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1st Quarter, PE Fitness for Life

00.00 Start Here (Fitness for Life)

Course Description

Fitness for Life is an individualized, concepts-based course delivered by EHS in 2 quarter classes. Fitness for Life is designed to give students the knowledge and skills necessary to self-assess, create, conduct, evaluate, and redesign personal fitness programs.

This class is required of all students and there are no substitutions, including participation in athletics. Fitness for Life may be taken anytime during grades nine through twelve, but it is strongly recommended that students take the class in either the ninth or tenth grade year. The course is a combination of classroom and activity-based learning activities with a focus on proper nutrition and the mastery of skills and concepts necessary for students to become accomplished monitors of their personal lifetime fitness. Through participation, students learn to compare the fitness benefits in a variety of individual and team activities.

NOTE: Students may only earn Fitness for Life Q1 and Fitness for Life Q2 credit once from EHS.

Also, you may take only one online PE or Fitness class with EHS at a time. You may NOT receive credit for two PE or Fitness classes taken concurrently.

Class Overview

Welcome to Fitness for Life online.  

Fitness for Life is unique in that each quarter is to be completed in 7 weeks, unlike the 10 week time limit given for all other EHS courses. Because improvement in fitness depends on consistent exercise, you will exercise for 6 consecutive weeks in order to complete each quarter. (The extra week is provided to allow for various interruptions that inevitably arise.)

8 "Must Read" Tidbits of Information:

1.    The first thing you should do is read the class requirements.

2.    All the online lessons include the written material and links to all the information needed to complete each assignment.  

3.    Prepare yourself to read all of the course content.

4.    Please consult the Pacing Guide for this course and commit to finish each quarter within seven weeks from your start date.     

       https://share.ehs.uen.org/view-syllabus/279,161 for Q1
       https://share.ehs.uen.org/view-syllabus/279,162 for Q2

       The start date is the Monday of the week of your enrollment date.

5.   You will begin with the About Me assignment and Parent Contact Form. Print out a copy of the PARENT CONTACT FORM, found in the Overview 01 section, and have your parent fill it out. You will submit it after the About Me assignment via the Parent Contact Form Submission window. Most students take a picture of the filled out form and submit it as a JPG. The attachments are provided in either PDF or RTF format--choose either version.

6.    Fitness for Life Q1 is divided into 4 units listed under “Class Content”.  The assignments, power-point presentations and materials are there to help you learn the necessary information for each unit.

Note: Assignments are found after the lessons.

IMPORTANT:   You will need to copy and paste assignments into a word processing file, type in your answers, and save it. Then go to that assignment on the front page of the class and, click "edit my submission," copy and paste in your completed work and click on "save." Make sure you ”save” your assignments to a file before sending them to be sure you have copies of what you sent. Image from Wikimedia Commons, Ninule01, CC Universal Public DomainImage from Wikimedia Commons, Ninule01, CC Universal Public Domain

 

7.    You should get started on your Cardiovascular Health Risks Profile Assignment 01.01.01 during the first week, as well as begin exercising at least three times per week aerobically in order to start fulfilling the requirement of Activity Log 1, which is to be completed during the first week, but submitted during the second. (Assignment 01.01.01 is to be submitted during the first week.)

8.   Workout log requirements: You must work out aerobically for at least 30 minutes three times a week and record an Activity Log Sheet to earn credit in this class. You must get your heart rate between 130-180 beats per minute for 30 consecutive minutes to earn full credit on logs (this means exercise without stopping to keep your heart rate up). The logs need to be signed by a parent and include a thoroughly written journal worth 20 points. Brief and poorly written logs will result in deductions from your log scores. To earn full credit on logs you must do both: exercise aerobically, and write.  

Before you start, you will need to take your resting heart rate. Count your pulse for 6 seconds and multiply by 10. This will tell you how many times your heart beats in one minute. Record your resting heart rate in your log.

Immediately after or during your exercise, take your heart rate again using the same steps explained above. This will be recorded as your exercise heart rate.

After 3 minutes take your heart rate a third time. Record this in your log as your recovery heart rate.

*You will find the Activity Log Sheets in Unit 1 Lesson 01 and in the overview 01 section. 

FAQ: Is there a specific type of aerobic exercise you must do? There is no specific type of exercise that must be performed to earn credit for your workout logs. Any exercise or activity that meets the requirement of elevating your heart rate to the aerobic training zone of 130-180 beats per minute for a total of at least 30 minutes will suffice. To give you a good idea of the types of exercise that are considered aerobic, here is a list of common aerobic exercises: jogging, swimming, brisk walking, riding a bike or stationary bike, running on an elliptical trainer, hiking, cross-country skiing, using a rowing machine, circuit training, Cross-Fit, using various exercise videos such as P90X or Insanity, etc. 

*IMPORTANT: Logs backdated more than two weeks from their completion date will not be accepted for credit, so please turn them in as you go rather than hold onto them for several weeks before submission.

Note: Students who have not submitted their 1st Activity Log by week 3 may automatically be dropped from the course. You have seven weeks to be done with the first quarter. As soon as you have completed the 1st quarter, you will need to take a proctored final exam for that quarter. You will choose a proctor from the list once you are approved to take the final, and you should take it within two weeks of finishing your work.  If you plan on taking Quarter 2, you will be able to request it once your Quarter 1 final is finished and EHS has processed your final course grade. This usually takes 1-2 weeks. Once you are enrolled into Quarter 2 you can start recording your Activity logs again; DO NOT keep logs in between enrollments; you will have to start over once you get enrolled into Quarter 2. The logs HAVE TO BE DONE while enrolled in the class! You can earn a total of .5 credits for this class after completing both the first and second quarters. You can request second quarter immediately after first quarter is completed and continue for an additional seven weeks (for a total enrollment time of 14 weeks).    

Turning in Your Work

The content of this class is divided into 4 units and is labeled as such. Work through each unit's lessons for a guide to the learning you need to accomplish. The assignments follow the lessons.

The third module contains indented links to the assignments, quizzes, and tests for the class. Each of these items is part of your gradebook. You need to successfully complete each item in module three. To turn in your assignment, click on the assignment name and then, depending on the assignment type, you use a button labeled [Submit Assignment] or [UPLOAD A FILE] or [EDIT MY SUBMISSION].

You'll see descriptions of your assignments along with the content. Create and then work on your assignments on your local computer.

You turn in your assignments in the Module 3 area.

*Reminder: Logs backdated more than two weeks from their completion date will not be accepted for credit.

Grading

Each assignment has a maximum number of points you can earn if you do an excellent job on that assignment. But you must earn a minimum of 60% on each assignment. 

You can always submit a revised, improved version of an assignment to get more points for it. Your final grade will be determined by the percentage of total points you earn, including the final. 

Your logs count 25%, other assignments/quizzes count 50%, and the final test counts 25%.

EHS Grading scale:
A 93-100%
A- 90-92%
B+ 87-89%
B 84-86%
B- 80 -83%
C+ 77-79%
C 74-76%
C- 70-73
D+ 67-69%
D 64-66%
D- 60 - 63%
No credit - below 60

As with all EHS classes, you must pass the proctored final test at the end of the class.

If you score below 60% on the final, you will fail the class and not earn credit. You may not re-take the final test, although you may re-take the entire class.

Note: You cannot retake the final to try to raise your grade.

US Navy image, public domainUS Navy image, public domain

If you do the bare minimum on assignments, you can expect to get scores around 70-80% (that's C to B range, for those of you who are used to letters); if you want to get maximum points for an "A," you need to "go the extra mile": show me some creativity and depth of understanding, as well as being meticulous about proofreading your work to make it correct.

Final Proctored Exam

The Final Proctored Exam is a multiple choice test. The questions are taken from the bank of questions used for Unit quizzes. You must score at least 60% on the test in order to earn credit for the course, and you may NOT re-take the final test unless you first re-take the class. 

Good luck! If you have questions, please feel free to ask, but first please read all the above listed materials; this will answer most questions you may have.  You can e-mail your instructor or use the message tool inside the class if you have further questions, see "Teacher Contact Information".

Note that, as with other classes, you can only get credit for Fitness for Life one time. That is, after earning your .5 credit for completing the two quarters, you may not sign up again and get a second .5 credit.

00.00 *Student supplies for Fitness for Life

Everything you need to complete Fitness for Life assignments and logs is included within the content of this course via the lessons and links. The textbook is not necessary, although some students like to order it as a supplement to the information provided in the online lessons.

00.00 About Me (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 5 points possible 15 minutes

This assignment is to be completed in WEEK 1 of this class. Please copy and paste the questions located between the ******** and then supply the answers.

By submitting this assignment you agree to abide by the EHS Honor Code, which is:

"As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers and staff with respect."

Please answer each question in a complete sentence and have your answers in Bold or Uppercase.

***********************************************************

Fitness for Life - About Me

 

1. Name - first and last: 

2. What school do you attend, and what grade are you in? 

3. What is your Fitness level? 

4. What are some interesting things about you (hobbies, fun story, interests, etc.)? 

5. What is the date you ENROLLED in this quarter of Fitness for Life? 

6. Now add 7 weeks to the date of Number 5, What is your maximum completion date? (You can finish before this date, but not after!) 

Please consult the Pacing Guide for this course and commit to finish this quarter within seven weeks from your start date.     

    https://share.ehs.uen.org/view-syllabus/279,161 for Q1
    https://share.ehs.uen.org/view-syllabus/279,162 for Q2

7. ACKNOWLEDGE that you understand and agree to abide by the EHS honor code: "As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers and staff with respect." YES or NO

8. Student contact information. USERNAME, EMAIL and PHONE NUMBER (This can be our email and phone #, or a parent/guardians email and phone #, or you can provide both. But I must have an email and phone number for contact information!) 

USERNAME:

EMAIL:

PHONE:

9. MAKE SURE you INCLUDE(Quarter 2) SUBMIT in correct submission (Quarter 1) the PARENT CONTACT FORM - you won't be able to move on till BOTH the PARENT CONTACT FORM and the ABOUT ME assignment have been submitted and graded.  Is your Parent Contact Form attached or submitted? 

10. Please submit logs that are dated WHILE YOU ARE ENROLLED IN THE CLASS - Logs backdated more than two weeks from their completion date will not be accepted for credit.        

Will logs backdated more than 2 weeks be accepted?

***************************************************************************************************

About Me Assignment Example:

1. My name is Jim Nasium

2. I attend Fit for Life High School, home of the Buff-N-Tuffs. I am in 10th grade.

3. On a scale from 1-10, if you consider watching sports while downing Dr. Pepper and Hershey's Nuggets a fitness activity, I am a solid 11. In reality I'd say my fitness level is probably a 7 or 8. I run 3 times a week and play dodgeball like a professional anytime my P.E. class engages in the activity. I probably need to add more weight training to my routine to increase my level.

4. I consider headbands a "must" fitness accessory. They go with my long socks, tank top, and short shorts. A girl I liked once beat me in the 50 yard dash. 

5. I enrolled in this class on the Ides of March, which if you are familiar with Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, you would know is March 15th.

6. I need to be finished by May 1st, which is 7 weeks from my start date.

7. Yes

8. Username: Jim.Nasium.1111

    Email: Jim.Nasium@Fitness4Life.com

    Phone: 435-Get-Fitt

9. Yes, I will submit my signed Parent Contact Form in the proper submission window.

10. No, I understand that backdated logs will not be accepted, no way, no how, not at anytime. 

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


00.01.01 Student Software Needs

 

Students need access to a robust internet connection and a modern web browser.

This class may also require the Apple QuickTime plug-in to view media.

For students using a school-issued Chromebook, ask your technical support folks to download the QuickTime plug-in and enable the plug-in for your Chromebook.

$0.00

01.00 Activity logs (Fitness for Life)

Students will demonstrate competency in motor skills and movement patterns needed to perform a variety of physical activities. Demonstrate active participation outside of the school day. Students will participate regularly in physical activity. Students will value physical activity for health, enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, and/or social interaction. Students will choose activities that are personally rewarding. Participate in a variety of individual and group activities appropriate for enhancing physical fitness both during and after school hours. Maintain activity journals illustrating activity participation outside of school hours. Utilize imagination, self-expression, and creativity in designing personal fitness plans.

 

Introduction:

Mountain biking is an aerobic activity!: By Dave Silver (www.bcbikerace.com) Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsMountain biking is an aerobic activity!: By Dave Silver (www.bcbikerace.com) Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Fitness for Life is a class in which you are required to exercise aerobically at least three times a week, just as you would in any physical education course. Aerobic means continuous activity that keeps your heart rate at 60-90% of its maximum. Maximum rate can be estimated by taking the number 220 and subtracting your age. For example, if you are 15 years old, your maximum heart rate would be 205. During your activity, you would want your heart rate to be between 123 and 185 beats per minute (205 * .60 = 123, 2.5 * .90 = 185). A minimum heart rate of 130 will be required for full credit (130-180 beats per minute) for cardiovascular workouts.

The purpose of this assignment is to help you design your own fitness program. Consider the things you need to do to increase your current level of physical activity; your assignments will help you along the way. You will be required to exercise aerobically for at least 30 minutes three times a week. The point is to select something that you will be able to engage in on a regular basis. The more you put into this, the more you will get out of it, and the better results you will achieve.

Task: Print out copies of the attached Activity Log Workout Sheet (6 for each term) for a total of 12 logs (if you are taking both quarters). You may need to reformat a bit to fit your page in Microsoft Word or Pages. Copy and paste--Number the sheets 1 through 12, and fill in the dates. Choose an aerobic exercise. Be creative--try new activities, and invite your family or friends to join you. Try to find something you enjoy doing.

Need more clarification concerning what qualifies as aerobic exercise for this class? Click on the link in Lesson 01.01: Workout Log Requirements Defined in 20 Sec.

• Before you start, you will need to take your resting heart rate. Count your pulse for 6 seconds and multiply by 10. This will tell you how many times your heart beats in one minute. Record your resting heart rate in your log.

• Immediately after or during your exercise, take your heart rate again using the same steps explained above. This will be recorded as your exercise heart rate.

• After 3 minutes take your heart rate a third time. Record this in your log as your recovery heart rate.

As you exercise each week, record your activities and heart rates in the boxes given. Be sure to include the duration of the exercise. Don’t forget to take your heart rate before, during and after your workout. You will be required to exercise a minimum of three times a week for no less than 30 minutes per session.

You will notice there is a space for “other” activities. You may use this space to record anything other exercise you do that is not necessarily aerobic. Once you have completed your activity log, be sure to have your parent sign and include an e-mail address of your parent or guardian in case we have questions. Submit your activity logs every week to your instructor via the online submission process.

Answers to Frequently Asked Questions: When should I start? How much are the logs worth? Where do I find the log sheets? Etc.

The weekly Activity Logs are an on-going assignment. They enable you to design your own fitness program. You should begin now, and continue to keep logs of your physical activity throughout the class. These logs will be worth 25% of your grade.

Download either version of the Activity Log sheet.  You will find them in Unit 1 Lesson 01 (attached, above) or in the Overview 01 section. You will need to print a set of six log sheets per quarter, and number them 1 through 6 (for first quarter) or 7-12 (for second quarter).

You may record exercises done in the assignments on your activity logs. 

All six Activity Logs must be completed (six each quarter) in order to earn credit. A parent or guardian signature is required on every log, so you will need to scan or photograph them to create an electronic image. Don't wait till the end of the class to send all your logs--send each as it is finished. 

*IMPORTANT: Logs backdated more than two weeks from their completion date will not be accepted for credit, so please turn them in as you go rather than hold onto them for several weeks before submission.

Is there a specific type of aerobic exercise you must do? There is no specific type of exercise that must be performed to earn credit for your workout logs. Any exercise or activity that meets the requirement of elevating your heart rate to the aerobic training zone of 130-180 beats per minute for a total of at least 30 minutes will suffice. To give you a good idea of the types of exercise that are considered aerobic, here is a list of common aerobic exercises: jogging, swimming, brisk walking, riding a bike or stationary bike, running on an elliptical trainer, hiking, cross-country skiing, using a rowing machine, circuit training, Cross-Fit, using various exercise videos such as P90X or Insanity, etc. 

Activity Logs are submitted in their respective submission windows with corresponding numbers. The Week 1 Activity Log 01.01.02, for instance, is submitted in window 01.01.02, and so on...

Due to the pacing of the class, your Week 1 Log will not be able to be submitted until your first assignment, The Cardiovascular Health Risk Profile 01.01.01, is submitted and graded. That is why it is not scheduled to be submitted until the second week of the course. See the pacing guide for further information concerning the proper order of submitting assignments and log.  

Students who have not submitted their 1st Activity Log by week 3 may automatically be dropped from the course. You have seven weeks to be done with the first quarter. The logs HAVE TO BE DONE while enrolled in the class!

Submit your assignments and logs via Module 3. DO NOT email them, as they will not be submitted into the grade book unless Module 3 is used.

Turning in your Log: To turn in your log, click on the log name and then use a button labeled [Submit Assignment] or [UPLOAD A FILE] or [EDIT MY SUBMISSION].

You turn in all logs and assignments via Module 3.

Evaluation: Each log in first quarter will be worth 65 points. You will receive 45 points for completing the chart portion of the log and 20 points for answering the questions at the bottom. Remember to number and record dates correctly. If you have any questions e-mail your instructor. Logs are worth one fourth of your grade, so remember to exercise aerobically at least 30 minutes three times a week, getting your heart rate up to at least 130 beats per minute.

01.00 Getting Started with Exercise (Fitness for Life)

Cross-country skiing is aerobic exercise.: By Peterparr at en.wikipedia, Public domain, from Wikimedia CommonsCross-country skiing is aerobic exercise.: By Peterparr at en.wikipedia, Public domain, from Wikimedia Commons

In this unit, you will use various techniques to learn about your fitness. You will learn or review the following concepts:

Health-related fitness and skill-related fitness, FITT, specificity, overload, reversibility, aerobic and anaerobic work, RICE, hyperkinetic injuries, the relationship between diabetes and exercise, and the bone conditions osteoporosis, scoliosis, kyphosis, and lordosis.

Begin by viewing the unit presentation and reading the lessons in Unit 1.

The assignments related to this unit:

01.1.1 Cardiovascular Health Risk Profile

01.1.2 Activity log 1

01.2.1 Body composition

01.2.2 Activity log 2, and

Unit 1 quiz.  

01.01 What is your body trying to tell you? (Fitness for Life)

Demonstrate an understanding of the fitness outcomes in a variety of activities. Demonstrate basic competence in a variety of activities that contribute to improvement of overall fitness. Compare aerobic and anaerobic activities, showing examples of each. Use FITT (frequency, intensity, time, type) guidelines to evaluate activities. Compare aerobic and anaerobic activities, showing examples of each. Pre-test to establish baseline fitness information for muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, body composition, heart rate, blood pressure, and cardiovascular endurance.

Essential Question: What is your body trying to tell you? View the Unit 1 presentation (see the attached file above, or the links to the video version below). If you have trouble downloading the PPTX file, right-click the file and tell it to download to your local computer and open it that way. U.S Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Terry Spain, public domainU.S Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Terry Spain, public domain To begin this class, you may be a little nervous about being able to complete the assignments or adequately complete the workouts. Health and Wellness standards require you to have enough fitness to

  • Reduce risk of health problems,
  • Achieve wellness benefits, and
  • Enjoy free time and meet emergencies.

Notice that it doesn’t say feeling tired, injured, or in pain; so, before we begin on this assignment, let’s discuss some important points about developing physical fitness, and “working out.”

  1. Getting fit and Self-Assessment are parts of the stairway to lifetime fitness. Remember, the name of this class is “Fit for Life," not “Get you buff this week.” For more information on Fitness for life, you should download and study the “Stairway to Lifetime Fitness.” (See the first link at the bottom of this lesson.)

    a. There are a lot of differences between genders, including how each will respond to different types of workouts. There are also a lot of differences between body types, and age groups. However, those are just differences, not definitive factors. Gender is not a factor that influences physical fitness. Both genders can become physically fit. Both genders can, and do benefit from participating in any or all of the components of health related physical fitness. Read "The Five Components of Health-Related Fitness" (see link at the bottom of this lesson).

  2. There are a variety of definitions of physical fitness. In fact, there are a variety of types of physical fitness. For a better look at these, study the different levels of the Physical Activity Pyramid. You can find this in a variety of places (Read the Physical Activity Pyramid, at the bottom of this lesson).

    a. Pay special attention to the second level regarding aerobic fitness. In this class, the workouts will be in that area. b. Although you may wish to work on skill-related fitness, which includes such things as agility, balance, coordination, and power (mostly specific to sport skills), in our workouts we will focus primarily on cardiovascular fitness.

  3. Now that we have a little background, let’s talk about some specific things you will want to consider when planning your workouts:

    a. When choosing your physical activity, you will want to consider the following.

    • What is your current fitness level? What CAN you do continuously and rhythmically for 30 minutes that will elevate your breathing and heart rate, but that you can adjust during the activity so that you remain relatively comfortable? • What are your interests? Walking? Jogging? Swimming? Biking? Dancing?

    b. Are you ready for the workout? Do you have the proper clothing? Equipment? Do you have any medical conditions that may preclude your participation in this activity (and, how do you know this?)? c. What if you just don’t want to work out today? Try the ten minute rule, which basically states, do it for 10 minutes and see if you don’t feel like finishing after that. d. Avoid activities that include joint twisting, compression, or excessive friction. You may experience occasional common injuries such as micro-trauma (minor sprains or sore muscles), overuse injuries (sore joints or tender areas), or side stitch, but anything that may threaten to cause major sprains, dislocation, or muscle tears should be avoided, at least for the workout. e. How hard should you work? Well, principles of physical activity include overload (doing more than normal), Progress (pushing enough to do a little bit more) and specificity (you will improve the skills or systems that you work). Part of working out is to focus, and document your workout so that you can find that fine line between pushing hard enough to improve, but not so hard that your body cannot adequately recover and rebuild. f. What do you do if you do incur common injuries such as sore muscles, minor sprains, or tenderness or inflammation of overworked areas? Athletic trainers and other medical personnel rely on what is known as the “RICE” formula:

    R = rest. Give it a little time to heal. I = Ice. Ice massage the area (never more than 15 minutes at a time.) The ice will not only reduce the inflammation, but will initiate healing (applying cold to injuries is also known as cryotherapy.) C = Compression. Use an elastic bandage or compression sock to prevent the area from swelling. Take care that you do not cut off circulation. E = Elevation. Keep the injured part above the heart as much as possible, again to reduce blood flow and keep from swelling.

Aerobic and Anaerobic Exercise:

View the short video regarding aerobic exercise (see link at the bottom of this lesson). Aerobic (with air) activities are characterized by rhythmic, and continuous activity that can be maintained over long periods of time. Metabolism (breathing, heart rate, muscle activity) can increase to match overload demands, and allow the activity to continue indefinitely. Aerobic activity can be comfortably maintained for longer than 3 minutes. For the purposes of this class, aerobic activity should be such that it is maintained for a minimum of 30 minutes. Track or swimming contests lasting more than 1 minute would usually be considered, at least in part, as aerobic. Anaerobic (without air) activities are characterized by short, intense bursts of activity that can seldom be maintained for longer than 1 minute at a time without rest. Most sports, such as basketball, football, tennis, skiing, and volleyball, are anaerobic. Track or swimming events lasting less than 1 minute would usually be considered anaerobic.

The chart below is for your information. The data reflect varying degrees of ability to cover distances (1.5) over lengths of time (12 minutes), and give you some indication of how that reflects your level of physical conditioning. These may help you set some goals for this class. Interpreting Results of the 1.5 Mile or 12-Minute Run

  1.5-Mile Run (min:sec)   12-Minute Run (miles)  
Age Women (min:sec) Men (min:sec) Women (miles) Men(miles)
Good
15-30 under 12:00 under 10:00 over 1.5 over 1.7
35-50 under 13:30 under 11:30 over 1.4 over 1.5
55-70 under 16:00 under 14:00 over 1.2 over 1.3
Adequate for most activities
15-30 under 13:30 under 11:30 over 1.4 over 1.5
35-50 under 15:00 under 13:00 over 1.3 over 1.4
55-70 under 17:30 under 15:30 over 1.1 over 1.3
Borderline
15-30 under 15:00 under 13:00 over 1.3 over 1.4
35-50 under 16:30 under 14:30 over 1.2 over 1.3
55-70 under 19:00 under 17:00 over 1.0 over 1.2
Need extra work on cardiovascular fitness
15-30 over 17:00 over 15:00 under 1.2 under 1.3
35-50 over 18:30 over 16:30 under 1.1 under 1.2
55-70 over 21:00 over 19:00 under 0.9 under 1.0

Use these links to view the unit 1 presentation in the video version online. It is split into several parts so that it will download quickly. When the link opens, click the play icon in the lower left of the viewing box to start the video.

01.01.01 Cardiovascular Health Risk Profile assignment (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 60 minutes

(*Please keep a record of this assignment. You will need to refer back to it for the last assignment in second quarter.)

Introduction: The purpose of this assignment is to introduce you to some of the relationships that exist between physical fitness and health. You will also examine your personal health risks, physical activity, and cardiovascular fitness. Let’s find out just how “fit” you are so that you can begin applying the principles from Lesson 01.01 by designing your own plans to become “fit for life”. Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

IMPORTANT: To turn in your assignment, click on the assignment name and then, depending on the assignment type, you use a button labeled [Submit Assignment] or [UPLOAD A FILE] or [EDIT MY SUBMISSION].

You'll see descriptions of your assignments along with the content. Create and then work on your assignments on your local computer.

You turn in your assignments in the Module 3 area.

Please do not email assignments, as this delays the grading process, since emails do not become submitted into the instructor's grade book. 

*************************************************************************** Name:_______________________________ Date:_________________________

Tasks: For this assignment, you will:

Calculate your body mass index (BMI). (5pts.)

Perform the following calculations to calculate your BMI. SHOW YOUR WORK! DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS.

STEP 1: _____ convert your weight in pounds to your weight in kilograms. (Divide your weight in pounds by 2.2.; e.g., a 130 pound woman / 2.2 = 59.09 kg)

STEP 2: _____ convert your height in inches to your height in centimeters (Multiply your height in inches by 2.54; e.g., a 64 inch woman x 2.54 = 162.56 cm)

STEP 3: _____ convert your height in centimeters to your height in meters (Divide your height in centimeters by 100 to get your height in meters; e.g., 162.56 / 100 = 1.6256

STEP 4:_____ square your height in meters to get the denominator for BMI calculation (Multiply the number by itself; e.g., 1.6256 x 1.6256 = 2.64)

STEP 5:______ use your weight in kilograms as your numerator (e.g., STEP 1 or 59.09 kg) and your height in meters squared as your denominator (e.g., STEP 4 or 2.64) and divide out the fraction (e.g., 59.09 / 2.64 = 22.38) Enter your BMI in the table below.

Complete a supervised 1.5 mile run. (5pts.)

Parent or Teacher’s name who will be administering the 1.5 mile run: __________________ Parent or Teacher’s email who will be giving you the 1.5 mile run test: __________________ You will run 1.5 miles under the supervision of a physical education teacher, coach, or parent. It is important to make sure that you provide a valid e-mail address so that I can confirm you completed the run. This person should help you measure out the correct distance (1.5 miles is 6 times around a regular track) and time you during the run.

Important Note: If you have a physical condition that may prevent you from completing this run, or a condition such that a run of this nature may cause or exacerbate an injury, you may modify the requirement by performing another form of aerobic exercise, such as swimming, stationary biking, elliptical trainer, etc. If you modify the assignment, just perform your chosen exercise for 15 minutes non-stop and record the distance covered, so you will have data to compare with at the end of the course in Q2. Also, be sure to mention to your instructor in the assignment that you modified the requirement.

You will complete the run for this assignment at the beginning of the class and again at the end of the class for assignment #21. This will count as two separate assignments. You may use a treadmill, but make sure that your run is conducted the same way for assignment #21. The purpose of this run is to assess your cardiovascular health. Run or jog for 1.5 miles in the shortest time possible. Try to set a pace that you can keep up for the full mile and a half. If you start too fast, you probably will not be able to run for the entire distance. Make sure to do your best and run what you can. If you walk, make sure to speed walk to keep your heart rate up. Enter your 1.5 mile time in the table below.

Need a little motivation before your run? Check out Studio C's "The Truth of Running" link above. 

Measure your blood pressure. (5 pts.)

Have your blood pressure measured by a doctor or you may use an automated blood pressure machine located in most stores that have a pharmacy. Look for the machine next to the pharmacy counter, these machines are free and easy to use. Enter your blood pressure in the table below.

Cardiovascular Health Risk Profile

*Be Honest--You need to give your best effort as this course not only earns you a PE credit, but challenges your cardiovascular fitness levels. * Record your answers in the middle column. In the right columns are what are considered “Critical Values.” These are not “Optimal,” meaning good, but rather are borderline values, meaning that numbers higher than these signal critical health concerns.

Risk Factors My Values Critical Values
Systolic Blood Pressure   under 140 mmHg
Diastolic Blood Pressure   under 90 mmHg
BMI (Body Mass Index)   under 25 kg.m-2
1.5 mile time   Men under 15 minutes Women under 17 minutes

 

1. Share your data with at least two other people (parents, peers, etc.) in a group setting. If you so desire, you may wish to use Facebook or some other form of social media as base for your discussion. (If you do, remember you are trading some aspects of privacy for a broader, quicker, audience.) As a group, discuss the strengths and weaknesses of your cardiovascular health risk profile (blood pressure, BMI, run time) and what they indicate about your cardiovascular fitness. Ask specifically, “What does this data indicate that your body is trying to tell you?” Describe the primary conclusions of the group. (5 pts.)

 

2. Brainstorm with your group some realistic and specific ideas about how you can improve your cardiovascular fitness levels, given your own unique situation. (5 pts.)

 

3. Choose one of these ideas, and explain why you believe this would work best for you, as opposed to something else. Include ideas from your group in your answer. (5 pts.)

 

4. Using the definitions of aerobic and anaerobic, and the information from both the video clip and the power point presentation with this chapter, list three activities that you believe are aerobic activities, and justify why they fit the aerobic criteria. Then list three activities you believe are anaerobic activities, and justify why they fit the anaerobic criteria.

A. Aerobic (5 pts.)

1.

2.

3.

Justification (5 pts.)

1.

2.

3.

B. Anaerobic (5 pts.)

1.

2.

3.

Justification (5 pts.)

1.

2.

3.

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.01.02 Activity log 1 (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 65 points possible 120 minutes

Tech. Sgt. Michael R. Holzworth, U.S. Air Force (www.defense.gov), Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsTech. Sgt. Michael R. Holzworth, U.S. Air Force (www.defense.gov), Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Submit your first activity log (found in lesson 01.00, above). To submit your work, scan or take a photo of your log. Save as a .jpg, .pdf or .gif and click the activity log assignment 01.01 on the main class page to SUBMIT your first activity log files.

(You will not be able to submit Activity Log 1 until your Cardiovascular Health Risk Profile Assignment, 01.01.01, is submitted and graded)

IMPORTANT: Please do not email logs, as this delays the grading process, since emails do not become submitted into the instructor's grade book. 

REMEMBER: Logs backdated more than two weeks from their completion date will not be accepted for credit.

Note: Students who have not submitted their 1st Activity Log by week 3 may automatically be dropped from the course.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.02 Conditions related to exercise (Fitness for Life)

Recognize the relationship between physical activity and personal health. Recognize that health-related fitness is a lifelong process unique to each individual. Identify genetic influences on body type, sedentary lifestyle diseases, muscle types, and rates of weight gain and loss. Use FITT (frequency, intensity, time, type) guidelines to evaluate activities. Explain the concepts related to body composition, e.g., the difference between being overweight and obese, genetic influences, and various ways to measure body composition. Research family history for health-risk factors such as coronary heart disease, cancer, diabetes, cholesterol, and blood pressure. Calculate body composition by using skin-fold calipers or electrical impedance analyzers.

Essential question: What is your body trying to tell you? As we begin to become conscious of our physical fitness level, we become aware of several different factors that may affect our ability to exercise, may be results from our exercising or lack of exercising, or may suggest that we specifically adjust our exercise to meet those possible problems. Let’s discuss some of these.

A. A common problem as we age, especially among women but also in men, is osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis is the thinning of bone tissue and loss of bone density over time. Osteo is a term that always refers to bones, and “porosis” refers to the thinning or “porous” condition of the bone. (Note: Osteoporosis is sometimes confused with the similar term osteoarthritis, a condition relating to inflammation of the joints.) Regular exercise can largely prevent or delay the development of osteoporosis, and can reduce the likelihood of bone fractures in people with osteoporosis. Read the "Exercise for Osteoporosis" article at the link at the bottom of this lesson.

B. Some other problems relating to bones are conditions such as lordosis (excessive curvature in the lower back), kyphosis (excessive curvature in the upper back) and scoliosis (lateral curvature of the back, often caused by one leg being slightly longer than the other).

Any of these may be caused by poor posture, or they may develop independently, resulting in postural problems. Since exercise is done most efficiently using good posture, exercise will help prevent these conditions, will help correct these conditions, and often will help identify these conditions in the early stages when more aggressive medical remedies can be more effective. Read the "Scoliosis" article at the link at the bottom of this lesson.

C. A common problem that is affected by exercise is diabetes.

Diabetes is a condition in which a person’s body cannot regulate sugar levels (due to the inability of the pancreas to produce sufficient levels of insulin.) Since obesity is a common risk factor in diabetes, exercise can help prevent this disease. Once a person suffers from diabetes, regular aerobic exercise can significantly help regulate blood sugar levels, allowing the individual to require less external insulin supplement. There are two types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is much less common. Type 1 diabetes always starts in children or young people; their bodies do not produce insulin. Type 2 diabetes is much more common, and may begin at any age. In people with type 2 diabetes, their bodies do produce insulin, but do not use it properly, so their blood sugar gets much too high. Risk factors for diabetes include genetics (if you have ancestors or family members with diabetes, you are more likely to develop it), being overweight or inactive, or eating a poor diet. Read the "Exercise Guidelines for Diabetics" article at the link at the bottom of this lesson.

D. Hyperkinetic disorders may occur BECAUSE of exercise.

Hyperkinetic literally means “too much exercise”. (Note: Hyperkinetic is a term also often used in conjunction with such conditions as ADHD. For our purposes here, we apply the term only to those conditions that occur due to too much exercise.) As you exercise, you need to be aware of these signs, and then moderate your exercise accordingly. These may be as benign as simply not allowing your body enough time to recover, resulting in being over-tired. The cure is to simply back off, allow a day in between workouts, adjust your diet, or decrease intensity. On the other hand, other hyperkinetic disorders may include overuse injuries, body image disorders, or eating disorders. Although these are not technically mental disorders, the conscientious athlete will monitor these closely, and will adjust their workouts and diets to fit within healthy guidelines. Read the "Overuse Injuries" article at the link at the bottom of this lesson.

E. The lifestyle problems we will focus on mostly in this class will be cardiovascular disease.

This develops over a lifetime, and then results in such things as atherosclerosis, heart attack, high blood pressure, or stroke. Regular aerobic exercise with a reduced fat diet will help prevent and reduce these cardiovascular diseases later in life. Watch the "Aerobic fitness and intensity" video at the link below this lesson.

External and xray views of a woman with scoliosis: © 2008 Weiss and Goodall; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)External and xray views of a woman with scoliosis: © 2008 Weiss and Goodall; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)

01.02.01 Body composition assignment (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 45 minutes

Well, it’s time to get to work. This assignment is designed to help you get a general idea of your body composition, as an indicator of your general fitness. Please understand that these are not exact indicators, and their accuracy may vary with body type. Do these with interest, then discuss how you believe they may serve as valuable indicators in relation to your general fitness and propensity to develop some of the problems we have discussed. Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. Tasks: We estimate our body composition all the time, in a variety of ways. When we stand on the scales, the information we receive allows us to 'estimate' our body composition, usually in terms of excess body fat. For this assignment, you will estimate your body composition in terms of percent body fat. Notice that the word "estimate" is used. The various methods available can only give us an estimate that we can then use to compare with other factors, such as height/weight ratio and body type, to consider our body composition, and then use all of these to make inferences about what our body needs.

For a little warped humor, check out Studio C's "Weighty Matters" via the link below. Enjoy.

******************************************************************************************************************* 

Name:_______________________________ Date:_________________________

1. Find your approximate % body fat. You may use any ONE of the following THREE methods. DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS.

Method #1: Skinfolds using calipers. Two skinfold measurements (triceps and calf). A physical education teacher may have access to calipers. _____ = first triceps skinfold (mm) _____ = first calf skinfold (mm) _____ = second triceps skinfold (mm) _____ = second calf skinfold (mm) _____ = third triceps skinfold (mm) _____ = third calf skinfold (mm)

Method #2 Body Fat Device or Machine. There are some scales or hand held devices that have methods of determining your body fat percentage. You may find one at a gym, from a doctor, or they may be purchased from a sporting goods store. You may also contact the PEAK academy at the University of Utah (585-7325) to make an appointment to have your body composition assessed.

Method #3 Go to the link below and use one of the 6 methods described there.

1. Estimated % body fat ______ Method Used _____________ (5pts.) 

2. Complete the height-weight assessment as described using the height/weight chart at the link below. This is an assessment of height relative to weight using the height-weight tables. Take your height and weight measurements without shoes. Write your results in the spaces below. _____ = height (in feet and inches) ______ = weight (in pounds) A. Are you within the normal weight range for a person your height and age? (5pts.)

3. Measure your waist-to-hip ratio and waist circumference and enter the data in the chart below. Then, compare your information to the critical values.

STEP 1: _____ measure your waist circumference (the width of your waist circumference at the umbilicus or belly button)

STEP 2: _____ measure your hip circumference (while viewing the hips from the side—rather than the front—measure the circumference at the widest point)

STEP 3: _____ use your waist circumference (STEP 1) as the numerator and your hip circumference (STEP 2) as the denominator and divide out the fraction (STEP 1 / STEP 2) to get your waist-to-hip ratio What is your waist/hip ratio? (5pts.) ________________ Refer to the chart at the link below to determine your health risks based on this ratio.

4. Complete Table 1: Comparison of My Body Composition Values to Critical Values

Risk Factors My Values Critical Values
Body fat percent   Males: 10-20%
Females: 15-25%
Height/weight
(are you in the normal range?)
Yes/No See height/weight chart link below
BMI (you found this in assignment 1)   Less than 25 kg/m2
Waist/hip ratio   Males: less than .90 is good; .91-1.0 is borderline; over 1.0 is higher risk
Females: less than .8 is good; .80 - .85 is borderline; over .85 is higher risk

Note: You may want to review the short video about Aerobic fitness and Intensity (from the lesson above) before completing the following questions:

Complete the following discussions and questions:

5. Discuss with your parents, peers, or a teacher, the values you have discovered regarding your approximate % body fat, your height/weight ratio, your hip/waist ratio, and your genetic body type. (If you so desire, you may wish to use Facebook or some other form of social media as base for your discussion. If you do, remember you are trading some aspects of privacy for a broader, quicker, audience.)

* Discuss the relationships between each of these measurements, and what that says about you. * Discuss the difference between what these say about “Normal” body composition, and your “Optimal” body composition. * As a result of these discussions, how far do you believe you are away from your 'Optimal' body weight? (Indicate who was involved in the discussion, any disagreements you may have had, and explain your reasoning for your final conclusions.) (5pts.)

6. As a result of your discussions, and what you have learned from the Power Point presentation, briefly describe what you believe you need to do to achieve the body composition that is right, and most healthy, for you. (5pts.)

7. Suppose your friend asks you to develop a workout for them. They have a specific purpose in mind. Develop the workout, and provide the following information.

A. Describe the purpose of the workout. (Example: Lose weight, prepare for a marathon, prepare for ski season, develop a better jump shot, etc.) (5pts)

B. Describe the workout. Include the type(s) of exercise/ days per week exercised/ durations, distances, or sets and reps of exercise(s) performed, etc.   (10pts)    

C. Indicate how components of your proposed workout plan fit with the FITT principles. (3pts)

Frequency-

Intensity-

Type-

Time-

D. Describe which components are aerobic, and which are anaerobic. Explain why they fit that definition. (3pts)

E. Describe which components are health related, and which are skill related. (4 pts.) (You don’t have to have both. Just explain where each component fits, in specific terms as presented in the Unit 1 power point presentation.)

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.02.02 Activity log week 2 (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 65 points possible 120 minutes

Submit your activity log. To submit your work, scan or take a photo of your log and the form. Save as a .jpg, .pdf or .gif and go to Topic 3 on the main class page to upload the files. IMPORTANT: Please do not email logs, as this delays the grading process, since emails do not become submitted into the instructor's grade book.

Reminder: The workout log sheets are found as a link in the overview 01 section.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.03 Unit 1 study guide (Fitness for Life)

Recognize the relationship between physical activity and personal health. Explain the elements of physical fitness, e.g., flexibility, cardiovascular endurance, and body composition).

U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Damon J. Moritz, Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsU.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Damon J. Moritz, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Study Guide: Unit 1

1. Understand the difference between health-related and skill-related fitness, including the various components of each. Be ready to recognize each component in a life scenario. For example:

a. Question: As you walk to school, your arm becomes fatigued as you try to carry a large load of books, so you must repeatedly shift them from one arm to the other. What aspect of fitness is most likely causing your discomfort? Answer: Static muscular endurance.

2. Understand the four FITT principles. Be ready to evaluate their application to a life scenario. 3. Understand the application principles of specificity, overload, and reversibility. For example:

a. Question: Your friend lifts 3 sets of 7 reps of a given lift 3 days each week. When they are able to increase to 8 reps, they increase the weight so they go back to only 7 reps. What principle are they applying? Answer: Overload.

4. Understand the difference between aerobic and anaerobic work, and be ready to recognize or apply those principles in a real life scenario.

5. Understand the nature of such bone conditions as osteoporosis, scoliosis, kyphosis, and lordosis, and how they respond to exercise.

6. Understand the relationship between diabetes and exercise.

7. Be prepared to analyze and apply the RICE principles to Hyperkinetic (overuse) injuries.

01.03.01 Unit 1 quiz (Fitness for Life)

computer-scored 15 points possible 15 minutes

Go to Topic 3 on your main class page to take this quiz. You may take it multiple times, but you must score at least 80%.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.00 Flexibility (Fitness for Life)

Many sports require flexibility: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Kate from UK, CC Attribution Share-Like Generic licenseMany sports require flexibility: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Kate from UK, CC Attribution Share-Like Generic license This unit covers the basics related to improving and maintaining your flexibility. Begin by reading/viewing the unit presentation and lessons. Remember to keep up on your activity logs.

Assignments related to this unit:

02.2.1 Baseline assessment of health-related fitness 


02.2 Avoiding injuries


02.3.1 Arm, leg and trunk flexibility


02.4.1 Flexibility exercise program

02.4.2 Activity log 3

02.01 Flexibility (Fitness for Life)

Explain the principles of warm-up and cool-down as they relate to proper stretching, active vs. passive recovery, and injury prevention and rehabilitation. Explore concepts related to flexibility, e.g., genetics, static vs. ballistic stretching, and joint variations.

By Shustov (Own work) CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0), via Wikimedia CommonsBy Shustov (Own work) CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0), via Wikimedia Commons

Watch the unit 2 presentation (PowerPoint attachment above, or links to online video version, below). If you have trouble downloading the PPTX file, right-click the file and tell it to download to your local computer and open it that way.

Use these links to view the unit 2 presentation in video version online. It is split into parts so that it will download quickly. When the link opens, click the middle of the viewing box then the play icon in the lower left of the viewing box to start the video.

02.01.01 Baseline Assessment of Health-Related Fitness Components (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 90 minutes

Introduction: One of the first steps in designing your own fitness program is to assess your current level of fitness. From this information, you can see where your strengths and weaknesses lie and design a program that will address your weaknesses. These tests are very basic and they should be used to gain an understanding and appreciation for each component of health and skill-related fitness. These tests should not be used to compare yourself to others, nor are there "norms" that would allow you to compare your values to those of students your age.

Essential Question: What is your body trying to tell you? Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. You might want to print out a copy to take with you to your workout. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Don't forget to highlight your answers. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

***********************************************************************************

Name:_______________________________ Date:_____________________

Tasks: Complete the following: DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS.

1. Cardiovascular Fitness

_____ Heart rate prior to exercise

_____Heart rate (beats per minute) after running in place for 1 minute (Note: If you have a physical condition that prevents you from running in place, choose another vigorous exercise that uses as many large muscles as possible that you can do to substitute for this part of the lab. Be sure to describe the exercise you used, and the reason for the substitution.)

_____ Heart rate (bpm) after resting for 1 minute after completing exercise.

What do you believe the changes in your heart rate indicate about your level of physical fitness? (5pt)

2. Flexibility

With your heels together, bend forward and reach with your hands between your legs and behind your ankles. 

What do you believe your results indicate about your flexibility using these joints? Do you believe these results are consistent with other joints? (5pt.)

3. Muscular Endurance (Single Leg Raise)

High Knee jog. Run in place with knees coming above the belly button. Count your repetitions. Continue until knees can no longer be brought above belly button, or a maximum of 1 minute.

_____ How many high knee repetitions could you perform? (Goal: 20 repetitions.)

What do you believe your results indicate about your level of muscular endurance? Explain your answer. (5pt)

4. Body Fatness (Arm Pinch)

Pinch the fold of skin on the back of your arm. (Do not include muscle, only a “folding” of the skin. Estimate the thickness of the fold. If you performed this task as a part of Assignment #2, enter that value.)

_____ How many inches was the fold of skin on the back of your arm?

What do you believe your results indicate about your level of body fatness? Explain your answer. (5pt)

5. Muscular Strength (90-degree Push-Up)

If you have access to free-weights or a bench-press machine, determine your 10 rep max. If you do not, do push-ups with your fingers pointing forward, elbows out, and your hands placed at elbow width, forming a 90 degree bend at the elbow. Exercises like pushups can often serve as an indicator of either muscular strength or muscular endurance. If you can do 10 or less, it is an indication of lack of strength. 10 or more pushups is more of an indication of muscular endurance.

_____ How many push ups were you able to perform in one minute?

What do you believe your results indicate about your muscular strength? Do you feel this is an accurate indication of other areas of your body? Explain your answer. (5pt)

6. Share your results with a group (2 or more) peers, your parents, or teachers.

If you so desire, you may wish to use Facebook or some other form of social media as base for your discussion. (If you do, remember you are trading some aspects of privacy for a broader, quicker, audience.) Discuss with them your strengths and weaknesses as indicated by these results. Be sure to include in your discussion the relationships these indicators have with overall fitness, how accurate you feel these are, and if there are other indicators that you feel also give you valuable information regarding your fitness. Describe the results of your discussion, including disagreements, and conclusions.(10 pts.)

7. Based on your discussion, what are some activities that you feel would be good for you to improve your physical fitness?

Explain why you chose these specific activities, and why you feel they would be best for you. (5pts.)

Before completing question 8, you may wish to review the short video clip at the link below.

8. Create a weekly workout schedule that incorporates those personal needs you have identified.

• Be sure to include flexibility guidelines.

• Indicate when and how you are going to incorporate those activities you have chosen with your 30+ minute aerobic workouts. (10pts.) This plan must include at least 30 or more minutes of aerobic (rhythmic, continuous) exercise at least three days per week. If you need to, go back to your group to discuss any modifications that are necessary to meet all these criteria. If you are unsure about exactly what constitutes aerobic exercise, contact your teacher. Briefly describe your plan here, then incorporate that plan as your workout plan, and log the experience for three consecutive weeks in your activity logs.

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.02 Avoiding Injuries (Fitness for Life)

Identify appropriate risks and safety factors in the selection of fitness activities. Observe safety precautions in training, e.g., over-training.

Keith Langford stretching: By Botend (Own work) CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0), via Wikimedia CommonsKeith Langford stretching: By Botend (Own work) CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0), via Wikimedia Commons

Although activity and exercise are good for you, it is possible to over-do it!

Understanding and following the principles of exercise physiology can help you prevent or minimize injuries. Again, listen to what your body is telling you--if you take care of minor problems, you can prevent major one.

02.02 Avoiding Injuries assignment (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 60 minutes

Introduction: The purpose of this assignment is to help you learn more about injuries and injury prevention. Essential Question: What is your body trying to tell you? Tasks: Choose an exercise-related injury such as an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, achilles tendonitis, tennis elbow, ankle sprain, rotator cuff (shoulder) injury, muscle cramps or muscle strain that is common in a sport or activity in which you participate, or is common in the types of exercise you have planned for your workout in Assignment #3. You can be creative. Conduct some research on the internet and/or in the library to find answers to the questions below.

This should be submitted as a 5 paragraph research paper. Follow the paragraph structure shown below. Do not just answer the questions below without putting it in written (research paper) format. Be specific and write in full sentences. Include an image that contributes to the understanding of the injury.

Write your paper in a word-processing document on your computer, save a copy for yourself then copy and paste it into the assignment submission box. • "Do not cut and paste from articles on the internet! This is plagiarizing(cheating) and no credit will be given!" • Be sure to cite your sources (at least three, one of which might be a person who has experienced or treated this injury).

For inspiration check out how goalie Scott Sterling, the man, the myth, the legend, deals with sports injury via the Just for Fun Studio C link below.

Structure Content
Paragraph 1: Introduction - a paragraph describing or defining the injury. What happens when a person gets this injury? (5 pts)
Paragraph 2: A paragraph going into more detail about the injury. What body parts are affected and how? (5 pts) What is/are the common cause(s) of this injury? (5 pts)
Paragraph 3: A paragraph describing treatment and prevention of the injury. How is this injury typically treated? (5 pts) How is this injury typically prevented? (5 pts)
Paragraph 4: A paragraph describing how specific exercises or stretches apply to this injury. Identify three different stretches or exercises that may affect, prevent, or rehab this injury. (5 pts) • Describe each one. (5 pts)
Paragraph 5: Conclusion - a paragraph describing how you can apply this information. • Determine if you would, or would not, want to incorporate each one into your workout routine as a prevention and/or rehabilitation for this injury and explain why. (5 pts)

Works cited--a list of your sources, including authors, titles, and complete URL for internet sources.

Image

Where did you find your information? (HINT: Carefully document where you found your information and double-check that the sources are reliable and valid. Make sure that you list at least three sources.) (5 pts)

Include an image that contributes to the understanding of this injury. (5 pts)

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.03 Arm, Leg and Trunk Flexibility (Fitness for Life)

Explore concepts related to flexibility, e.g., genetics, static vs. ballistic stretching, and joint variations. Provide definitions for overload.

by Lambtron, CC-BY-SA-3.0, via Wikimedia Commonsby Lambtron, CC-BY-SA-3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Use the links below with the next assignment.

02.03 Arm, Leg and Trunk Flexibility assignment (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 30 minutes

Introduction: The purpose of this assignment is to introduce you to some of the ways you can assess your own site-specific flexibility. Essential Question: What is our body trying to tell us? Tasks: Recruit a friend, your parent, a sibling, or a teacher to help you with this test as they can help you measure and record some of your results. Jog or walk for 5 to 10 minutes to warm up your cardiovascular and muscular system. This is important, since physical inactivity can cause flexibility to be lost, both in the long term, and in the short term. (Just sit through a long lecture, then try to stand up straight!) Conduct Self Assessment test: Found in the online descriptions from the previous lesson links. This self-assessment asks you to complete six flexibility tests: arm lift, zipper, wrap around, trunk rotation, knee to chest, and ankle flex. For each assessment, stretch and hold the position one time for 2 seconds while a friend, your parent, or your brother or sister checks your performance. Report your score for 1 repetition of each exercise. Answer the following questions relative to your performance on the flexibility exercises. Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. You might want to print out a copy to take with you to your workout. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Don't forget to highlight your answers. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. ******************************************************************************** Name:_______________________________ Date:_________________________ DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS. Arm Lift Test:

To perform the arm lift test, first lie stomach down on the ground with legs straight behind you and arms stretched overhead. Next, grab hold of a yardstick (or broomstick) so that your palms are approximately shoulder width apart. Have a partner stand right in front of you with another yardstick (or tape measure) that is placed perpendicular to the one that you are holding, with the zero measurement starting at the ground. Then, while keeping your chin fully rested on the floor, lift your arms up as high as you can go along the perpendicular yardstick. Your partner then takes this measurement as your score. Repeat the process three times and then use your best result.

1. While performing the "arm lift" test, how many inches were you able to lift your arms off the ground? _____ inches. • What is your fitness rating for the "arm lift" test? (2 pts)

o Good = 8 to 10 inches or higher o Marginal = 5 to 7 inches o Low (Needs Improvement) = 0 to 4 inches

Shoulder Mobility (Open hands) or Zipper test

2. On the "zipper test" with your right elbow up, were you able to touch or overlap your fingers? • Yes or No (2 pts.)

3. Repeat the Zipper test, this time using the left shoulder. On the "zipper test" with your left elbow up, were you able to touch or overlap your fingers? • Yes or No (2pts.)

Active Chest Flexibility, or Wrap Around Test:

4. On the "wrap around" test, with your right elbow up, were you able to touch the corner of your mouth? •Yes or No (2 pts.)

5. On the "wrap around" test, with your left elbow up, were you able to touch the corner of your mouth? •Yes or No (2pts.)

Hip roll, or Trunk Rotation Test:

6. On the "trunk rotation test," were you able to keep both shoulders in contact with the ground? • Yes or No (2pts.)

Thomas Test, or Knee to Chest test

7. When you perform the "knee-to-chest" test with your left leg pulled to your chest, was your right calf one inch or less from the floor? o Yes or No? (2 pts)

8. When you perform the "knee-to-chest" test with your right leg pulled to your chest, was your left calf one inch or less from the floor? o Yes or No? (2pts.)

Straight Knee Foot Raise, or Ankle Flex Test:

9. When performing the "ankle flex" test with your right foot, was the sole of your foot angled 90 degrees or less? • Yes or No (2 pts.)

10. When performing the "ankle flex" test with your left foot, was the sole of your foot angled 90 degrees or less? • Yes or No (2pts.)

11. Discuss any imbalances you might have in flexibility. These imbalances may be from side to side, opposing muscles across the same joint, or muscles that may affect your posture in certain positions. • Why do you think you have those imbalances? (These could be hereditary, results of exercise of lack of it, injury, or maybe something else.) (5pts.)

12. Identify and describe three specific stretching exercises designed to increase flexibility. (15 pts)

13. Discuss the principles of overload as it applies to stretching. (10 pts)
**********************************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.04 Flexibility exercise program (Fitness for Life)

Explore concepts related to flexibility, e.g., genetics, static vs. ballistic stretching, and joint variations.

Introduction: The purpose of this assignment is to have you perform a workout that emphasizes flexibility. Once you perform this type of workout, you can decide how to incorporate flexibility activities into your overall workout program. Essential Question: What is our body trying to tell us? Jog or walk for 5 to 10 minutes to warm up your cardiovascular and muscular system. For this assignment, you will experience a Flexibility Exercise Program. Use the online demonstrations provided at the links below. This workout asks you to complete ten flexibility exercises:

knee-to-chest, backsaver sit-and-reach, spine twist, sitting stretcher, zipper, arm pretzel, hip stretcher, chest stretch, arm stretcher, and calf stretcher. For each exercise, follow the directions.

First, a few notes:

  • For this assignment, do not complete the ballistic stretches. Only conduct ballistic stretches under the direction of a qualified physical education teacher or coach.
  •  
  • If you have noticeably weakened muscles or joints, do not stretch them until the connective tissue has healed. Simply make a note of that difficulty on the assignment.
  •  
  • As you apply some of these flexibility exercises to your workout, note that muscles and other connective tissues should be stretched daily (for optimal flexibility and performance.) Although they do NOT increase strength or cardio fitness, proper stretching will help increase performance and avoid injuries.
  •  
  • For those who experience chronic back pain, it is often caused by decreased flexibility of the hip flexor muscles, a result of sitting too much at a desk. This puts an unnatural strain on the back. Flexibility exercises, done properly, can often decrease chronic back pain.

02.04 Flexibility exercise program activity (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 60 points possible 75 minutes

Complete the log as you finish each exercise and at the end of your activity, answer the questions relative to your performance on the flexibility exercises. Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. You might want to print out a copy to take with you to your workout. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Don't forget to highlight your answers. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. ************************************************************************** Name:_______________________________ Date:_________________________ DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS.

1. Lower Back Stretch:

Go to Seated Lower Back Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the stretch (Hold for 10-15 seconds). (2 pts)

2. Hamstring Stretches:

Go to Seated Hamstring Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the stretch. (Hold for 10-15 seconds). (1 pt)

Go to PNF Seated Hamstring Stretch(see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the stretch. (1 pt)

3. Obliques, Hip, and Lower Back Stretch:

Go to Lying Crossover Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the stretch for 10-15 seconds. Make sure you stretch both your right and left side and repeat so each side is stretched twice. (2 pts)

4. Lying Hamstring Stretches:

Go to Lying Hamstring Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the stretch for 10-15 seconds. Make sure you stretch both your right and left side and repeat so each side is stretched twice. (1 pt)

Go to PNF Lying Hamstring Stretch (see link in lesson above)______ Check here after you complete each stretch twice. (1 pt)

4. Glute Stretches:

Go to Seated Glute Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the stretch for 10-15 seconds on each side. (1 pt)

Go to PNF Seated Glute Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the stretch on each side. (1 pt)

5. Triceps Stretches:

Go to Overhead Triceps Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the stretch for 10-15 seconds. (1 pt)

Go to PNF Overhead Triceps Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the stretch. (1 pt)

6. Shoulder Stretch:

Go to Side Deltoid Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the stretch for 10-15 seconds. Repeat this exercise so you stretch these muscles twice. (2 pts)

7. Hip Flexor Stretch:

Go to Lunging Hip Flexor Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the hip stretcher static stretch for 10-15 seconds. Repeat this exercise so you stretch these muscles twice. (2 pts)

8. Biceps Stretch:

Go to Seated Biceps stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the stretch for 10-15 seconds. Repeat this exercise so you stretch these muscles twice. (1 pt)

9. Chest Stretch:

Go to Behind Head Chest Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the stretch for 10-15 seconds. (1 pt)

PNF Chest Stretch: Go to PNF Behind Head Chest Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the PNF chest stretch. (1 pt)

10. Calf Stretch:

Go to Lunging Straight Leg Calf Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the stretch for 10-15 seconds. Repeat this exercise so you stretch these muscles twice. (1 pt)

Questions

1. Discuss which stretches seemed to work the best for you and which stretches did not.• Describe the criteria that caused you to reach that conclusion. What were you feeling, and what was your body telling you?(10 pts.)

2. Do you feel you got a better stretch using static or PNF stretching? • Describe the physical response that makes you feel that way? (Note: You are not being asked which you like the best or which you will use. You are being asked about the relative quality of the muscle stretch.) (10 pts.)

3. Select 5 stretches from the above stretches performed that you think would be optimal to include in your workouts, and explain why you chose that stretch:  (4 pts each)

Stretch 1:

Why did you choose that particular stretch?

Stretch 2:

Why did you choose that particular stretch?

Stretch 3:

Why did you choose that particular stretch?

Stretch 4:

Why did you choose that particular stretch?

Stretch 5:

Why did you choose that particular stretch?

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.04.02 activity log week 3 (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 65 points possible 120 minutes

by Fabinou74, CC Attribution Share-Alike 3.0, via Wikimedia Commonsby Fabinou74, CC Attribution Share-Alike 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Submit your activity log. To submit your work, scan or take a photo of your log and the form. Save as a .jpg, .pdf or .gif and go to Topic 3 on the main class page to upload the files.

IMPORTANT: Please do not email logs, as this delays the grading process, since emails do link into the instructor's grade book. As a last resort, you may mail copies to your teacher's physical address.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.05 Unit 2 study guide (Fitness for Life)

Unit 2 Study Guide

1. Know the definition and types of flexibility.
2. Know the different types of connective tissues, and how and when they should or
shouldn’t be stretched.
3. Know what muscles need stretching, and why those muscles need stretching.
4. Be ready to recognize the different types of stretching, and evaluate what
they would look like. For example, you might see a question similar to this:

a. Your friend bends at the waist, reaching toward the floor until the
backs of his legs get tight, and then he holds it until he feels the
muscles gradually relax. He is most likely applying what type of
stretching technique? The answer here would be “Static”.

5. Know when the best time is to stretch, and why you would want to work on
flexibility in the first place.
6. Be ready to recognize, analyze, and evaluate descriptions of different
applications of flexibility techniques, such as overload, intensity, etc.

02.05.01 Unit 2 quiz(Fitness for Life)

computer-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

by Nemonoman, GNU General Public License, via Wikimedia Commonsby Nemonoman, GNU General Public License, via Wikimedia Commons

Take the quiz using the link in Topic 3 of the main class page. You may take it multiple times, but you must score at least 90%.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.00 Cardiovascular Fitness (Fitness for Life)

Image: Chris Brown, Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 GenericImage: Chris Brown, Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic

This unit will introduce you to the basic concepts related to cardiovascular fitness.

Begin by reading/viewing the unit presentation and lessons.

Assignments related to this unit:

03.2.1  Heart Rates

03.2.2 Places to participate in physical activity
03.3.1 Calculating Energy Expenditure
03.3.2 Activity log 4
03.4.1 Unit 4 quiz

03.01 Cardiovascular Fitness (Fitness for Life)

Bike riding can improve your cardiovascular fitness.: By Jbyrne1701 (Own work) ,CC0, via Wikimedia CommonsBike riding can improve your cardiovascular fitness.: By Jbyrne1701 (Own work) ,CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

Cardiovascular fitness has to do with how efficiently your heart circulates oxygen through your body. View the Unit 3 presentation (PowerPoint attached above, or links to online video version, below) and the Respiration video (use the Pioneer Library username and password when prompted).

Note: The images in the PowerPoint version of this presentation were found at Wikimedia Commons, and are in the public domain or under a Creative Commons Share-Alike license. Images in the video version were created specifically for this class, and are under a 'share-alike' license.

Use these links to view the unit 3 presentation in video version online. It is split into several parts so that it will download quickly. When the link opens, click  the play icon in the lower left of the viewing box to start the video.

03.02 Heart rates (Fitness for Life)

Calculate individual target heart rate training zones by using the maximum heart rate formula or maximum heart rate reserve formula. Incorporate appropriate training principles including maximum heart rate, target heart rate, perceived exertion, and rest and recovery. Explain methods and the importance of using heart rates to monitor the intensity of physical activities. Research family history for health-risk factors such as coronary heart disease, cancer, diabetes, cholesterol, and blood pressure. Define challenges and risk factors that change with the aging process. Participate in programs and facilities in the community that foster activity choice and self-expression. Participate in recreational activities offered through community agencies. Appreciate the aesthetic value of activity participation in a variety of settings.

Introduction: The purpose of this lesson is to help you understand resting heart rate, maximal heart rate, target heart rate, and recovery heart rate. Please read the information below and submit the last page of this assignment.

Essential Question: What is our body trying to tell us? Your heart rate tells you how hard you are working during exercise. It is important to learn to monitor your heart rate so you can tell if you are working too hard, or not working hard enough. People typically take their heart rate while resting, exercising or recovering from exercise. You can measure your heart rate at the carotid artery (on your neck) or the radial artery (on the thumb side of your wrist). See the links below.

Resting Heart Rate Your resting heart rate is the number of beats per minute (bpm) that your heart beats while relaxing. The best time to take your resting heart rate is early in the morning, as soon as you wake up. If you forget to take it then, you can also lie or sit down and take it after a five minute rest. A good reason to regularly take your resting heart rate is because you can tell how fit you are currently, and you can tell whether or not you are overtraining. The average resting heart rate for men is typically lower than that for women (e.g., men = 70 beats per minute; women = 75 beats per minute). If you are physically fit, your resting heart rate will typically be below 60 beats per minute. If you take your heart rate at the beginning of this class and it is 70 beats per minute, you would expect that your resting heart rate would decrease as you increase your physical activity level and become more fit. Your heart becomes more efficient as you exercise more regularly, thus, it beats fewer times each minute and pumps more blood with each beat. If, during one week, your resting heart rate is 60, and you are also working 40 hours a week, taking several exams in school, and getting 5 hours of sleep per night, your resting heart rate might show an increase. Any time your resting heart rate goes up, despite continued training, this is typically a sign that you are overtraining.

Maximal Heart Rate Your maximal heart rate is the maximum number of beats per minute that your heart can beat during a hard exercise bout. As you age, your maximal heart rate declines, mostly due to a decrease in physical activity, but also due to a less efficient heart. The only way to truly assess your maximal heart rate is to have an EKG test. Since that is not practical for most of us, an easy formula can be used to estimate your maximal heart rate. To estimate your maximal heart rate, subtract your age in years from 220. For example: If you are 15 years old, your estimated maximal heart rate is 220 - 15 or 205.

Target Heart Rate Range Now that you know how to find your resting heart rate and your maximal heart rate, you can use this information to calculate your target heart rate range. Your target heart rate range is the range of heart rate values you want to keep your heart rate in while you're exercising. If you work out such that your heart rate stays within this specific range, you should be working out hard enough to see improvements in your fitness, and you should not be working so hard that you risk injury, excessive soreness, or exercise burnout. There are two methods to calculate your target heart rate range: the heart rate range method and maximal heart rate range method.

Heart Rate Range: To use the heart rate range method, subtract your resting heart rate from your maximal heart rate. This value is your heart rate range. Multiply your heart rate range by .50, assuming that 50% of your maximal heart rate is the minimal level at which you should exercise. Add your resting heart rate back to this value for the threshold heart rate, or your minimal level of intensity.

EXAMPLE: 205 (maximal heart rate) -70 (resting heart rate) ----------- 135 (heart rate range) x .50 (minimal level of exercise or percentage of maximal heart rate) ----------- 67.5 +70 (resting heart rate) ----------- 137.5 (threshold heart rate or minimum heart rate at which you should workout)

Then calculate your target ceiling rate, or the highest intensity level at which you should exercise. Once again using your heart rate range,, multiply your heart rate range by .85, assuming that 85% of your maximal heart rate is the maximum level at which you should exercise. Add your resting heart rate back to this value for the target ceiling rate, or your maximal level of intensity.

EXAMPLE: 205 (maximal heart rate) -70 (resting heart rate) ----------- 135 (heart rate range) x .85 (maximal level of exercise or percentage of maximal heart rate) ----------- 114.75 +70 (resting heart rate) ----------- 184.75 (target ceiling rate or maximum heart rate at which you should workout)

To summarize the above information, the heart rate range at which this 15 year old should workout is 137.5 bpm and the target ceiling rate is 184.75 bpm. Athletes and those already in good physical condition can (and do) workout at intensities higher than 85% of maximum heart rate, however, this is most effectively done with a coach or fitness trainer. Also, some trained athletes have hearts that have become so strong that they cannot reach their calculated target heart rate. Their heart beats so strong it simply refuses to beat that fast, and other limiting factors such as muscle fatigue or oxygen exchange in the lungs will limit the intensity of the exercise before the heart becomes a factor.

Maximal Heart Rate Range: Another way to calculate your recommended heart rate during exercise is using the percent of maximal heart rate range. This method is much simpler than the previous method, but it is less accurate given that a persons' fitness level (e.g., resting heart rate) is not considered when using this formula. To calculate the lower end of the percent of maximal heart rate method, multiply your estimated maximal heart rate by .60, which represents 60% of your maximal heart rate.

EXAMPLE: 205 (estimated maximal heart rate for a 15 year old) x .60 ------------- 123 = lower end of heart rate range.

To calculate the upper limit of the percent of maximal heart rate method, multiply your estimated maximal heart rate by .90, which represents 90% of your maximal heart rate.

EXAMPLE: 205 x .90 ----------- 184.5 = upper end of heart rate range

Therefore, using the percent of maximal heart rate method, a 15 year old student should get his or her heart rate up to at least 123 bpm, but not higher than 184.5 bpm.

Recovery Heart Rate Immediately after exercising, it is important to track your recovery heart rate. The higher your level of fitness, the more quickly your heart rate will drop after exercise. For example, if you finish a mile run and your exercise heart rate is 160 bpm, and one minute later your heart rate is down to 100 bpm, you are very physically fit and your body is used to being physically challenged on a regular basis. If, on the other hand, you run a mile and your post-exercise heart rate of 160 bpm drops only to 140 after one minute, you have a lower level of fitness and regular training should improve the speed with which you recover from hard exercise.

03.02 Heart rates assignment (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 60 minutes

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. You might want to print out a copy to take with you to your workout. Complete your work and save a copy for yourself. Don't forget to highlight your answers. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. ********************************************************************************************************************** 

Name:_______________________________ Date:_________________________ DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS.

1. What is your resting heart rate (bpm), and your estimated maximal heart rate?

Resting Heart Rate: ______

Estimated maximal heart rate (220 - age): ______ (4pts)

2. In the space below, calculate your target heart rate range using the heart rate range method. SHOW YOUR WORK!

Threshold HR ______  Target Ceiling HR ______  (4pts)

To find your Heart Rate Range method, subtract your resting heart rate from your maximal heart rate. This value is your heart rate range. Multiply your heart rate range by .50, assuming that 50% of your maximal heart rate is the minimal level at which you should exercise. Add your resting heart rate back to this value for the threshold heart rate, or your minimal level of intensity.

EXAMPLE: 205 (maximal heart rate) -70 (resting heart rate) ----------- 135 (heart rate range) x .50 (minimal level of exercise or percentage of maximal heart rate) ----------- 67.5 +70 (resting heart rate) ----------- 137.5 (threshold heart rate or minimum heart rate at which you should workout)

Then calculate your target ceiling rate, or the highest intensity level at which you should exercise. Once again using your heart rate range,, multiply your heart rate range by .85, assuming that 85% of your maximal heart rate is the maximum level at which you should exercise. Add your resting heart rate back to this value for the target ceiling rate, or your maximal level of intensity.

EXAMPLE: 205 (maximal heart rate) -70 (resting heart rate) ----------- 135 (heart rate range) x .85 (maximal level of exercise or percentage of maximal heart rate) ----------- 114.75 +70 (resting heart rate) ----------- 184.75 (target ceiling rate or maximum heart rate at which you should workout)

To summarize the above information, the threshold heart rate at which this 15 year old should workout is 137.5 bpm and the target ceiling rate is 184.75 bpm.

3. In the space below, calculate your target heart rate range using the maximal heart rate method. SHOW YOUR WORK!

Lower Limit ______  Upper Limit ______  (4 pts.)

To find your Maximal Heart Rate Range multiply your estimated maximal heart rate by .60, which represents your lower limit or 60% of your maximal heart rate.

EXAMPLE: 205 (estimated maximal heart rate for a 15 year old) x .60 ------------- 123 = lower limit.

To calculate the upper limit of the percent of maximal heart rate method, multiply your estimated maximal heart rate by .90, which represents 90% of your maximal heart rate.

EXAMPLE: 205 x .90 ----------- 184.5 = upper limit of heart rate range

Therefore, using the percent of maximal heart rate method, a 15 year old student should get his or her heart rate up to at least 123 bpm, but not higher than 184.5 bpm.

4. How do your target heart rate ranges differ in questions 2 and 3? ___________ Which method do you believe would be most relevant for you, and for your situation? Why? (4pts.)

 

Oxygen Exchanges: The purpose of your cardiorespiratory system is to move oxygen from the atmosphere to the cells of your body, where it is used to produce energy. To complete that process, three oxygen exchanges must take place.

  • The first is between the lungs and the blood. When this exchange is under duress, we experience increased or labored breathing.
  • The second exchange is between the blood and the muscle. When we require increased oxygen to the muscles we experience increased heart rate and blood pressure, similar to what we have discussed earlier in this assignment.
  • The third exchange is getting enough oxygen inside the cell. When there is not enough oxygen getting inside the cell, a substance called lactic acid is produced, causing a burning or painful sensation inside the specific muscle. (This is what happens when your legs burn while running, or when you get a side stitch during exercise.)

5.  As you perform the activities below, see if you can feel sensations that indicate each of those oxygen exchanges in your body. Perform each of the activities below for three minutes. Record your heart rate: (6 pts)

  • Immediately at the end of each exercise,
  • 1 minute after completing each exercise, and
  • 3 minutes after completing each exercise.
ACTIVITIES Immediately after exercising After one minute of rest After three minutes of rest
a) sitting      
b) standing      
c) walking briskly      
d) exercising fairly intensely      

 

6. During which activity was your heart rate the highest? (5 pts.)

A. Describe any patterns you see. Do these tell you anything about how your body responds to the demands of exercise?

B. Describe any sensations you experience regarding any of the three oxygen exchanges.

C. How fast was your recovery from intense exercise?

D. Did your heart rate get below 100 bpm after 1 minute or after 3 minutes?

7. During your regular, scheduled, aerobic workout, monitor and record your heart rate at 5 minute intervals (Pay attention to other limiting factors such as breathing or muscle fatigue.): (8 pts.)

_____* Immediately prior to beginning exercise. _____* 5 minutes. _____ * 10 minutes. _____ * 15 minutes. _____ * 20 minutes _____ * 25 minutes _____ * 30 minutes _____ * 5 minutes after completion of exercise

8. Share your results with a parent, peer, or teacher. If you so desire, you may wish to use Facebook or some other form of social media as base for your discussion. (If you do, remember you are trading some aspects of privacy for a broader, quicker, audience.) Discuss the changes you see in your heart rate throughout your exercise. (5 pts.)

•Compare changes in heart rate to the heart rate you recorded with the individual exercises. What similarities and differences did you note? •Describe how your body was responding at each interval, and discuss how that describes your body’s response to exercise.

9. Imagine you are visiting with someone who believes they are at risk for a heart attack because their family has a history of CVD. Describe how you would counsel them regarding:

•The difference between atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis. (5 pts.)

•How to modify their lifestyle to prevent each. (5 pts.)

*************************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.02.02 Places to participate in physical activity (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 60 minutes

Some physical activities (say, walking, stretching or doing sit-ups) you can do nearly anywhere, but where you live and the time of year do limit your choices. For instance, you might be really interested in surfing, but living in Utah, you aren't likely to get the chance to surf on a regular basis. Conversely, if you were living in Southern California, you wouldn't have many chances to ski or snowboard. During the Utah summer (well, most summers) skiing isn't a local sport; moreover, if you live in Florida, whitewater kayaking wouldn't be an easy option. If you live in a big city, you may not be able to ride horses. And, if you live in a remote, rural area, you may not be able to work out in a well-equipped gym. You get the idea.

For this assignment you will document some of the places in your neighborhood or community where you can participate in physical activity, including some places where you have completed activities for this class. Note, right up front, that for safety/privacy reasons, you should NOT identify your home specifically on a map.

There are two options for completing this assignment (CHOOSE ONLY 1):

OPTION 1: Submit 5 pictures of places where you participate in physical activity. Include a written paragraph briefly describing each location. 

OPTION 2: Pinpoint 5 locations for recreation or activity on a map such as Google Maps or create a Google Earth Tour following the directions below. Follow these instructions, and refer to the links below and the attachment. You will need to download Google Earth if you don't already have it on your computer. (See link below for the download.) See "Sample Horse History Tour" in the attachment below. Click on the attachment to download. Launch/Open Google Earth, then open the sample KMZ Tour called "Horse History Three Events-PatLambrose." Use this sample KMZ Tour as an example when you build your Google Earth Tour. Geospatial Assignment: (For ideas about why these skills are important, view the Geospatial Revolution Episode 1 Video in links list below.)

Locate at least five places in your community where you might participate in a physical activity.

Write a paragraph in each placemark evaluating that place and explaining the kinds of activities available there. At least two of the places should be places where you have actually participated in activity. Comment on what you have done there.

HOW TO CREATE THE GOOGLE EARTH TOUR: 1-Launch/Open Google Earth 2-How do I locate each place? Use the Search box in the top left to type in each place's name, address, city or county. Zoom into each search result and create your own placemarks. Do not use the placemarks that are returned from your Search. 3-How do I add my own placemarks? Locate the yellow push pin on the top menu bar. Click "Add Placemark." You will create five placemarks in this tour. 4-In each Placemark pop-up form, you need to include the following information:

1-Change "Untitled Placemark" to the name of the place or resource. 2-In the Description section add the following:

a-Include an image about the resource or event for at least two of the placemarks. (See the link “Using Placemarks with Google Earth-How to Add Images”. You may use Wikimedia Commons for your images, or take your own pictures.) b-Give credit for each image by adding the following text below each image: (Wikimedia Commons, public domain) - or your name if they are your images. c-Write the paragraph in each placemark (as described above, in the three options).

5-Next you need to add a Folder. Go to the top menu bar and select Add. Next select Folder. Name this folder the following: CommunityActivityResources-YourFirstName YourLastname. In the Description section add your name as the creator, such as:by Pat Lambrose. 6-Drag your six placemarks into this new CommunityActivityResources(FirstLast) folder. 7-Highlight this CommunityActivityResources(FirstLast) folder, right click on it and choose Save Place As 8-Save this .KMZ file somewhere on your hard drive where you will REMEMBER! 9-Submit your saved Google Earth .KMZ file of your CommunityActivityResources tour to your teacher as an assignment. Note: The saved file name is the name of your folder so DO NOT CHANGE the file name. Refer to the links below for additional tutorial help on how to add Placemarks and create Google Earth Tours.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


by Oliver Dixon CC-BY-SA-2.0, via Wikimedia Commonsby Oliver Dixon CC-BY-SA-2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

03.03 Calculating energy expenditure (Fitness for Life)

Analyze daily activities such as walking, climbing, lifting, and various household chores for their ability to provide fitness benefits. Compare aerobic and anaerobic activities, showing examples of each. List and evaluate activities that develop specific elements of physical fitness.

By http://www.flickr.com/people/sigsegv/ CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0), via Wikimedia CommonsBy http://www.flickr.com/people/sigsegv/ CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0), via Wikimedia Commons

Introduction: In the 1990’s, several important statements were issued regarding the benefits of physical activity and the detrimental effects of a sedentary lifestyle. For example, the American Heart Association declared that a sedentary lifestyle is a risk factor for heart disease--along with cigarette smoking and high cholesterol. The Surgeon General’s Office issued a report that explained the relationship of physical inactivity to not only heart disease, but also diabetes, osteoporosis, colon cancer, and depression.

A key component of the research that led to these conclusions is the accurate measurement of physical activity. Physical activity can be measured in several ways, the most convenient (and least expensive) of which is through a questionnaire. Questionnaires, although easy to administer, are not necessarily as accurate as more direct tests such as measuring activity through a pedometer or observation. It is also important to know how many calories we use during the activities we participate in.

The purpose of this activity is to teach you how to calculate your energy expenditure and figure out how many calories you burn during various physical activities. Essential Question: What is your body trying to tell you?

Energy Calculation

1. For the following assignment, choose five physical activities listed in the “Compendium of Physical Activities” at the end of this lesson, or at the link provided (bottom of page). You will estimate the caloric expenditure of these activities, so choose activities that you like and regularly participate in. These activities should vary in intensity. Make sure one of your activities is light intensity (e.g., 3.5 – 4.5 METS), two are moderate intensity (4.6 to 7 METS) and two are vigorous intensity (> 7 METS). Because 1 MET equals the amount of energy you expend at rest, you will typically be working at 6-12 METS when you are exercising vigorously.

2. Participate in each activity for at least 20 minutes, and taking care to maintain the designated intensity (light, moderate, or vigorous).

3. Record each activity, the intensity of the activity (i.e., MET value from compendium), and the duration of each activity in minutes.

4. Convert your weight in pounds to your weight in kilograms. In other words, divide your weight in pounds by 2.2.

5. Convert the number of minutes of participation in each activity to a proportion of an hour. For example, if you ride your mountain bike for 1/2 hour, that converts to .5 of an hour (30 minutes / 60 minutes = .5). If you ride your mountain bike for 40 minutes, divide 40 by 60 and you get .67 of an hour. To perform this conversion accurately, always put the number of minutes you performed the activity over 60 (minutes). If you go longer than 1 hour, your number could be as high as 2.5 hours. If you go less than 1 hour, your number will be below 1.

6. Once you have the MET value of your activity, your weight in kilograms, and the amount of time in which you participated in your activity, multiply these values by each other to estimate your caloric expenditure for each of the nine activities.

7) Here is an example for calculating your energy expenditure:

Suppose I liked to mountain bike, so we will use mountain biking as an example. Mountain biking can be fairly vigorous, so, we will estimate my energy expenditure is 8.5 METS. (Of course, if I am just coasting down the canyon it would be less, so there must be some honest estimation of how hard I am working) Let's say I weigh 132 pounds or 60 kilograms (132 / 2.2 = 60). If I go mountain biking for 1 and 1/2 hours, my participation in mountain biking would be 1.5 hours. First, I'll multiply the MET value (8.5) by my weight in kilograms (60) to get a value of 510. Next, I'll multiply 510 by the duration of my activity (1.5 hours) to get a total caloric expenditure during the bike ride of 765 calories.

Now that is an estimation of my caloric expenditure DURING the exercise. Of course, as we’ve discussed elsewhere, there are a lot of other factors, including duration, post exercise activity, and diet, that will determine how many calories I keep burning after the exercise, but right now, we want to understand what is happening DURING the exercise. (Reference: Compendium of Physical Activities (Energy Expenditure) Compendium Values Adapted From: Ainsworth, B.E., Haskell, W.L., Whitt, M.C., Irwin, M.L., Swartz, A.M., Strath, S.J., O'Brien, W., Bassett, D.R., Schmitz, K.H., Emplaincourt, P.O., Jacobs, D.R., Leon, A.S. (2000). Compendium of physical activities: An update of activity codes and MET intensities. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 32(9 Suppl), S498-S516.)

Light Activities (< 4.5 METS)

Activity, MET value:

Hacky Sack 3.5
Badminton 4.5
Bicycling, < 10 mph
4.0 Boating, power 2.5
Fishing 3.0

Golf, walking and carrying clubs 4.5
Golf, with cart 3.5
Ironing 2.3
Mopping 3.5
Light cleaning 2.5
Washing dishes 2.5
Vacuuming 3.5
Putting away groceries 2.5
Scrubbing Floors 3.8
Sitting & Reading 1.5
Kickball 4.0
Playing a Musical Instrument 2.0
Snowmobiling 3.5
Stretching or hatha yoga 2.5
Treading Water 4.0
Walking, moderate pace 3.0

 

Moderate Activities (4.6 to 7 METS)

Activity, MET Value

Aerobics, low impact 5.0
Skiing, general 7.0
Canoeing, moderate effort 7.0
Dancing, ballroom 4.5
Hiking, moderate terrain 6.0

Hunting 5.0
Ice Skating, general 7.0
Mowing Lawn 5.5
Raking Lawn 4.3
Weeding Garden 4.5
Racquetball, general 7.0
Sailing or windsurfing 5.0
Shoveling Snow 7.0
Skateboarding 5.0
Skiing, cross country (light effort) 7.0
Softball or baseball 5.0
Stationary Cycling, 150 watts 7.0
Swimming, freestyle, moderate 7.0
Swimming, backstroke 7.0
Tennis, general 7.0
Tennis, doubles 6.0
Volleyball 4.0
Walking, uphill 6.0
Water Aerobics 4.0
Waterskiing 6.0
Weight Lifting 6.0

 

Vigorous Activities (> 7 METS)

Activity, MET Value

Aerobics, 6-8" step 8.5
Aerobics, 10-12" step
10.0 Basketball 8.0
Bicycling, 12 - 13.9 mph 8.0

Bicycling, mountain or BMX 8.5
Bicycling, 14 - 14.9 mph 10.0
Bicycling, 16 - 19 mph 12.0
Bicycling, > 20 mph (racing) 16.0
Calisthenics (pushups, situps) 8.0
Flag Football 8.0
Martial Arts 10.0
Rock Climbing, ascending 11.0
Rock Climbing, rappelling 8.0
Rollerblading 12.5
Rope Jumping, general 10.0
Rowing, 150 watts 8.5
Running, 12 min/mi 8.0
Running, 11.5 min/mi 9.0
Running, 10 min/mi 10.0
Running, 9 min/mi 11.0
Running, 8 min/mi 12.5
Running, 7 min/mi 14.0
Running, 6 min/mi 16.0
Skiing, cross country, moderate speed 8.0
Skiing, cross country, vigorous speed 9.0
Snow shoeing 8.0
Soccer, competitive 10.0
Swimming, freestyle fast 10.0
Swimming, breaststroke 10.0
Swimming, butterfly 11.0
Water Jogging 8.0
X-C Ski Machine 7.0

03.03 Calculating energy expenditure assignment (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 60 minutes

Task: Using the instructions and data given in the lesson, complete the chart below. Make sure you show your calculations, as shown in the example at the top of the chart. Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Don't forget to highlight your answers. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

To refresh your memory about various paces of exercise, you might want to watch Studio C's "Race Pace" video via the link above.

******************************************************************************* Name:___________________ Date: _____________________ DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS.

Conversion of Body Weight from lbs to kg (Divide your weight in lbs by 2.2) = ______ (2 pts.)

(Calculations of exercises below 10 pts.)

Name of Activity 1. MET Value, Using Compendium 2. Body Weight in (kg) 3. Duration (in proportion of an hour) 4. Kcals Estimated: multiply values 1x2x3
Mountain biking 8.5 132/2.2 = 60 1.5 hours 8.5x60x1.5 = 765
1        
2        
3        
4        
5        

 

When answering questions 6, 7, and 8, discuss the questions, and your data, with a friend, parent, or teacher of your choice. If you so desire, you may wish to use Facebook or some other form of social media as base for your discussion. (If you do, remember you are trading some aspects of privacy for a broader, quicker, audience.) Ask them to describe to you similar situations from their own experience. Listen carefully to their thinking, and compare it to your own. Explain your thinking to them before writing your conclusion. Please consider each exercise individually, and provide complete answers for each exercise.

Remember, the inquiry here is to analyze what that exercise is doing for your body, and what your body is telling you about, and during, that exercise.

6. Which of the five activities you chose best meets the criteria as an aerobic workout? (30+ minutes, continuous, rhythmic, exercise that can raise the breathing and heart rate, but can be maintained at a steady pace.) Explain your reasoning: (5 pts.)

* Do you feel there is any significant cross-over with this exercise? In other words, you listed this as primarily aerobic, but do you feel it incorporates some benefits of cardiovascular or anaerobic exercise as well? Why?(5 pts.)

7. Which of the five activities you chose do you feel would best qualify as a cardiovascular workout? (exercise heart rate maintained for 12-20 minutes.) Explain your reasoning.(5 pts.)

* Do you feel there is any significant cross over with this exercise? In other words, you listed this as primarily cardiovascular, but do you feel it incorporates some benefits of aerobic or anaerobic exercise as well? Why or why not? (5 pts.)

8. Which of the five activities you chose do you feel would best qualify as an anaerobic workout? (Short bursts of great intensity for approximately 30 second to 2 minute intervals.) Explain your reasoning.(5 pts.)

* Do you feel there is any significant cross-over with this exercise? In other words, you listed this as primarily anaerobic, but do you feel it incorporates some benefits of aerobic or cardiovascular exercise as well? Why or why not? (5 pts.)

9. Provide definitions of the following modifiable CVD factors and explain what steps you might take to maintain them at healthy levels.

•Blood pressure. (2 pts.) •Triglycerides.(2 pts.) •LDL-C (2 pts.) •HDL-C (2 pts.)

******************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.03.02 Activity log week 4 (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 65 points possible 120 minutes

Submit your activity log. To submit your work, scan or take a photo of your log and the form. Save as a .jpg, .pdf or .gif and go to Topic 3 on the main class page to upload the files. IMPORTANT: Please do not email logs, as this delays the grading process, since emails do not become submitted into the instructor's grade book. As a last resort, you may mail copies to your teacher's physical address.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.04 Unit 3 Study guide (Fitness for Life)

Unit 3 Study Guide

1. Understand the different parts of the cardio-respiratory system, including the sensations that would indicate oxygen exchanges between the lungs to blood, blood to muscle cells, or within the cells.

a. For example, you may see a question similar to the following: As you begin your aerobic workout, you start out a little fast and find that you must slow down because your leg muscles begin to ache and cramp. Your cardiorespiratory system is most likely struggling to accomplish what task? Answer: To move enough oxygen from your blood into the cells. (Hint: You know this because the discomfort is localized to the specific skeletal muscles.)

2. Understand the nature of arterio and athero-sclerosis, and how they affect the blood pressure and work of the heart. 3. Understand the relationships between LDL-C cholestrol, HDL-C cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood pressure, and modifiable risk factors of CVD.

a. For example, you may see a question similar to the following: You have your cholesterol checked, and you find that you have a cholesterol level of 180 mg./dl. What is proper analysis of that result? Answer: Your cholesterol levels are optimal. (Hint: Below 200 mg./dl.)

U.S. Navy photo by Senior Chief Mass Communication Specialist Joe Kane, Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsU.S. Navy photo by Senior Chief Mass Communication Specialist Joe Kane, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons4. Understand how heart rate and blood pressure are used as indicators of cardiovascular fitness.

5. Understand how the FITT principles apply to cardiovascular fitness.

6. Understand how such concepts as aerobic, anaerobic, warm up, cool down, and type of exercise apply to cardiovascular fitness.

03.04.01 Unit 3 quiz (Fitness for Life)

computer-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

Go to the link in Topic 3 to take this quiz. You may take the quiz multiple times, but you must score at least 90%.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.00 Muscular Strength and Endurance (Fitness for Life)

This unit covers the basics related to building and maintaining muscular strength and endurance. Begin by reading/viewing the unit presentation and the lessons. Image by Erik van Leeuwen, GNU Free Documentation LicenseImage by Erik van Leeuwen, GNU Free Documentation License

Assignments related to this unit:

04.2.1  Muscular Endurance Assessment


04.2.2 Muscular Endurance Workout


04.3 Muscle Fitness

04.3.1 Activity Log 5 


04.4.1 Muscular Strength Assessment


04.5.1 Muscular Strength Workout


04.6 Circuit Training Workout

04.6.1 Activity Log 6

04.01 Unit 4 presentation (Fitness for Life)

Lifting weights to increase muscle strength: By Lance Cpl. Josh Cox, Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsLifting weights to increase muscle strength: By Lance Cpl. Josh Cox, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

View the Unit 4 presentation (attachment above, in PowerPoint form, or links below for narrated video).

These are the narrated, video version of the required unit 4 presentation. It is offered in five parts so that download times will be much quicker.

04.02 Muscular endurance (Fitness for Life)

Explain the concepts related to muscular strength, e.g., isotonic, isometric, and isokinetic exercises, the overload principle, and the work/rest ratio. Incorporate appropriate training principles including overload, progression, specificity, intervals, circuits, reversibility, maximum heart rate, target heart rate, perceived exertion, and rest and recovery.

Introduction: The next several assignments will introduce you to methods of developing muscular fitness in both endurance and strength.

By U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Nathanael Miller, Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsBy U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Nathanael Miller, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

The principle of specificity means that the specific types of exercise improve specific parts of fitness. That is true of cardio, flexibility, and muscular fitness workouts. Although they are, in many ways, markedly different, the first being that cardio is primarily aerobic while muscular improvement is primarily anaerobic, yet the FITT principle still may be usefully applied to muscular endurance or strength improvement as well as cardio workouts.

Muscular improvement requires application of the overload principle, which states that you must do more than you normally do to improve your fitness level. This principle, coupled with the principle of progression, is applicable to both endurance and strength. It also still applies to flexibility and cardiorespiratory training. Although the major emphasis in this class is on cardiorespiratory training as a lifetime health benefit, muscular fitness is also important because it can improve your performance in simple tasks, improve posture, help avoid injuries, and improve your appearance.

04.02 Muscular endurance assessment assignment (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 45 minutes

The purpose of this assignment is to introduce you to some of the ways you can assess your own muscular endurance and perform a workout that emphasizes the development of muscular endurance.

Once you perform this type of workout, you can decide how to incorporate muscular endurance activities into your overall workout program. If you have not previously been engaged in a muscle-specific workout, you may experience some muscle-specific soreness. This is normal. Just be sure to warm up slowly, and it will go away in about a week. One of the incentives of continuing to keep up with your muscle workout is that, once the soreness is gone, it won’t come back, unless you lay off your workout for a week or two. Also, minor soreness may occur if you are working your muscles incorrectly.

You can prevent most muscle soreness through proper warm-up, progressive increases in workload, and by avoiding bouncing or jerking movement. Essential Question: What is your body trying to tell you?

Task: Jog or walk for 5 to 10 minutes to warm up your cardiovascular system. Then perform 5-10 stretching exercises to warm up your muscles and prepare for this test.

Conduct Self-Assessment using the exercises described below.

For the first three exercises of this self-assessment you will identify whether the exercise is isotonic or isometric. Isometric exercises are static, meaning the positions are held in place for a length of time. Isotonic exercises involve movement through contraction of muscles and are done as repetitions. 

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. You might want to print out a copy to take with you to your workout. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Don't forget to highlight your answers. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.. **************************************************************************** Name:_______________________________ Date:_____________________________

DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS.

1.  Trunk Extension

Procedure: Lie prone on your stomach on the floor with legs together and arms extended approximately parallel. Slowly raise upper body and legs off floor.

a. How many seconds did you hold the Trunk Extension? _____ seconds. (2 pts)

b. Are you in the "healthy fitness zone" for muscular endurance as assessed using the trunk lift? (males = 30 seconds / females = 20 seconds) ____yes ____no (2 pts)

c. Was this exercise Isometric or Isotonic? (2 pts.)

2. Sitting Tuck

Procedure: Sit so that your back and feet are off the floor. Place your hands on top of your head (not behind your neck). Keeping your back and feet off the floor, alternately bend your legs and bring your knees towards your chest, and then extend your feet away from your body. Repeat.

a. How many repetitions of the "Sitting Tuck" did you perform? _______ Repetitions. (2 pts.)

b. Are you in the "healthy fitness zone" for muscular endurance as assessed using the sitting tuck? (males = 25 repetitions / females = 20 repetitions) _____yes _____no (2 pts.)

c. Was this exercise Isometric or Isotonic? (2 pts.)

3.Bent Arm Hang

Bent Arm Hang: Begin timing when hanging from bar with overhand grip and chest close to the bar. Stop timing when (1) chin touches bar (2) head tilts back in effort to keep chin from touching bar (3) chin falls below level of bar.

a. How many seconds were you able to hold the "bent arm hang"? ______seconds? (2 pts.)

b. Are you in the "healthy fitness zone" for muscular endurance as assessed using the bent arm hang test? (males = 16 seconds / females = 12 seconds) ______ yes ______ no (2 pts.)

c. Was this exercise Isometric or Isotonic (2 pts.)

4. _____ complete 20 stride jumps or 20 Jumping Jacks.

(If you completed less than 20 write down the number you did complete in this space _______) •What were some of the specific physical sensations you experienced during this exercise? (2pts.)

5. _____ complete 20 side leg raises with right leg as described in the book, or go to the link below for Side Bridge Hip Abduction:

(If you completed less than 20 write down the number you did complete in this space _______) •What were some of the specific physical sensations you experienced during this exercise? (3pts.)

6. _____ complete 20 side leg raises with left leg as described in book, or Side Bridge Hip Abduction the link.

(If you completed less than 20 write down the number you did complete in this space _______) •What were some of the specific physical sensations you experienced during this exercise? (3 pts.)

7. _____ complete 20 repetitions of the trunk lift as described in the book, or go to the link below for Barbell Deadlift (no weights)

(If you completed less than 20 write down the number you did complete in this space _______) •What were some of the specific physical sensations you experienced during this exercise? (3 pts.)

8. _____ complete 20 repetitions of the bridge as described in the book, or go to the link below for Lying Hip Extension.

(If you completed less than 20 write down the number you did complete in this space ________) •What were some of the specific physical sensations you experienced during this exercise? (3 pts.)

9. _____ complete 15 repetitions of the 90-degree push-up as described in the book, or go to the link below for Push-ups.

(If you completed less than 15 complete the knee push-up exercise below.) *Do the modified push up if you are unable to complete the 90-degree push-up. _____ completed 20 repetitions of the knee push-up (If you completed less than 15 write down the number you did complete in this space ______) •What were some of the specific physical sensations you experienced during this exercise? (3pts.)

10. _____ complete 20 repetitions of the curl-up with twist as described in the book, or go to link for Weighted Twisting Crunch (Weights are optional, but not required)

(If you completed less than 20 write down the number you did complete in this space _______) •What were some of the specific physical sensations you experienced during this exercise? (3 pts.)

11. _____ completed 20 repetitions of the high knee jog (Self Explanatory. Jog in place, raising knees to level of belt buckle.)

(If you completed less than 20 write down the number you did complete in this space _______) •What were some of the specific physical sensations you experienced during this exercise? (3 pts.)

12. _____ complete 20 repetitions of the prone arm lift as described in the book, or go to the link below for Dumbbell Rear Lateral Raise (weights optional, not required.)

(If you completed less than 20, record the number you did complete in this space ______) •What were some of the specific physical sensations you experienced during this exercise? (3 pts.)

Complete a cool-down and stretching session, to avoid injury.

Also answer these questions:

13. How were the results of your isometric assessments different from those of your isotonic assessments? (2 pts.)

14. Given your results on the tests of muscular endurance, which area was your strongest? Which area was your weakest? What types of activities will you do to remedy your weaknesses? (3 pts.)

******************************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.03 Muscle fitness assignment (Fitness for Life)

04.03 Muscular Fitness Guidelines (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 60 minutes

Introduction: The purpose of this assignment is to increase your awareness and understanding of the dangers of anabolic steroids. This assignment will also help increase your understanding of resistance training and basic muscle fitness.

Task: Use the links below and other online resources to answer the following questions: Notice that anabolic steroids are, at their most basic, simply artificially produced male hormones. Use of anabolic steroids results in raising the body’s level of male hormones, usually by an exponential factor. Therefore, all effects, both desired and adverse, are basically a result of an unnatural hormonal imbalance. Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Don't forget to highlight your answers. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. ********************************************************************************************************************** 

Name:_______________________________ Date:______________________ DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS.

A. List nine adverse effects of taking anabolic steroids: (2 pts. ea)

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

B. Define or give an example of each of the following kinds of exercise: (2 pts. ea)

1. Isometric-

2. Isotonic-

3. Isokinetic-

4. Plyometric-

5. Calisthenic-

Strength Training: C. Define each of the following strength training practices. (2 pts. Each.)

1. Resistance Training

2. Circuit Training

3. Weight lifting:

4. Powerlifting

5. Body building:

D. List guidelines that should be followed when participating in resistance training. Go to the link below to see similar guidelines by the American College of Sports Medicine.

Choose the resistance training guidelines that you feel are the most important. (2 pts. ea)

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


Identify appropriate risks and safety factors in the selection of fitness activities. Examine the effects of steroids on health and performance. List and evaluate activities that develop specific elements of physical fitness.

By U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Nathanael Miller, Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsBy U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Nathanael Miller, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

One of the purposes of exercise is to increase your muscle strength. In the following assignment, you will learn about different ways of classifying exercise, and types of strength training.

Increasing your muscle strength takes time, work and persistence. It seems to be human nature to look for shortcuts, and strength training is no exception to this rule. Look in any fitness magazine, and you will see advertisements for expensive equipment that claims it is the best or quickest way to improve your muscle strength (some of the ads say things like "in only five minutes a day!"). Vitamins, herbs and other supplements also claim to produce "miraculous" results.

Some of the most dangerous (and generally illegal) of such substances are anabolic steroids. There are legitimate, legal medical uses for steroids, but helping athletes 'bulk up' isn't one of them. The side-effects and risks are not worth it.

04.03.01 Activity log week 5 (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 65 points possible 120 minutes

Submit your activity log. To submit your work, scan or take a photo of your log and the form. Save as a .jpg, .pdf or .gif and go to Topic 3 on the main class page to upload the files. IMPORTANT: Please do not email logs, as this delays the grading process, since emails do not become submitted into the instructor's grade book. As a last resort, you may mail copies to your teacher's physical address.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.04 Muscular strength (Fitness for Life)

Develop weight training programs to build muscular strength, muscular endurance or a combination of the two. Explain the concepts related to muscular endurance, e.g., high repetitions with low resistance, sport specificity, and the work/rest ratio.

By Sgt. Richard Blumenstein, Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsBy Sgt. Richard Blumenstein, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Introduction: The purpose of this lesson and assignment is to teach you how to safely test your muscular strength.

There are several ways to test your muscular strength. The best definition of muscular strength is the maximal amount of weight you can lift at one time. Therefore, it should come as no surprise that one method of assessing muscular strength is the 1RM or 1 repetition maximum method, which requires you to lift the maximum amount of weight possible one time. This procedure is NOT recommended for individuals who have not yet reached full physical maturity, OR for those with no experience with strength training methods. The extreme nature of the attempt can cause severe damage to bone, cartilage, and tendons. Tissue that is still forming is especially susceptible to this kind of injury. If you do perform a 1RM test, it should be under the direct supervision of a trained teacher, coach, or trainer, since any deviation from proper technique dramatically increases the possibility of long-term injury.

A safer procedure for assessing muscular strength is the Modified 1RM Method test that requires individuals to estimate the amount of weight they can lift one time by lifting a weight several times and using a scientifically developed chart to make an educated guess about how much you can lift at one time. (A similar method is used by pro football teams for the simple reason of avoiding injury to valuable players.)

Use the websites at the links below.

04.04 Muscular strength assessment assignment (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 60 minutes

Task: For this assignment, you will:

Find a weight training facility at your school, at home, or a city gym.

Jog or walk for 5 to 10 minutes to warm up your cardiovascular system. Then, perform 5-10 stretching exercises to warm up your muscles and prepare for this test.

Conduct the self-assessment below. This self-assessment asks you to complete several strength training exercises. Carefully view the exercises (in the links above) prior to doing this test. If possible, seek the feedback of a trained teacher, coach, or trainer.

For each exercise, choose a weight that you think you can lift at least five times but not more than ten times. Use the One Rep Max link above to estimate your 1RM's from the tests performed. Complete the form below relative to your Modified 1RM test. Then, answer the questions related to your performance on the muscular strength assessment. Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. You might want to print out a copy to take with you to your workout. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Don't forget to highlight your answers. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. *********************************************************************

Name:____________________________ Date:_________________________________

1. Seated Overhead Press: Go to the link for Seated Overhead Bench Press above. (3 pts.)

Weight Lifted: _______

Repetitions performed: _______ (5-10)

* Estimated 1RM _______ 

2. Bench Press: Go to the link for Bench Press: (3 pts.)

Weight Lifted: _______

Repetitions Performed: _______ (5-10)

* Estimated 1 RM:_______ 

 

3. Knee Extension: Go to the link for Knee Extension: (3 pts.)

Weight Lifted: _______

Repetitions Performed: _______ (5-10)

*Estimated 1RM:_______ 

4. Squat: Go to the link for Squat: (3 pts.)

Weight Lifted: _______

Repetitions Performed: _______ (5-10)

*Estimated 1RM _______ 

5. Hamstring Curl: Go to the link for Cable Lying Leg Curl (3 pts.)

Weight Lifted: _______

Repetitions Performed: _______ (5-10)

*Estimated 1RM _______ 

6. Biceps Curl: Go to the link for Biceps Curl. (3 pts.)

Weight Lifted: _______

Repetitions Performed: _______ (5-10)

*Estimated 1RM: _______ 

7. Heel Raise: Go to the link for Dumbbell Standing Calf Raise (Weights optional. Not required.) (3 pts.)

Weight Lifted: _______

Repetitions Performed: _______ (5-10)

*Estimated 1RM _______ 

8. Triceps Extension:Go to the link for Dumbbell Lying Triceps Extension. (3 pts.)

Weight Lifted: _______

Repetitions Performed: _______ (5-10)

*Estimated 1RM _______ 

9. Bent Over Dumbbell Row:Go to the link for Dumbbell Bent-over Row. (3 pts.)

Weight Lifted: _______

Repetitions Performed: _______ (5-10)

*Estimated 1RM _______ 

10. Deadlift: Go to the link for Barbell Deadlift. (3 pts.)

Weight Lifted: _______

Repetitions Performed: _______ (5-10)

*Estimated 1RM _______ 

Also answer these questions: DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS. (Please provide adequate information for full credit)

11. (3 pts.) Given your results on the tests of muscular strength, which body part was your strongest? Which body part was your weakest?

12. (10 pts.) What types of activities will you do to remedy your weaknesses? What type of workout plan would you make? (Include at least 5 days of exercise, as well as exercises, sets, reps)

13. (5 pts.) Which of the exercises performed do you feel most qualifies as a “Core Lift”? A "Core Lift" is an exercise that targets the mid-section: abs, obliques, or lower back. Explain your answer. 

14. (2 pts.) Describe a safety concern that the exerciser should be aware of when engaged in your proposed core exercise.

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.05 Muscular strength workouts (Fitness for Life)

Develop weight training programs to build muscular strength, muscular endurance or a combination of the two. Explain the concepts related to muscular endurance, e.g., high repetitions with low resistance, sport specificity, and the work/rest ratio.

A few principles regarding strength training are important to discuss here.

1. The principle of progression describes the gradual increase of resistance in strength training. This becomes important for all concerned. The person exercising should have a good idea of exactly how many times they can lift, with proper technique, the given weight. The spotter should be aware of this goal, and encourage the lifter to give max effort. If the lifter can lift one more than the goal, it is a win for everyone in the room.

2. To build strength, you should lift moderately heavy weights six to eight times. This means that you choose the weight that you can lift at least six, but no more than eight times (reps). When you gain sufficient strength to lift the weight nine times, you increase the weight, a principle known as progression.

3. Be sure to warm up, exercise large muscles first, concentrate on strength when beginning a program, and complete the full range of motion to increase flexibility and gain the full benefits of the resistance training. (By concentrating on large muscles and the heavier weights first, you will be able to better control the weights and avoid injury.)

4. Be aware that strength training will most likely lead to an increase in muscle size. With regular strength training exercise muscle fibers often increase in size. People who exercise for six to eight weeks may actually gain weight because of this increase in muscle size. This does not mean you are going to “bulk up”, a fear among women more than men. The effects of strength training are determined by the hormones in the body. Strength training will build in men the more masculine figure they desire. Strength training in women will not give them a more masculine figure, but rather will build the feminine figure they desire (unless they use steroids, which is one of the things you should have learned about in an earlier assignment).

Also view the video at the following link.

04.05 Muscular strength workouts assignment (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 60 minutes

Introduction: The purpose of this assignment is to have you perform a workout that emphasizes the development of muscular strength. Once you perform this type of workout, you can decide how to incorporate strength building activities into your overall fitness program.

Task: For this assignment, you will: Choose some of your favorite music and play it during your workout. Upbeat music has been shown to help individuals stay motivated during exercise. Jog or walk for 5 to 10 minutes to warm up your cardiovascular system. Then, perform 5-10 stretching exercises to warm up your muscles and prepare for this workout.

Go to the 2nd link below, and use exercises from that site. Indicate which exercises you choose.

This muscular strength program asks you to complete the same exercises you completed for the modified 1RM test. Use your estimated 7RM values, as calculated from your modified 1RM values from assignment 04.04. Make sure you note the differences between the program using weight machines and free weights. To determine your 7RM, multiply your estimated 1RM by the appropriate percentage for your age (13 year olds = 60% or .60; 14 year olds = 65% or .65; 15 and older = 75% or .75) Make sure you work with a partner so he/she can spot you if necessary and provide corrective feedback where necessary. Take turns completing the exercise so you get some rest between each set of repetitions.

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. You might want to print out a copy to take with you to your workout. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Don't forget to highlight your answers. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. ********************************************************************************

Name:_____________________________ Date:________________________

Fill in all the blanks provided when you complete the exercises, including the recommendations for the next exercise session. Then, answer the questions below relative to your completion of the muscular endurance workout. (3 pts. each) (Recommended percentage by age: 13 year olds = 60% or .60; 14 year olds = 65% or .65; 15 and older = 75% or .75)

1. Seated Overhead Press: Go to the link below for Dumbell Shoulder Press: (3 pts.)

a. Estimated 1RM (from your previous muscle strength assessment assignment): _______

b. Recommended weight for 7RM (1RM x recommended percentage for your age): _______

c. # of sets performed: _____

d. Weight Lifted: _____

e. # of reps performed: _____

f. Recommendations for next exercise session (If you can do > 10 reps, increase the weight by 5 to 10%; if you cannot do 7 reps, decrease the weight): Increase weight to _____Decrease weight to_____ Stay the same_____

2. Bench Press: Go to the link below for Bench Press: (3 pts.)

a. Estimated 1RM (from your previous muscle strength assessment assignment): _______

b. Recommended weight for 7RM (1RM x recommended percentage for your age): _______

c. # of sets performed: _____

d. Weight Lifted: _____

e. # of reps performed: _____

f. Recommendations for next exercise session (If you can do > 10 reps, increase the weight by 5 to 10%; if you cannot do 7 reps, decrease the weight): Increase weight to _____Decrease weight to_____ Stay the same_____

3. Knee Extension: Go to the link below for Knee Extension: (3 pts.)

a. Estimated 1RM (from your previous muscle strength assessment assignment): _______

b. Recommended weight for 7RM (1RM x recommended percentage for your age): _______

c. # of sets performed: _____

d. Weight Lifted: _____

e. # of reps performed: _____

f. Recommendations for next exercise session (If you can do > 10 reps, increase the weight by 5 to 10%; if you cannot do 7 reps, decrease the weight): Increase weight to _____Decrease weight to_____ Stay the same_____

4. Squat: Go to the link below for Squat: (3 pts.)

a. Estimated 1RM (from your previous muscle strength assessment assignment): _______

b. Recommended weight for 7RM (1RM x recommended percentage for your age): _______

c. # of sets performed: _____

d. Weight Lifted: _____

e. # of reps performed: _____

f. Recommendations for next exercise session (If you can do > 10 reps, increase the weight by 5 to 10%; if you cannot do 7 reps, decrease the weight): Increase weight to _____Decrease weight to_____ Stay the same_____

5. Hamstring Curl: Go to the link below for Cable Lying Leg Curl: (3 pts.)

a. Estimated 1RM (from your previous muscle strength assessment assignment): _______

b. Recommended weight for 7RM (1RM x recommended percentage for your age): _______

c. # of sets performed: _____

d. Weight Lifted: _____

e. # of reps performed: _____

f. Recommendations for next exercise session (If you can do > 10 reps, increase the weight by 5 to 10%; if you cannot do 7 reps, decrease the weight): Increase weight to _____Decrease weight to_____ Stay the same_____

6. Biceps Curl: Go to the link below for Biceps Curl: (3 pts.)

a. Estimated 1RM (from your previous muscle strength assessment assignment): _______

b. Recommended weight for 7RM (1RM x recommended percentage for your age): _______

c. # of sets performed: _____

d. Weight Lifted: _____

e. # of reps performed: _____

f. Recommendations for next exercise session (If you can do > 10 reps, increase the weight by 5 to 10%; if you cannot do 7 reps, decrease the weight): Increase weight to _____Decrease weight to_____ Stay the same_____

7. Heel Raise: Go to the link below for Dumbbell Standing Calf Raise: (3 pts.)

a. Estimated 1RM (from your previous muscle strength assessment assignment): _______

b. Recommended weight for 7RM (1RM x recommended percentage for your age): _______

c. # of sets performed: _____

d. Weight Lifted: _____

e. # of reps performed: _____

f. Recommendations for next exercise session (If you can do > 10 reps, increase the weight by 5 to 10%; if you cannot do 7 reps, decrease the weight): Increase weight to _____Decrease weight to_____ Stay the same_____

8. Triceps Extension: Go to the link below for Dumbbell Lying Triceps Extension: (3 pts.)

a. Estimated 1RM (from your previous muscle strength assessment assignment): _______

b. Recommended weight for 7RM (1RM x recommended percentage for your age): _______

c. # of sets performed: _____

d. Weight Lifted: _____

e. # of reps performed: _____

f. Recommendations for next exercise session (If you can do > 10 reps, increase the weight by 5 to 10%; if you cannot do 7 reps, decrease the weight): Increase weight to _____Decrease weight to_____ Stay the same_____

9. Bent Over Dumbbell Row: Go to the link below for Dumbbell Bent-over Row: (3 pts.)

a. Estimated 1RM (from your previous muscle strength assessment assignment): _______

b. Recommended weight for 7RM (1RM x recommended percentage for your age): _______

c. # of sets performed: _____

d. Weight Lifted: _____

e. # of reps performed: _____

f. Recommendations for next exercise session (If you can do > 10 reps, increase the weight by 5 to 10%; if you cannot do 7 reps, decrease the weight): Increase weight to _____Decrease weight to_____ Stay the same_____

10. Deadlift: Go to the link below for Barbell Deadlift: (3 pts.)

a. Estimated 1RM (from your previous muscle strength assessment assignment): _______

b. Recommended weight for 7RM (1RM x recommended percentage for your age): _______

c. # of sets performed: _____

d. Weight Lifted: _____

e. # of reps performed: _____

f. Recommendations for next exercise session (If you can do > 10 reps, increase the weight by 5 to 10%; if you cannot do 7 reps, decrease the weight): Increase weight to _____Decrease weight to_____ Stay the same_____

11. Abdominal Exercise: Go to the link below for Crunch: (2 pts.)

a. # of reps performed: _____

b. # of sets performed: ______

c. Recommendation for next exercise session (If you can do > 20 reps, increase the reps to 50; if you cannot do 20 reps, decrease the reps to 10): Increase reps to _____ Decrease reps to_____Stay the same _____

ADDITIONAL QUESTIONS: (Please provide adequate information for full credit.) DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS.

12. (3 pts.) Did you find the muscular strength workouts (this one) easier or harder than the muscular endurance workout completed previously in the first assignments for this unit (04.02.02)? Why?

 

13. (3 pts.) Describe an exercise that you might use to substitute for one or more of these exercises that would better fulfill the requirements of “Core Lift”. A "Core Lift" is an exercise that targets the mid-section: abs, obliques, or lower back. Explain your answer. 

 

14. (2 pts.) Describe a safety concern that the exerciser should be aware of when engaged in your proposed Core exercise. Before answering the next question, you may wish to review the short video clip on strength training from the previous lesson.

 

15. (5 pts.) According to SJS Sports (see link below), list and describe at least 5 responsibilities of the spotter when strength training.     

     1.

     2.

     3.

     4.

     5. 

 

16. (5 pts.) Given your experiences with this workout, how could you incorporate muscular strength exercises in your workouts?    

       What would a workout for you consist of? (i.e. exercises, sets, reps)—Describe your workout plan below:

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.06 Circuit training workout (Fitness for Life)

Incorporate appropriate training principles of circuit training. Utilize imagination, self-expression, and creativity in designing personal fitness plans.

Official Navy Page from United States of America MC3 Donald White Jr./U.S. Navy, Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsOfficial Navy Page from United States of America MC3 Donald White Jr./U.S. Navy, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Circuit training is a method that combines muscular strength, muscular endurance, and aerobic conditioning. Once you perform this type of workout, you can decide how to incorporate circuit training into your overall workout program.

04.06 Circuit training workout assignment (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 45 minutes

Introduction: The purpose of this assignment is to introduce you to circuit training.

Task: Jog or walk for 5 to 10 minutes to warm up.

Conduct the Circuit Training Workout. This workout asks you to complete a circuit training workout for 30 minutes. Go to the link below this assignment and complete the total body workout suggested there by “Sports Fitness Advisor”. Or… You may substitute for a different circuit training workout of your choice, but you MUST justify your alternative workout for full points. If you use the on-line “Sports Fitness Advisor” workout, you will need some minor equipment. You may substitute household items where appropriate. Follow the directions given for proper technique. Describe which workout you chose, and list the exercises completed.

  • You might consider checking out the holiday circuit workout video link below for additional pointers.
  • Studio C's "P90 X" link demonstrates circuit training like no other. See below. 

Fill in the exercises you will perform BEFORE you begin the workout. That way you will only need to fill in the number of reps performed.

• Have a visible clock, with a second hand, that you can easily see WHILE you exercise.

• Participate in each exercise for 1 minute and 50 seconds. Allow 10 seconds between exercises.

• When you check heart rate, check for 10 seconds. Multiply by 6 AFTER the entire workout is completed.

• Continue the workout, rotating through the exercises, for a total of at least 30 minutes.

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Print a copy to take with you to your workout. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Don't forget to highlight your answers. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

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Name:________________ Date:________________ Workout: _______________________

Exercise Reps
1._______________________ ____________
2. ______________________ ____________
3. ______________________ ____________
4. ______________________ ____________
5. ______________________ ____________

 

Heart rate after 10 minutes ______________

 

6. ______________________

____________
7. ______________________ ____________
8. ______________________ ____________
9. ______________________ ____________
10. _____________________ ____________

 

Heart rate after 20 minutes ______________

11. _____________________

____________
12. _____________________ ____________
13. _____________________ ____________
14. _____________________ ____________
15. _____________________ ____________

 

Heart rate after 30 minutes ______________

(30 pts. for completion.)

Additional Questions: Provide adequate information for full credit DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS.

9. (5 pts.) Did you enjoy alternating muscular endurance/strength activities with aerobic activities as is done in a circuit? • Why or why not?

10. (5 pts.) Now that you have completed workouts to improve muscular endurance, muscular strength, and both (circuit training), which type of workout did you like the best and why?

11. (10 pts.) Given your experience with this workout, create and describe a program that you would use to incorporate circuit training into your future workouts. list at least 5 different exercises and provide the number of repetitions or durations for each.

• General Description: • Exercises:

1. #reps:
2. #reps:
3. #reps:
4. #reps:
5. #reps:

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.06.01 Activity log week 6 (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 65 points possible 120 minutes

Submit your activity log. To submit your work, scan or take a photo of your log and the form. Save as a .jpg, .pdf or .gif and go to Topic 3 on the main class page to upload the files. IMPORTANT: Please do not email logs, as this delays the grading process, since emails do not become submitted into the instructor's grade book. As a last resort, you may mail copies to your teacher's physical address.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.07 Unit 4 study guide (Fitness for Life)

Unit 4 Study Guide:

1. Understand applications of muscular strength and endurance.

i. Example: You decide to try to compete in the 800 meter swim. You probably need to complete exercises that work on what aspect of fitness. Answer: Dynamic endurance

2. Intensity:

a. Appropriate measurements of intensity for different types of workouts.
b. Periodization.

3. Duration

4. Types of training, including such concepts as Isotonic, Isometric, Isokinetic, Circuit Training, Split Training, Super Slow Training, Sport Specific Training, Pyramid Training, Power lifting, etc.

a. Example: You work with a trainer who has designed a series of strength training exercises in which you complete only one set of each lift slowly, and with constant monitoring and assistance of the trainer. You are most likely engaged in what type of strength training? Answer: Super Slow Training.

5. Understand the application of proper spotting techniques.

6. Effects of steroids, including the fact that they basically cause a hormonal imbalance.

04.07.01 Unit 4 quiz (Fitness for Life)

computer-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

Go to the link in Topic 3 on the main class page to take this quiz. You may take it multiple times, but you must score at least 90%

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.08 Ready - Fitness for Life first quarter final test (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 1 points possible 15 minutes

EHS does not allow finals to be taken until all coursework is completed and receives a minimum passing score. Also, you must meet the minimum score on all unit quizzes. Once your assignments are in a graded, Module 4 will unlock, so you can arrange to take your final. Use the "Ready" link to let your teacher know you are ready to take your final test. Your teacher will mark your "Ready" assignment with a "1" if you are approved to take the final.

Try to schedule your final test (following the instructions in the "Arranging to take my final proctored test" link) within a week of submitting your Ready assignment.

You must score at least 60% on your final test to pass and receive credit for the class. You may NOT re-take the final test without re-taking the class.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.09 First quarter final test (Fitness for Life)

computer-scored 385 points possible 45 minutes

After your teacher has marked your 'Ready' assignment with a '1', use the link "Arranging to take my final proctored test" in Module 4 of the main class page to set up your test.

Note that you must score at least 60% on the final test to earn credit for the class, and you may NOT re-take the final test unless you first re-take the class.

 

Note to proctor: No notes are allowed during the test.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


Parent Contact Form

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

A PARENT CONTACT FORM must be submitted before you will be able to advance to the modules/assignments in the class.

Print out a copy of the PARENT CONTACT FORM, and have your parent fill it out. Send it in so the rest of the class assignments/lessons/and quizzes will unlock. The attachments are provided in either PDF or RTF format--choose either version.
 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.