other than procreation.  Paul, the great promoter of chastity as the highest human state, reluctantly agreed that it was "better to marry than to burn" (i.e., in Hell for the sin of lust if it could not be prevented by "medicinal" application of marriage).

The Rules of Love
Joseph Félon, c. 1850, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsJoseph Félon, c. 1850, public domain via Wikimedia Commons
1. Marriage is no excuse for not loving.
2. He who is not jealous can not love.
3. No one can be bound by two loves.
4. Love is always growing or diminishing.
5. It is not good for one lover to take anything against the will of the other.
6. A male cannot love until he has fully reached puberty.
7. Two years of mourning for a dead lover are prescribed for surviving lovers.
8. No one should be deprived of love without a valid reason.
9. No one can love who is not driven to do so by the power of love.
10. Love always departs from the dwelling place of avarice.
11. It is not proper to love one whom one would be ashamed to marry.
12. The true lover never desires the embraces of any save his lover.
13. Love rarely lasts when it is revealed.
14. An easy attainment makes love contemptible; a difficult one
makes it more dear.
15. Every lover turns pale in the presence of his beloved.
16. When a lover suddenly has sight of his beloved, his heart beats wildly.
17. A new love expells an old one.
18. Moral integrity alone makes one worthy of love.
19. If love diminishes, it quickly leaves and rarely revives.
20. A lover is always fearful.
21. True jealousy always increases the effects of love.
22. If a lover suspects another, jealousy and the efects of love increase.
23. He who is vexed by the thoughts of love eats little and seldom sleeps.
24. Every action of a lover ends in the thought of his beloved.
25. The true lover believes only that which he thinks will please his beloved.
26. Love can deny nothing to love.
27. A lover can never have enough of the embraces of his beloved.
28. The slightest suspicion incites the lover to suspect the worse of his beloved.
29. He who suffers from an excess of passion is not suited to love.
30. The true lover is continuously obsessed with the image of his beloved.
31. Nothing prevents a woman from being loved by two men, or a man
from being loved by two women.

Consider what commonalities you can find between the ideas here and the three stories you read.

03.04.02 Performance Assessment (English 11)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 45 minutes

Choose two of the three stories from this unit ("The Jilting of Granny Weatherall", "The Other Wife" and "The Story of an Hour").

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

********************************************************************************************

1.  Identify which story you chose as your first story.

2.  What are two themes or claims made by the author of this story?

3.  Identify, and copy and paste, sentences from the text that support the first theme or claim.

4.  Identify, and copy and paste, sentences from the text that support the second theme or claim. 

5.  What "rules" from the Andreas Capellanus reading apply to this story?  (Choose two or three.)

6.  Use evidence from the story text to explain how those rules relate to the story.

7.  Identify which story you chose as your second story.

8.  What are two themes or claims made by the author of this story?

9.  Identify, and copy and paste, sentences from the text that support the first theme or claim.

10.  Identify, and copy and paste, sentences from the text that support the second theme or claim. 

11.  What "rules" from the Andreas Capellanus reading apply to this story?  (Choose two or three.)

12.  Use evidence from the story text to explain how those rules relate to the story.

13.  Identify three commonalities between all three selections (the two stories and the Capellanus reading).

14.  Provide evidence, in the form of quotations, from each text to support two of those commonalities:

Name the first commonality:

Three quotations to support it:

Name the second commonality:

Three quotations to support it:

*************************************************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.05 Book Project (English 11)

teacher-scored 80 points possible 60 minutes

Zelda Fitzgerald, inspiration for Daisy in The Great Gatsby: Metropolitan Magazine, 1922, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsZelda Fitzgerald, inspiration for Daisy in The Great Gatsby: Metropolitan Magazine, 1922, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Quarter 1 Book Project

Theme:  Love and Relationships

Novel Choices- Choose one book to read from the following list, then complete the activities.

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford
The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Shaffer and Annie Barrows
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
Peony by Pearl S. Buck

Activities

NOTE: These activities should be completed in one single word-processing document and turned in all together.  Remember the EHS Honor Code - all of your answers, other than the direct quotes from the book, must be your own, original work in your own words, not copied from other sources.

1. Choose five quotes from the book. For each quote, write a short paragraph discussing the significance of the quote. Things to consider might be how the quote develops a character, how the quote helps with understanding of theme, personal connections you made, or the writing style of the author. (20 points)

2. Character Identification: Choose four characters from the book. For each character do the following (20 points):

• Descriptive Phrase (something quoted directly from the book)

• Memorable quote (this is also quoted directly from the book; can be something the character said or something said about the character)

• Your first impression of the character

• Three words to describe your character

• Relationship to other characters

3. Theme Discussion (10 Points) Write a paragraph discussion about the connection between the novel and the quarter topic (Love and Relationships).

Questions to consider in your discussion:

• What does this novel say about love and relationships?

• Do you agree or disagree?

• What personal connection did you make to the book?

• What does each character learn about “love and relationships” through the course of the novel?

• What is a lesson to be learned or a theme of the novel?

• How does the theme connect to the topic of “love and relationships”?

4. Essay Question

A symbol is an object, action, or event that also represents something more or that creates a range of associations beyond itself. In literary works, a symbol can express an idea, clarify meaning, or enlarge literal meaning. Consider the book you read and, focusing on one symbol, write an essay analyzing how that symbol functions in the work and what it reveals about the characters or themes of the work as a whole. Do not merely summarize the plot. At least five paragraphs.  (20 points)

Essay Question Alternate Assignment:

Instead of writing an essay, you can submit a PowerPoint presentation responding to all parts of the essay question. Your presentation must be at least ten slides long and five of the slides need a picture. The focus of the PowerPoint is a response to the essay question--make sure you are answering the question and NOT just giving a summary of the book.

5. Setting (10 Points) Using Google Earth, find the actual spot on the globe of a location in your book. Look around at the setting, and even though it will not necessarily look like the setting described in the book, think about the importance of 'place' and how it might affect the character. Write a paragraph response considering setting and its importance in the book. How does setting affect the character and make a difference in the story? You need to have a picture from Google Earth of your 'place' for full credit. Please include a screen shot of your 'place' (use “print screen” and then paste it) or save it as a .jpeg and then paste it into your document.

Book Project Scoring Rubric

20 Points= Quote Section
10 points= 2 points for each quote (5 total)
10 points= 2 points for each quote discussion; each discussion is more than one paragraph (5 total)
20 Points= Character Identification For each of the four chosen characters, the five questions have all been answered
10 Points= Theme Discussion
5 points= Discussion is in a complete paragraph
5 points= Discussion incorporates examples from the book
20 Points= Essay Question
5 points= Essay focuses on the question and responds with clarity and examples from the book
3 points= Essay has a clear thesis statement which responds to the question
2 points= Essay is in organized into paragraphs for clarity
3 points= Essay contains few distracting spelling and grammar mistakes
3 points= Essay is long enough to adequately respond to the prompt (4-5 paragraphs)
3 points= Essay has a clear introductory paragraph which sets up the discussion
2 points= Essay has a strong concluding paragraph
2 points= Essay DOES NOT just summarize the book
20 Points= Essay Question Alternative Assignment
5 points= Presentation is at least ten slides long.
5 points= Five of the ten slides contains a picture.
3 points= Presentation responds to all parts of the prompt.
2 points= Slides are neat and easy to read with few mistakes.
3 points= Presentation is NOT a summary of the book but a response to the essay question.
2 points= Presentation is unique and interesting.
10 Points= Setting.
5 points= Paragraph discussion of the importance of setting.
5 points= Screen shot or jpeg of the setting found from GoogleEarth or a similar source.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.06 Critical Movie Review (English 11)

teacher-scored 13 points possible 40 minutes

Critical Viewing Movie Review

Choose a movie (or live play or musical) that fits with the quarter theme (love and relationships) and write a one page response to that viewing.  

Suggested movies for this quarter: Ever After, Tangled, Twilight, Love Story, Westside Story, The Great Gatsby, Jane Eyre, Pride and Prejudice, Romeo and Juliet, Much Ado About Nothing

*Note: You are not restricted to any of these titles. Any movie that fits within the theme of the quarter will work.

If you are not sure if a movie fits with the theme, just send me a message. Honestly, I don't watch many movies, so I am not really sure what is out there--use your best judgement.

You will then present your response in one of two ways: use Google Voice (801-317-8401, In the message include:  your name, quarter, assignment #, and the assignment.  Also, submit a comment through Learn with the date and time you left the message; the assignment will NOT be graded unless the date and time are submitted in Learn as well.) to record your response, OR make a short video of your response and submit through Canvas. It is best to have your response written out and practice it before making the phone call or final video.

Respond to the following questions in your review: 

1895 illustration for Pride and Prejudice: C. E. Brock, public domain via Wikimedia Commons1895 illustration for Pride and Prejudice: C. E. Brock, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

1. How does this movie tie into the quarter theme of Love and Relationships?

2. What is the message or theme of the movie?

3. What obstacles did the protagonist have to overcome?

4. What rating (out of five stars) would you give this movie? Why? 

 If you use Google Voice, you can leave up to a three-minute message. Use the questions to guide your response and write out your review in detail before completing the assignment. In the assignment submission box, simply make a note of the day and time you recorded your message.

If you make a video, you can upload it there as well. The video does not have to be anything super elaborate; it can be just you talking to the camera and answering the questions about the movie.

Scoring Rubric

8 Points - Student responds to each question clearly and adequately.

5 Points - Student is well-spoken during the presentation; it is clear that he or she has practiced.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.06.01 Unit 03 Review Quiz (English 11)

computer-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

Complete the review quiz on unit 3 after you have completed reading the novel.  You will need to understand and apply the literary terms as they relate to the book you read.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.00 Narrative Writing

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing from the Utah Core:

• For students, writing is a key means of asserting and defending claims, showing what they know about a subject, and conveying what they have experienced, imagined, thought, and felt.

• To be college and career-ready writers, students must take task, purpose, and audience into careful consideration, choosing words, information, structures, and formats deliberately.

• Students need to be able to use technology strategically when creating, refining, and collaborating on writing.

• Students must have the flexibility, concentration, and fluency to produce high-quality first-draft text under a tight deadline, as well as the capacity to revisit and make improvements to a piece of writing using multiple drafts when circumstances encourage or require it.

04.01 Narrative Writing Practice (English 11)

Students will write in response to various prompts incorporating writing skills learned earlier in the quarter. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

This group of assignments is a warm-up for a longer narrative. The thought questions presented will give you a chance to write about things that are important to you and will also give you a chance to use various techniques in your writing.

There are ten journal options, and you will choose five to complete. Each journal is worth 10 points and requires you to incorporate some different literary devices.

Quick review of common narrative techniques (used mainly in fiction, but may also apply in some narrative nonfiction)

by Alex Proimos, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic via Wikimedia Commonsby Alex Proimos, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic via Wikimedia Commons

dialogue: conversation between two or more characters. Remember that the characters' actual words are enclosed by quotation marks.
exposition: just telling what happens, often in summary form
description: creating sensory "images" of places, people or things
reflection: the character's thoughts, often looking back at events
point of view: who is telling the story? Is it in first person or third person? Is the narrator a character in the story, limited to knowing what that character knows, or an "omniscient" narrator who knows more than a real person in the story could?
setting: where and when is the story happening? How does this affect events or characters?
character development: do the characters seem like real people, with both good and bad qualities? How are the characters changed by events, and how do the characters' changes affect later events?
parallel plots: does the action shift back and forth between two (or more) different characters or places to show events happening at the same time? (These events may seem unrelated at first.)
subplots: additional conflicts or stories that are somehow connected to the main plot and characters, but not as important
pacing: how the author handles time and sequence - does the story skip over weeks or months? Are there flashbacks? or does everything unfold in the same, steady, chronological manner?
suspense: Is there foreshadowing of future events? Does the author switch back and forth between parallel plots at critical points in the story? Are you kept in doubt about the outcome of events?

04.01.01 Narrative Writing Practice 1 (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

You will choose one of the following journal prompts to respond to. Include the prompt at the beginning of your submission (including any special instructions).

School-teacher: Krzysztof Lubieniecki, 1727, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsSchool-teacher: Krzysztof Lubieniecki, 1727, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Your submission should be at least 300 words in length. Pay attention to all parts of the question. Underline or highlight the places where you use the required techniques.

• If I were a teacher, I would... (include an ALLITERATION and at least one example of PARALLEL STRUCTURE)

• If I could give one piece of advice to any person in history, that advice would be... (Use a SIMILE and at least one example of PARALLEL STRUCTURE)

Narrative Writing Practice Scoring Rubric

3 points= response is at least 300 words in length, and word count is included

2 points= response is creative and interesting as well as descriptive and clear

2 points= any special instructions have been followed and highlighted

1 point= prompt is included at the beginning of the submission

2 points= writing is relatively error free; spelling and grammar mistakes are minimal

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.02 Narrative Writing Practice 2 (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

Four generations: Azoreg, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsFour generations: Azoreg, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

You will choose one of the following journal prompts to respond to. Include the prompt at the beginning of your submission (including any special instructions).

Your submission should be at least 300 words in length. Pay attention to all parts of the question. Underline or highlight the places where you use the required techniques.

 • The best lesson my grandparent (or parent or any relative) ever taught me was.. (use a COLLOQUIALISM and an example of REFLECTION)

• Tell five things you'd like to do on your next birthday. (Add at least two HYPERBOLEs and an example of REFLECTION)

 Narrative Writing Practice Scoring Rubric

3 points= response is at least 300 words in length, and word count is included

2 points= response is creative and interesting as well as descriptive and clear

2 points= any special instructions have been followed and highlighted

1 point= prompt is included at the beginning of the submission

2 points= writing is relatively error free; spelling and grammar mistakes are minimal

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.03 Narrative Writing Practice 3 (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

You will choose one of the following journal prompts to respond to. Include the prompt at the beginning of your submission (including any special instructions).

Clare Johnson, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsClare Johnson, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

Your submission should be at least 300 words in length. Pay attention to all parts of the question. Underline or highlight the places where you use the required techniques.

• In 20 years, I will be... (Include at least two METAPHORS and an example of DESCRIPTION)

• Tell about an event in your life that has caused a change in you. (Include a PARADOX and an example of DESCRIPTION)

Narrative Writing Practice Scoring Rubric

3 points= response is at least 300 words in length, and word count is included

2 points= response is creative and interesting as well as descriptive and clear

2 points= any special instructions have been followed and highlighted

1 point= prompt is included at the beginning of the submission

2 points= writing is relatively error free; spelling and grammar mistakes are minimal

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.04 Narrative Writing Practice 4 (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

Vacation homes in Argentina: Gustavo Facci, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsVacation homes in Argentina: Gustavo Facci, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

You will choose one of the following journal prompts to respond to. Include the prompt at the beginning of your submission (including any special instructions).

Your submission should be at least 300 words in length. Pay attention to all parts of the question. Pay attention to all parts of the question. Underline or highlight the places where you use the required techniques.

• Describe your perfect vacation. (Include an ONOMOTOPOEIA and an example of EXPOSITION)

• My worst mistake was... (use APOSTROPHE in your writing and an example of EXPOSITION)

Narrative Writing Practice Scoring Rubric

3 points= response is at least 300 words in length, and word count is included

2 points= response is creative and interesting as well as descriptive and clear

2 points= any special instructions have been followed and highlighted

1 point= prompt is included at the beginning of the submission

2 points= writing is relatively error free; spelling and grammar mistakes are minimal

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.05 Narrative Writing Practice 5 (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

Engraving of President Ulysses S. Grant funeral train passing West Point, New York: Cadet C.T. Hamilton, 1885, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsEngraving of President Ulysses S. Grant funeral train passing West Point, New York: Cadet C.T. Hamilton, 1885, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

You will choose one of the following journal prompts to respond to. Include the prompt at the beginning of your submission (including any special instructions).

Your submission  should be at least 300 words in length. Pay attention to all parts of the question. Underline or highlight the places where you use the required techniques.

  • What would you do if you were president of the United States? (include an ALLUSION and DIALOGUE)
  • A funny thing that happened to me was ... (include a PERSONIFICATION and DIALOGUE)

Narrative Writing Practice Scoring Rubric

3 points= response is at least 300 words in length, and word count is included

2 points= response is creative and interesting as well as descriptive and clear

2 points= any special instructions have been followed and highlighted

1 point= prompt is included at the beginning of the submission

2 points= writing is relatively error free; spelling and grammar mistakes are minimal

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.06 Narrative Writing

Students will write a 600-800 word narrative on a topic related to "Love and Relationships" Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

Steve Evans, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsSteve Evans, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

 

The theme for English 11 Quarter 1 is “Love and Relationships.”

Definition of narrative: a story or account of events, experiences or the like, whether true or fictitious.  A narrative is not a report or essay, but a story.

Summary of the assignments for this section: (complete instructions will be with each assignment)  

The first assignment for this section will be to brainstorm a list of 25 things that come to mind about “love and relationships.” Make a list of things you could write about, then narrow down your topic. (5 Points)

Once you have decided on a topic, please write approximately two pages (600-800 words) in narrative form. (15 points for the submission)

After the paper has been turned in, the teacher will give you a set of revision instructions that you must complete to receive the final grade for this paper. (Final paper: 40 points) Attached is the scoring rubric for the final paper.

04.06.01 Narrative Brainstorming

teacher-scored 5 points possible 8 minutes

The first assignment for this section is to brainstorm a list of 25 things that come to mind about “love and relationships.”

Make a list of things you could write about and then narrow down your topic.

Your brainstorm can be in any form--freewriting, mindwebs, lists, etc.

Narrowing down a topic can be the hardest part of writing. The key to a good narrative is a good idea, and one that is manageable. Don't try to tell about your entire first date, relating every step of the day. Instead, try focusing on a single moment with all the details and showing your experience. Don't overwhelm the reader with too much 'fluff' -- focus on the details and be creative.

Narrative Brainstorm Scoring Rubric
4 points= includes a list of possible topics
1 point= chosen topic is somehow highlighted in the "brainstorm"
5 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.07 Narrative Draft 1 (English 11)

teacher-scored 15 points possible 75 minutes

Illustration from "Off on a Comet": 1877, Philippoteaux (WMC, public domain)Illustration from "Off on a Comet": 1877, Philippoteaux (WMC, public domain)

Once you have decided on a situation that has to do with love or relationships, please write approximately two pages (600-800 words) in narrative form.

Definition of narrative: a story or account of events, experiences or the like, whether true or fictitious. Remember, a story has characters, conflict and dialogue.  You are NOT writing an argument essay - you are writing a story.

Please complete this activity as a word-processing document that you will upload, not something that you will copy and paste into the submission box.

Include the word count at the top of your paper, directly under the title

Draft 1 Scoring Rubric
5 points= narrative is creative and well written with a narrow focus
4 points= word count and title are included
3 points= required word count has been met
3 points= narrative contains few mistakes

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.08 Final Narrative Paper (English 11)

teacher-scored 40 points possible 50 minutes

Final Paper

After submitting your first draft, the teacher will send you a list of revisions to include in the final draft.

Das Stelldichein: Carl Schweninger, c. 1900 (WMC, public domain)Das Stelldichein: Carl Schweninger, c. 1900 (WMC, public domain)

Please underline or bold the revisions in your final paper.

The final paper is worth 40 points.

Final Paper Scoring Rubric (review attached rubric)

5 Points= Narrative introduction is engaging and introduces the characters/narrator
2 Points= Narrative follows a logical development and smoothly progresses through the story
5 Points= Writer uses effective narrative techniques (ex: dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, etc.)
3 Points= Writer develops relationships, cohesion, and flow
5 Points= Word choice, style and tone are developed with precise language and literary devices
5 Points= Conclusion of the narrative is satisfying
5 Points= Writing has few or no errors in grammar and spelling
2 Points= Paper has met the length requirements
8 Points= Teacher directed revisions have been included and are somehow highlighted in the text

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.09 Units 2-4 Review Quiz (English 11)

both teacher- and computer-scored 15 points possible 30 minutes

 Take the review quiz on units 2 through 4.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.00 Informative and Explanatory Writing

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing from the Utah Core:

Petroglyphs in southern Africa: Greg Willis, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsPetroglyphs in southern Africa: Greg Willis, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

• For students, writing is a key means of asserting and defending claims, showing what they know about a subject, and conveying what they have experienced, imagined, thought and felt.

• To be college and career ready writers, students must take task, purpose and audience into careful consideration, choosing words, information, structures and formats deliberately.

• Students need to know how to combine elements of different kinds of writing--for example, to use narrative strategies within argument and explanation within narrative--to produce complex and nuanced writing.

• Students need to be able to use technology strategically when creating, refining and collaborating on writing.

• Students have to become adept at gathering information, evaluating sources and citing material accurately, reporting findings from their research and analysis of sources in a clear and cogent manner.

• Students must have the flexibility, concentration and fluency to produce high-quality first-draft text under a tight deadline, as well as the capacity to revisit and make improvements to a piece of writing using multiple drafts when circumstances encourage or require it.

05.01 Research Review

Username: pioneer

Password: [Please ask your local school librarian or your teacher for the password.]

05.01 Research Review (English 11)

Students will review research skills and use Pioneer Library to explore topics Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.

GNU General Public License via Wikimedia CommonsGNU General Public License via Wikimedia Commons

 

Please review the information found in the attached presentations concerning the use of the Pioneer LIbrary (including EBSCO and SIRS) and MLA documentation. After looking over the information, you will be required to take a short quiz on the material.

*If you have trouble opening any of the file attachments, please let me know and I will send it to you in a different format.

05.01 Research Review Quiz (English 11)

computer-scored 10 points possible 4 minutes

Complete the review quiz on research.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


05.02 I Search Paper (English 11)

Students will use research skills to learn about a topic of interest to them. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Filosofias filosoficas, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsFilosofias filosoficas, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

For this assignment, you get to choose a topic that interests you.  Bear in mind you will need to be able to find sources of information on the topic, so don't pick something TOO obscure.

Have you heard of "metacognition"?  Metacognition is thinking about how we think.  Similarly, this project will ask you to think about how you did the research and what you learned.

05.02.01 I Search Research Project (English 11)

teacher-scored 70 points possible 180 minutes

President Richard Nixon, 1972: NARA, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsPresident Richard Nixon, 1972: NARA, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

The attachment is an example to help with formatting. 

I Search Research Review Assignment 

*This assignment should be completed in a word-processing program and sent as an attachment to the teacher

Section 1: First, write a paragraph describing the topic you have chosen and why you have chosen it. Explain what you already know about the subject, what you think you know, what you assume or what you imagine. (10 points) 

Section 2:  Create an annotated bibliography.  

You need to find at least four sources on your chosen topic (you can only have two Internet sources). Sources found in Pioneer Library are not considered “internet” sources.

You are going to complete an annotation for each of the sources you have found. To do an annotation, first put the bibliographic information, then write a complete paragraph discussing the information in the source. Do not simply copy and paste information--it must be in your own words. (40 Points) 

Annotated Bibliography Example

(Bibliography) McPherson, James. To the Best of My Ability: The American Presidents. Dorling- Kindersley: New York, 2001.

(Descriptive Paragraph) This book is an excellent look at the highlight of each President. It contain nearly 500 pages of amazing information that is detailed enough to avoid triviality yet is simple and easy to read. To the Best of My Ability is an outstanding reference book but also includes little known facts about each president. One of my favorite features of this book is the use of specific quotations stated by each president. This book also contains some great pictures of each president. Another handy feature are the side bars which includes tidbits of information such as date of birth, party affiliation, and the major events of the presidency. Each president’s section details their presidency from beginning to end. I choose to look specifically at Richard Nixon for my report. One interesting thing I learned about Nixon was that “in spite of his known flaws, a lot of Americans obviously did like him (267). I was also surprised to read a remark by Adlai Stevenson that “this is a man of many masks… who can say they have seen his real face” (269). 

Section 3: This section should be between two and three paragraphs. You need to compare what you originally thought about your subject with what you have learned. Include personal commentary and draw conclusions. You should use the information you found in your research. You should include at least two textual references in your discussion. (20 Points) 

Section 3 Alternate: Instead of writing three paragraphs discussing what you have learned, you can put the information into a PowerPoint presentation or create a video presentation outlining what you have learned in your research.

I Search Scoring Rubric

Section 1= 10 Points
6 Points= complete paragraph outlining what you already know about the topic
4 Points= paragraph is well written and engaging with few errors in spelling and grammar

Section 2= 40 Points
Each annotation is worth 10 Points
5 Points= complete paragraph summary of the article
3 Points= correct MLA bibliographic information is included
2 Points= paragraph is not copied from the source and is well written with few errors

Section 3= 20 Points
9 Points= review paragraphs discuss the topic in detail focusing on the new information acquired
5 Points= paragraphs are well written and engaging with few errors
6 Points= Information from the research is used in the discussion and specific textual references are used.
Section 3 Alternate= 20 Points
8 Points= Research is presented thoroughly in a PowerPoint presentation or video; new information learned is clear
6 Points= Presentation of the topic is creative and engaging
6 Points= Specific textual references are used in the presentation and somehow highlighted for emphasis

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.00 Argumentative Writing and Informational Text

Congresswoman Mary Bono interviewed by "CBS 2" News, 2007: US Govt photo, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsCongresswoman Mary Bono interviewed by "CBS 2" News, 2007: US Govt photo, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing from the Utah Core:

• For students, writing is a key means of asserting and defending claims, showing what they know about a subject, and conveying what they have experienced, imagined, thought, and felt.

• To be college and career-ready writers, students must take task, purpose, and audience into careful consideration, choosing words, information, structures and formats deliberately.

• Students need to know how to combine elements of different kinds of writing—-for example, to use narrative strategies within argument and explanation within narrative--to produce complex and nuanced writing.

• Students need to be able to use technology strategically when creating, refining and collaborating on writing.

• Students have to become adept at gathering information, evaluating sources and citing material accurately, reporting findings from their research and analysis of sources in a clear and cogent manner.

• Students must have the flexibility, concentration, and fluency to produce high-quality first-draft text under a tight deadline as well as the capacity to revisit and make improvements to a piece of writing using multiple drafts when circumstances encourage or require it.

06.01 Editorial Writing (English 11)

Students will explore argumentative writing with a study of editorial and opinion examples: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. a. Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases. c. Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims. d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.

Editorial Writing

An editorial, sometimes called an "opinion piece"  may be argument or persuasive writing. What's the difference?

Argument, or argumentative writing, is intended to analyze a topic about which there may be disagreement, and find a true or useful solution.  An argument is written to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.  When you research before and as you write an argumentative piece, the conclusion is influenced by the facts of the matter.

Persuasion, or persuasive writing, is intended to convince the audience to agree with the author. When you research for a persuasive piece, you look for evidence that supports the opinion you started with. 

Most editorials are fairly short (about 200-800 words).  This is partly because newspapers and magazines, the usual place editorials are published, have limited space.  Note that you should check the questions you will need to answer before you choose a piece for the second assignment, to make sure the subject matter will work with the questions. 

Please note that you should not use phrases like "I believe", "I think" or "in my opinion" in your argument writing.  It is redundant (because the reader will presume that what you write is what you believe or think), and it weakens your statements.  For example, if you have written, "In my opinion, most teachers assign too much homework," you should instead write "Most teachers assign too much homework."

For this set of  assignments, you will be required to complete three tasks.

Editorial cartoon shows Wyoming miners killing Chinese workers, 1885; the caption reads "There's no doubt of the U.S. being at the head of enlightened nations!": Thomas Nast, Harper's Weekly, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsEditorial cartoon shows Wyoming miners killing Chinese workers, 1885; the caption reads "There's no doubt of the U.S. being at the head of enlightened nations!": Thomas Nast, Harper's Weekly, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

1. You will read an editorial supplied by the teacher and answer questions

2. You will read an editorial of your choice and respond to questions

3. You will write an editorial in response to your chosen article

06.01.01 Editorial Practice (English 11)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 40 minutes

Editorial/ Letter to the Editor Response

Ed Poor, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsEd Poor, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

Read the article from the Deseret News: "Final Wake Up Call?" (link below)

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

************************************************************************************

1. What problem does the author present in the article?  (2 points)

2. How could this problem potentially affect you? (2 points)

3. Who else does the problem affect? (2 points)

4. What is the cause of the problem? (2 points)

5. What is the effect of the problem? (2 points)

6. Who is the audience? (2 points)

7. What solutions (if any) does the author present in the article? (2 points)

8. What other solutions can you come up with for the problem presented by the author? (2 points)

9. Does the author make a valid statement? Why or why not? (2 points)

10.  Is this persuasion or argument?  Justify your answer with evidence from the article. (2 points)

11. Write a one-paragraph response to the author of the article. (5 points)

************************************************************************************

Scoring Rubric

2 Points each= Questions 1-10

5 Points= Question 11

25 Points total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.02 Choice Editorial Article (English 11)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 45 minutes

Your assignment is to find a letter to the editor or an editorial on a topic that interests you (see links below for possible sources). You will answer almost the same set of questions as for the previous article.  If these questions don't make sense with the editorial, you need to choose another one.

Make sure you include the link to the article or a picture of the article.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

************************************************************************************

1. Article Title (1 point):

2. Article Source (1 point):

3. Author (1 point):

4. What problem does the author present in the article? (2 points)

5. How could this problem potentially affect you? (2 points)

6. Who else does the problem affect? (2 points)

7. What is the cause of the problem? (2 points)

8. What is the effect of the problem? (2 points)

9. Who is the audience? (2 points)

10. What solutions (if any) does the author present in the article? (2 points)

11. What other solutions can you come up with for the problem presented by the author? (2 points)

12. Does the author make a valid statement? Why or why not? (2 points)

13.  What logical reasons or facts does the author use?  What appeals to emotion does the author use? (2 points)

14. *Article Link (2 points):

*You need to turn in a copy of the letter or a link to the letter to the teacher along with this assignment. You can send the link if it is an online source, copy and paste, or take a picture of the article and email it to me. I will not score this assignment without the link or copy of the article.

************************************************************************************

Scoring Rubric

3 Points= questions 1-3 (1 point each)

22 Points= questions 4-13 (2 points each)

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.03 Letter to the Editor (English 11)

teacher-scored 33 points possible 60 minutes

Letter to the Editor

After answering questions about the letter to the editor or editorial of your choice (from the last assignment), you are going to write an argument letter in response to the one you read. Your letter should be between 450 and 550 words (if you were going to send it to a newspaper, there is usually a strict word-count limit).

Please address it to the appropriate audience (the readership of the publication) by using suitable word choice. You should incorporate some of the information found in the letter you are responding to to make your argument.  You should also do a little research to find relevant examples or facts to help you design the claim in your response, and to support either your claim or a counterclaim.

This assignment will be completed as a word-processing document and turned in as an attachment. You may also submit your letter to the publication from which you read the initial editorial or letter.

Make sure to submit reworked letter through Learn (where you submit assignments) for grading. 

"Readers Debate Earlier Retirement", editorial page ROA June 2006: Gerald Berch, released into public domain via Wikimedia Commons"Readers Debate Earlier Retirement", editorial page ROA June 2006: Gerald Berch, released into public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Letter to the Editor Rubric

5 Points= Letter is within the word count guidelines of 450 and 550 words (please include your word count at the top of your document)

8 Points= Letter responds to the letter chosen by the student in the previous assignment. In the student's letter, there are at least two direct citations of the letter chosen by the student.  Content of the letter is argumentative in nature, using valid logic.

6 Points= Letter uses examples and outside information for support (can use outside sources; please cite any outside sources used)

6 Points= Word choice and language are appropriate for the audience

4 Points= Student uses argument instead of persuasion in responding to the letter. Student avoids statements such as "I believe" or "I think"

4 Points= Letter has few or no spelling and grammar errors

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.04 Directed Research Paper (English 11)

Students will write an argumentative research paper on topic chosen by the teacher. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Pamala Wilson, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsPamala Wilson, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

Directed Research Paper Topic: Should homework be abolished?

Homework is a source of stress in many American households. This stress is compounded when both parents work or in single-parent households. Students are also busier than ever with after-school activities including sports, music lessons and part-time jobs, which leave little time for hours of homework.

However, school reform movements like the No Child Left Behind Act that require schools to show improvement in student performance or lose funding make it more likely that homework is not going away.

The National PTA and the National Education Association both endorse the "ten-minute rule" created by Duke University psychology professor Harris Cooper. This rule says that students should get ten minutes of homework a night per grade--a first grader would have 10 minutes of homework, a second grader 20 minutes, and so on.

Critics of homework argue that too much of it is busywork that has little academic value.

Use the links below to research this issue.

06.04.01 Directed Research Paper Articles (English 11)

teacher-scored 51 points possible 200 minutes

The next section of this project requires you to read three total articles about the topic. Choose one pro article and one con article from the links below; then find one article on your own (you may use EBSCO or another source).

You will need to accurately cite all of your sources for your paper using MLA format.  EBSCO has a tool to use for citing sources from there. For other sources, you may find a site such as citationmachine.net helpful in generating accurate citations.  If you need to review using EBSCO or citing sources, this information can be found in Unit 5.

After reading each article, you will answer the questions below. Please use a word-processing program to type your responses in a single document and then turn it in all together as an attachment. Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document to help you complete the requirements for the assignment.

************************************************************************************

Respond to each question for each article:

1. What is the author’s argument or suggestion? (2 points)

2. What key points does the author make to support his/her argument? (2 points)

3. Do you agree or disagree with the author? Explain your position. (3 points)

4. List three of the author’s points that really made you reconsider your own opinion about this topic (you don't need to have changed your position, just thought more or in a different way about it). (3 points)

5. Directly quote two sections of the text you could use in your essay. (4 points)

6. Explain why you think this author is a credible source. (2 points)

7. Include the correct MLA documentation for each source. (3 points)

19 Points for each article= 51 Points total 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.04.1 Directed Research Paper (English 11)

You can access "Homework" articles if you are already logged in to the Pioneer Website (pioneer.uen.org). 

06.05 Pro/ Con Chart for Directed Research Paper (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

The next step in this assignment is to create a pro/ con chart based on the research you have done.

List at least five pros and five cons.

Scoring Rubric:

5 points for each pro argument

5 points for each con argument

10 Points total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.06 Directed Research Essay (English 11)

teacher-scored 19 points possible 45 minutes

Activity: Write a five-paragraph argumentative essay responding to the prompt "Should homework be abolished?"

Use your experiences and opinions along with the evidence from your research  to develop your response.

Essay Scoring Rubric

5 points= student uses the five paragraph model to organize the essay.  The three body paragraphs each include evidence and examples to support one aspect of the main claim OR the third body paragraph addresses a counter-claim.

3 points= student develops a clear thesis statement

5 points= student uses enough discussion and detail to support the thesis

3 points= student avoids statements such as "I believe" and "I think"

3 points= essay has minimal spelling and grammar mistakes, and cites sources in MLA style.  

21 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.07 Directed Research Final Draft (English 11)

teacher-scored 34 points possible 60 minutes

Now, you get to take your original five-paragraph essay and revise it into a complete argumentative research paper.

Rennett Stowe, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsRennett Stowe, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

Your final paper should be between 600-800 words. You must also incorporate directly cited text from your articles and include the correct MLA reference. You should have at least five text citations in your final paper.

See the attached rubric for details about grading. Below is a simplified version of the rubric.

Scoring Rubric

3 Points= Introduces precise, knowledgeable claim and establishes significance
5 Points=Develops claims and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly; supplies most relevant data and evidence
5 Points=Uses words, clauses and phrases, as well as varied syntax, to link major sections of the text, create cohesion and clarify the relationships between claims and reasons
5 Points=Establishes and maintains a smooth, formal style and objective tone; words and phrases such as "I believe" and "I think" are non-existent
3 Points= Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented
5 Points=Has few or no errors in conventions, grammar or usage
5 Points=Lists and appropriately cites credible, relevant, authoritative sources
3 Points= Paper is adequate in length and word count is included

34 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.08 Final Research Paper (English 11)

Students will write a final research paper using the skills they have built through the course. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Stadium High School, Tacoma WA: Joe Mabel, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsStadium High School, Tacoma WA: Joe Mabel, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsYour job is to research the following topic:

Some people feel that the public school system does not adequately prepare students for the real world.
Identify and discuss ONE improvement you think schools need to make in order to better prepare students for life after high school.

Focus in on one specific problem area and one improvement, and research for evidence to support that need.  Your introduction might mention several problems or make a broad, general statement, but should narrow it down to one problem and make a claim about the improvements need to address that problem.

Do NOT try to cover a broad problem like "High schools do not prepare students for real life" or even "High schools do not prepare students for college."  It would take a long book to cover those topics - you are only writing one essay.

 

06.08.01 Final Paper Research (English 11)

teacher-scored 51 points possible 75 minutes

Prompt: Some people feel that the public school system does not adequately prepare students for the real world. Identify and discuss improvements you think schools need to make in order to better prepare students for life after high school.

Research three articles that would help you make a claim on this topic.  You may choose from the articles listed below or research your own.  EBSCO in Pioneer Library is a great resource to use for research. 

You will need to accurately cite all of your sources for your paper.  EBSCO has a tool to use for citing sources from there. For other sources, you may find a site such as citationmachine.net helpful in generating accurate citations.  If you need to review this information, it can be found in Unit 5.

After reading each article, you will answer the questions below. Please use a word processing program to type your responses in a single document and then turn in all together as an attachment. Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document to help you complete the assignment.

*********************************************************************

Respond to each question for each article:

1. What is the author’s main claim? (2 points)

2. What key points does the author make to support his/her claim? (2 points)

3. Do you agree or disagree with the author? Explain your position. (3 points)

4. List three of the author’s points that really made you reconsider your own opinion about this topic. (3 points)

5. Directly quote two sections of the text you could use in your essay. (4 points)

6. Explain why you think this author is a credible source. (2 points)

7. Include the correct MLA documentation for each source. (3 points)

16 Points for each article= 48 Points total

***********************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.09 Final Research Paper (English 11)

teacher-scored 34 points possible 100 minutes

Using your research, write a paper which outlines your claim about the topic:  Some people feel that the public school system does not adequately prepare students for the real world. Identify one improvement you think schools need to make in order to better prepare students for life after high school.

Sasayamahomei High School, Japan: 松岡明芳, released into public domain via Wikimedia CommonsSasayamahomei High School, Japan: 松岡明芳, released into public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Your final paper should be between 500-700 words. You must also incorporate directly cited text from your articles and include the correct MLA reference. You should have at least five text citations in your final paper.

See the attached rubric for details about grading. Below is a simplified version of the rubric.

Scoring Rubric

3 Points= Introduces precise, knowledgeable claim and establishes significance
5 Points=Develops claims and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly; supplies most relevant data and evidence
5 Points=Uses words, clauses and phrases, as well as varied syntax, to link major sections of the text, create cohesion and clarify the relationships between claims and reasons
5 Points=Establishes and maintains a smooth, formal style and objective tone; words and phrases such as "I believe" and "I think" are non-existent
3 Points= Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented
5 Points=Has few or no errors in conventions, grammar or usage
5 Points=Lists and appropriately cites credible, relevant, authoritative sources
3 Points= Paper is adequate in length and word count is included

34 Points Total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


06.10 Unit 06 Review Quiz (English 11)

computer-scored 19 points possible 5 minutes

Girls in needlework class, UK, c. 1945: from the collections of the Imperial War Museums, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsGirls in needlework class, UK, c. 1945: from the collections of the Imperial War Museums, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Complete the unit 6 quiz.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.