Skip navigation.

1st Quarter, Health II

00.0 Start Here - Welcome to Health II

Course Description

Health education provides opportunities for students to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for practicing lifelong, health-enhancing behaviors.

The Health II high school curriculum focuses on what students can do for themselves to meet the objectives of the six state core standards and illustrates the impact their attitudes and behaviors have on the world around them.

The curriculum builds on the foundation established in Health I with an advanced, age-appropriate focus. Students will learn they are responsible for their personal well-being and that building a solid foundation of health literacy and decision-making skills can contribute to positive health choices throughout life. In addition, they will explore the impact their personal health has on society as a whole.

CLASS RULES AND INSTRUCTIONS

NOTE: NO TEXTBOOK IS REQUIRED FOR THIS COURSE. ALL MATERIAL IS AVAILABLE ONLINE.

HOW TO OBTAIN REQUIRED HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT IN HEALTH EDUCATION II:

-- Quarter 1 contains units 1, 2, 3, and 4, and does NOT require a signed permission form from your parents.
-- Quarter 2 contains units 5, 6, 7, and 8, and DOES require the signed permission form from your parents. Permission form is found in q2 only.

You must complete all assignments in the quarter and score at least 70% on all quizzes (higher where indicated in the quiz instructions) before taking the final test. You MUST pass the final test (with at least 60% correct) to earn credit in the class. You may NOT retake the final test without re-taking the class.

THE FINAL PROJECT FOR THIS CLASS (unit 4 for first quarter, or unit 8 for second quarter) TAKES at least TWO WEEKS TO COMPLETE, SO DON'T PUT OFF STARTING ON IT TILL JUST BEFORE YOU NEED YOUR CREDIT.

THESE ARE THE STEPS YOU NEED TO FOLLOW IN ORDER TO COMPLETE THE COURSE:

1. Please read all the "Start Here" instructions below to carefully review all class rules and procedures which apply to both 1st and 2nd quarter classes.

2. The first assignment you submit will be the "About Me" assignment.  To begin your first assignment, scroll down to the "About Me" assignment at the bottom of this page and use the instructions there to complete and submit your assignment.

[For second quarter only. You must be enrolled in 2nd quarter to see the permission form.] You will find this form and instructions on how to submit the form under the "Overview 05 Safety and Intervention Skills and PERMSSION FORM" link in module 2.

3. How to complete all subsequent lessons AFTER the "about me" lesson: Lessons are in Module 3, on the left side of the list (out-dented left). Click the desired lesson and carefully follow all instructions. To submit the assignment, copy and paste the assignment instructions (everything between the two lines of asterisks) into a word processing document, answer the questions, and save your work so you will have your own copy of your assignment if anything gets lost.

4. SUBMIT YOUR ASSIGNMENTS to your instructor by following these instructions:

--- Copy and paste whatever portion of the assignment is needed to complete it into a word processing file.
--- Answer all questions, complete any charts or write any essays or papers required.
--- SAVE THE COMPLETED ASSIGNMENT.
--- Come back to or reopen the assignment you need to submit.
--- Click the name of the assignment under Topic 3 of the main class page.
--- Click "Edit My Submission" found at the bottom of the submission window.
--- Scroll down to where you'll see a text window that you can work in.
--- Copy and paste your completed assignment into that window.
--- Click "Save Changes" to submit your assignment.

5. READ the course material for the next assignment and REPEAT the STEPS until EVERY assignment is completed (ALL ARE REQUIRED TO RECEIVE CREDIT AND A GRADE IN THE COURSE). Plan to complete about four assignments or quizzes a week to finish the class in the same time as a regular quarter. You will automatically be dropped from the class TEN WEEKS after you were enrolled.

6. You must follow the EHS HONOR CODE: "As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers and staff with respect."

7. You have TEN WEEKS to complete this class.

image from Wikimedia Commons,Open Clip Art Library, public domainimage from Wikimedia Commons,Open Clip Art Library, public domain

PREREQUISITES

You need to take Health Quarter One before you take Health Quarter Two.

HOW YOUR WORK IS GRADED

Your work is graded according to the rubrics in each lesson.

Your grade becomes final after the proctored test, and there is no opportunity to raise your grade after that. If high grades are important to you, remember--you can retake all tests and quizzes and resubmit assignments as many times as you like. The opportunity to resubmit work is lost after the proctored test is complete. Good luck.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION that improves success and raises your grade:
1) Submit work each week.
2) Retake any test if you score less than 70%.
3) Retake tests as often as you like to improve grades or study.
4) Read all returned assignments to find out if your assignments were accepted or if further work is necessary.
5) If a website doesn’t work, submit the assignment anyway, using other sites, asking people, etc. Inform me of the problem.
6) Remember that this class requires two quarters to complete to meet the state .5 credit requirement.
7) Per quarter, you have 8 weeks to complete the assignments, quizzes and unit tests. Then the 9th week, after I have graded everything you submitted the 8th week, you will need to submit the READY message and arrange to take the final. I will submit your grade the 10th week.  You will automatically be dropped from the course after TEN weeks.

FINAL PROCTORED EXAM

The proctored final test must be taken with an EHS-certified proctor, who will enter the test password. You must score at least 60% to pass. If you do not, please inform your teacher immediately. IMPORTANT (your grade will not be submitted until you do the following): AFTER TAKING THE TEST, SEND YOUR TEACHER A MESSAGE SAYING: "MY NAME IS (name). I COMPLETED THE PROCTORED TEST FOR (#) quarter."

You may use both sides of a 4X5 note card on the proctored test.

First Quarter:  There are 84 Questions. Your final is weighted 31% of your grade.

Second Quarter:  There are 79 Questions. Your final is weighted 30% of your grade.

FINAL GRADE SCALE

(“C-” is the lowest grade given in this class)
"A" begins at 95% of total points.
"A-" Begins at 90% of total points.
"B+" begins at 85% of total points.
"B" begins at 80% of total points.
"B-" Begins at 75% of total points.
"C+" begins at 70% of total points.
"C" begins at 65% of total points and extends to 55% of total points.

*** Because of the sensitive nature of some of the materials incorporated in the Utah State Secondary Health Core Curriculum, respect for parental rights as to how it could be taught to their children has always been and will continue to be valued by the Utah State Board of Education. Utah State Law indicates that "Prior written parental consent must be obtained before including any aspect of contraception in the curriculum." It should be understood that parents may opt out of any aspect of this secondary health curriculum. We believe those entrusted to teach these delicate issues will do so with an increased sensitivity that does not undermine cherished values. ***

clipboard image from Wikimedia Commons

00.00 *Student supplies for Health Education II (Health II)

No textbook is required for this class. All materials are available online. Prior to beginning the second quarter of this course (you must be enrolled in q2 to find the form), you will need to copy a parental permission form, have a parent or guardian sign it, and either scan or take a picture of the form and upload the form. After the permission form has been received and scored you may begin the class.

00.00 About Me (Health)

teacher-scored 5 points possible 10 minutes

About Me Assignment To complete and submit this assignment copy the material between the asterisks into a blank word-processing document. Answer the questions using complete sentences, appropriate punctuation and sentence structure. All answers must be bold or UPPER CASE. Save the document. Finally, select all, copy, then paste the entire document into the box that opens when you click to submit this assignment.

******************************************

Answer the following:

  1. Your EHS username.
  2. The school where your credit will be sent.
  3. Also include why you are taking health through EHS, and your interests.
  4. Please pledge to adhere to the EHS Honor Code: "As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers and staff with respect."
  5. Consult the Pacing Guide for this course and commit to finish this quarter within ten weeks from your start date.

        https://share.ehs.uen.org/view-syllabus/278,161 [for Quarter 1]
        https://share.ehs.uen.org/view-syllabus/278,162 [for Quarter 2]
 

******************************************

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


00.01.01 Student Software Needs

 

Students need access to a robust internet connection and a modern web browser.

This class may also require the Apple QuickTime plug-in to view media.

For students using a school-issued Chromebook, ask your technical support folks to download the QuickTime plug-in and enable the plug-in for your Chromebook.

$0.00

01.0 Healthy Self (Health II)

Standard 1: Students will demonstrate knowledge, skills, and strategies related to mental
and emotional health to enhance self-concept and relationships with others.

Objective 1: Develop strategies for a healthy self-concept.

a. Recognize how personal self-concept relates to interactions with others.
b. Analyze the influence of personal values on individual health practices.
c. Determine how adolescent brain development affects self-concept and social interactions.
d. Use decision making skills to solve problems.
e. Determine healthy ways to accept, manage, and adapt to changes in relationships (e.g., coping with loss and grief).


Objective 2: Identify strategies that enhance mental and emotional health.

a. Identify positive ways to express emotions.
b. Explore the risk and protective factors of mental and emotional health.
c. Apply stress management techniques.


Objective 3: Examine mental illness.

a. Review types of mental disorders.
b. Explain the effects of mental disorders on individuals and society.
c. Describe ways to eliminate the stigma associated with mental illness.
d. Investigate school and community mental health resources.

01.01 WHO AM I? (Health II)

Standard 6, Objective 2
: Describe the interrelationship of physical, mental, social, and emotional health.

Who Am I? Assignment Lesson Material & Introduction to Course Thomas Moore, an Irish singer, songwriter, poet and entertainer, wrote:

The great malady of the 20th century, implicated in all of our trouble and affecting us individually and socially, is ‘loss of soul.’ When soul is neglected, it doesn’t just go away; it appears symptomatically in obsessions, addictions, violence, and loss of meaning. We have come to know the soul only in its complaint--when it stirs, disturbed by neglect and abuse, and causes us to feel its pain. All of these symptoms such as emptiness, meaninglessness, vague depression, disillusionment, a yearning for personal fulfillment, a loss of morals and values, and hunger for spirituality reflect a loss of soul. We yearn excessively for entertainment, power, intimacy, sexual fulfillment, and material things, and we think we can find these things if we discover the right relationship or job, the right church or therapy. But without soul, whatever we find will be unsatisfying, for what we truly long for is the soul in each of these areas.

Thomas Moore discusses what happens to us when we lose our 'souls.' He tells of the unhappiness that exists when we lose track of ourselves and the things that really matter. What he says we “long for” is the soul in each area of our lives. The idea of soul has been defined and redefined over time, but some of the discussions involving soul say that it is synonymous with the essence of who we are, our heart, or our aliveness. In this class, hopefully you will come to a better realization of what things make you feel most alive and happy, and what areas you can improve upon to become a more balanced, healthy individual. When talking about health, most people think of living a healthy lifestyle nutritionally and physically, but there is so much more to our health and happiness--to our souls--that needs our attention and care. The areas that require our work in living a healthier, more soul-enriched life are described below. There are SIX AREAS OF HEALTH that we will discuss throughout this course. They are MENTAL, EMOTIONAL, SOCIAL, SPIRITUAL, PHYSICAL and ENVIRONMENTAL. The table below lists a few of the things that these types of health include. The term 'self-concept' gets used a lot, but what does it mean? Basically, your self-concept is how (or what) you think of yourself. It isn't something you were born with, and it changes all the time. It's sort of like a house that gets remodeled multiple times. Maybe the walls were originally painted yellow, and then repainted to white, and then someone put on a layer of wall paper, and eventually the first layer of wallpaper was papered over with another pattern. The original stuff is still there, but mostly hidden under the newer layers. Your self-concept began to develop when you were very young. It's affected by all your experiences and, maybe even more, by how you think of those experiences. For instance, not all children who are bitten by a dog will be afraid of dogs. One might be afraid of all dogs, another might like most dogs but be afraid of the particular kind of dog that bit him, and another child might still be fine about all dogs. If you hit a home run in your first Little League game, you might think, "Wow, I'm going to be a great baseball player!" or "Wow, that was lucky. I bet that will never happen again!" Your self-concept affects how you think about your experiences, and how you think about your experiences affects your self-concept. Do you think of yourself as shy, outgoing, brave, timid, athletic, good-looking, nice, aggressive, hard-working, smart, clumsy, kind? That's part of self-concept, and it isn't always apparent from the outside. Even your friends might not know what you think about yourself. Your self-concept is also affected by things other people say to or about you, and by how other people treat you. Again, the way you think about what happens can be at least as important as what actually happened. Say you invite someone to study for a test with you, and that person says, "Sorry, I can't tonight." Perhaps you feel sad and think, "She must not like me" or "I guess there's no point in asking her to do anything again." Maybe you feel annoyed and think "I guess she thinks I'm not good enough for her" or "She's just stuck-up" or "See if I ever ask her to do anything again!" You may even feel a little disappointed and think, "Maybe she has a dentist appointment or something" or "We'll get together another time." Notice that your self-concept will affect the people around you, and your relationships with them! Teamwork, friendships, and all relationships will go better if both (or all) people involved have a healthy self-concept so that they aren't easily offended or hurt. Read at least the required articles using the links below.

01.01 WHO AM I? (Health II)

01.01 WHO AM I? assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 37 points possible 60 minutes

Mental, emotional, social, spiritual, physical and environmental health are all intertwined throughout this course to encompass both the state core curriculum requirements, as well as to help you better understand who you are and what your purpose is. These six types of health also combine to make up the essence or soul of who we are. We each need improvement in different areas of our lives...and our health begins with improving the “soul” or essence in each of them, as Thomas Moore has stated. To begin this healthy process, take a look at the different types of health mentioned in the chart above and determine what things make up who you are. Consider what areas your passionate about and what areas you could improve upon. Then, complete the essay in the WHO AM I ASSIGNMENT to tell me, and maybe even you, a little bit more about yourself.

Compare and contrast your strengths and weaknesses in an essay about yourself (at least eight paragraphs in length, including an introduction, six paragraphs detailing the six types of health as they relate to you, and a conclusion) dealing with the following points: Essay Topic: Based on the "Who Am I" lesson material, and considering EACH of the six different types of health, what interests, feelings and habits make up the complete you and make your soul most alive and fulfilled? AND what areas could be improved upon in your life? Compare and contrast the things that both awaken and weaken your “soul,” as discussed in the lesson material according to the six different types of health. (4 points possible for a solid opening and closing paragraph, and 4 points per paragraph about each of the six types of health as they relate to you, plus up to 5 points for conventions. Points will be given based on thought, depth, and quality of response, as well as grammar and spelling checks.).

Organizing your essay (Note: feel free to change the order of the different categories of health)

Content by paragraph Structure
1. Begin with some general statements to introduce yourself and your general health. How do your personal values affect your health practices? Introduction: write at least three complete sentences.
2. Write about the status of your physical health. What are your strengths and weaknesses? Give a specific example from your experiences. Topic sentence, then three+ sentences with supporting details and examples
3. Write about the status of your mental health. What are your strengths and weaknesses? Give a specific example from your experiences. Topic sentence, then three+ sentences with supporting details and examples
4. Write about the status of your emotional health. What are your strengths and weaknesses? Give a specific example from your experiences. Topic sentence, then three+ sentences with supporting details and examples
5. Write about the status of your spiritual health. What are your strengths and weaknesses? Give a specific example from your experiences. Topic sentence, then three+ sentences with supporting details and examples
6. Write about the status of your social health. What are your strengths and weaknesses? How does your self-concept affect the way you interact with others? Give a specific example from your experiences. Topic sentence, then three+ sentences with supporting details and examples
7. Write about the status of your environmental health. What are your strengths and weaknesses? Give a specific example from your experiences. Topic sentence, then three+ sentences with supporting details and examples
8. Sum up the main ideas, and/or look toward the future and how you might improve your health, or challenges you may face as you grow to adulthood. Conclusion: write at least four complete sentences

GO TO TOPIC 3, ASSIGNMENTS, TESTS AND QUIZZES, AND CLICK ON THE "WHO AM I?" ASSIGNMENT to submit your work.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.02 Decision-making (Health II)

Standard 1, Objective 2d: Use decision making skills to solve problems.

FORGOTTEN ASPECTS OF DECISION MAKING

Prior to identifying the steps to decision making, it is important to recognize some 'forgotten' aspects of decision making. Oftentimes, gathering important information and weighing the potential consequences of a decision have less influence on our choices than the following list of 'forgotten' aspects: Values and Attitudes

If an individual values his/her parents' respect, many decisions are already made for that person. For example, friends have invited you to a party that will have alcohol present. If you value your parents' respect, you do not need to gather more information. You know that deciding to go to the party will disappoint your parents, thus, the decision is made. Additionally, if individuals value fun and adventure at all costs, he/she may not gather important facts, or properly weigh the consequences of their actions before 'jumping in' to a situation that may or may not be right for them.

Feelings and Emotions

Often, we make decisions based on how we feel, or how we want to feel. I may know the decision I am about to make could have very negative consequences; However, I really like the person asking me to go along. Although the facts may tell me this is a bad decision, I may allow the feelings of "I really want this person to like me" to control my decision.

Other People's Feelings

We make many decisions based on what others want or need. For example, when deciding where to go for lunch, if a friend really wants to go to Wendy's, and you don't really care, you will eat at Wendy's. However, there are times we make decisions that are not in our best interest because another person pleads with us to do what they want.

Self-Concept

If I believe I am a person of value, with a right to a happy, healthy future, I am going to make decisions that decrease the likelihood of negative consequences. If I do not care about myself, I may take unnecessary risks or not even consider consequences when making a decision. If I have an inflated self-concept, I may take risks simply because I believe I am invincible, and cannot be hurt.

Habits

Many of the decisions we make are actually not even made. Some of our behaviors are dictated by habit. It is always interesting to observe teachers at a faculty meeting. Everyone walks into the room and takes a donut. As we are eating the donut, it occurs to many of us that we did not even want one. Why did we take it? It was there, free food, habit. Many of our food-related behaviors are based on habit, as are many of our safety-related behaviors, for example, wearing seat belts when driving, or helmets when biking or snowboarding.

Pressures

We experience many pressures to behave in certain ways. I hope that my track team members feel pressure from their teammates to be the best possible students and athletes they can be. Much of the pressure we experience comes from our own expectations of ourselves. As with all the "forgotten aspects" of decision making, pressure is not necessarily bad. However, its source and purpose should be taken into consideration when making a decision.

RISKS IN DECISION MAKING Risks come in four catagories: risks we MUST ACCEPT; risks we CAN ACCEPT; risks we CAN NOT ACCEPT and risks we CAN NOT AFFORD TO NOT ACCEPT.

1) The risks we MUST ACCEPT are the aspects of everyday life that we may encounter in all that we do. For example, if I drive a car, I must accept the risk of getting into an accident. 2) The risks we CAN ACCEPT are outcomes that are acceptable to us, although we hope things do not turn out that way. For example, I can accept that I may get injured when working hard to prepare myself while training for a race. 3) The risks I CAN NOT ACCEPT include consequences that I will not allow to happen. For example, a person who cannot accept hurting another while driving under the influence of alcohol will not drink and drive. 4) Risks we CAN NOT AFFORD TO NOT ACCEPT fall under the catagory of 'it is easier to ask forgiveness than permission.' For example, you know missing school for a free day of skiing will get in you in trouble. However, free skiing is too good to say no to, so you accept the potential consequences of skiing on a school day.

DECISION MAKING STEPS

1. Take care of yourself first. If you have ever flown on a commercial airline, you have been instructed to do this very thing. "If the cabin should lose pressure, a mask will drop from above. If you are traveling with small children or someone who needs assistance, put your mask on first." Taking care of yourself first puts you in a position to help others. Additionally, by taking care of yourself first, you are determining if you are willing to live, or die, with the decision you make. 2. Get the Facts Gather the information you need to make the best possible decision. You do not need to assemble all the facts. However, you do need to consider what you need to know to make a decision. For example, I'm trying to decide if I should go to a party with my friends this Friday night. As I gather information, I find that there will be illegal substances at the party. This is all I need to know to make the decision. I am not willing to pay the consequences that may come with being at a party where illegal substances are present. 3. Anticipate What might be the positive consequences of your decision? What might be the negative consequences of your decision? The more consequences you anticipate, the more likely you will be prepared for the outcome of the decision you make. 4. Use Judgement Use your best judgement based on the information you have and the consequences you anticipated. Remember, good judgement usually comes from experience, while experience often comes from bad judgement. You will not always use the best judgement, but if you learn from your mistakes, you will get better and better at making good decisions. 5. Have a Gut Check You have made a decision based on facts and potential consequences. Now consider, "Does it feel right?" That feeling in the pit of your stomach or back of your head should be listened to. If a decision doesn't feel right, it probably is not. 6. Do It or Walk Away What is your plan of action? If your decision is to do it, what next? If your decision is to walk away, how do you say no? 7. Evaluate Did you make the right decision? Is it working? Do you need to re-think your decision?

01.02 Decision-making assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 21 points possible 40 minutes

Come up with a decision you need to make in the near future, or one that you have recently made: for example, buying a car, going to a dance, getting a part time job, or taking a class via the electronic high school. It should be a choice you need to make and should be personal to you.

Once you have determined the problem you need to make a decision about, brainstorm at least five alternatives/options, and then list two positive and negative consequences for each one. As you get to alternatives four or five, they may get a little silly. That is okay. Sometimes the best way to know what we want is to know for certain what we don't want.

In making your decision, complete the chart below. Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

********************************************** 

DECISION MAKING CHART

1. Identify The Problem (What is the decision that needs to be made?):

2. Gather Information (What do you need to know to make the decision?):

3. Brainstorm Alternatives: (These are the different options to your decision; for example, if you're deciding whether to buy a car or not, you're alternatives might be 1) save up for a few months so that I can make payments on a new car, 2) drive my parent's car until I can afford my own, 3) carpool with friends, 4) ride my bike, OR 5) stay at home and never go anywhere). You need to come up with at least five different options, even if they seem ridiculous to you. Continue filling out the chart below with the different options you have come up with, and weigh the positive and negative consequences of each (at least two positives and negatives for each alternative).

Alternative 1:

Positive Consequences
1.
2.
Negative Consequences
1.
2.

Alternative 2:

Positive Consequences
1.
2.
Negative Consequences
1.
2.

Alternative 3:

Positive Consequences
1.
2.
Negative Consequences
1.
2.

Alternative 4:

Positive Consequences
1.
2.
Negative Consequences
1.
2.

Alternative 5:

Positive Consequences

1.

2.

Negative Consequences

1.
2.

4. Forgotten Aspects (State what else may be influencing your decision.):

5. Your Choice (Tell me the decision you've made after weighing your different options. Your answer here should be listed as one of your five possible solutions on #3.):

6. Action Plan (Tell me how you intend to put your decision into action.):

7. Evaluate (How do you feel about the decision you've made?): ******************************************************

 What to do: Complete questions 1-7 following the instructions provided.

Points Possible: 21
Question 1 1
Question 2 1
Question 3: 1 point per alternative (need five alternatives listed for 5 pts.) 1/2 point per pro and con listed (2 pts./each alternative for 10 pts.) 15
Question 4 1
Question 5 1
Question 6 1
Question 7 1
Total Points Possible: 21

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.03 Stress management (Health II)

Standard 1, Objective 2d: Apply stress management techniques.

Stress can be defined as the body’s reaction to a demanding situation. These demands can be positive (eustress) or negative (distress). Although the causes of stress are varied, the body’s physiological reaction is the same. First, the brain signals the attack of the stressor. The hypothalamus then responds by producing cotropin-releasing factor (CRF). The CRF activates the pituitary gland, which secretes adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) into the circulatory system. The adrenal glands then secrete adrenaline. Effects of the adrenal hormones:

-- Increases release of cortisol, epinephrine and norepinephrine -- Increases glucose -- Increases heart rate -- Increases blood fats -- Increases blood pressure -- Reduces protein stores -- Increases contractility of the heart -- Reduces white blood cells -- Increases cardiac output -- Increases body core temperature -- Causes copious sweating

As you look at the effects of the adrenal hormones listed above, consider how they may impact performance and/or health. An athlete may use this stress response to prepare for a competition, as the body is physiologically prepared for action. Too much stress, over a long period of time, could contribute to a greater susceptibility to illness, as the body becomes exhausted. Symptoms of chronic stress may include two or more of the following symptoms:

-- Upset stomach, diarrhea, or indigestion -- Headaches, backaches -- Insomnia (inability to sleep) -- Eating too much or too little -- Feeling hostile, angry or irritable -- Feeling anxious -- Avoiding other people -- Crying -- Feeling frustrated with things that normally bothered you a little

STRESS MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES The following strategies may help you manage stress in your life:

TALK Communicate with family members; make certain they are aware of all the demands you face each day. Share your feelings with others. If you cannot talk to someone, write a letter or e-mail, or express your feelings on paper. GET AWAY FOR AWHILE Have you ever felt so frustrated trying to follow assembly instructions that you felt like breaking something? Leaving for a minute or two and clearing your head makes the instructions much easier to follow when you return. There are situations that are best left for awhile: an escalating disagreement, a baby that continues to cry despite your best efforts, or an injustice that you have no control over. WORK IT OFF Have you ever been angry when you began a physical task? Before you knew it, the job was done and you felt better than when you started? Stress causes the body to prepare for fight or flight. However, some stresses such as disagreements or failing a test do not require your body to respond. "Working off" that type of stress can be a very effective release. Exercise, especially aerobic exercise, can be the best stress reliever, as the body releases endorphins that make us feel better. GIVE IN ON OCCASION This might be best said as "pick your battles." There are arguments you will never "win" and do not have to. It is sometimes okay for others to be right, even when you do not agree. DO SOMETHING FOR OTHERS Sometimes, simply gaining perspective can be a great stress reliever. Providing help to others makes us feel better about ourselves. It also allows us to see that others face even greater demands or challenges than we do. TAKE ONE TASK AT A TIME Imagine standing in front of a class of 40 people, each holding a tennis ball. How many could you catch if each person tossed you a tennis ball, one at a time? How many could you catch if everyone threw the tennis balls at the same time? We can accomplish any number of things if we complete one task at a time. Prioritizing those tasks, and doing what is most important first, is a great way to reduce stress in our lives. AVOID A SUPER PERSON IMAGE We all like to do things well. However, no one can be perfect in all areas. Do important tasks to the best of your ability; focus on the process rather than the outcome. Allow yourself to be no better than adequate in some areas. BALANCE WORK AND RECREATION Make time for work AND fun every day. Play is a vital ingredient in developing a healthy self. As George Shehann stated, "We will do anything, for any length of time, if we think it is play." Find ways to enjoy all that you do. Remember the simplicity of playing for the sake of play. RELAXATION Yoga, deep breathing, watching clouds go by, stretching or gentle exercise can be great stress relievers. A small amount of time each day is all that is needed to make a difference in your stress levels. LAUGHTER Have you ever got the "giggles" at an inappropriate time? When a friend falls or gets hurt, or at a funeral? Why? Because laughter is a tremendous stress reliever. Use your sense of humor and ability to laugh. Your mind and body will be healthier as you laugh. SLEEP Most Americans do not get enough sleep. In order to meet the challenges of each day, adolescents require 8-10 hours of sleep each night. Your body responds best if you sleep the same hours each night. For example, make a habit of getting to sleep each night at 10 o'clock and getting up at 6 o'clock in the morning.

01.03 Stress management (Health II)

01.03 Stress management story for assignment (Health II)

Standard 1, Objective 2d: Apply stress management techniques.

Read the story below You will need to identify the stressors in Jeff's life in your next assignment. Jeff is the second son in a very successful family. His older brother, David, is attending Yale on an academic scholarship. Jeff's father is extremely proud of his oldest son's accomplishments, and expects the same success from Jeff. His mother is very socially conscious and loves the status her oldest son has brought the family. Additionally, David was a very neat, well-organized child, and Jeff's mom cannot understand why he cannot keep his room as clean as David did. Jeff has a passion for art and is a very talented artist. He does well in school, but struggles in chemistry. He expects himself to live up to his brother's example in all things, and would like to make his parents proud of him. March 1st Jeff wakes up to his alarm that has been going off for the past 30 minutes. Frustrated with himself for oversleeping, he rushes into the bathroom. As he looks in the mirror, he hates what he sees. He has dark circles under his eyes from staying up most of the night drawing. "If only I could take more art classes, and fewer science. I'd have less homework, and time in school to do what I love," he thought. His hair is a mess, he needs more sleep, his shirt is wrinkled, and he can't find his back pack. Arriving to school late, he rushes to first period only to find he got a "B" on his calculus test. A "B", he thought, my dad will never understand. My brother never got a "B" in anything. At lunch he sees the girl he has been interested in all term and wishes he had the nerve to ask her out. His best friend sees who he is looking at and encourages him to go talk to her, but there is no way he could do that--but he had to do something soon. The prom was only a month away, and he had to find a date. The only thing was, if he asked her and she said no, he would never be able to show his face again. In science he walked in only to remember the homework he had completely forgotten about last night. The teacher also decided to give a pop quiz on their reading assignment. Jeff couldn't remember anything because he was so tired when he read it last night. English was no better; Jeff's teacher assigned them a 2000 word essay, typed, double spaced that would have to be turned in Monday at the beginning of class. I'm never going to get any of this done, Jeff thought, I don't have any free time. I have to work this weekend to get enough money for the drafting table I want more than anything. The track meet after school was close, Jeff's school was tied for first place, and it was the last race. It was the 4X400 meter relay. Jeff was running the final leg, and he was in the lead when he got the baton. He went out hard, keeping his lead for most of the race. Near the end, the other runner pulled up along his side. Jeff strained to regain the lead, but his efforts were useless as the other runner took the lead and won the race, winning the meet for his team. Jeff's heart sank. He had let his entire team down. It was all his fault the team lost the meet. What good was he, anyway? After the meet Jeff got to his car only to find the battery dead. I must have left the lights on this morning, he thought. Why does all this have to happen to me? As Jeff arrived home, he saw his mother was already angry. As usual, he had left his bed unmade, dishes in the sink, and was late for dinner. If only he was more like David. He quickly apologized to his mom and sat down to eat. His dad asked how his day was, and he didn't know where to start. He knew his day would be even more disappointing to his dad than it was to him. As Jeff told him of his difficulty in calculus, he could see his dad's mounting anger. "Your brother struggled in calculus at first, but you didn't see him giving up," scolded his father. Jeff figured he may as well go for broke, and told his dad of his love for art. His mother was mortified. What would the neighbors think if her son dropped out of his AP classes to take art? His dad was disgusted. How could he ever make a living doodling? Completely frustrated, Jeff left the table and went to his room. After giving up on dinner, the only thing that appealed to Jeff now was sleep. I'm so tired, he thought, but I can't sleep. I have at least four hours of homework left to do today. Jeff sat down in a chair to rest for a few minutes before he started on his homework. He was thinking about what to do first when he fell asleep.

01.03.01 Stress management assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 49 points possible 40 minutes

What to do: Complete Sections I, II, and III, following the instructions provided below.

Points Possible:  
Complete Section I: Fill in an appropriate way to deal with stress for each of the letters (1 point per letter) 19
Complete Section II: List your top five stressors (1 point for each) Tell how you can deal with your top five stressors in a healthy way (1 point for each) 10
Complete Section III: List each of Jeff's stressors in the story (1 point for each) Tell how Jeff could deal with each of his stressors in a healthy way (1 point for each) 20
Total Points Possible: 49

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

********************************************************** 

Section I: Make a list of appropriate ways to manage stress and express emotions for each letter listed below. The suggestions on your list should begin with each of the letters. (Each good suggestion is worth 1 point for a total of 19 points in this section).

H O W
T O
D E A L
W I T H
S T R E S S

Section II: List the top five stressors in your life AND tell how you can best manage them (1 point for the stressor listed and another for the healthy way to deal with it).

Section III: After reading the story in 01.3.1, list the stressors Jeff encounters during his day. For each stressor listed, give one or more ways he could best manage the situation. (You will earn one point for each of his stressors listed and one point for a healthy way that he could deal with it).

**********************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.04 Mental disorders and mental health (Health II)

Standard 1, Objective 3: Examine mental illness.

Everyone experiences life a little differently. Humans' perception and processing of reality vary from one person to the next, and most people fall somewhere into what we think of as a 'normal' range. Most of us have periods of feeling depressed or manic, anxious or obsessive. If we go long enough without sleep, we may even experience hallucinations. Some of us, though, have persistent or recurring symptoms over extended time periods that seem to go beyond the 'normal.' We use the term 'mental disorder' (or mental illness) to name problems that seem to originate in or affect the mind, rather than the body. There have been individuals with mental disorders throughout history. They were sometimes regarded as being possessed by demons, or gifted by the gods. If they were fortunate, others regarded them as odd but harmless. If they were unfortunate, they might be burned as witches, or banished from their communities. Even now, when effective treatments may be available, people with mental disorders are often avoided, put down, or accused of being fakers or lacking self-discipline. Odds are very high that you know at least a couple people who live with mental disorders--though they may not talk about it. Mental illness is still stigmatized unlike most physical illnesses. People may fear that they will lose their job, friends, spouse, or children if others know they have a mental disorder. Many health insurance plans don't provide coverage for mental disorders as extensively as they do for physical disorders. Some mental disorders tend to run in families, so there is some genetic influence on a person's chance of developing a mental health problem. However, genetics do not determine every outcome. You may inherit the genes, but still not develop the problem. Some interactions between the person's genetic make-up and his or her environment and experiences apparently cause the mental disorder to develop in some people but not in others. Some risk factors for developing mental disorders include physiological problems in the nervous system, a 'difficult temperament' (someone who tends to be irritable, moody, angry and/or unhappy more than most people), chronic physical illness, serious marital problems in the family, low socioeconomic status, living in crowded conditions, parents with a history of criminal behavior or mental illness, substance abuse, low birth weight, or lack of good education. On the other hand, protective factors can help protect against the development of mental disorders: a strong support system of stable family and friends, involvement in enjoyable group activities or meaningful hobbies, regular exercise, and good education are examples. Read the articles at the links below. There will be quiz questions over this material, and you will find it useful in the next assignment.

01.04 Mental disorders Brochure Project (Health II)

teacher-scored 35 points possible 60 minutes

You will create a brochure about a type of mental disorder chosen from the topics listed below.

Overview of assignment

Purpose: to inform
 Audience: teens and young adults


TOPIC CHOICES:

Anxiety Disorders (phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorders, anxiety disorders) Somatoform Disorders (hypochondria) Affective Disorders (clinical depression, manic-depressive disorder) Personality Disorders (antisocial personality disorder, schizophrenia)

Do a web search for information on the topic you chose from the list above. Use at least two of the websites listed for the previous lesson (01.4) and at least two other sources you find yourself. You may choose a full group of disorders to research or a specific disorder from one of the listed categories. Either is fine.

Length: Fill out the attached brochure on the mental disorder from the list above. Complete the brochure as if you are informing someone about the selected disorder. Be creative with your project! Use pictures and images to make the brochure more appealing and interesting to its audience.

Sections:

1. Description of the disorder and how it affects the person living with the disorder,
2. How the disorder is best managed, community resources that can help, and
3. Who is most likely affected by this disorder (is there a known risk factor for certain populations??).

4. Question and answer section (common questions of the illness).

REMEMBER TO WRITE IN YOUR OWN WORDS, CITE YOUR SOURCES ON ALL RESEARCHED OR QUOTED WORK (this means within the paper, as well as a works cited section at the end)! and make sure to PROOFREAD and EDIT your report before submitting it. You can include your sources at the bottom of the description of the disorder or attached in the comments of the assignment.

Organizing your brochure

Content by section Structure
1. Begin by naming the disorder and giving a brief description or definition of it. Then explain why it is important. You might include the prevalence (how many or what percentage of people have it). Explain the symptoms of the disorder, and how it affects the person living with it. Use information or quotes from your research Topic sentence, then three+ sentences with supporting details and examples; include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of a sentence/section where you have used information or quotes from your research.
2. Explain how the disorder is best managed. Use information or quotes from your research. Include information about resources available in your school or community to help individuals cope with this disorder.  Topic sentence, then three+ sentences with supporting details and examples; include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of a sentence/section where you have used information or quotes from your research.
3. Explain who is most likely affected by the disorder, and the age or time of life when it is usually diagnosed. Use information or quotes from your research

Topic sentence, then three+ sentences with supporting details and examples; include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of a sentence/section where you have used information or quotes from your research.

4. Question and Answer Section. Common questions about the illness. (At least 3 questions and answers) Think of some common questions people may have about the disorder. Ask the question and then find the answer to this question. Cite answers at bottom of section.
5. List your sources (authors; book, magazine, or article titles; exact url for internet sources). See a writer's guide for the correct format in which to list sources. Can be submitted at the end of the description of the disorder section or in the comments.

Overview of grading
:

Ideas and content 25 points:

Clearly state your chosen topic, and cover all requested information

Support your paper with documented research Cite your sources within the body of the text so that it is clear where you obtained all of your information (worth 5 points). Include a works cited section at the end of your paper (worth 5 points). Introduce in your own words, put in quotation marks, cite, and comment on (again, in your own words) any researched material used in your paper (worth 5 points).

Creative/Pictures 5 points:

Be creative! Use pictures and images to make the brochure appealing.

Conventions 5 points:

Proof, spell check and edit your work before sending it (worth 5 points).

***DO NOT copy and paste material directly from a website, DO NOT leave any links to other websites in your paper, and DO NOT plagiarize or cheat in any way. Papers suspect to plagiarism or cheating will result in an automatic ZERO with no chance of corrections.

 

***You can select to open the DOCX version or the PDF version. Whichever works best on your computer!

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.04.02 Mental disorders quiz (Health II)

computer-scored 25 points possible 30 minutes

You may take this quiz multiple times, but you must score at least 90%. Go to the link in Topic 3 on the main class page to take the quiz.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.05 Grief and Loss (Health II)

Standard 1, Objective 4d: Determine healthy ways to accept, manage, and adapt to changes in relationships (e.g., coping with loss and grief).

Imagine making a nametag for yourself. Imagine decorating it in a fashion that tells others a little bit about you. For example, my nametag may have my name written in red or yellow. I would decorate it with pictures of family and friends, athletes, and pictures of beautiful places. Imagine or make a tear in your name tag for each of the following events you have experienced: -- The loss of a loved pet. -- Moving to a new home -- The divorce of parents/grandparents/siblings -- A brother or sister moving away -- Changing schools -- The death of a friend -- The death of a family member -- The loss of an ability due to injury or illness (paralysis, loss of a limb) -- A parent being diagnosed with a debilitating illness. The list could continue on. However, look at your imaginary nametag. Does it look the same as it did before you read through the list? If you are a typical adolescent, you have not escaped events that may cause grief in your life. Although we all respond differently to the above situations, most of us have grieved at some level after the experience. You can tape your nametag back together; however, it will still show the tears and rips, albeit repaired. Grief is like this. Events that cause tremendous grief in our lives never go completely away, but they do eventually fade. For example, think of a bad cut or broken bone you have had. The initial pain was horrible, but it probably didn’t hurt as badly as having the bone set, or the cut cleaned and stitched. As much as it hurts, you know you must get it treated or it will only get worse. For a while, it hurt most of the time; eventually, it only hurt when you moved a certain way, then only when you bumped it. Now you may have a scar and when you look at it, you remember the injury. Sometimes it even makes a great story. Severe grief is like an injury. The initial news is painful, but shock keeps someone from immediate suffering. Going through the grief is very painful, but if you don’t go through it, the pain will fester and grow until it controls you. After a while, the sadness or grief only returns when you are reminded of the loss. However, just like the scar from having a cut stitched, the loss will always be a part of you. If the loss was the death of a loved one, birthdays, anniversaries, and other important dates will bring back the memory of their death. With time, you will also be able to remember the happy times and the love. Psychiatrist Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, MD, describes FIVE STAGES OF GRIEF that people often experience after a serious loss. They are as follows:

1) DENIAL AND ISOLATION At first you may deny that the loss has taken place. You may need to gather more information before the loss can sink in. 2) ANGER The next stage is anger. You may feel furious at the person who caused your sadness, even if that person is dead. You may feel anger at your belief system, yourself, the world. You may feel responsible in some way for letting the event take place, even if there was nothing you could have done to change the outcome. 3) BARGAINING At this point in the grieving process, you may feel unable to face what has happened. You may make bargains with your higher power to change the events that caused your sadness. It is natural to want to avoid facing up to your loss. 4) DEPRESSION During this time, you may feel numb, with anger and sadness just below the surface. You are not certain how or what to feel. This stage may last a few days to a couple of months. 5) ACCEPTANCE This is the last stage of grieving. At this point, you are able to accept the reality of the loss. As you move through the grieving process, you are able to have more and more pleasant memories and move back into the routine of daily life.

It is important to understand that people handle grief in many ways. Some will want to talk about their feelings, the loss, and the events surrounding the loss. Others will withdraw and isolate themselves. Some want to move on quickly, almost act as if the loss did not occur, while others seem to not want to get past it. Some direct their anger inward and engage in self-destructive behaviors, or use drugs and alcohol to numb their feelings. There are no right or wrong feelings when confronted with a loss; however, there are helpful, appropriate ways to process the emotions associated with loss. Moving through the grief process is a very individual endeavor. It is important to understand that all feelings are acceptable, and you should be allowed to feel and process them. The death of a loved one is probably the most difficult loss to endure. The strategies listed below may be helpful ways for someone to cope with and eventually process the grief associated with the death. Many of these strategies are from my own experiences, books on grief and grief counselors. Strategies for Coping with Grief

WHAT IS NORMAL? In a 1994 publication, Marilyn Gootman writes "Don’t judge yourself or others by the way you act or the way they act. Pain is pain, no matter how it looks on the outside. Don’t waste your time comparing one person’s reactions to anothers or one person’s pain to anothers. You all hurt, and you all have the right to express it in your own special ways." Do not blame yourself if you feel nothing, or if you are overly emotional. You are allowed to feel whatever you experience. If you feel like returning to work or school immediately, return. If, when you get there, you find you are not ready, leave. Give yourself permission to function and feel moment by moment. TAKE TIME TO GRIEVE Allow yourself to grieve where and when you need to. Share your feelings. Earl A. Grollman writes, "Grief is a process. Recovering is your choice. Grief is the price you pay for love, but you don’t have to go on paying forever. Time does not automatically heal your pain. It is your willingness to touch your pain--to accept it, to work with it, to understand your change of moods and behavior, and then to begin to reorganize your life. Healing happens as you allow feelings to happen. Time does not completely heal a broken heart; it only teaches you how to live with it." Forgive yourself and others. You give yourself the opportunity to place behind you those past agonies that diminish your strength and vigor. You give yourself new energies to move on to meet new challenges. You give yourself permission to live in an unfair, disappointing world. WRITE Put your feelings in writing. Keep a journal. Write a letter to the loved one that has died. If you are angry, say why. If you feel guilt, or responsibility, express it and ask forgiveness. Tell the person you love them, what you might do differently, and how you are going to remember them. CREATE MEMORIES Plant a tree, create and bury a time capsule, make a monument or scrapbook. Share your memories with others. "Remember to live your life to the fullest. Try to think of something positive from your friend, something funny that happened when you were together, or a pleasant time you shared. Know that a part of your friend will always remain with you." -- Marilyn Gootman SURROUND YOURSELF WITH LOVED ONES As was said in the remarks at my nephew’s funeral, "You cannot be a human being and live in isolation." No one can truly know what is going on in your head or heart, but others can support you in your pain.

SUPPORT FOR OTHERS IN THEIR GRIEF Perhaps one of the most difficult aspects of grief is what to do for loved ones who are grieving. A friend had experienced the death of her eight year old son told me the most difficult aspect of his death was the isolation she felt afterward. After his funeral, people stopped dropping by, they looked the other way when driving down the street, even avoided her at church. I do not think her friends, neighbors, or church members meant to be thoughtless; they just did not know what to do, so they avoided the situation. The following are suggestions for supporting others in grief from my health students based on classroom discussions and their personal experiences with death:

BE THERE Sometimes words cannot possibly communicate the feelings you or your friend is experiencing. As a friend, Being near, not feeling compelled to talk, not trying to fix things, and not feeling the need to take the pain away can help more than anything else. LISTEN Your friend may not want to talk. He or she may want to go on as if their life has not been changed by the death. Allow them to move on, but be willing to listen and ask prompting questions when they do choose to talk. For example, ask how that makes them feel, or what might they do to work an issue through. Offer suggestions if asked, but once again, do not assume you know what is best for them. SAY THE NAME OF THE LOVED ONE Don't try to avoid talking about the lost loved one. Terry Kettering wrote a poem entitled "The Elephant in the Room." Read it at the link at the bottom of this lesson. PROVIDE SUPPORT Little things may not seem to matter. Be on hand to take care of little tasks such as laundry, dishes, purchasing and preparing food. Your friend may want help with missed schoolwork, or for you to do the work with him/her for a little while. School may not be the most important thing on your friend’s mind, but he/she will need to keep his/her head above water.

01.05 Grief and Loss assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

PART I: Respond in essay form (complete sentences and paragraphs) to the following question based on what you’ve learned from unit lesson 01.5, life experiences and research you’ve done:

1. What have you learned about life while thinking and reading about loss and grief? What are some healthy ways to deal with change and loss?

PART II: Based on information read in the lesson portion of this unit, answer in essay form ONE of the questions below (same criteria as above). MAKE SURE YOU INCLUDE EXAMPLES FROM THE LESSON MATERIAL SO THAT I CAN TELL WHAT YOU'VE LEARNED.

2. How does your own experience with grief relate to the information contained in the lesson? In what ways do you agree or disagree with the "research?" What helped you the most through the grieving process?

OR... 3. What might you do for a best friend that has experienced the death of a family member? Would your actions reflect the stages of grief? Be specific, and use information contained in the lesson.

Grading summary

Respond in paragraph form to question #1, based on the information you've read in the lesson.
  • 5 points for spell checking, editing and composing your essay in a grammatically correct paragraph form.
  • 5 points for referring to what you've read in the lesson material and relating it to your own life, while also answering the question completely.
10
Respond in paragraph form to EITHER question #2 or #3, based on the information you've read in the lesson.
  • 5 points for spell checking, editing and composing your essay in a grammatically correct paragraph form.
  • 5 points for referring to what you've read in the lesson material and relating it to your own life, while also answering the question completely.
10
Total Points Possible: 20

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06 Aging, Death and Dying (Health II)

Standard 1, Objective 2d: Apply stress management techniques.

As a young person, you probably have not yet had any reason to think about your own old age or death. You might not even have experienced the death of a close loved one. If your grandparents are alive and nearby, you probably have witnessed at least a few of the problems of aging. In any case, you know that all of us will die eventually, and most of us will grow old. In our culture, we try to remain young as long as possible, and tend to avoid thinking about aging or death. Although staying active and healthy is certainly a good thing, sometimes avoiding a subject just makes it even more of a scary bogeyman in the dark closet. More than likely, you will someday have to cope with issues relating to your parents' aging, and then your own. Some important questions about aging and death are best addressed before the issues arise. Will there be enough money to support you when you can no longer work? If you were badly injured or had a serious heart attack or stroke, would you want to be kept on life support indefinitely even if there seemed to be no hope of recovery? How long would you want to be kept on life support? Would you want (for yourself or an elderly loved one) a 'do not resuscitate' order? Would you want your organs, or a loved one's organs, donated? Should people who are terminally ill have the right to doctor-assisted suicide? When our pets are suffering or very infirm, and we can't 'cure' the problem, we often consider it kind to euthanize them. Should the same be true for people? Should a person dying or in extreme pain be hospitalized, or should 'hospice' care be available at home? If a terminally ill patient is in such great pain that only dangerously high doses of painkillers can keep them comfortable, should we risk giving such high doses of drugs? Read the 'required' links below. You may find the 'supplemental' links useful for your next assignment.

01.06 Death & dying research paper (Health II)

teacher-scored 35 points possible 120 minutes

You will write a researched essay about an issue related to death, aging and dying chosen from the topics listed below.

Overview of assignment

Purpose: to inform
 and persuade; Audience: teens and young adults


TOPIC CHOICES:

Hospice Care, Euthanasia, Living Wills, Doctor Assisted Suicide, or Organ Donations

Search Pioneer Library, SIRS Knowledge Source, for information on the topic you chose from the list above. Use at least one of the websites listed for the previous lesson (01.6) and at least one source from Pioneer Library. Length: at least 550 words, plus a list of your sources.

Write a two-page paper (12 point font, double or single-spaced, 1" margins, at least 550 words) clearly stating your position on the chosen topic, with research to support your claims (more sources than just Wikipedia are required, though it may be used minimally if you’d like). More quality sources are encouraged. BE SURE TO CITE YOUR SOURCES OF INFORMATION FROM YOUR RESEARCH throughout the paper, as well as a works cited section included at the end. REMEMBER TO WRITE IN YOUR OWN WORDS, CITE YOUR SOURCES ON ALL RESEARCHED OR QUOTED WORK (this means within the paper, as well as a works cited section at the end)!! and make sure to PROOFREAD and EDIT your report before submitting it.

Organizing your essay

Content by paragraph (you may have MORE than one paragraph on each of these) Structure
1. Begin by stating your position on the issue. Explain any historical background or context for the issue. Then explain why it is important and list at least two reasons for your position. Introduction: write at least three complete sentences. If you use information or quotes from your research, remember to include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of the sentence.
2. Give one reason for your position on the issue. Use information or quotes from your research. Use logic, an analogy or give an example from experiences of family, friends, or news stories. Topic sentence, then three or more sentences with supporting details and examples; include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of a sentence/section where you have used information or quotes from your research.
3. Give another reason for your position on the issue. Use information or quotes from your research. Use logic, an analogy or give an example from experiences of family, friends, or news stories. Topic sentence, then three or more sentences with supporting details and examples; include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of a sentence/section where you have used information or quotes from your research.
4. Give another reason for your position. Use information or quotes from your research. Use logic, an analogy or give an example from experiences of family, friends, or news stories. OR You might explain opposing positions and tell why those positions are wrong or less important. Topic sentence, then three or more sentences with supporting details and examples; include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of a sentence/section where you have used information or quotes from your research.
5. Sum up the long-term effects on individuals and on society of this issue You might include something from your research, but be sure to make your own generalizations. End with another definite statement of the position you took, but not in exactly the same words as in your introduction. Conclusion: write at least four complete sentences; include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of a sentence or section if you have used information or quotes from your research.
6. List your sources (authors; book, magazine, or article titles; exact url for internet sources) See a writer's guide for the correct format in which to list sources

Overview of grading
:

Ideas and content 15 points:

Clearly state your opinion on the chosen topic, and cover all requested information

Documented research and citations 15 points:

Support your paper with documented research, including a source from Pioneer Library. Cite your sources within the body of the text so that it is clear where you obtained all of your information (worth 5 points). Include a works cited section at the end of your paper (worth 5 points). Introduce in your own words, put in quotation marks, cite, and comment on (again, in your own words) any researched material used in your paper (worth 5 points).

Conventions 5 points:

Proof, spell check and edit your work before sending it (worth 5 points).

***DO NOT copy and paste material directly from a website, DO NOT leave any links to other websites in your paper, and DO NOT plagiarize or cheat in any way. Papers suspect to plagiarism or cheating will result in an automatic ZERO with no chance of corrections.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06.02 Thoughts & feelings on death assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 40 minutes

You will write your imagined obituary following the guidelines below, and then complete the questions in part II. First write the obituary in a word processing document on your computer. Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks below the obituary, in the same document. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

Overview of assignment

Purpose: to create an 'obituary' for your future self, and consider how you feel about death

Audience: your future friends and family


TOPIC :

Write your own obituary. Focus on the things that you want to accomplish in life, as opposed to looking at the negatives of writing out your own death. You may choose all the details that people actually have no control over. For example, you could die at age 305, in space while defending the universe, if you choose. However, you must include the following information in your obituary.

  1. Age and way you die
  2. Accomplishments
  3. Survived by (who would still be living after you die?)
  4. Preceded in death by (who in your family or close associates would have died before you?)
  5. Funeral Arrangements

(WRITE THESE ITEMS OUT IN PARAGRAPH FORM, AS THEY WOULD APPEAR IN A LOCAL PAPER. DON'T JUST FILL OUT THE FACTS ABOVE).

Length: at least 200 words.

*************************************************************  

PART II:(10 points possible, 1 point per answer) Complete the following statements.

  1. Death is
  2. I want to die at
  3. I don’t want to live past
  4. I would like to have at my bedside when I die
  5. When I die, I will be proud that when I was living I
  6. My greatest fear about death is
  7. When I die, I will be glad that when I was living I didn’t
  8. If I were to die today, my biggest regret would be
  9. When I die, I will be glad to get away from
  10. When I die, I want people to say

*************************************************************** 

Overview of grading
:

Part 1:

Write Your Own Obituary including the five requirements listed above (2 points for each of numbers 1-5, and 10 points for spell-checking, editing and composing your obituary in paragraph form).

20 points
Part II: :

Complete the statements (1 point per completed statement)

10 points

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.07 This is your brain (Health II)

People used to believe that by the time you were a teenager, your brain was pretty much finished developing--you had all the brain cells you were ever going to have, and not much could change (unless you started killing cells off). NOT SO! Research using new technology shows that your brain isn't finished developing till you are in your mid-twenties, and even much older people's brains can still adapt and develop new cells on a smaller scale.

This is kind of a good news/bad news situation. The good news is that even if you have a hard time with, say, algebra, when you are 12, you can still reasonably expect to get better at it (so don't give up). The bad news is that any substance abuse before you are about 25 is likely to have more serious effects on your brain than substance abuse later in life. The good news is that if you have a stroke or brain injury later in life, there is still a chance your brain can heal or learn to work around the damage. The bad news is that the areas of your brain that help you make good decisions and responsible choices won't be mature till you are around 25--and there are a whole lot of decisions and choices to make between now and then!

Read or view the information at the links below. Yes, it will be on the quiz.

01.07 Unit 1 quiz (Health II)

computer-scored 25 points possible 30 minutes

Go to Topic 3 (Assignments, Quizzes and Tests) to take this quiz.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.00 Nutrition and Fitness (Health II)

Standard 2: Students will use nutrition and fitness information, skills, and strategies to
enhance health.

Objective 1: Describe the components and benefits of proper nutrition.

a. Describe the primary nutrients and their functions.
b. Evaluate how the United States Department of Agriculture’s Seven Guidelines and the
most current Food Pyramid can enhance proper nutritional choice.
c. Analyze and employ healthy food choices (e.g., reading food labels, calculating calorie
intake).
d. Identify and investigate community nutritional resources.

Objective 2: Analyze how physical activity benefits overall health.

a. Describe the elements of physical fitness (e.g., muscular strength and endurance, cardio
vascular endurance, flexibility, body composition).
b. Develop strategies for maintaining life-long fitness and avoiding the consequences of
inactivity.
c. Identify and investigate available fitness resources.
d. Create individual fitness goals.

Objective 3: Recognize the importance of a healthy body image and develop appropriate weight-
management behaviors.

a. Explain how caloric intake and energy expenditure affect body weight.
b. Explore the short and long term effects of poor nutrition and inactivity (e.g., obesity,
chronic diseases).
c. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various body-weight indicators (e.g., Body Mass
Index [B.M.I.], waist circumference, body fat percentage calculators).
d. Examine the causes, symptoms, and the short and long-term consequences of eating
disorders.
e. Analyze the influence of media on body image.

02.01 Making healthy food choices (Health II)

Standard 2, Objective 1a: Describe the primary nutrients and their functions.

Nutrition Objectives Objective 1

a. Describe the primary nutrients and their functions. Lesson Material: Using the link listed at the bottom, go to the website and read about the six primary nutrients. (You may need to click on the subcategories within the text or at the bottom to find all the information you need.) After reading the information, complete the nutrients assignment 02.1.1.

b. Evaluate how the United States Department of Agriculture’s Seven Dietary Guidelines and the most current Food Guide Pyramid can enhance proper nutritional choice. Lesson Material: Using the Dietary Guidelines link below, click on the pdf file for dietary guidelines. (Don’t print this document as it is 112 pages when printed. You may want to print out just the pages you need.) Read the following out of this file:

1. Executive Summary and Key Recommendations (pages viii – xi in the document; using the page counter at the bottom of the pdf file is pages 10-13)
2. Chapter 2--Balancing Calories to Manage Weight
3. Chapter 3--Foods and Food Components to Reduce

Use the MyPlate link below, click on the News and Media tab and watch Secretary Vilsack's video (2 minutes). Complete the assignment 02.1.2 on Dietary Guidelines.

c. Analyze and employ health food choices (e.g. reading food labels, calculating caloric intake). Using the MyPlate link below, click on "Daily Food Plan". Fill out your information and get your personalized plan. Go complete the assignment 02.1.3 on daily caloric intake.

d.  Go to the Food Labels website and read about food labels. After reading this, complete the assignment 02.1.4 on food labels.

02.01 Nutrients assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 46 points possible 45 minutes

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

*******************************************************

Complete numbers 1-5 following the instructions below:

1. Using the information from the website on the six essential nutrients, make and fill out a chart like the one below. (33 points possible)

Nutrient Name Functions Sources Toxicity symptoms/Deficiency symptoms
A. ________      
B. ________      
C. ________ Type:1 Type:2 Type 1: Type 2: Type1: Type 2:  
D. _________ Type 1: Type 2: Type 1: Type 2: Type 1: Type 2:  
E. _________ Type 1: Type 2: Type 1: Type 2: Type 1: Type 2:  
F. _________      

Answer the following questions based on what you've learned from the lesson material (links) and chart:

2. What happens if the carbohydrate supply is too low for the body? (1 point possible)

3. What are kwashiorkor and marasmus? How are they caused, and what are the effects?(6 points possible)

4. How much water should an average adult person consume daily? What about an active teen?(1 point possible)

5. Should you consume more of saturated or unsaturated fats? Why? (2 points possible)

6. How might an individual’s physical, mental and social well-being be affected by not consuming enough of the nutrients? (3 points possible)

************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.01.02 Dietary guidelines assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 23 points possible 50 minutes

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

Dietary Guidelines Assignment

What to do: Total Points Possible:
Complete Questions 1-4 following the instructions provided below. 23
Question 1 2
Question 2 1
Question 3 10
Question 4 10

*********************************************************

Answer the following questions using information from the lesson material:

1. What are the two main concepts that the Dietary Guidelines encompass?
a.
b.

2. What are the daily caloric needs for someone of your age, gender and physical activity?

3. In two short paragraphs, summarize the key recommendations for the Guidelines of Balancing Calories to Manage Weight and Foods and Food Components to Reduce.

4. According to the information, the rate of obesity among teens in the United States has increased significantly in recent years. Many people who have weight problems in the teen years continue to have weight problems as adults. As you read, obesity is a risk factor for many diseases such as high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease and some types of cancer. What factors do you think have contributed to the increase in weight problems among teens? And how do you think following the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the Choose My Plate guidelines might help teens reverse this trend and reduce disease risks?

Write in paragraph form. Be sure to explain your rationale.

************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.01.03 Daily caloric intake assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 40 minutes

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

Daily Caloric Intake ASSIGNMENT

What to do: Total Points Possible:
Complete Questions 1-4 following the instructions provided below. 30
Question 1 1
Question 2 6
Question 3 15
Question 4 8

*******************************************************

Read the information in the lesson portion of the course material for this assignment.

Answer the following questions based on what you read:

1. What is your daily recommended caloric intake?

2. How many servings of each group should you eat?

Food Group Servings Suggested
Grains  
Vegetables  
Fruit  
Dairy  
Protein  

Fats/Oils

 

 

3. Based on your suggested servings, plan a menu for one day. Be sure you include exactly and only your daily recommended amount--don’t go above or below.

4. Think about what a normal day of eating is for you. You can make a list of what you ate if you need to. Write a paragraph comparing and contrasting the menu you just created with a normal day of eating for you. How are they alike, how are they different? Which one is healthier etc…

*****************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.01.04 Food labels assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 20 minutes

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

Food labels ASSIGNMENT

What to do: Total Points Possible:
Complete questions 1-7 following the instructions below 18
Question 1 1
Question 2 1
Question 3 1
Question 4 1
Question 5 3
Question 6 6
Question 7 5
Question 8 2

 

********************************************

Read the information in the lesson portion of the course material for this assignment. Use the food label to the left to answer the questions:

Answer the following questions based on what you read:

1. How much is a serving size? _____________

2. How many ounces are in the entire package? _____

3. How many calories come from fat? ______

4. What percentage of the total daily value calories comes from fat? ____

5. What percent of the DV is: Cholesterol _____ Sodium _____ Fiber _____

6. Is this product high or low in “Limit these nutrients” and “Get Enough of these nutrients”? Explain in detail.

7. Without knowing what the product is, is it a healthy choice? Why or Why not? Write a paragraph explaining your answer.

8. What are two big changes the FDA made to food labels?

***************************************** 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.02 Maintaining physical fitness for life (Health II)

Standard 2, Objective 2: Analyze how physical activity benefits overall health.

Up until quite recently in human history, most people got plenty of exercise. Hunting, gathering, cultivating or harvesting food, building and maintaining shelter, gathering fuel to cook and keep warm and making clothing all required physical labor. Now, though, most of us could go for weeks without any real exercise if we wanted to. We have to deliberately make time for activities that help us stay physically fit. Is it worth the effort? Regular exercise improves your physical, emotional and mental health. Want to look, feel, and think better? Get active, and stay active! Read and view at least the required links below, and then go on to the quiz.

02.02 Maintaining physical fitness for life quiz (Health II)

computer-scored 36 points possible 30 minutes

Go to Topic 3 on the main class page to take this quiz. You may take it multiple times, but you must score at least 90% to pass.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.03 Weight management: energy in, energy out (Health II)

Standard 2, Objective 3: Recognize the importance of a healthy body image and develop appropriate weight management behaviors.

Objective 1: Explain how caloric intake and energy expenditure affect body weight.

What is metabolism? It’s a series of chemical reactions within our body’s cells. Metabolism changes the fuel in our food to energy that our bodies need to do our daily activities. These activities may range from exercising vigorously to reading a book. Metabolism is a continuous process that begins before we were born and ends when we die. It is an important process for all living organisms--not just humans. If metabolism ceases, living things die. After we eat food, enzymes break it down into simpler substances that can be released by our bodies for energy or stored in our liver, muscles, or body fat for use at a later time.

Metabolism, in its simplest form, is something that affects how easily our bodies gain or lose weight. This is where the discussion of calories begins. A calorie is a unit that measures how much energy a specific kind of food provides to the body. A candy bar has more calories than an orange, so it provides the body with additional energy. Sometimes that can be too much of a good thing. Just like a truck stores gas in the gas tank until it is needed to run the engine, the body stores calories--mainly as fat. If we overfill a truck's gas tank, it overflows onto the pavement. Similarly, if we eat too many calories, we "overflow" in the form of excess body fat. The number of calories we burn in a day is influenced by how physically active we are, the amount of fat, in comparison to muscle, in our bodies, and our basal metabolic rate.

The basal metabolic rate (BMR) is a calculation of the rate at which our bodies "burn" energy, in the form of calories, while at rest. The BMR can play a role in our tendency to gain weight. For example, if we have a low BMR (we burn fewer calories while at rest or sleeping) we will be inclined to gain more pounds of body fat over time, compared with a same-sized person with an average BMR who eats the same amount of food and gets the same amount of exercise. Are we stuck with the BMR we inherited from our parents without a chance to change it, or can we change it? Fortunately, we can definitely change our BMR! Exercising and becoming more physically fit will raise our BMR. Also, if we have more muscle and less fat, we will have higher BMRs.

If we take in more calories than our bodies burn, we will gain weight. If we take in the necessary amount of calories for our bodies, we will maintain a healthy weight if we already have a nutritious diet and we exercise regularly.

02.03 Weight management: Fighting Fat viewing assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 45 minutes

You will view the video "Fighting Fat - New Ways to Win" (link below), but before viewing, answer the first set of questions.

Keep the "During Viewing" questions handy while you watch so you can write down the answers. Then finish the rest of the assignment.

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

************************************************************************

Before Viewing

1. What is a healthy diet?
2. How do you check to see if your diet is healthy?
3. How does advertising affect your food intake? Name some fast food commercials and explain their purpose.
4. List diseases that are associated with being overweight.

During Viewing

1. Name three forms of fuel for our bodies.
2. What does BMI mean?
3. Currently, what are four ways to lose weight (including medical procedures)?

Activity You are hungry, and your friend has just volunteered to pick up your favorite fast food meal. What would you order?

1. Select a restaurant from the following: Arby’s, Burger King, KFC, McDonald's, Taco Bell, or Wendy’s and write your order here (you'll fill out the other information next):

Item How many? Calories in each item Percent fat
       
       
       

2. Now that you have your order, go to the nutritional information web page for your selected restaurant. (Web addresses of popular fast-food restaurants are listed below).
3. On the lines next to each item you ordered, write the number of calories and percent fat for that item.

Analyzing the Data

1. Total the calories of your meal.

2. How much of your recommended daily calories (2,000) did you use on this one meal?

3. How many calories do you have left for two more meals and any snacks?

4. Did you stay within the recommended amount of fat (less than 30% of calories from fat)?

*************************************************************************** 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.04 The effects of poor nutrition and inactivity (Health II)

Standard 5, Objective 2: Analyze the effects of non-communicable diseases.

Explore the short and long term effects of poor nutrition and inactivity (e.g., obesity, chronic diseases). Obesity is an epidemic among teens. One-third of youth ages 2-19 are overweight or obese. This can lead to serious health problems when teenagers become obese adults. Some of these include short-term effects like lethargy, depression, and low self-esteem. Long-term effects are arthritis, heart disease, high blood pressure, strokes, diabetes, and cancer.

HOW DO PEOPLE BECOME OBESE? When people continue to eat more calories than they can burn, more fat builds up in their bodies. If this habit of poor nutrition, combined with physical inactivity, continues, they become overweight or obese. WHY DO PEOPLE BECOME OBESE? Even though genes impact our body types and sizes, environment plays a huge role! Many of us consume fast foods high in fat and sugars. High-calorie, low-nutrient snacks and drinks, larger portions of food, and less-active lifestyles are all adding to the obesity epidemic. NEGATIVE EFFECTS OF OBESITY: Obesity is not only bad for a person’s body, but also for their minds. Obese individuals are more likely to be depressed and have a lower self-esteem. It can make someone lethargic, feeling like they have no energy to do anything. Obesity’s negative effects on the body are many, but we will mention the main ones. Carrying extra weight puts added stress on the body, especially the bones and joints of the legs. Wear and tear on the joints from carrying extra weight can cause painful arthritis at a young age. As overweight kids and teens get older, they are more likely to develop chronic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. They are also more prone to develop high blood pressure and high cholesterol levels which can cause strokes. WHAT CAN I DO TO OVERCOME OBESITY? Fortunately, we can do easy things to combat obesity. Things such as exercising, eating a nutritious and balanced diet, controlling portion sizes, and limiting TV, computer, and video game time can help teenagers overcome obesity and maintain a healthy weight.

See also the information at the links below.

02.04 Viewing assignment "The Diabetes Cure" (Health II)

teacher-scored 36 points possible 75 minutes

View "The Diabetes Cure – Creating Hope" found at the link below, under the HUMAN HEALTH tab, but first complete the "Before Viewing" questions.

Then answer the other questions and complete the activity.

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

****************************************************************** 

Background: Glucose is broken down from food in the digestive system. Glucose enters the blood stream and is the major source of energy in animals. To convert glucose in the blood into energy, the body needs the hormone insulin, which is produced in the pancreas.

Before Viewing

1. What is diabetes?

2. Who is at risk of getting diabetes?

3. What do you know about diabetes, and what are some of its symptoms, consequences and treatments?

Symptoms Consequences Treatments
     
     

4. Can dogs and other animals get diabetes?

After Viewing

1. What are the two types of diabetes? How do the different types of diabetes differ? Do both types have to be treated with insulin injections?

2. What does the acronym INGAP stand for? Where would you find INGAP?


Activity A. Write a 500-word paper (this is about two pages) on diabetes. Your paper should include a description of diabetes, an explanation on the different types of diabetes, causes, complications, risks and prevention, as well as treatments. Write the paper in your own words--DO NOT copy and paste. Include references where you obtained your information for your paper.

*********************************************************** 

Structure Content Points possible
Introduction (one paragraph) Basic description, and reasons why diabetes is important 3 points
one to two paragraphs Describe the types and causes of diabetes 3 points
one to two paragraphs Describe the risks and possible complications of diabetes; if you know people with diabetes, describe how it affects their lives 3 points
one to two paragraphs Describe prevention and treatments of diabetes 3 points
Conclusion - one paragraph Describe how diabetes would affect your life (or how it does, if you already have it), and what you would be willing to do to prevent it 3 points
Works cited - list Include authors, titles, publication dates of your sources; include url if it was an internet source 3 points
Editing Correct any spelling, punctuation, capitalization or other conventions errors 3 points

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.05 Body composition measurement (Health II)

Standard 2, Objective 3c: Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various body-weight indicators (e.g., Body Mass Index [B.M.I.], waist circumference, body fat percentage calculators).

Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various body-weight indicators (e.g., Body Mass Index [B.M.I.], waist circumference, body fat percentage calculators).

BMI If we go to our doctor’s office to inquire the status of our weight, our doctor will measure our height and weight to get our BMI. BMI is our weight in kilograms divided by our height in meters squared. The BMI measure is a quick and easy way to determine if we are underweight, at the ideal weight, overweight, or obese. A weakness of the BMI is that it doesn’t distinguish between fat weight versus muscle weight. We can have an unhealthy BMI reading even though we may be in top physical condition just because we have a large mass of muscles. It would also give an inaccurate reading for a pregnant mother. Another weakness is that it doesn’t distinguish between weight that’s centered around the midsection or belly of a person to the weight that’s centered around the lower body of another person. People with the greater amount of weight around the belly, or with a higher waist circumference, have a greater risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes than those with the weight in the lower body. Waist circumference A strength of the waist circumference (WC)test then, is that it has a high correlation between risks of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and colon cancer to men with a WC > than 102 cm and women with a WC > than 88. The major weakness of the WC test is the high ethnic variability that exists. There are different healthy cutoff numbers, depending on your ethnicity. Body fat calculators A strength of the body fat percentage calculator is that it gives general readings for body fat percentages for men and women of different ages. Calculators that ask for specific data and a wide range of body measurements would be more accurate than those that just ask for your age, gender, height, weight, and waist circumference. A weakness of the calculators is that it isn’t ultimately the most accurate way to determine your body fat percentage. Underwater weighing and the U of U’s BOD POD may give more accurate readings.

02.05 Eating disorders (Health II)

Standard 2, Objective 3d: Examine the causes, symptoms, and the short and long-term consequences of eating disorders.

Examine the causes, symptoms, and the short and long-term consequences of eating disorders.

Eating disorders are a serious health problem that affects around 1 to 2% of teens.

  Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder in which individuals have a fear of gaining weight. Teens who have this disorder go long periods of time without food, and any food eaten is in very small amounts.  Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder in which teens binge (eat a very large amount of food) and then purge (a forced vomit, or laxatives may be used) to prevent any weight gain.  Binge eating disorder is characterized by eating very large amounts of food at a time, and at least three times a week.

Causes

There are several causes of eating disorders. Teens (most often girls, but boys may also be affected) who develop an eating disorder typically are between the ages of 13 and 17 years old. This is a time when there’s pressure to do well in school, there’s peer pressure, and it’s a time when many physical and emotional changes occur in a teen. For girls, it’s entirely normal and necessary to gain some weight in fat during puberty. Some of them feel the pressure to look like petite movie stars or celebrities. They may feel pressure to get rid of this new weight any way possible. Teens who experience depression, anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, and the need for control may also have an eating disorder. There is also some evidence that a tendency for eating disorders may be genetic although this is difficult to determine because individuals learn behaviors from their families.

Symptoms and Consequences

Symptoms of anorexia include becoming very thin, nothing but “skin and bones” thin. These individuals are obsessed with weight control, they intentionally avoid social activities where food is present, they portion food carefully, and they believe they are fat even when they become dangerously thin. Short term consequences of anorexia include loss of hair, lower blood pressure, lightheadedness and inability to focus. Long term consequences include osteoporosis, anemia, decreased kidney functioning, dehydration, low potassium, and death.

Symptoms of bulimia are feeling depressed with body size, shape, and weight. Individuals with bulimia eat a lot of junk food (binge) and then, secretly, go and use the bathroom soon after the binge (so they can vomit the food out of their bodies). They may also exercise excessively to rid themselves of any weight gain. Short term consequences of bulimia include mood swings, getting tired easily, loss of hair, feeling cold often, dry skin, and constipation. Long term consequences include damage to the stomach, kidneys, and throat because of vomiting stomach acid, tooth decay because of stomach acid, and loss of potassium that can lead to heart problems and death. Recovered bulimics often cannot eat acidic foods or foods that are spicy for the remainder of their lives because their throat and stomach are permanently damaged.

Possible binge eating consequences would be obesity leading to diabetes, heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and cancer.

02.05 The influence of the media on body image (Health II)

Standard 2, Objective 3e: Analyze the influence of media on body image.

Analyze the influence of media on body image.

Body image is how we feel about our own physical appearance. Self esteem is how much we value and respect ourselves. Body image and self esteem are linked together during the teen years because it’s during this time that teens care most about how others view them.

Some teens may have a poor self esteem and body image when they go through puberty because their bodies go through many changes. Going through these changes, along with the desire to be accepted, leads teens to compare themselves with others. Often teens also compare themselves with celebrities on TV, in movies, or in magazines. It is normal to occasionally feel critical of your own body. You may wish to be better-looking, more muscular, thinner, taller, or shorter. You may wish you had higher cheekbones, narrower hips, wider shoulders, darker eyes, clearer skin, longer legs, or whatever.

It is healthy to set realistic goals for change, but not to obsess about things you can't change. In a short video clip, a professional photographer explains how 99% of pictures of celebrities in magazines have been photoshopped. Many teens look at pictures of celebrities in these magazines and view them as perfect. The truth of the matter is that celebrities don’t look perfect and in many cases, have several physical flaws that get photoshopped out of their pictures.

To overcome a negative body image of ourselves, it’s important to understand that no one, celebrities included, looks perfect. We all have flaws that we may or may not be able to change. If it’s something that can be changed, like lack of muscle tone, then we can do our best to change it. On the flipside, we all have positive qualities. It’s important to focus some of our energy into what we do well and what makes us happy in life.

If we focus on what we do well, then naturally, our self esteem will improve. The media (and especially advertising) also suggest that in order to find happiness, we need to be good-looking and sexy. In commercials, movies and TV shows, tall, muscular, good-looking men and slender beautiful women fall in love, get married, have successful careers and plenty of money, own nice homes, and have happy families. This is unrealistic. Being good looking does not mean you will have a happy life. Lacking good looks doesn't mean you will end up poor, unemployed, single or unhappy! This is common sense, and we hear constantly about celebrities who have tremendous good looks going through drug addiction, terrible divorces or suicide--but we are also bombarded by media images suggesting otherwise. Watch the video clips below.

02.05 The influence of the media on body image assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 60 minutes

After viewing both body image videos (links above), please answer question number one and write a persuasive essay for number two.

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

********************************************************** 

1. List ten ways that photographed images could be altered (for 10 points). Include examples from the videos.

2. Write a persuasive essay of 250 words or more, on whether or not you think the media is being deceptive in their methods of altering photographed images, and whether you think this is a problem. Your essay must contain three to five examples to support your opinion. You must also list references at the end of your essay.

************************************************************** 

Structure Content Points possible
Introduction - one paragraph Clearly state your opinion about whether you think the media is deceptive in altering images, and whether this is a problem or not, in general terms 3 points
One paragraph First argument - give at least one reason and one example supporting your opinion about whether the media is being deceptive 4 points
One to two paragraphs Additional arguments - give at least two reasons and at least two examples of whether or how altering images creates problems or not 6 points
Conclusion - one to two paragraphs Reinforce your most important reason with examples from personal experience, and finish with a recommendation about what should be done (or not done) 4 points
Works cited List at least two sources (author, title, and url if from internet); one may be a video from the lesson, but one should be another source you found 2 points
Editing Correct conventions errors (spelling, punctuation, capitalization, etc) 1 point

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.05.02 Trends in obesity rates (Health II)

teacher-scored 28 points possible 40 minutes

As you work on this assignment, you may want to keep a separate window open to view the web pages as you answer the questions.

Note that 'obese' is defined as having a BMI of at least 30 (for example, a 5'9" adult who weighs at least 203 pounds). "Overweight" means having a BMI between 25 and 30. "PIR" is the abbreviation for poverty income ratio. People who have higher incomes have a higher PIR.

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

****************************************************************** 

1. According to the US Obesity Rates map, which state has the highest rate of obesity? Which states have the lowest rates? (2 points)

2. Which areas of the United States tend to have higher obesity rates? Which areas tend to have lower obesity rates? (2 points)

3. According to the animated map on the Percent of Obese (BMI > 30) in U.S. Adults website, which state was the last to rise above both 10% and 15% in obesity rates? (1 point)

4. Which states had less than a 23% obesity rate in the most recent year? (1 point)

5. Compare the Leisure-Time Physical Inactivity map to the US Obesity Rates map. What similarities and differences can you find? (3 points)

According to the Obesity and Socioeconomic Status in Adults: United States, 2005–2008 website:

6. Are men with a higher income more or less likely to be obese than men with a lower income? Are women with a higher income more or less likely to be obese than women with a lower income? (2 points)

7. Are men with a higher education more or less likely to be obese than men with a lower education? Are women with a higher education more or less likely to be obese than women with a lower education? (2 points)

8. Are most obese adults in the low income category? (1 point)

9. According to the chart in figure 4, in which group did the obesity rate increase the most between the earlier period (1988-1994) and the later period (2005-2008)? Which group showed the smallest increase? (2 points)

10. Why do you think some areas of the country have obesity rates that are so much higher or lower than other areas? Write a full paragraph suggesting at least two reasonable explanations. (6 points)

11. Write two "why" questions of your own about the data, and make a conjecture (guess) at what an answer might be for each question. (4 points)

**************************************************************** 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.05.03 Unit 2 quiz (Health II)

computer-scored 25 points possible 30 minutes

Go to Topic 3 (Assignments, quizzes and tests) to take this quiz.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.00 Risk-reducing Behaviors and Substance Abuse Prevention (Health II)

Standard 3: Students will demonstrate health-promoting and risk-reducing behaviors to
prevent substance abuse.

Objective 1: Examine the consequences of drug use, misuse, and abuse.

a. Explain the short and long term effects of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs (e.g., brain
development/function, the multiplier effect, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders).
b. Describe the importance of guidelines for the safe use of medicine (e.g., over-the-counter
drugs, prescription drugs, herbal supplements).
c. Recognize, respect, and communicate personal boundaries for yourself and others.
d. Identify the legal consequences for the abuse of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs.
e. Evaluate the impact that the use/abuse of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs has on families
and communities.


Objective 2: Analyze the risk and protective factors that influence the use and abuse of alcohol,
tobacco and other drugs.

a. Discuss the risk and protective factors associated with alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use
and abuse.
b. Examine the impact of peer pressure on alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use and abuse.
c. Evaluate media and marketing tactics used to promote alcohol, tobacco, and other drug
products.
d. Advocate for healthy alcohol, tobacco, and other drug policies in home and community.


Objective 3: Access information for treatment of addictive behaviors.

a. Describe methods of professional intervention for those affected by addictions.
b. Examine practices that will help support a drug-free lifestyle.
c. Identify community resources available to support those impacted by substance abuse.

03.01 Media & Technology Misuse and Safety (Health II)

Standard 4, Objective 4: Examine the dangers of inappropriate use of current technology.

Objective: Examine the dangers of inappropriate use of current technology.

a. Discuss use and misuse of current technology (e.g., internet, email, websites, instant messages, cell phones). b. Determine the short and long term dangers of sharing private information when using current technologies. c. Explore personal and legal consequences for using technology inappropriately and discuss school and LEA policies. d. Analyze violence in the media and how it impacts behavior.

Watch/read at least the 'required' resources listed below. Take notes so you will be able to use the information on the assignment.

03.01 Media & Technology Misuse and Safety assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 35 points possible 60 minutes

After you have read the lesson and watched the required video, using the information in the video, write an essay on the dangers of inappropriate use of technology (12 point font, double or single-spaced, at least 600 words). You must include at least the following information:

How is current technology used and misused? (include all types e.g., internet, email, websites, instant messages, cell phones; and give examples from your own - or friends' and family's - experience). What are the short and long term dangers of sharing private information when using current technologies? How can sending via cell phone, email, etc… or posting inappropriate pictures of yourself on social networking sites affect you now and in the future? What are some legal consequences for using technology inappropriately? What are your school and LEA (district) policies? Analyze violence in the media and how it impacts behavior. Include facts from the video and/or other sources, and express your own opinion about how violence in the media may impact behavior.

Scoring: Content 30 points (Cover the 6 items listed, 5 points each), Conventions 5 points (spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar etc)

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.02 Implications of substance abuse (Health II)

Standard 3: Students will demonstrate health-promoting and risk-reducing behaviors to prevent substance abuse.

SOME GENERAL INFORMATION ON DRUGS AND THEIR EFFECTS

What is a drug? A drug is "any" chemical substance that brings about physical, emotional, or mental changes in people. Alcohol, tobacco, and even caffeine (in coffee, tea, cocoa, and cola drinks) are drugs. However, the term "drug" is more typically used to refer to marijuana, amphetamines, barbiturates, tranquilizers, narcotics, cocaine, phencyclidine (PCP), volatile chemicals (glue and other inhalants), LSD, and heroin. What is Drug Misuse? Drug misuse is the improper use of a legal chemical substance. Examples include using an expired drug, sharing prescription drugs with those other than the person their prescribed to, or taking more or less than the recommended dose. For example, "Two Advil works okay on my headache, so I'll take four this time to really help it feel better." Or, using a prescription drug prescribed for someone else, but because you have similar symptoms, you assume it will also work for what you have. What is Drug Abuse? Drug abuse is the use of a chemical substance, legal or illegal, which causes physical, mental, emotional, or social harm to a person or to people close to him or her. Are All Drugs Harmful? All drugs can be harmful. The effect of any drug depends on a lot of things, including how much is taken and how often, the way it is taken (smoking, taking pills, ect.), whether other drugs are taken at the same time, the user's personality, and the setting (the place). This is true whether the drug is 'natural' or manufactured. Do People Often Take More Than One Drug? Many do. Multiple drug use is very common and very dangerous. People who use one kind of drug are more likely to use other kinds of drugs too, whether by taking various drugs one after another or at the same time. Greater risks exist when a combination of drugs or a mixture of unknown pills is taken. A good example of multiple drugs use is the use of alcohol and sleeping pills taken togther, which can lead to respiratory failure and coma or death.

What is Drug Potentiating? When a person increases the dose (amount of a drug taken at one time), two things happen. The side- effects of the drug are increased or amplified in strength, and additional side-effects are experienced that only happen at the higher dose. This effect is called "drug potentiating". Example: Look at the side effects listed on a box of Advil (over-the-counter) and the side effects printed out by the pharmacist for Motrin (prescription). It's the same, exact drug, only different doses. When two drugs are taken at the same time, one or two different things happen - never 1 + 1 = 2.

WHAT IS AN ANTAGONISTIC EFFECT? Sometimes you get an "antagonistic effect", 1 + 1 = 1. Example: Tetracycline (antibiotic) taken simultaneously with alcohol--you only get the effect of the alcohol. WHAT IS A SYNERGISTIC EFFECT? Sometimes you get a "synergistic effect", 1 + 1 = 3. Example: Valium taken with a martini, or 1 + 1 = 5 (prescription sleeping pills taken with alcohol). If you want testimonials, ask Marilyn Monroe, Jimi Hendrix, Chris Farley, John Candy, John Belushi, or Jim Morrison (Oh, I guess you can't--they're all dead).

EFFECTS OF PSYCHOACTIVE DRUGS Psychoactive drugs are drugs that affect the neurotransmitters in the brain. All senses are interpreted by brain cells sending and receiving neurotransmitters. Although you have many senses, the five major ones are sight, sound, taste, feel and smell. Psychoactive drugs come to us as illicit street drugs, prescription drugs, over-the-counter drugs, herbal drugs and synthetic drugs. Each type impairs human perception and performance. Psychoactive drugs be classified as Uppers (stimulants), Downers (depressants), All-arounders (hallucinogens), or Inhalants (solvents).

UPPERS Uppers send extra neurotransmitters from one cell to the other. The amount and type depend on the strength and amount of the drug. The brain on uppers makes an individual thinks he/she has more energy, is faster, smarter, isn't hungry, or is better-looking than normal. Examples of uppers are cocaine, crack, methamphetamine, speed, crank, ice, caffeine, nicotine, diet pills, ecstacy or mini thins. DOWNERS Downers slow down the neurotransmitters being sent and blocks some from being sent at all. Again, the amount stopped or slowed down depends upon strength amount of drugs used. The brain on downers doesn't think as quickly as it should or can. Examples of downers are alcohol, sleeping pills, valium, heroin; morphine, opium or pain killers, ALL-AROUNDERS All-arounders send the neurotransmitters to the wrong place. An individual on all arounders can hallucinate in any of their senses. Typical all-arounders are LSD (acid), PCP (angel dust), Peyote, Mushrooms, Mescaline or Marijuana. DISSOLVERS Dissolvers literally dissolve the brain cells. It is like pouring gasoline into a styrofoam cup: the cup just disappears. Examples of dissolvers are gas, glue, paint or any other inhalants.

List of chemicals found in tobacco & tobacco smoke:

-- Acetaldehyde (used as a solid fuel) -- Acetone (paint stripper) -- Acetic Acid (vinegar) -- Acrolein (tear gas) -- Acrylonitrile (poisonous liquid) -- Ammonia (toilet and floor cleaner) -- Arsenic (rat poison) -- Benzene (carcinogen) -- Benzo(a)pyrene (car exhaust) -- Butane (lighter fluid)
-- Cadmium (batteries) -- Carbon Monoxide (car exhaust) -- Cresol (explosives) -- Dimethylamine (agricultural fungicide) -- DDT/Dieldrin (pesticides) -- Ethanol (alcohol) -- Formaldehyde (body tissue preservative) -- Furfural (industrial solvent) -- Hexamine (barbecue lighter) -- Hydrogen cyanide (gas chamber poison)
-- Hydrogen Sulfide (toxic sewer gas) -- Hydroquinone (photographic developer) -- Isoprene (synthetic rubber) -- Methane (swamp and sewer gas) -- Methanol (rocket fuel, antifreeze) -- Methylamine (rocket propellant, explosives) -- Napthalene (mothballs) -- Nicotine (insecticide) -- Nitrogen dioxide (deadly poison) -- Phenol (plywood adhesive)
-- Propane (tractor fuel) -- Pyrene (coal tar) -- Stearic Acid (candle wax) -- "Tar" -- Toluene (industrial solvent)

The Harmful Effects of Smoking

On the BRAIN: Nicotine, the highly addictive chemical in cigarettes and tobacco, stimulates the pleasure centers in the brain creating pleasure and alertness. Nicotine initially stimulates the brain, then acts as a tranquilizer and sedative. Nicotine directly affects, alters, and takes control of specialized receptor cells in the brain responsible for regulating well-being, mood, and memory. The drug remains active 20-40 minutes, then withdrawal symptoms begin. Mood changes, irritability, anxiety, and discomfort become more severe--stimulating intense cravings for more nicotine. Regular and long-term use lead to addiction.

THROAT: Smoking irritates the membranes of the throat, and can cause cancer of the larynx and esophagus.

HEART: Nicotine raises the heart rate, increases blood pressure, and constricts blood vessels. Carbon monoxide (deadly gas produced from cigarette smoke) decreases the delivery of oxygen to the heart, increasing risk of heart attack and strokes. It also causes a weakening of the heart muscle's ability to pump blood, leading to death. And aortic aneurism (blood-filled sac in aorta) and pulmonary heart disease are common in smokers. LIVER: Smoking can lead to cirrhosis of the liver.

ADRENAL GLANDS: Smoking stimulates adrenaline production, speeding up the heart and increasing blood pressure.

VERTEBRAE: Increased risk of vertebral cancer.

REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM: Nicotine reduces sex drive and increases risk of impotence in males. In females, it increases the chance of cervical cancer, infertility, and the early onset of menopause. Smoking increases the chance of miscarriage, pregnancy complications, bleeding, and premature delivery. Smoking during pregnancy may cause impairment of the baby's growth, intellect, and emotional development.

CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM: Nicotine stimulates adrenaline production. This increase of adrenaline does have positive effects such as hunger supression and the reduction of anxiety and pain. But, the bad effects far, far outweigh the good. For instance, in smokers, the heart rate goes up 15-20 beats per minute which increases blood pressure. Smoking also constricts blood vessels, reduces sex drive, inhibits urine formation and irritates the mouth and throat. It is also a major cause of heart attack, lung diseases, strokes, and death.

MOUTH: Smoking dulls the taste buds and irritates the membranes of mouth. It causes bleeding and receding gums, gum disease, foul breath, and numbness of the mouth. It stains the teeth, causes tooth decay and the loss of teeth. Smoking is also the leading cause of cancer of the mouth.

LUNGS: Smoking causes the progressive limitation of airflow in and out of lungs leading to chronic Obstructive Lung Disease. It damages and destroys tiny air sacs of the lung, reducing the lungs' ability to bring in oxygen and remove carbon dioxide. It causes emphysema. It inflames and thickens the bronchial tubes, and increases mucus, resulting in narrowing of air passage--creating chronic bronchitis. Tar and other particles settle in bronchial tubes causing lung cancer. Tar and smoke destroy tiny cells that clean, protect, and remove foreign particles from lungs.

STOMACH AND DUODENUM: Smoking causes stomach and duodenal ulcers to form, creating burning pain.

KIDNEYS: Smoking reduces the kidney's ability to process fluids and waste, inhibiting the formation of urine. It can lead to cancer.

BLOOD VESSELS: Nicotine causes blood vessels to constrict, increasing blood pressure and risk of heart attack.

BLADDER: Smoking can cause cancer of the bladder.

BONES: Smoking increases the risk of early onset of osteoporosis (weakening, softening and thinning of the bone).

03.02 Implications of substance abuse quiz (Health II)

computer-scored 25 points possible 30 minutes

You may take this quiz multiple times, but you must score at least 90% to pass. Go to the link in Topic 3 on your main class page to take the quiz.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.03 Substance abuse prevention (Health II)

Standard 3: Students will demonstrate health-promoting and risk-reducing behaviors to prevent substance abuse.

Given the difficulty and high cost (both in money and in human suffering) of rehabilitating people with substance abuse problems, it is far better to prevent these problems before they start. To prevent the problem, we first need to understand its causes. SOME REASONS YOUNG PEOPLE USE/ABUSE DRUGS:

--Lack of information --Lack of skills in making good decisions --Difficulty in coping with strong emotions --Low self esteem --Curiosity --Lack of clear standards/values --Feels good --Boredom --Escape from problems --Risk taking --Recreation --Advertising pressure --Status/sexy/macho/grown-up --Lack of refusal skills --No clear consequences --Modeling adult behaviors --Peer acceptance

FACTORS THAT PREVENT DRUG USE/ABUSE:

--Practicing a religious/moral/ethical life code --Having a healthy self image and positive self-esteem --Being actively involved in worthwhile projects and activities that involve teamwork or service to others --Exhibiting personal discipline and managing time well --School programs meeting the individual interests and needs of the students --Perceiving school as a positive place

03.03 Substance abuse prevention assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. ******************************************************************************************** Answer the following questions based on what you've learned from reading the course material for this assignment:

  1. Based on the list of reasons young people use/abuse drugs, what might you do personally to reduce drug use/abuse among your friends and peers? (2 points possible)
  2. How might the items listed under factors that prevent drug use/abuse actually prevent drug use? Do you agree with all the items on the list? What might you add or take off the list? (3 points possible, 1 point per answer)
  3. Make a list of 25 positive alternatives to drug use, based on at least two reasons you believe people use/abuse drugs. First give the reason, then list the healthy alternatives under it. (1 point for every 5 listed up to 25, 5 points total)
  4. List 10 places you could refer a friend who is struggling with drug related behaviors. For example: parent, teen line, …… Be specific, and name local resources. (1 point for every 2 listed up to 10, 5 points total)
  5. Why is professional intervention required when a person is suffering from an addiction to a drug or behavior? (2 points possible)
  6. How can what we know about development of the teenage brain (refer back to lesson 01.7) apply to substance abuse prevention? List at least three factors or ideas. (up to 3 points possible)

***********************************************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.00 Goal Setting (Health II)

In unit 4, you will apply some of the ideas you have been working with in this quarter to setting a personal goal.
Objective: Create personal goal-setting strategies to promote a healthy lifestyle.

04.01 Goal setting lesson (Health II)

Standard 1, Objective 1E: Create personal goal-setting strategies to promote a healthy lifestyle.

Goal setting objectives: Create personal goal-setting strategies to promote a healthy lifestyle. No matter where we are at in life, there is always room for personal improvement. This is why setting goals is useful. There are many different approaches to setting goals. The primary objective in setting a goal is to better one’s quality of life, thus promoting a healthier lifestyle. So far in this class, we have looked at ways to make better decisions, reduce stress, understand illness, deal with loss, aging and death, balance nutrition and exercise, and make intelligent and safe choices regarding media and drug use. Consider all that we have touched upon, and think about at least one area in your life that could use improvement. Recall in the first assignment where we discussed the six different types of health and consider where you most need improvement. In this assignment, you will need to look back on the topics covered this quarter and determine what area you would like to improve at this point in your life. If we haven’t yet covered an area in which you would like to set a goal, that is okay. The purpose of the assignment is to make the goal something that is personal to you and that will advance you in the direction of a healthy lifestyle. Some questions you might want to consider in terms of your own healthy lifestyle that will help get you thinking about where you might improve are these. . .

Is there any stress in my life that needs to be addressed, eliminated or reduced, and what things do I need to do to lessen or get rid of that stressor? Is there a loss I’m dealing with that I need to work through? Are there any accomplishments I wrote about in my obituary that I need to be working toward now? Am I eating and exercising as well as I’d like to be? Do I feel good about my appearance, or are there habits I can change or work on to feel better? Am I a good example of healthy living, or is there an area in which I can improve?

After pondering these questions, as well as the topics that we’ve addressed so far (decision making, stress management, mental disorders, grief/loss, death/dying, accomplishing and fulfilling your dreams in life, nutrition, physical fitness, body image, weight management, media and technology misuse and safety, and drug abuse prevention), CHOOSE AND WRITE DOWN THE ONE THING YOU’D MOST LIKE TO IMPROVE FROM ONE OR MORE OF THE AREAS WE’VE DISCUSSED IN THIS QUARTER. Keep in mind that you can always improve in more than one area, but for this assignment, we’ll just be starting by thinking of three goals and then setting one single goal. With that said, what is a goal? A goal is a dream with a deadline. Or, another way of thinking about it is, a goal is when your dream puts on work clothes. Henry David Thoreau said, “If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put foundations under them.” In other words, it’s great to dream and imagine what could be. Without dreams, we have nothing to drive us. However, once the dream is in place, floating like “castles in the air,” now is the time to decide ways to reach your dream, or to build a foundation for the suspended castle that represents what you want. Goals help us bridge the gap between dreaming about what we want and actually getting what we want. Steps to setting a goal:

1. Write out your goal statement. A goal statement tells you exactly what you are going to accomplish. A goal statement must be stated positively and in the present tense (i.e. “I am completing this goal and being this new person now, in the present moment.) 2. Make sure your statement meets the SMART criteria below, and if not, rewrite your goal statement until it does. A good start is to write down what you want to accomplish and then alter or add words to make it more specific, measurable, action-oriented, etc. A goal must be S.M.A.R.T. (according to Doran, G. T. (1981). There's a S.M.A.R.T. way to write management's goals and objectives. Management Review, Volume 70, Issue 11(AMA FORUM), pp. 35-36.)

Next, make your goal even SMARTER, by adding these two factors:

Evaluate & Re-Evaluate.

Make your goal...

SPECIFIC MEASURABLE ACTION-ORIENTED REALISTIC & RELEVANT TIME BASED, then...

EVALUATE (to determine if you're satisfied or need to make adjustments) & RE-EVALUATE (to continually better yourself as much as needed).

04.01 Goal setting project (Health II)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 120 minutes
What to do: (NOTE: this project takes at least two weeks to complete) Total Points Possible:
FULLY COMPLETE THE STEPS LISTED BELOW.  
STEP 1 - COMPLETE THE GOAL SETTING CHART 27
STEP 2 - COMPLETE A VISUAL REPRESENTATION OF YOUR GOAL 10
STEP 3 - WRITE A REFLECTION PARAGRAPH 10
STEP 4 - SUBMIT THE COMPLETED ASSIGNMENT WITH STEPS 1-3 INCLUDED 47

Instructions: Fully complete the steps listed below. STEP 1: Complete the GOAL SETTING CHART below for your chosen, appropriate, healthy, class-related goal (all questions in the chart, 1-7 must be completed). To complete the chart, you must identify three possible goals you need to set in different areas of your life. Consider three areas you can improve upon, and consider how you might best accomplish those goals.

Goal 1: Goal 2: Goal 3:

From those you’ve considered, choose one that you’d like to complete for this assignment. When you’ve chosen the goal that you’d most like to accomplish, decide how you can relate it to the lesson material criteria, the SMART acronym. Your chosen goal MUST relate to the previous units discussed, which means your goal must fit within one of these, some of these, or all of these options:

Option 1 – Your goal is something that makes you a more healthy, balanced, and/or a less stressed individual mentally or emotionally (i.e. I am setting a balanced schedule that allows time for me and the things that I enjoy doing each day, while still allowing me to take care of the things I need to do).

Option 2 – Your goal is something that aims to make you more healthy and fit nutrionally and/or physically (i.e. I am working out at least three times a week in order to reach my goal of feeling confident in a swimsuit by summer time).

Option 3 – Your goal is something that helps you or someone else better cope with grief and/or loss (i.e. I am documenting my feelings each day and choosing one way to remember the person I lost in a positive way so that I can eventually accept the loss I have experienced).

Option 4 – Your goal is something that helps you succeed at something you want to accomplish in life (i.e. I will enroll in swimming lessons and research the best form for different strokes and competitive success so that I can feel competent to try out for the swim team in the fall).

Option 5 – Your goal is something that helps you lead a healthier life by avoiding and implementing safeguards to keep you away from online predators and harmful substances and/or to change an unhealthy habit or behavior (i.e. I am spending time with friends I know will choose the same values I have and not engage in harmful substances by planning a schedule that keeps me engaged in useful activities and doesn’t leave time for other things that have hurt me in the past).

You can print out a chart like the one below or make your own on a poster or regular blank sheet of printer size paper (8 ½” x 11”, no smaller than this but can be bigger). Follow the same instructions and complete each part of the chart whether you print it out or make by hand. Goal Setting Chart: (27 Points Possible)

1. List three possible personal goals that would improve your life now. (See options 1-5 and remember your goal must fit the SMART acronym, must be stated positively and presently – as though it’s already put into action) (6 PTS. POSS.). Goal 1: Goal 2: Goal 3:
2. State your chosen goal here (See options 1-5 and remember your goal must fit the SMART acronym, must be stated positively and presently--as though it’s already put into action): (7 PTS. POSSIBLE--1 For each criteria of the SMART acronym met, and 2 points for a positive and present statement).
3. State how your chosen goal ties into the lesson material you’ve learned so far in quarter 1 of Health (i.e. Identify what lessons and/or assignments it best fits with or material you related to in choosing your goal). List family, community or school resources that could help you toward your goal. (4 PTS. POSS.)
4. Short Term Goals (at least three required, 1 PT. EACH). List three things you can begin doing right now to help you achieve your goal: 1. 2. 3. More, if needed:
5. Long Term Goals (at least three required, 1 PT. EACH): List three things you can do in the future (next week or later) to help you achieve your goal: 1. 2. 3. More, if needed:
6. Evaluate after one week. How is it going so far? What changes could make your success greater? (2 PTS. POSS.):
7. Re-evaluate after another week. Are you happy with the way things are going? What things do you need to do differently, if anything? (2 PTS. POSS.):

Step 2: On paper, poster or computer media, create a visual representation of your goal (this must be a healthy and appropriate representation) 10 POINTS POSSIBLE: BASED ON APPROPRIATENESS AND ABILITY TO RELATE TO AND REMIND YOU OF YOUR GOAL IN A POSITIVE WAY. This can be a visual collage of magazine photos or hand drawn pictures, a single photo/picture/work of art, etc. You’re only limited by your own efforts or imagination, but it must visually represent the goal you’ve chosen to accomplish.

Step 3 (10 POINTS POSSIBLE): Put your goal into ACTION!! Place the goal setting chart and visual representation where you will see it at least once a day, if not more often. Write a paragraph or more about…

Your progress and how you feel so far about your chosen goal, why you chose it, and what the picture(s) you chose means to you and how it helps remind you of how you’re making your goal happen.

Step 4: Submit the completed work (both the goal setting chart and visual representation of your goal) as an assignment to your instructor. If needed, take a picture or scan either parts, and send them as email or assignment attachments, or include both in the submission portion if possible. Please check to make sure you have met all criteria listed above in the “what to do” chart before submitting your work. THANKS!

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


04.02 Unit 3 & 4 quiz (Health II)

computer-scored 25 points possible 30 minutes

Go to Topic 3 to take this quiz. If you do not score at least 90%, you will need to take the quiz again.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.