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Life Skills

00.00 Start Here (Participation Skills and Techniques)

Getting Started

READ through the COURSE MATERIAL and complete each assignment and quiz. Make sure you include the questions with your answers for each assignment.

Complete the Fitness Testings before you begin any of the other assignments. There are some other assignments in the classes that have to be done in sequential order. It will be easier for you to do well on each unit if you complete each one in sequential order.

Make sure you check the pacing guide of each assignment to be able to complete the class in the required time frame. Please be sure to proofread, spell check, edit, and save all work that is submitted to the teacher for grading. YOU MUST SAVE YOUR OWN COPIES OF ALL ASSIGNMENTS!

Assignments are scored according to these criteria:

  1. Did you answer each question, with an appropriate answer?
     
  2. Did you give thorough, thoughtful answers in complete sentences?
     
  3. Did you follow the directions for completing and turning in assignments?
     
  4. Did you complete the hours required for each assignment?
     
  5. Did you put your name and date in the correct place?

You can retake class quizzes as many times as you like, but you need to get a score of at least 80% to pass.

This class requires the creation of 3 Skill Videos.

Students need access to either a video recording device such as

  • Web Cam
  • Video Camera
  • iPod with built-in camera, iPad, Tablet

and/or presentation creation software such

  • Google Presentation
  • Powerpoint

It is best to upload videos to YouTube or PhotoBucket but if you would like to use another alternative I have listed the ONLY  Audio/Video file extensions I can view. Please make sure when submitting audio/video files it is one of the following extension formats or you will have to redo the assignment.

.aac, .adts, .ac3, .aif, .aiff, .aifc, .caf, .mp3, .m4a, .m4b, .snd, .au, .sd2, wav

00.00 About Me (Health)

teacher-scored 5 points possible 15 minutes

About Me Assignment To complete and submit this assignment copy the material between the asterisks into a blank word-processing document. Answer the questions using complete sentences, appropriate punctuation and sentence structure. All answers must be bold or UPPER CASE. Save the document. Finally, select all, copy, then paste the entire document into the box that opens when you click to submit this assignment.

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Answer the following:

  1. Your EHS username.
  2. The school where your credit will be sent.
  3. Also include why you are taking health through EHS, and your interests.
  4. Please pledge to adhere to the EHS Honor Code: "As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers and staff with respect."
  5. Consult the Pacing Guide for this course and commit to finish this quarter within ten weeks from your start date.

        https://share.ehs.uen.org/view-syllabus/278,161 [for Quarter 1]
        https://share.ehs.uen.org/view-syllabus/278,162 [for Quarter 2]
 

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


00.00 About Me (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 5 points possible 15 minutes

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

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Fitness for Life - About Me

1. Tell me your name, grade, where you go to school, and some of your interests. What is your current fitness level? What experiences have you had that affect your attitudes about fitness? Use proper sentence structure including capitalization, punctuation and spelling. If you took the first quarter of this class from me, tell me something I don't already know for second quarter! 

2. Submit the Parent Contact Form with your About Me assignment as a separate uploaded file in the About Me submission window. You will find the form in the Overview 01 section. NOTE: I cannot grade your About Me assignment until your Parent Contact Form is submitted with your About Me assignment.

3. Please pledge to adhere to the EHS Honor Code: "As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers and staff with respect." 

4. Please consult the Pacing Guide for this course and commit to finish this quarter within seven weeks from your start date.     

    https://share.ehs.uen.org/view-syllabus/279,161 for Q1
    https://share.ehs.uen.org/view-syllabus/279,162 for Q2

 

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Example:

Hi my name is Jim Nasium and I am a senior at Richardson High School. My interests are kickball and dodgeball. I hope to go pro in one of them one day.

My fitness level is great because I am the master of jumping jacks, push-ups, and sit-ups. The other students in my P.E. classes are always jealous of me and my awesome abilities. I have always liked exercise because I am so good at it.

My contact info is Jim.nasium@shortshortsandhighsocks.com

I, Jim Nasium, commit to finish this quarter within seven weeks.

I, Jim Nasium, pledge to keep the EHS Honor Code.

 

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


00.00 Start Here (English 11)

00.00 Start Here (English 9)

00.00.02 About Me (English9)

teacher-scored 5 points possible 10 minutes

Copy and paste the questions between asterisks into a word processing document on your computer.  Answer the questions, save a copy for yourself, and then copy and paste the entire assignment into the submission page for About Me. (Click the link for the About Me assignment, back on the main class page.)

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1.  Tell me the last two books you read for fun (not because you had to read them for a class), what you thought of them, and the last two books you were required to read for a class (not what you will be required to read for this class, but reading required for your English class last year or the year before).

2.  What is your contact information?

3.  Are you committed to finishing this class within ten weeks (take your final test in the ninth week after you enroll)?

4.  Do you understand and agree to abide by the EHS Honor Code:   "As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers, and staff with respect." ?

5.  Which of the following best describes your reason for taking this class on-line instead of 'live' at a regular high school?

I didn't pass the class the first time I took it, so I am using this class to make up that credit, OR I am behind on my credits and trying to catch up or graduate early.

 

I'm not behind on my credits, and I want to graduate early.

I wanted to take extra electives, so I didn't have room in my schedule for this class at school.

I think this will be easier or faster than taking a class live.

I think I will learn more or enjoy the class more than taking it live at my school.

I am home-schooled.

I have health problems that make it difficult to attend school.

I am traveling (for competitons, family reasons, filming, etc) so I can't be in school regularly.

I attend a charter school or private school that uses EHS classes.

I am suspended or expelled from my school.

Other (please explain)

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Be sure to check your conventions (spelling, punctuation, capitalization, etc) and correct typos before you submit your work.

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


00.01 About Me (PE Individualized Lifetime Activity)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

Intro To Fitness Assignment In your "About Me" assignment, write a small paragraph telling me a little about yourself.

00.01 Introductory Astronomy Survey (Astronomy 1)

computer-scored 50 points possible 10 minutes

Welcome! This is the first assignment for this course. It is computer graded. You only need to take it once. Please try to do your best. This will generate the best data that we will use later in the course to determine you well you and I are doing in this class. It is not proctored. You may jot down "burning" question that you may rediscover while you take the survey. This would be fun to talk about in our class blog. So, have fun, (as much as one can have while taking a 'quiz."

00.01 Meet Tiff and Cameron (Financial Literacy)

NOTE: This video can take from 3 to 12 minutes to load. I suggest you go ahead and try it, but feel free to open another screen and work on the next activity while it is loading. The video makes the class more interesting but does not contain critical information.
Your computer needs to have QuickTime installed to view this video. To view it, click the link then click the play button.

00.01.01 Start Here: Introductory Astronomy Survey (Astronomy 1)

I believe that Astronomy is one of the most important science courses anyone can take. It generates the most questions. It has generated the most data from probably the most experiments in human history. As we learn more about our planet, Earth, we can theorize how and why, the conditions on other planets, exist. We study a very close star, our Sun. Again, this leads to theories concerning how and why its probably like on stars that are hugely far away. I believe that YOU probably know more than you think you do about the cosmos. i also believe you can learn even more, because, you will want to. You are hard-wired to ask the deep questions and seek answers to them. It is my intent, to inspire you, to seek the answers to your many questions. This first activity is designed to help you and me know what your perceptions are concerning the cosmos. At the same time, it will remind you of things you have always wanted to know about. This dynamic will help us both in moving through the content of the course. You should emerge from these quizzes excited and ready to learn. I know that one quiz is 100 questions, but, it will generate very good data for us both to analyze. Its the beginning of your developing the life skills known as "Science Process Skills." You will use these skills to solve problems for the rest of your life. You are probably already using them (hopefully). Do not be overwhelmed and do not worry about how well (or not) you do on these quizzes, they are only surveys not actual quizzes. They are designed to determine what you currently know about astronomy. They are also designed to generate a good data set that we can use to determine how you and I are doing in the course. I thank you for taking the time to answer the questions. Again, as long as you take them and try to do the best you can, you will earn 100%.
Do Your Dreams

NGC7822  Hubble Space Telescope  Nebula (APOTD) Astronomy Picture of the Day: This Hubble Space telescope image is a deep space nebula.  This image is from the NASA website callee Astronomy Picture of the Day or (APOTD)NGC7822 Hubble Space Telescope Nebula (APOTD) Astronomy Picture of the Day: This Hubble Space telescope image is a deep space nebula. This image is from the NASA website callee Astronomy Picture of the Day or (APOTD)

00.01.1 Start Here: Introductory Astronomy Survey (Astronomy 1)

computer-scored 21 points possible 10 minutes

The very first assignment I have for you is to go to the Quizzes section in Topic 3 and take two of them. The first is a short assessment named: Introductory Astronomy Survey. It has 21 questions. I also need you to take the quiz named: Astronomy Pre-Course Assessment. This one has 100 questions. They are NOT proctored. You just go to the quizzes at Topic 3 and take them before you begin any other assignments. As a scientist, I like to compare data. I trust data and it is one of my goals to help you learn this very important life skill, collecting and analyzing data. So, I do not care how many questions you get wrong. Your grade will be either an A or a NO Grade (only if you do not take the surveys before you do any other learning activity in this course.. I really need you to complete these before you begin any other assignment. These are easy A's as long as you take them before you begin any other course work. I will be comparing your scores with the scores on your final. I want to know how effective I am as your instructor and i want you to know how much important information and relevant problem solving skills you will have acquired by the end of the term. I also have one other suggestion, and that is to do the course in order as the concepts are built on understanding the concepts learned early in the course.

These are the instructions for 00.01.1 the quiz: Introductory Astronomy Survey.
21 questions
It should take you about 10-15minutes

3...2...1...Take Off!: Take off of an Ares rocket used by both NASA and the European Space Agengy.  This image is from NASA's APOTD3...2...1...Take Off!: Take off of an Ares rocket used by both NASA and the European Space Agengy. This image is from NASA's APOTD

00.02 About Me - English 10

teacher-scored 5 points possible 10 minutes

Getting to know you! Copy and paste the following questions between the rows of asterisks below into a word document and answer them accordingly. *******************************************************************

In a numbered list, provide the following information: Answer the following questions in list form.

1. What is your full name, parent(s) name(s), and contact information for both you and your parent(s)?

2. Where do you go to school?

3. What is your counselor's full name and contact information?

4. What year will you graduate and have you read the EHS Honor Code and understand that this class needs to be finished within the 10 week limit?

In a CREATIVE WRITTEN PROJECT, paragraph form, tell me about yourself being sure to answer the following questions in the process:

          a. Tell me something about yourself.

          b. Why are you taking this class and what do you expect to get out of it?

          c. What is one word that best describes you?

By the way, here is the EHS honor code: "As a student of the Electronic High School, I agree to turn in my assignments in a timely manner, do my own work, not share my work with others, and treat all students, teachers, and staff with respect."

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I am excited to get to know you! Grading Criteria:

1. Creativity

2. Writing mechanics

3. All requested information is included in your list and paragraph Submit this assignment now.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


00.02 About Me and Course Guidelines (AR1)

teacher-scored 15 points possible 20 minutes

Assignment One: Assignment One is the "About Me & Parent Form" assignment. YOU WILL PASTE your paragraph and questions A - C below into the Submission Box under "About Me & Parent Form" and also you will upload the form in this same assignment box. You also paste Assignment Two in this first box. On this main page you will see a capital BLUE A with A + in the far left margin and that is the indicator throughout the course that it is an ASSIGNMENT when you see the A+. You may have to send the paragraph and answers and then send the form separately, but still within that About Me Submission Box.

Write a paragraph (at least five sentences) about yourself. Also in About Me, do the following:

A. give your parent/guardian's name and email address and phone
B. give your school counselor's name and email and phone
C. state if there is anyone else who oversees or helps you with your work - if there is, include their name, email and phone number.

FOR ALL OF YOUR ASSIGNMENTS in this course, type all of your answers into your word processing document (use a cheap program like TextEdit or Notes - "Word" does not format and I would have to ask you to redo it.) Then copy all of the data asked for in the Submission Box (this is ALL of your answers that you just put in the word processing program) and paste it into the Assignment Submission Box. Your word processing document, that you'll keep on your computer or a flash drive will be your copy of the entire course. This is for safe keeping and everything from About Me to the very end will be on that document.

There is NOT a Submission Box for every single assignment or unit, in fact, there may be several units in one Submission Box. Just keep putting your answers in your word processing document as you go along. Keep clicking on the arrow on the bottom right that says "Next." Then you will come to a Submission Box and it will say to paste certain assignments within that box. BUT, do no skip even one or else the whole thing will be rejected. Do put All that is requested in this box and only paste all of the work one time.

Parent Permission Form - Required by the State of Utah (If you submit this for first quarter, you don't have to submit it again in second quarter.)
To get your top 50 points you must include the Parent Permission Form with Assignment One. You submit that in this area right after you do the About Me paragraph and A-C and Assignment Two. (Don't upload these. The only thing you upload is the signed Parent Form. :)

Print out the Parent Permission Form--it is shown as an attached document in orange print at the bottom of the very first "Overview" page. Have your parent/guardian sign it. It is best to take a photo of it or scan the document and upload it asap. Be sure you scan the parent signature. You cannot get credit for this course if you have not sent this form. If you are over 18, don't send the form, just write, "I'm 18" in the assignment box. :)

Upload the Parent Permission Form. If you look down, a little lower to the right you should see blue letters that say Upload or Re-upload data. Click on that and you should be able to upload the form. (25 points)

Assignment Two:

A. Review the Adult Roles and Responsibilities Standards document, and then, in the assignment answer box write a paragraph about what topics in the course that you think you will enjoy the most. :)

Assignment Three:

Pre-Course Guidelines You will paste the Pre-Course Guidelines in the Submission Box with the same title. Rewrite them as is asked and don't send the questions, as 21 says.

If you are in Quarter Two, please review these Course Guidelines again, so they are fresh for you. If you recall, it is important to me that you follow the directions exactly. This is a good habit for you to develop - it will prepare you for college and a future job. :) However, if you have already done them in quarter one, you can just write a sentence saying, "I did these in quarter one."

Rewrite the answers to the questions below. Rewrite them using your own words.

I am giving you the answers to this section. I want you to rewrite the answers in your own words, do not copy and paste them. This information is all vital to your success. I grade heavily on following directions so always follow the course guidelines exactly. Memorize these.

1. Can you start the Teen Living course if you have not read all of the Information and Start Here sections?

Answer: No, I must read those sections first before starting the course.

2. If you have a special deadline, what are you required to do?

Answer: I must let the teacher know at least two weeks prior to the date of the final deadline.

3. Can you send individual exercises, meaning sending Exercise 1 and then Exercise 2 at another time and so on?

Answer: No, I am not to put anything in the assignment boxes until the unit is 100% completed in the word processing program. I should not send messages in the assignment box, they are to go in the “Messages” area or to be sent in an email message. No assignments are to ever be sent in email, only messages.

4. Can you send the exercises in any order you choose?

Answer: No, I must send all answers in consequential order and if there is something missing, I should state that. I must always check the Lesson material at the top of the unit. All data that will be on the final is in this Lesson Content area, so you must read it all. Before saying something is missing check above and below in the curriculum. Then, if you can't find it or if you can't get a document to open, STOP and notify the teacher by email or in the Message area. Do not leave anything blank.

5. Can you skip an exercise?

Answer: No, I cannot skip any exercises and I cannot say “I don’t know.”

6. How long do you normally need to wait for the teacher to correct your work?

Answer: The teacher is encouraged to have all work corrected within three days.

7. Can you give the teacher "phony" deadlines? How might the teacher feel if s/he finds out you made up a deadline?

Answer: I would lose trust with my teacher because it’s really a lie.

8. If you sign up to take the course in the late spring, when should you start sending work? Why?

Answer: I must send work immediately because I cannot expect the teacher to grade one whole quarter in a couple of days.

9. Can you work from an old printed copy of the curriculum? Why?

Answer: No, because the teacher might think that I am cheating. I must only use current curriculum.

10. If you have a problem with the teacher, why is it best to talk to the teacher first before complaining elsewhere?

Answer: I must learn that this is the proper procedure in the work world and elsewhere. It complicates things and typically makes the teacher OR immediate supervisor (if you do this on your job) feel badly because you did not follow the proper communication procedures. I've seen many people be fired for not communicating with the proper person. In this case, your teacher is the proper person to complain to or to tell of your problem. If it is a system issue, then I will forward your problem on to the EHS administration.

11. Can you be automatically dropped from Teen Living? If so, why would that happen?

Answer: Yes, I can be automatically dropped if I don’t send work regularly. I must send work within a two-week period of time.

12. If you intend to finish this course in less than one month, what is required?

Answer: Especially if it is in the spring, just prior to graduation, I must let the teacher know. If many students wait until the very last minute, it may be impossible for my teacher to correct a quarter’s worth of work in a few days for a lot of people.

13. Can I send my work through email?

Answer: No, I can never send assignments through email.

14. What are important formatting guidelines?

Answer: Use normal font, always use black, normal size (12), no bold or underline (except for Exercise #1, etc.). Also, no centering or right alignment because when the teacher answers, I may not see the answer. Also, I must always leave a line space prior to each ASSIGNMENT label that is in caps and bold. If my personal computer won't do bold, then just caps is sufficient for the EXERCISE labels.

15. Why is it important that you work from a Word Processing program?

Answer: Because then I have a copy of all of my work if something happens and I can also finish a unit over several days, but it will be in one place for me to copy and paste into the Assignment box when it is 100% complete.

16. Does the teacher like it if I ask questions?

Answer: Yes, the instructor sincerely wants to help me. If I don’t understand something, I should copy the question and paste it into a message for my instructor and then tell her which parts I don’t understand. I must ALWAYS state my name as it appears in the EHS record, and give the course name and state which quarter it is.

17. Should students wait to start the course until after the permission form is entered?

Answer: No, I should not wait to start the course until after the permission form is entered. I should start immediately. But, I must not forget - the form is required by law.

18. After the final, am I immediately finished?

Answer: No, I must be sure to check with my counselor within two weeks at the end of the course. I must SEE my credit on my transcript before I stop checking. This is very important.

19. Can students request that their grade be changed if they don’t like the final grade, and can students retake the final exam?

Answer: No, once you take the final, your grade cannot be changed if you don’t feel it is high enough. No, there are no retakes on the final.

20. Can students get an A for the course if they do not get an A on the final exam?

Answer: No. Students MUST get an A on the final exam or they cannot get an A for a final course grade. Study very HARD for the final. The finals are quite different in each class and some are a lot harder than others - you must be prepared by studying VERY hard for each one. Each final is worth 50% of your grade, so don't think the final will be easy. Study the entire course for the final, and there are no notes or helps allowed.

21. Do you send the teacher all of the questions and curriculum?

Answer: No, I only send answers, no questions or curriculum. The teacher wants to see answers only, and my work will not be accepted if I forget.

01.00 Activity logs (Fitness for Life)

This is an on-going assignment--you will begin now, and continue to keep activity logs of your physical activity throughout the class. These logs will be worth 25% of your grade. Download either version of the activity log (attached, above). This assignment should help you design your own fitness program and maintain an activity log. You will need to print a set of six log sheets per quarter, and number them 1 through 6 (for first quarter) or 7-12 (for second quarter). You may record exercises done in the assignments on your activity logs. All six Activity Logs must be complete (six each quarter) before your credit will be issued. A parent or guardian signature is required on every log, so you will need to scan or photograph them to create an electronic image (as a last resort, you may mail a photocopy to your teacher's physical address). Don't wait till the end of the class to send all your logs--send each as it is finished. Note: Students who have not submitted their 1st Activity Log by week 3 will automatically be dropped from the course.

Submit your logs via Module 3. DO NOT email them, as they will not be submitted into the grade book unless Module 3 is used.

Introduction:

Mountain biking is an aerobic activity!: By Dave Silver (www.bcbikerace.com) Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsMountain biking is an aerobic activity!: By Dave Silver (www.bcbikerace.com) Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Fitness for Life is a class in which you are required to exercise aerobically at least three times a week, just as you would in any physical education course. Aerobic means continuous activity that keeps your heart rate at 60-90% of its maximum. Maximum rate can be estimated by taking the number 220 and subtracting your age. For example, if you are 15 years old, your maximum heart rate would be 205. During your activity, you would want your heart rate to be between 123 and 185 beats per minute (205 * .60 = 123, 2.5 * .90 = 185). A minimum heart rate of 130 will be required for full credit (130-180 beats per minute) for cardiovascular workouts. The purpose of this assignment is to help you design your own fitness program. Consider the things you need to do to increase your current level of physical activity; your assignments will help you along the way. You will be required to exercise aerobically for at least 30 minutes 3 times a week. The point is to select something that you will be able to engage in on a regular basis. The more you put into this, the more you will get out of it, and the better results you will achieve.

Task: Print out copies of the attached Workout Log (6 for each term) for a total of 12 logs (if you are taking both quarters), AND the Parent Contact form. You may need to reformat a bit to fit your page in Microsoft word. Copy and paste--Number the sheets 1 through 12, and fill in the dates. Choose an aerobic exercise. Be creative--try new activities, and invite your family or friends to join you. Try to find something you enjoy doing.

• Before you start, you will need to take your resting heart rate. Count your pulse for 6 seconds and multiply by 10. (You may also count your pulse for 10 seconds and multiply by 6). This will tell you how many times your heart beats in one minute. Record your resting heart rate in your log. • Immediately after or during your exercise, take your heart rate again using the same steps explained above. This will be recorded as your exercise heart rate. • After 3 minutes take your heart rate a third time. Record this in your log as your recovery heart rate. As you exercise each week, record your activities and heart rates in the boxes given. Be sure to include the duration of the exercise. Don’t forget to take your heart rate before, during and after your workout. You will be required to exercise a minimum of three times a week for 30 minutes, 90 minutes total. You may divide this time up however you would like as long as cardio workouts are done at least three days of the week for 30 minutes each. You will notice there is a space for “other” activities. You may use this space to record anything else you do that is not necessarily aerobic. Once you have completed your activity log, be sure to have your parent sign and include an e-mail address of your parent or guardian in case we have questions. Submit your activity logs every week to your instructor via the online submission process.

Turning in your Log: To turn in your assignment, click on the assignment name and then, depending on the assignment type, you use a button labeled [Submit Assignment] or [UPLOAD A FILE] or [EDIT MY SUBMISSION].

You'll see descriptions of your assignments along with the content. Create and then work on your assignments on your local computer.

You turn in all logs and assignments via Module 3.

Evaluation: Each log in first quarter will be worth 65 points. You will receive 45 points for completing the chart portion of the log and 20 points for answering the questions at the bottom. Remember to number and record dates correctly. If you have any questions e-mail your instructor. Logs are worth one fourth of your grade, so remember to exercise aerobically at least 30 minutes three times a week, getting your heart rate up to at least 130 beats per minute.

01.00 Introduction - Google Earth Tour (PE Individualized Lifetime Activity)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 90 minutes

Master's athletic championship for men and women over 80 in India: by Vishma thapa, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported via Wikimedia CommonsMaster's athletic championship for men and women over 80 in India: by Vishma thapa, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported via Wikimedia Commons

 

Take a look at the life expectancies from all around the world by clicking on the link in blue at the bottom, titled "Life Expectancies Of The World." You will create a Google Earth tour of six countries listed in the web site "Life Expectancies of the World". Refer to the Google Earth links and video tutorials provided below for additional help. 

Let's create a custom Google Earth (GE) tour locating the six countries below using data from the web site "Life Expectancies Of The World".

1- Japan--highest life expectancy
2- United States
3- Kazakhstan
4- Burkina Faso
5- Afghanistan
6- Mozambique--lowest life expectancy

Use the Google Earth (GE) Tour above called Example_6_Countries_Life_Expectancies-PatLambrose.kmz as an example tour.
Print out the pdf file called Life_Expectancies_PE_Ind-Q1.pdf and carefully follow the detailed instructions. It may take some experimenting to get it just right! Refer to Google Earth links for additional help.
Once all six countries' placemarks are created, save your GE Tour as follows: 6_Countries_Life_Expectancies-YourFirstNameYourLastname.
Be sure to save your .kmz file on your hard drive where you will remember. Finally, once your Google Earth tour is completed, submit your saved .kmz file to your teacher as an assignment.

01.00 Learning to Draw (How the Brain Works Video) (ArtFouii)

01.00 Standard 1 (Participation Skills and Techniques)

On the Intermountain Live site, you see 4 different links: "Eat Well," "Move Well," "Feel Well," and "Be Well." Click on any of these links and explore the website. Once in these different links if you scroll down you will see a link "Videos" these are some funny mini videos. Take some time to watch a few or all of these videos. You'll see funny and true ideas about physical activity.

01.00 Standard 1 (PESkills)

On the top right corner of the Intermountain Live site, you see an index for some mini videos. Take some time to watch a few or all of these videos. You'll see funny and true ideas about physical activity.

The names of the videos are: "CHAINED TO THE TELEVISION," "EAT YOUR VEGETABLES," "CHIPS," "MOM DRIVING," "HEADS ON DESKS," "IN LOVE," "TREADMILL," "REFLEXES."

Enjoy!

01.00 Unit 1 (Citizenship)

01.00 Unit 1 - Earning (Financial Literacy)

NOTE: This video can take from 3 to 12 minutes to load. I suggest you go ahead and try it, but feel free to open another screen and work on the next activity while it is loading. The video makes the class more interesting but does not contain critical information.
Your computer needs to have QuickTime installed to view this video. To view it,click the link and click the play button.

01.00.02 Meet the Players Google Earth Tour

teacher-scored 30 points possible 90 minutes

Create a Google Earth (GE) tour locating the countries where the four students- “The Players” are from. These students will attend a school in Paris, France. Before starting this virtual language course, you will become geographically familiar with each player’s country as you build this tour in Google Earth.

What do I include in my tour?

A) Students’ names and countries:
1-Lucas George- United States
2-Victoire Thibault- Quebec, Canada
3-Gille La Croix- Island of Haiti
4 & 5-Marie-Catherine Phan- Northern Switzerland and Vietnam
6-Paris, France
(The last country in your Google Earth Tour is France, specifically Paris.)

B) -One sentence about each student
-One sentence about the school for the France Placemark.

Use the Google Earth (GE) Tour above called Example_Players_6_Places-PatLambrose.kmz as an example tour. Download Google Earth if you do not have the program on your computer. See Google Earth links below for additional help.

Open Google Earth, then Select File, Open, and browse to the folder on your hard drive for the Example_Players_6_Places-PatLambrose.kmz. Refer to this example tour as a guideline as you build your Meet the Players Google Earth Tour.
Note: This file will be under Temporary Places in the Table of Contents screen.

Once all 6 countries are located and placemarks created, save your GE Tour as follows: Players_6_Places-YourFirstNameYourLastname.kmz Be sure to save your kmz file on your hard drive where you will remember.

See detailed instructions for this assignment in the PDF file listed above. The file name is Meet_the_Players_GE_French_Q1.pdf. Once your GE Tour is completed, submit the Google Earth Tour KMZ file to your teacher as an assignment.

01.00.02 Meet the players links (FrenchI)

 

You will need to recognize these characters, Meet the Players, for your tests.

Use the Google Earth links to help you create your tour.

 

01.00.03 Class policies quiz/survey (English9)

computer-scored 11 points possible 15 minutes

Read the information on the Start Here page and the Required Resources page first.
Then, go to your main class page and into Topic 3 to take this quiz. You may take this quiz multiple times, but you must score 100%. I want to make sure you understand how the class works!

If you haven't already, also click the link for the About Me assignment, and introduce yourself to me!

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.01 Agility, Balance, Coordination (PESkills)

Use the following website to look up and get familiar with these terms, one at a time:

  1. agility
  2. balance (ability)
  3. coordination

01.01 WHO AM I? (Health II)

Standard 6, Objective 2
: Describe the interrelationship of physical, mental, social, and emotional health.

Who Am I? Assignment Lesson Material & Introduction to Course

Thomas Moore, an Irish singer, songwriter, poet and entertainer, wrote:

The great malady of the 20th century, implicated in all of our trouble and affecting us individually and socially, is ‘loss of soul.’ When soul is neglected, it doesn’t just go away; it appears symptomatically in obsessions, addictions, violence, and loss of meaning. We have come to know the soul only in its complaint--when it stirs, disturbed by neglect and abuse, and causes us to feel its pain. All of these symptoms such as emptiness, meaninglessness, vague depression, disillusionment, a yearning for personal fulfillment, a loss of morals and values, and hunger for spirituality reflect a loss of soul. We yearn excessively for entertainment, power, intimacy, sexual fulfillment, and material things, and we think we can find these things if we discover the right relationship or job, the right church or therapy. But without soul, whatever we find will be unsatisfying, for what we truly long for is the soul in each of these areas.

Thomas Moore discusses what happens to us when we lose our 'souls.' He tells of the unhappiness that exists when we lose track of ourselves and the things that really matter. What he says we “long for” is the soul in each area of our lives.

The idea of soul has been defined and redefined over time, but some of the discussions involving soul say that it is synonymous with the essence of who we are, our heart, or our aliveness. In this class, hopefully you will come to a better realization of what things make you feel most alive and happy, and what areas you can improve upon to become a more balanced, healthy individual.

When talking about health, most people think of living a healthy lifestyle nutritionally and physically, but there is so much more to our health and happiness--to our souls--that needs our attention and care.

The areas that require our work in living a healthier, more soul-enriched life are described below.

There are SIX AREAS OF HEALTH that we will discuss throughout this course. They are MENTAL, EMOTIONAL, SOCIAL, SPIRITUAL, PHYSICAL and ENVIRONMENTAL. The table below lists a few of the things that these types of health include.

The term 'self-concept' gets used a lot, but what does it mean?

Basically, your self-concept is how (or what) you think of yourself. It isn't something you were born with, and it changes all the time. It's sort of like a house that gets remodeled multiple times. Maybe the walls were originally painted yellow, and then repainted to white, and then someone put on a layer of wall paper, and eventually the first layer of wallpaper was papered over with another pattern. The original stuff is still there, but mostly hidden under the newer layers. Your self-concept began to develop when you were very young. It's affected by all your experiences and, maybe even more, by how you think of those experiences.

For instance, not all children who are bitten by a dog will be afraid of dogs. One might be afraid of all dogs, another might like most dogs but be afraid of the particular kind of dog that bit him, and another child might still be fine about all dogs. If you hit a home run in your first Little League game, you might think, "Wow, I'm going to be a great baseball player!" or "Wow, that was lucky. I bet that will never happen again!" Your self-concept affects how you think about your experiences, and how you think about your experiences affects your self-concept. Do you think of yourself as shy, outgoing, brave, timid, athletic, good-looking, nice, aggressive, hard-working, smart, clumsy, kind? That's part of self-concept, and it isn't always apparent from the outside. Even your friends might not know what you think about yourself.

Your self-concept is also affected by things other people say to or about you, and by how other people treat you. Again, the way you think about what happens can be at least as important as what actually happened. Say you invite someone to study for a test with you, and that person says, "Sorry, I can't tonight." Perhaps you feel sad and think, "She must not like me" or "I guess there's no point in asking her to do anything again." Maybe you feel annoyed and think "I guess she thinks I'm not good enough for her" or "She's just stuck-up" or "See if I ever ask her to do anything again!" You may even feel a little disappointed and think, "Maybe she has a dentist appointment or something" or "We'll get together another time." Notice that your self-concept will affect the people around you, and your relationships with them! Teamwork, friendships, and all relationships will go better if both (or all) people involved have a healthy self-concept so that they aren't easily offended or hurt.

Read at least the required articles using the links below.

01.01 WHO AM I? (Health II)

01.01 Agility, Balance, Coordination (PESkills)

Put each term into the search box.

01.01 Fitness Testing (Participation Skills and Techniques)

One of the best motivations for staying active is measuring your progress in the activity. The more you play tennis, the better you become at it, and the "easier" it is. This is the same idea with any physical activity. It is good to get a baseline before you start setting fitness goals. To get your baseline, you will need to do a fitness test. Please read the link "Fitness Testing" below to learn more about fitness testing. Once you have read the article, continue to the assignment "Fitness Testing" and complete it.

01.01 Fitness Testing (Participation Skills and Techniques)

both teacher- and computer-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

This assignment should be completed by WEEK 1 of this class

01.01 Fitness Testing (PE Activity) You need to complete and submit the following assignment and I need an e-mail from a parent or guardian verifying that you completed this portion of the class.

The verification can be as follows: My son/daughter (name) has completed the Fitness Testing. Below is their results. (Include your results here) Please have your parent or guardian title the subject line of their email. Fitness Testing _your name.

Once the email has been sent you still NEED to SUBMIT this ASSIGNMENT.

Submit your work either by pasting it into the assignment submission window for this assignment, or click on the "Submit Assignment" and type in your work there. Please put all 'answers' in bold or UPPER CASE.

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Fitness Testing 01.01 1.

1. Student's Name:

2. Mile run time:

3. Push-ups: (from your feet, not on your knees). How many you can do continuously in ONE minute without stopping?:

4. Sit-ups: (hands behind your head, and sit up all the way up to your knees. Someone can hold your feet). How many you can do in a minute?:

5. Where was the test completed?

6. What was the date the test was completed (must be in the time-frame of being enrolled in this class)?

7. What is your class and quarter:

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.01 Fitness Testing (PE Skills)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 15 minutes

01.01 Fitness Testing (PEActivity)

You need to complete the following and I need an e-mail from a parent or guardian verifying that you completed this portion of the class. Please have your parent or guardian include in the email: your name, your class, the quarter, your time for the mile run, and the number of push-ups and sit-ups.

Have them e-mail me the results and where and when you completed the fitness testing. Be sure they include your EHS username and have the e-mail subject line be: Fitness Testing

The 3 things you will be tested on are as follows:

1. A mile run
2. Push-ups from your feet, not on your knees.
(how many you can do continuously, without stopping but no longer than a minute.)
3. Sit-ups hands behind your head and all the way up to your knees. Someone can hold your feet.
(how many you can do in a minute)

01.01 How papers are scored, rubrics and the writing process (English 9)

01.01 Introductory Information for this Course (Computer Technology)

COURSE TIPS

Please work through one unit at a time, going through the activities from top to bottom of the list. Send the materials according to the instructions given. Make sure your full name is on all of your work. NOTE: Whenever you see an abbreviation in parenthesis [i.e. (BQ)], this indicates an assignment, quiz or test. You will need to go to the Assignment section (Topic 3) to complete this assignment, quiz or test. Make a note of where you left off in the unit so you can come back to it easily.

Along with the objectives for each unit, I have included a grading sheet for each unit. This will be helpful to print out and record your scores along with the date. This will help keep you on track and moving forward in this class. At the bottom of each grading sheet, I have indicated the number of weeks you will want to spend on this module to complete the class within a semester.

The PowerPoint presentations and other documents can be opened on your computer. If you need to fill in information in a document, you will want to save it and then retrieve it from the appropriate program (i.e. Word). To do this you will right click on the document file link, and then click on Save Target As. Save the file to the appropriate folder; then open it in the software program (i.e. Word).

You can use your notes and assignments while taking quizzes and tests, so you will want to make sure you do them well. Most tests are timed.

Grades: I will leave feedback on assignment scores that you have earned less than the total points possible. Please take the time to view this feedback so you can learn from your mistakes and be more prepared for the tests.

If you are confused or need clarification, please don't hesitate to email me.

Introduction to Class Presentation (see attached Introduction to the Class.pps)

This presentation is a quick overview of some of the concepts that will be covered in this course. Click the left mouse button to move from slide to slide. Click the back button at the top, left of the screen to go back to continue working on the unit.

ONGOING ASSIGNMENTS

  • Creating Folders (see attached Creating Folders.pdf)
  • Instead of putting your assignments all together, you will organize the documents into folders for each of the units. Follow the steps to create the folders you will need. Let's get organized!

  • Keyboarding Technique (see attached Keyboarding Skills.pdf)
  • Throughout this course, you should be working on improving your keyboarding technique to improve speed and accuracy. In each of the units, you should be working on a different keyboarding technique. The technique you should work on will be listed at the beginning of the module. Please remember to apply the specific technique as you complete your assignments for that module. Once you finish a module, please don't forget that technique. Continue to work on it as you then start working on the new technique for the next module. Following this procedure, by the end of the course you should have great keyboarding skills that you can then use for the rest of your life!

    Please print the technique sheet and hang it by your computer to remind you of the techniques you should be working on each time you keyboard.

  • Grading Sheet (see attached Grade Tracking Form 1st.xls)
  • Attached is a spreadsheet that can be used to keep track of all of your scores for this course. It also lists the abbreviation for each assignment, quiz and test.

  • Email Instructor

If you are confused or need clarification, please don't hesitate to e-mail your instructor. The instructor's e-mail address is near the top of the main class page, in Topic 1.

01.01 Personal Lifestyle Costs (Financial Literacy)

Students will consider personal values that affect financial choices.

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS (Note: if you have not yet read the "Start Here" instructions on the main course web-page, please go back and read them now before continuing. Then return to this point and read the instructions below.) Read the “BACKGROUND” information. Visit any URL(s) you see at the bottom of the assignment and follow their instructions. Submit the assignment or quiz. For ASSIGNMENTS: Copy all information between the asterisks (including lesson title and information, and questions.); go to the assignment (either by using the Next button below this lesson or going to the front page of class and clicking on the assignment), then paste the questions into the answer box after clicking on "Edit my submission"; then answer the questions with bold or upper case answers and save them according to the instructions. Finally, MAKE SURE YOU HIT RETURN AT THE END OF EACH ANSWER. For QUIZZES: Go to Assignments, Quizzes, and Tests” to take the quiz. image from Wikimedia Commons, Go Team, public domainimage from Wikimedia Commons, Go Team, public domain BACKGROUND

You have 7 weeks to complete the assignments, quizzes and unit tests.  

Then the 8th week, after I have graded everything you submitted the 7th week,  you will need to submit the READY message.

Take the final the 9th week and I will submit your grade the 10th week.

How much money will you need to earn right after high school if you are living on your own? This assignment will help you estimate the hourly wage you will need.

VISIT URL #1 shown at the bottom and respond to the questions by assuming you live away from home and support yourself totally.

01.01 Personal Lifestyle Costs (Financial Literacy)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Submit your assignment according to the instructions.

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ASSIGNMENT 1.01 (12E) (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

1)What hourly wage did the web site predict you need? > ANSWER:

2)Name one lifestyle change you might make if you only earn minimum wage ($7.25/hr): > ANSWER:

3)Knowing that you are allowed to submit multiple assignments per day, what is your weekly goal for completed assignments? ANSWER:

4)Review the course rules and answer the following questions: a)What three things should be copied into every assignment? > ANSWER: b)All answers must be in bold (preferred) or UPPERCASE. Are your answers in this assignment in bold or UPPERCASE? (If not, see the instructions below after #5). > ANSWER:

5)Q: (1.01): Write your first and last name and today's date.> ANSWER:

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Make all your answers bold. If that is not possible (in the old system), UPPER CASE is fine.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.01 Vocabulary Activities (English 11)

Students will learn 30 new vocabulary words and be able to use them daily in their writing and speaking

 

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English: Victor Korniyenko, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia CommonsOxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English: Victor Korniyenko, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons

The vocabulary section of this quarter is divided into three sections, each with ten words. You will do a writing activity and a quiz for each of the word sets. You do not have to complete them all at once (like everything in this course, you can decide the pace and order in which you work).

Why Study Vocabulary? (from verbalworkout.com)

Words are the tools we use to think and communicate - and this in an age when thinking and communicating are more important than strength and dexterity. At a personal level, a versatile vocabulary helps a man to woo a woman. It helps us to heed the philosophers’ advice to lead a “considered life.” Materially, a large vocabulary helps an artist describe the right shade of blue. It helps a student understand the textbook, and helps a leader manipulate concepts to formulate and share a vision. In words of Sebastian Wren, imagine if your reading required understanding this passage of text: While hortenting efrades the populace of the vaderbee class, most experts concur that a scrivant rarely endeavors to decry the ambitions and shifferings of the moulant class. Deciding whether to oxant the blatantly maligned Secting party, most moulants will tolerate the subjugation of staits, savats, or tempets only so long as the scrivant pays tribute to the derivan, either through preem or exaltation.

In addition, your vocabulary makes an early impression. People judge you by the words you use and understand. It's no surprise that an extensive vocabulary is highly correlated with academic and professional success.

01.01 What is your body trying to tell you? (Fitness for Life)

Essential Question: What is your body trying to tell you?

View the unit 1 presentation (see the attached file above, or the links to the video version below). If you have trouble downloading the PPTX file, right-click the file and tell it to download to your local computer and open it that way. If you have chosen to purchase the optional textbook, also read chapters 1-4.
U.S Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Terry Spain, public domainU.S Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Terry Spain, public domain

To begin this class, you may be a little nervous about being able to complete the assignments or adequately complete the workouts. Health and Wellness standards require you to have enough fitness to

  • Reduce risk of health problems,
  • Achieve wellness benefits, and
  • Enjoy free time and meet emergencies.

Notice that it doesn’t say feeling tired, injured, or in pain; so, before we begin on this assignment, let’s discuss some important points about developing physical fitness, and “working out.”

  1. Getting fit and Self-Assessment are parts of the stairway to lifetime fitness. Remember, the name of this class is “Fit for Life," not “Get you buff this week.” For more information on Fitness for life, you should download and study the “Stairway to Lifetime Fitness.” (See the first link at the bottom of this lesson.)

    a. There are a lot of differences between genders, including how each will respond to different types of workouts. There are also a lot of differences between body types, and age groups. However, those are just differences, not definitive factors. Gender is not a factor that influences physical fitness. Both genders can become physically fit. Both genders can, and do benefit from participating in any or all of the components of health related physical fitness. Read "The Five Components of Health-Related Fitness" (see link at the bottom of this lesson).

  2. There are a variety of definitions of physical fitness. In fact, there are a variety of types of physical fitness. For a better look at these, study the different levels of the Physical Activity Pyramid. You can find this in a variety of places (Read the Physical Activity Pyramid, at the bottom of this lesson).

    a. Pay special attention to the second level regarding aerobic fitness. In this class, the workouts will be in that area, but we will avoid sports for some specific reasons.
    b. Although you may wish to work on skill-related fitness, which includes such things as agility, balance, coordination, and power (mostly specific to sport skills), in our workouts we will focus primarily on cardiovascular fitness.

  3. Now that we have a little background, let’s talk about some specific things you will want to consider when planning your workouts:

    a. When choosing your physical activity, you will want to consider the following.

    • What is your current fitness level? What CAN you do continuously and rhythmically for 30 minutes that will elevate your breathing and heart rate, but that you can adjust during the activity so that you remain relatively comfortable?
    • What are your interests? Walking? Jogging? Swimming? Biking? Dancing?

    b. Are you ready for the workout? Do you have the proper clothing? Equipment? Do you have any medical conditions that may preclude your participation in this activity (and, how do you know this?)?

    c. What if you just don’t want to work out today? Try the ten minute rule, which basically states, do it for 10 minutes and see if you don’t feel like finishing after that.

    d. Avoid activities that include joint twisting, compression, or excessive friction. You may experience occasional common injuries such as micro-trauma (minor sprains or sore muscles), overuse injuries (sore joints or tender areas), or side stitch, but anything that may threaten to cause major sprains, dislocation, or muscle tears should be avoided, at least for the workout.

    e. How hard should you work? Well, principles of physical activity include overload (doing more than normal), Progress (pushing enough to do a little bit more) and specificity (you will improve the skills or systems that you work). Part of working out is to focus, and document your workout so that you can find that fine line between pushing hard enough to improve, but not so hard that your body cannot adequately recover and rebuild.

    f. What do you do if you do incur common injuries such as sore muscles, minor sprains, or tenderness or inflammation of overworked areas? Athletic trainers and other medical personnel rely on what is known as the “RICE” formula:

    R = rest. Give it a little time to heal.

    I = Ice. Ice massage the area (never more than 15 minutes at a time.) The ice will not only reduce the inflammation, but will initiate healing (applying cold to injuries is also known as cryotherapy.)

    C = Compression. Use an elastic bandage or compression sock to prevent the area from swelling. Take care that you do not cut off circulation.

    E = Elevation. Keep the injured part above the heart as much as possible, again to reduce blood flow and keep from swelling.

Aerobic and Anaerobic Exercise:

View the short video regarding aerobic exercise (see link at the bottom of this lesson).

Aerobic (with air) activities are characterized by rhythmic, and continuous activity that can be maintained over long periods of time. Metabolism (breathing, heart rate, muscle activity) can increase to match overload demands, and allow the activity to continue indefinitely. Aerobic activity can be comfortably maintained for longer than 3 minutes. For the purposes of this class, aerobic activity should be such that it is maintained for a minimum of 30 minutes. Track or swimming contests lasting more than 1 minute would usually be considered, at least in part, as aerobic.

Anaerobic (without air) activities are characterized by short, intense bursts of activity that can seldom be maintained for longer than 1 minute at a time without rest. Most sports, such as basketball, football, tennis, skiing, and volleyball, are anaerobic. Track or swimming events lasting less than 1 minute would usually be considered anaerobic.

The chart below is for your information. The data reflect varying degrees of ability to cover distances (1.5) over lengths of time (12 minutes), and give you some indication of how that reflects your level of physical conditioning. These may help you set some goals for this class.

Interpreting Results of the 1.5 Mile or 12-Minute Run

1.5-Mile Run (min:sec) 12-Minute Run (miles)
Age Women
(min:sec)
Men
(min:sec)
Women
(miles)
Men(miles)
Good
15-30 under 12:00 under 10:00 over 1.5 over 1.7
35-50 under 13:30 under 11:30 over 1.4 over 1.5
55-70 under 16:00 under 14:00 over 1.2 over 1.3
Adequate for most activities
15-30 under 13:30 under 11:30 over 1.4 over 1.5
35-50 under 15:00 under 13:00 over 1.3 over 1.4
55-70 under 17:30 under 15:30 over 1.1 over 1.3
Borderline
15-30 under 15:00 under 13:00 over 1.3 over 1.4
35-50 under 16:30 under 14:30 over 1.2 over 1.3
55-70 under 19:00 under 17:00 over 1.0 over 1.2
Need extra work on cardiovascular fitness
15-30 over 17:00 over 15:00 under 1.2 under 1.3
35-50 over 18:30 over 16:30 under 1.1 under 1.2
55-70 over 21:00 over 19:00 under 0.9 under 1.0

Use these links to view the unit 1 presentation in the video version online. It is split into several parts so that it will download quickly. When the link opens, click the middle of the viewing box, then the play icon in the lower left of the viewing box to start the video.

01.01 WHO AM I? assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 37 points possible 60 minutes

Mental, emotional, social, spiritual, physical and environmental health are all intertwined throughout this course to encompass both the state core curriculum requirements, as well as to help you better understand who you are and what your purpose is. These six types of health also combine to make up the essence or soul of who we are. We each need improvement in different areas of our lives...and our health begins with improving the “soul” or essence in each of them, as Thomas Moore has stated. To begin this healthy process, take a look at the different types of health mentioned in the chart above and determine what things make up who you are. Consider what areas your passionate about and what areas you could improve upon. Then, complete the essay in the WHO AM I ASSIGNMENT to tell me, and maybe even you, a little bit more about yourself.

Compare and contrast your strengths and weaknesses in an essay about yourself (at least eight paragraphs in length, including an introduction, six paragraphs detailing the six types of health as they relate to you, and a conclusion) dealing with the following points: Essay Topic: Based on the "Who Am I" lesson material, and considering EACH of the six different types of health, what interests, feelings and habits make up the complete you and make your soul most alive and fulfilled? AND what areas could be improved upon in your life? Compare and contrast the things that both awaken and weaken your “soul,” as discussed in the lesson material according to the six different types of health. (4 points possible for a solid opening and closing paragraph, and 4 points per paragraph about each of the six types of health as they relate to you, plus up to 5 points for conventions. Points will be given based on thought, depth, and quality of response, as well as grammar and spelling checks.).

Organizing your essay (Note: feel free to change the order of the different categories of health)

Content by paragraph Structure
1. Begin with some general statements to introduce yourself and your general health. How do your personal values affect your health practices? Introduction: write at least three complete sentences.
2. Write about the status of your physical health. What are your strengths and weaknesses? Give a specific example from your experiences. Topic sentence, then three+ sentences with supporting details and examples
3. Write about the status of your mental health. What are your strengths and weaknesses? Give a specific example from your experiences. Topic sentence, then three+ sentences with supporting details and examples
4. Write about the status of your emotional health. What are your strengths and weaknesses? Give a specific example from your experiences. Topic sentence, then three+ sentences with supporting details and examples
5. Write about the status of your spiritual health. What are your strengths and weaknesses? Give a specific example from your experiences. Topic sentence, then three+ sentences with supporting details and examples
6. Write about the status of your social health. What are your strengths and weaknesses? How does your self-concept affect the way you interact with others? Give a specific example from your experiences. Topic sentence, then three+ sentences with supporting details and examples
7. Write about the status of your environmental health. What are your strengths and weaknesses? Give a specific example from your experiences. Topic sentence, then three+ sentences with supporting details and examples
8. Sum up the main ideas, and/or look toward the future and how you might improve your health, or challenges you may face as you grow to adulthood. Conclusion: write at least four complete sentences

GO TO TOPIC 3, ASSIGNMENTS, TESTS AND QUIZZES, AND CLICK ON THE "WHO AM I?" ASSIGNMENT to submit your work.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.01.01 Cardiovascular Health Risk Profile assignment (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 90 minutes

(*Please keep a record of this assignment. You will need to refer back to it for the last assignment in second quarter.)

Introduction: The purpose of this assignment is to introduce you to some of the relationships that exist between physical fitness and health. You will also examine your personal health risks, physical activity, and cardiovascular fitness. Let’s find out just how “fit” you are so that you can begin applying the principles from lesson 01.1 by designing your own plans to become “fit for life”. Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

IMPORTANT: To turn in your assignment, click on the assignment name and then, depending on the assignment type, you use a button labeled [Submit Assignment] or [UPLOAD A FILE] or [EDIT MY SUBMISSION].

You'll see descriptions of your assignments along with the content. Create and then work on your assignments on your local computer.

You turn in your assignments in the Module 3 area.

Please do not email assignments, as this delays the grading process, since emails do not become submitted into the instructor's grade book. 

*************************************************************************** Name:_______________________________ Date:_________________________

Tasks: For this assignment, you will:

Calculate your body mass index (BMI). (5pts.)

Perform the following calculations to calculate your BMI. SHOW YOUR WORK! DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS. STEP 1: _____ convert your weight in pounds to your weight in kilograms. (Divide your weight in pounds by 2.2.; e.g., a 130 pound woman / 2.2 = 59.09 kg) STEP 2: _____ convert your height in inches to your height in centimeters (Multiply your height in inches by 2.54; e.g., a 64 inch woman x 2.54 = 162.56 cm) STEP 3: _____ convert your height in centimeters to your height in meters (Divide your height in centimeters by 100 to get your height in meters; e.g., 162.56 / 100 = 1.6256 STEP 4:_____ square your height in meters to get the denominator for BMI calculation (Multiply the number by itself; e.g., 1.6256 x 1.6256 = 2.64) STEP 5:______ use your weight in kilograms as your numerator (e.g., STEP 1 or 59.09 kg) and your height in meters squared as your denominator (e.g., STEP 4 or 2.64) and divide out the fraction (e.g., 59.09 / 2.64 = 22.38) Enter your BMI in the table below.

Complete a supervised 1.5 mile run. (5pts.)

Parent or Teacher’s name who will be administering the 1.5 mile run: __________________ Parent or Teacher’s email who will be giving you the 1.5 mile run test: __________________ You will run 1.5 miles under the supervision of a physical education teacher, coach, or parent. It is important to make sure that you provide a valid e-mail address so that I can confirm you completed the run. This person should help you measure out the correct distance ( 1.5 miles is 6 times around a regular track) and time you during the run. Important Note: If you have a physical condition that may prevent you from completing this run, or a condition such that a run of this nature may cause injury, be sure to contact your instructor before attempting this part of the assignment so that adequate modifications can be made. You will complete the run for this assignment at the beginning of the class and again at the end of the class for assignment #21. This will count as two separate assignments. You may use a treadmill, but make sure that your run is conducted the same way for assignment #21. The purpose of this run is to assess your cardiovascular health. Run or jog for 1.5 miles in the shortest time possible. Try to set a pace that you can keep up for the full mile and a half. If you start too fast, you probably will not be able to run for the entire distance. Make sure to do your best and run what you can. If you walk, make sure to speed walk to keep your heart rate up. Enter your 1.5 mile time in the table below.

Measure your blood pressure. (5 pts.)

Have your blood pressure measured by a doctor or you may use an automated blood pressure machine located in most stores that have a pharmacy. Look for the machine next to the pharmacy counter, these machines are free and easy to use. Enter your blood pressure in the table below.

Cardiovascular Health Risk Profile

*Be Honest--You need to give your best effort as this course not only earns you a PE credit, but challenges your cardiovascular fitness levels. * Record your answers in the middle column. In the right columns are what are considered “Critical Values.” These are not “Optimal,” meaning good, but rather are borderline values, meaning that numbers higher than these signal critical health concerns.

Risk Factors My Values Critical Values
Systolic Blood Pressure   under 140 mmHg
Diastolic Blood Pressure   under 90 mmHg
BMI (Body Mass Index)   under 25 kg.m-2
1.5 mile time   Men under 10 minutes Women under 14 minutes

 

1. Share your data with at least two other people (parents, peers, etc.) in a group setting. If you so desire, you may wish to use Facebook or some other form of social media as base for your discussion. (If you do, remember you are trading some aspects of privacy for a broader, quicker, audience.) As a group, discuss the strengths and weaknesses of your cardiovascular health risk profile (blood pressure, BMI, run time) and what they indicate about your cardiovascular fitness. Ask specifically, “What does this data indicate that your body is trying to tell you?” Describe the primary conclusions of the group. (5 pts.)

 

2. Brainstorm with your group some realistic and specific ideas about how you can improve your cardiovascular fitness levels, given your own unique situation. (5 pts.)

 

3. Choose one of these ideas, and explain why you believe this would work best for you, as opposed to something else. Include ideas from your group in your answer. (5 pts.)

 

4. Using the definitions of aerobic and anaerobic, and the information from both the video clip and the power point presentation with this chapter, list three activities that you believe are aerobic activities, and justify why they fit the aerobic criteria. Then list three activities you believe are anaerobic activities, and justify why they fit the anaerobic criteria.

A. Aerobic (5 pts.)

1.

2.

3.

Justification (5 pts.)

1.

2.

3.

B. Anaerobic (5 pts.)

1.

2.

3.

Justification (5 pts.)

1.

2.

3.

*****************************************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.01.01 Exercise You Can Do At Home(PESkills)

Click on the blue link below and then read the article. Pay attention to the 'critical cues' for each exercise (see explanation below).
Practice the exercises
given in the article, as they will help you practice your agility, balance, and coordination. Get familiar with these exercises as you will be asked to do them in the assignment section. See 01.2.1 STANDARD 1 ASSIGNMENT - you will want to get started right away on the three-week exercise part of the assignment.

What are critical cues for movement skills?
The critical cues are the specific directions you need to make sure you follow to do a movement correctly - the criteria by which your teacher or coach might evaluate whether you are doing it right. Examples of a few critical cues in different activities:

  • In archery: As you prepare to release an arrow, the fingers of your left hand should be relaxed and open, not clenched tightly around the bow.
  • In horseback riding: Your heels should be down, stirrups on the ball of your foot, toes pointing ahead or slightly out, knees bent.
  • For push-ups: Your back should be straight, your toes, the balls of your feet and the palms of your hands on the floor, with your hands about the same width apart as your shoulders
  • To begin demi-plie in first position in ballet: Stand straight and in alignment, heels together and legs turned out to a 180 degree angle

Of course, these are just brief examples - there are lots more considerations for each of these movements - but you get the point.

01.01.01 Writing an Equation, example 1 -- Planning a Birthday Party (Math I)

Ashley's birthday is in July. She wants to spend the day with her family and friends at the local water park. They have a group rate of $100 for the first five people, and $17 for each additional person.




Ashley has four people in her immediate family, and she wants to invite her three BFF's. What will it cost for Ashley's birthday group to get into the park?

Okay, how do we solve this problem? Well, we know that there are seven people total. We also know that the first five cost $100, total. That leaves two people we still need to pay for. They cost $17 each. Therefore, the two additional people will cost $34. The total price is $134.

Of course, in real life, it is possible that all the problems will not have been solved. What if Ashley's brother gets sick? Or if Ashley's favorite cousin is visiting? Will Ashley's aunt, uncle and all four cousins want to come also? Or maybe Ashley's aunt will take a day off and send the kids with dad, but stay home herself. And what if Ashley's brother wants to bring a friend? Or what if one of Ashley's BFFs is stuck babysitting her little sister, and either has to stay home or bring the sister along?

These are the real problems that occur in my family. How about yours?

How awesome would it be if we didn't have to go through the logic of the problem every time we added or subtracted a person or six from the group? This is one of the reasons people first started writing equations: So they didn't need to solve the same problem over and over. So they could just solve it once, then plug in different numbers to get the rest of the answers.

Consider Ashley's birthday party. Say after counting siblings and friends and adult relatives and cousins Ashley has a caravan of 12 people going to her party. We will work through the solution again, but this time paying careful attention to what happens to the number 12.

To begin with, the first five people cost $100, so we need to subtract 5 people from the total of 12, but we also need to add $100 at the end. Okay. Now, after subtracting 5 from 12, we have 7 people we still need to pay for. Each of these 7 people cost $17, so we need to multiply 7 by $17, which gives us $119. Finally, we add that original $100 to this. The total cost is $219. Okay?

Next we want to write this as an equation. The first thing we did was pay $100 for 5 people

upfront cost for 5 people = $100 (eq. 2)



Next we subtracted 5 from 12 to get the number of people we still needed to pay for. Write that down,

additional people = (12 – 5) people. (eq. 3)



The next thing we did was multiply that answer by $17 to get the total cost for the additional people. So write that,

cost of additional people = ($17 per person)[(12 – 5) people]. (eq. 4)



Finally, we added the original $100 to that value to get the total cost, and I am just going to call that c, for "cost." Now finally we have

c = ($17 per person)[(12 – 5) people] + $100. (eq. 5)



Now, to really write this out as an equation that I don't have to redo every time someone gets sick or has to babysit, we will replace the number 12 with a letter: how about p for “people"?

c = ($17 per person)(p – 5 people) + $100. (eq. 6)



Okay? Now, the advantage of this is, when Ashley's mom decides that her brother cannot bring a friend, Ashley doesn't have to work through the process again; she can just replace the p with 11.

The cost of bringing 11 people to the water park is

c = ($17 per person)[(11 – 5) people] + $100 (eq. 7)
= ($17 per person)(6 people) + $100 (eq. 7a)
= $102 + $100 (eq. 7b)
= $202 (eq. 7c)



Your turn. How much will it cost to bring 9 people to the water park? The answer will be at the end of the next section.

You may have noticed that this equation could have been simplified. Start by multiplying the first term through by the factor ($17 per person),

c = ($17 per person)(p – 5 people) + $100 (eq. 6)
= ($17 per person)(p) + ($17 per person)(-5 people) + $100 (eq. 6a)
= ($17 per person)(p) + (-$85) + $100. (eq. 6b)



Next, combine like terms. This phrase means to add together anything that can be added together. In this problem, the last two terms can be added together,

c = ($17 per person)(p) + (-$85) + $100 (eq. 6b)
= ($17 per person)(p) - $85 + $100 (eq. 6c)
= ($17 per person)(p) + $15. (eq. 6d)



This is a simpler equation, but the relationship between the equation and the problem is less obvious.



Ashley's birthday is in July. She wants to spend the day with her family and friends at the local water park. They have a group rate of $100 for the first five people, and $17 for each additional person.




Ashley has four people in her immediate family, and she wants to invite her three BFF's. What will it cost for Ashley's birthday group to get into the park?

Okay, how do we solve this problem? Well, we know that there are seven people total. We also know that the first five cost $100, total. That leaves two people we still need to pay for. They cost $17 each. Therefore, the two additional people will cost $34. The total price is $134.

Of course, in real life, it is possible that all the problems will not have been solved. What if Ashley's brother gets sick? Or if Ashley's favorite cousin is visiting? Will Ashley's aunt, uncle and all four cousins want to come also? Or maybe Ashley's aunt will take a day off and send the kids with dad, but stay home herself. And what if Ashley's brother wants to bring a friend? Or what if one of Ashley's BFFs is stuck babysitting her little sister, and either has to stay home or bring the sister along?

These are the real problems that occur in my family. How about yours?

How awesome would it be if we didn't have to go through the logic of the problem every time we added or subtracted a person or six from the group? This is one of the reasons people first started writing equations: So they didn't need to solve the same problem over and over. So they could just solve it once, then plug in different numbers to get the rest of the answers.

Consider Ashley's birthday party. Say after counting siblings and friends and adult relatives and cousins Ashley has a caravan of 12 people going to her party. We will work through the solution again, but this time paying careful attention to what happens to the number 12.

To begin with, the first five people cost $100, so we need to subtract 5 people from the total of 12, but we also need to add $100 at the end. Okay. Now, after subtracting 5 from 12, we have 7 people we still need to pay for. Each of these 7 people cost $17, so we need to multiply 7 by $17, which gives us $119. Finally, we add that original $100 to this. The total cost is $219. Okay?

Next we want to write this as an equation. The first thing we did was pay $100 for 5 people

upfront cost for 5 people = $100 (eq. 2)



Next we subtracted 5 from 12 to get the number of people we still needed to pay for. Write that down,

additional people = (12 – 5) people. (eq. 3)



The next thing we did was multiply that answer by $17 to get the total cost for the additional people. So write that,

cost of additional people = ($17 per person)[(12 – 5) people]. (eq. 4)



Finally, we added the original $100 to that value to get the total cost, and I am just going to call that c, for "cost." Now finally we have

c = ($17 per person)[(12 – 5) people] + $100. (eq. 5)



Now, to really write this out as an equation that I don't have to redo every time someone gets sick or has to babysit, we will replace the number 12 with a letter: how about p for “people"?

c = ($17 per person)(p – 5 people) + $100. (eq. 6)



Okay? Now, the advantage of this is, when Ashley's mom decides that her brother cannot bring a friend, Ashley doesn't have to work through the process again; she can just replace the p with 11.

The cost of bringing 11 people to the water park is

c = ($17 per person)[(11 – 5) people] + $100 (eq. 7)
= ($17 per person)(6 people) + $100 (eq. 7a)
= $102 + $100 (eq. 7b)
= $202 (eq. 7c)



Your turn. How much will it cost to bring 9 people to the water park? The answer will be at the end of the next section.

You may have noticed that this equation could have been simplified. Start by multiplying the first term through by the factor ($17 per person),

c = ($17 per person)(p – 5 people) + $100 (eq. 6)
= ($17 per person)(p) + ($17 per person)(-5 people) + $100 (eq. 6a)
= ($17 per person)(p) + (-$85) + $100. (eq. 6b)



Next, combine like terms. This phrase means to add together anything that can be added together. In this problem, the last two terms can be added together,

c = ($17 per person)(p) + (-$85) + $100 (eq. 6b)
= ($17 per person)(p) - $85 + $100 (eq. 6c)
= ($17 per person)(p) + $15. (eq. 6d)



This is a simpler equation, but the relationship between the equation and the problem is less obvious.



01.01.02 Intro to Fitness

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work by pasting it in to the assignment submission window for this assignment.

***************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

Intro To Fitness Assignment

  1. What do you like most about PE?
  2. What do you like least about PE?
  3. Do you feel that physical fitness is important? Why or why not?
  4. What do you think it takes to become physically fit?
  5. Do you think your diet is adequate? Explain.
  6. Have you had positive or negative experiences in PE so far in your lifetime? Explain.
  7. Why do you think you are required to take PE?
  8. My Fitness Goals:

    Mile run:

    Sit-ups:

    Push-ups:

  9. Nutrition Goals:

    What are you going to eat more of?

    What are you going to eat less of?

  10. Class Goals:

    What do you hope to improve on?

    What activity would you like to become better at?

    What is something new you are excited to try?

***************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

01.01.02 Activity log 1 and parent contact form (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 65 points possible 100 minutes

Tech. Sgt. Michael R. Holzworth, U.S. Air Force (www.defense.gov), Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsTech. Sgt. Michael R. Holzworth, U.S. Air Force (www.defense.gov), Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Submit your first activity log and the Parent Contact form (found in lesson 01.00, above). To submit your work, scan or take a photo of your log and the form. Save as a .jpg, .pdf or .gif and click the activity log assignment 01.01.02 on the main class page to SUBMIT both the Parent Contact form and your first activity log files.

IMPORTANT: Please do not e-mail logs, as this delays the grading process since e-mails do not link into the instructor's grade book. As a last resort (if you can't attach a copy), you may mail copies to your teacher's physical address.

Note: Students who have not submitted their 1st Activity Log by week 3 will automatically be dropped from the course.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.01.03 Hopscotch (PESkills)

How long has it been since you played hopscotch? Hopscotch is a great game that requires balance, coordination, and agility. Use the following links to check out the rules and equipment you need to play hopscotch.

GIVE HOPSCOTCH ANOTHER TRY. YOU ARE NEVER TOO OLD. Your friends will think it is fun to do something different, and if you have little brothers, sisters, nieces, nephews, etc., you can teach them how to play.

(Select the link "Hopscotch")
(Select the link "How to Play Hopscotch")

01.01.04 Unit 1 Quiz(PESkills)

computer-scored 6 points possible 5 minutes

Go to section 3 "Assignments, Quizzes, Tests" on the homepage of the class. Then click on "pe.skills.Q1.standard1quiz " to take the quiz: (Note: you may retake the quiz as many times as you like, but you must score at least 80%.)

01.02 Applying your skills: get active! (PESkills)

In the following assignments, you will apply what you have been learning as you practice physical skills.

01.02 Career Awareness (Basic Photography)

One of the best ways to find out about a career is to research and on a website called Utah Futures. Utah Futures is a free online career information system. you can sign-up for an account or just research about different careers using the occupation index link on Utah Futures.

01.02 Conditions related to exercise (Fitness for Life)

Essential question: What is your body trying to tell you?

As we begin to become conscious of our physical fitness level, we become aware of several different factors that may affect our ability to exercise, may be results from our exercising or lack of exercising, or may suggest that we specifically adjust our exercise to meet those possible problems. Let’s discuss some of these.

A. A common problem as we age, especially among women but also in men, is osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis is the thinning of bone tissue and loss of bone density over time. Osteo is a term that always refers to bones, and “porosis” refers to the thinning or “porous” condition of the bone. (Note: Osteoporosis is sometimes confused with the similar term osteoarthritis, a condition relating to inflammation of the joints.) Regular exercise can largely prevent or delay the development of osteoporosis, and can reduce the likelihood of bone fractures in people with osteoporosis. Read the "Exercise for Osteoporosis" article at the link at the bottom of this lesson.

B. Some other problems relating to bones are conditions such as lordosis (excessive curvature in the lower back), kyphosis (excessive curvature in the upper back) and scoliosis (lateral curvature of the back, often caused by one leg being slightly longer than the other).

Any of these may be caused by poor posture, or they may develop independently, resulting in postural problems. Since exercise is done most efficiently using good posture, exercise will help prevent these conditions, will help correct these conditions, and often will help identify these conditions in the early stages when more aggressive medical remedies can be more effective. Read the "Scoliosis" article at the link at the bottom of this lesson.

C. A common problem that is affected by exercise is diabetes.

Diabetes is a condition in which a person’s body cannot regulate sugar levels (due to the inability of the pancreas to produce sufficient levels of insulin.) Since obesity is a common risk factor in diabetes, exercise can help prevent this disease. Once a person suffers from diabetes, regular aerobic exercise can significantly help regulate blood sugar levels, allowing the individual to require less external insulin supplement.
There are two types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is much less common. Type 1 diabetes always starts in children or young people; their bodies do not produce insulin. Type 2 diabetes is much more common, and may begin at any age. In people with type 2 diabetes, their bodies do produce insulin, but do not use it properly, so their blood sugar gets much too high. Risk factors for diabetes include genetics (if you have ancestors or family members with diabetes, you are more likely to develop it), being overweight or inactive, or eating a poor diet.
Read the "Exercise Guidelines for Diabetics" article at the link at the bottom of this lesson.

D. Hyperkinetic disorders may occur BECAUSE of exercise.

Hyperkinetic literally means “too much exercise”. (Note: Hyperkinetic is a term also often used in conjunction with such conditions as ADHD. For our purposes here, we apply the term only to those conditions that occur due to too much exercise.) As you exercise, you need to be aware of these signs, and then moderate your exercise accordingly. These may be as benign as simply not allowing your body enough time to recover, resulting in being over-tired. The cure is to simply back off, allow a day in between workouts, adjust your diet, or decrease intensity. On the other hand, other hyperkinetic disorders may include overuse injuries, body image disorders, or eating disorders. Although these are not technically mental disorders, the conscientious athlete will monitor these closely, and will adjust their workouts and diets to fit within healthy guidelines. Read the "Overuse Injuries" article at the link at the bottom of this lesson.

E. The lifestyle problems we will focus on mostly in this class will be cardiovascular disease.

This develops over a lifetime, and then results in such things as atherosclerosis, heart attack, high blood pressure, or stroke. Regular aerobic exercise with a reduced fat diet will help prevent and reduce these cardiovascular diseases later in life. Watch the "Aerobic fitness and intensity" video at the link below this lesson.

External and xray views of a woman with scoliosis: © 2008 Weiss and Goodall; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)External and xray views of a woman with scoliosis: © 2008 Weiss and Goodall; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)

01.02 Decision-making (Health II)

FORGOTTEN ASPECTS OF DECISION MAKING

Prior to identifying the steps to decision making, it is important to recognize some 'forgotten' aspects of decision making. Oftentimes, gathering important information and weighing the potential consequences of a decision have less influence on our choices than the following list of 'forgotten' aspects:

Values and Attitudes

If an individual values his/her parents' respect, many decisions are already made for that person. For example, friends have invited you to a party that will have alcohol present. If you value your parents' respect, you do not need to gather more information. You know that deciding to go to the party will disappoint your parents, thus, the decision is made. Additionally, if individuals value fun and adventure at all costs, he/she may not gather important facts, or properly weigh the consequences of their actions before 'jumping in' to a situation that may or may not be right for them.

Feelings and Emotions

Often, we make decisions based on how we feel, or how we want to feel. I may know the decision I am about to make could have very negative consequences; However, I really like the person asking me to go along. Although the facts may tell me this is a bad decision, I may allow the feelings of "I really want this person to like me" to control my decision.

Other People's Feelings

We make many decisions based on what others want or need. For example, when deciding where to go for lunch, if a friend really wants to go to Wendy's, and you don't really care, you will eat at Wendy's. However, there are times we make decisions that are not in our best interest because another person pleads with us to do what they want.

Self-Concept

If I believe I am a person of value, with a right to a happy, healthy future, I am going to make decisions that decrease the likelihood of negative consequences. If I do not care about myself, I may take unnecessary risks or not even consider consequences when making a decision. If I have an inflated self-concept, I may take risks simply because I believe I am invincible, and cannot be hurt.

Habits

Many of the decisions we make are actually not even made. Some of our behaviors are dictated by habit. It is always interesting to observe teachers at a faculty meeting. Everyone walks into the room and takes a donut. As we are eating the donut, it occurs to many of us that we did not even want one. Why did we take it? It was there, free food, habit. Many of our food-related behaviors are based on habit, as are many of our safety-related behaviors, for example, wearing seat belts when driving, or helmets when biking or snowboarding.

Pressures

We experience many pressures to behave in certain ways. I hope that my track team members feel pressure from their teammates to be the best possible students and athletes they can be. Much of the pressure we experience comes from our own expectations of ourselves. As with all the "forgotten aspects" of decision making, pressure is not necessarily bad. However, its source and purpose should be taken into consideration when making a decision.

RISKS IN DECISION MAKING

Risks come in four catagories: risks we MUST ACCEPT; risks we CAN ACCEPT; risks we CAN NOT ACCEPT and risks we CAN NOT AFFORD TO NOT ACCEPT.

1) The risks we MUST ACCEPT are the aspects of everyday life that we may encounter in all that we do. For example, if I drive a car, I must accept the risk of getting into an accident.
2) The risks we CAN ACCEPT are outcomes that are acceptable to us, although we hope things do not turn out that way. For example, I can accept that I may get injured when working hard to prepare myself while training for a race.
3) The risks I CAN NOT ACCEPT include consequences that I will not allow to happen. For example, a person who cannot accept hurting another while driving under the influence of alcohol will not drink and drive.
4) Risks we CAN NOT AFFORD TO NOT ACCEPT fall under the catagory of 'it is easier to ask forgiveness than permission.' For example, you know missing school for a free day of skiing will get in you in trouble. However, free skiing is too good to say no to, so you accept the potential consequences of skiing on a school day.

DECISION MAKING STEPS

1. Take care of yourself first.

If you have ever flown on a commercial airline, you have been instructed to do this very thing. "If the cabin should lose pressure, a mask will drop from above. If you are traveling with small children or someone who needs assistance, put your mask on first." Taking care of yourself first puts you in a position to help others. Additionally, by taking care of yourself first, you are
determining if you are willing to live, or die, with the decision you make.

2. Get the Facts

Gather the information you need to make the best possible decision. You do not need to assemble all the facts. However, you do need to consider what you need to know to make a decision. For example, I'm trying to decide if I should go to a party with my friends this Friday night. As I gather information, I find that there will be illegal substances at the party. This is all I need to know to make the decision. I am not willing to pay the consequences that may come with being at a party where illegal substances are present.

3. Anticipate

What might be the positive consequences of your decision? What might be the negative consequences of your decision? The more consequences you anticipate, the more likely you will be prepared for the outcome of the decision you make.

4. Use Judgement

Use your best judgement based on the information you have and the consequences you anticipated. Remember, good judgement usually comes from experience, while experience often comes from bad judgement. You will not always use the best judgement, but if you learn from your mistakes, you will get better and better at making good decisions.

5. Have a Gut Check

You have made a decision based on facts and potential consequences. Now consider, "Does it feel right?" That feeling in the pit of your stomach or back of your head should be listened to. If a decision doesn't feel right, it probably is not.

6. Do It or Walk Away

What is your plan of action? If your decision is to do it, what next? If your decision is to walk away, how do you say no?

7. Evaluate

Did you make the right decision? Is it working? Do you need to re-think your decision?

01.02 Decision-making assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 21 points possible 40 minutes

Come up with a decision you need to make in the near future, or one that you have recently made: for example, buying a car, going to a dance, getting a part time job, or taking a class via the electronic high school. It should be a choice you need to make and should be personal to you. Once you have determined the problem you need to make a decision about, brainstorm at least five alternatives/options, and then list two positive and negative consequences for each one. As you get to alternatives four or five, they may get a little silly. That is okay. Sometimes the best way to know what we want is to know for certain what we don't want. In making your decision, complete the chart below. Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. *************************************************************************************** DECISION MAKING CHART 1. Identify The Problem (What is the decision that needs to be made?): 2. Gather Information (What do you need to know to make the decision?): 3. Brainstorm Alternatives: (These are the different options to your decision; for example, if you're deciding whether to buy a car or not, you're alternatives might be 1) save up for a few months so that I can make payments on a new car, 2) drive my parent's car until I can afford my own, 3) carpool with friends, 4) ride my bike, OR 5) stay at home and never go anywhere). You need to come up with at least five different options, even if they seem ridiculous to you. Continue filling out the chart below with the different options you have come up with, and weigh the positive and negative consequences of each (at least two positives and negatives for each alternative).

Alternative 1: Positive Consequences 1. 2. Negative Consequences 1. 2. Alternative 2: Positive Consequences 1. 2. Negative Consequences 1. 2. Alternative 3: Positive Consequences 1. 2. Negative Consequences 1. 2. Alternative 4: Positive Consequences 1. 2. Negative Consequences 1. 2. Alternative 5: Positive Consequences 1. 2. Negative Consequences 1. 2.

4. Forgotten Aspects (State what else may be influencing your decision.): 5. Your Choice (Tell me the decision you've made after weighing your different options. Your answer here should be listed as one of your five possible solutions on #3.): 6. Action Plan (Tell me how you intend to put your decision into action.): 7. Evaluate (How do you feel about the decision you've made?): *********************************************************************************************** What to do: Complete questions 1-7 following the instructions provided.

Points Possible: 21
Question 1 1
Question 2 1
Question 3: 1 point per alternative (need five alternatives listed for 5 pts.) 1/2 point per pro and con listed (2 pts./each alternative for 10 pts.) 15
Question 4 1
Question 5 1
Question 6 1
Question 7 1
Total Points Possible: 21

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.02 Intro to Fitness (Participation Skills and Techniques)

Some students love P.E., and some students don't. What is really important is to use your P.E. class to find activities that you enjoy doing. If you can find activities you enjoy doing, it is more likely that you will keep doing those activities, and that will help you stay physically fit throughout your life. Watch the video to help you answer the questions in the assignment, you can pause it while you answer some of the questions. It is also important to set goals when you are working to improve your physical fitness, but goal setting can also be destructive. It is important to understand what goals are realistic for you, and what is a healthy way to achieve your goals. Watch the video S.M.A.R.T. goals to complete the assignment. Make sure you are using a computer that allows you to access YouTube.

Stress Relief Any physical exercise helps reduce the hormones associated with stress in your body. Any enjoyable activity helps reduce your feelings of stress. Put those together, and an enjoyable physical activity gives you a double dose of stress relief! How Skills Learned in Sports Help in 'Real Life' Slamming a hockey puck into a goal, or performing a 'pas de chat' on pointe, may not have much practical application in other areas of your life, but many of the basic aspects of sports or other physical activities do!

Here are some attributes you can learn from sports that will help you in all your other endeavors:

teamwork, dedication, patience, cooperation, goal-setting, following the rules, accepting criticism, pushing your limits, self-assessment, sharing credit, self-discipline, coming back from defeat.... I bet you can think of more.

On the other hand It's up to you, your fellow participants, and your instructor or coach to make sure you focus on these positive qualities. The focus of your physical activities should be having fun, improving yourself, and encouraging others. If you get too focused on having to be the best, or winning at any cost, many of the benefits slip away.  

Once you have watched and read all of the links, continue to the assignment "Intro to Fitness."

01.02 Intro to Fitness (Participation Skills and Techniques)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

This assignment should be completed by WEEK 2 of this class

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word-processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work by pasting it in to the assignment submission window for this assignment. Please put all answers in bold or UPPER CASE.

REMEMBER: ONE word ANSWERS are NOT ACCEPTABLE!!! Use complete sentences and be detailed in your answers!

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Intro To Fitness Assignment 01.02

  1. What do you like most about PE?
  2. What do you like least about PE?
  3. Do you feel that physical fitness is important? Why or why not?
  4. What do you think it takes to become physically fit?
  5. Do you think your diet is adequate? Explain.
  6. Have you had positive or negative experiences in PE so far in your lifetime? Explain.
  7. Why do you think you are required to take PE?
  8. What are some of the benefits of physical exercise? List 3
  9. What is the heart rate zone that is preferred for teens?
  10. How many minutes should your heart rate be up in the zone?
  11. What does the letters S.M.A.R.T. mean?
  12. My Fitness Goals: Mile run: Sit-ups: Push-ups:
  13. Nutrition Goals: What are you going to eat more of? What are you going to eat less of?
  14. Class Goals: What do you hope to improve on? What activity would you like to become better at? What is something new you are excited to try?

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.02 Motor Skills (PE Individualized Lifetime Activity)

Read the information at "Motor Skill," "Gross Motor Skill" and "Fine Motor Skill" and study the TWO articles.

Image from Wikimedia Commons, Mathew Ingram, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic licenseImage from Wikimedia Commons, Mathew Ingram, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic license

01.02 Standard 1 video (PE Skills)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 40 minutes

Standard One Video

INSTRUCTIONS: You will need to submit an instructional video demonstrating one of the three exercises shown in the article “Easy Exercises for Teens,” located under unit one. If you are unable to make a video, you can submit a set of pictures showing the basics skills for the exercise you have chosen.

*There are three exercises you can choose from:

Sit Backs
Chair Squats
Butterfly Breath
(You only need to demonstrate one exercise.)

*Your video needs to be at least one minute long and no longer than two minutes long. If you would rather take pictures and use a video editor program to make a video/powerpoint to create your video, you can.
*You will be the star of your video, so you might need to get a friend to do the filming. You will need to explain in the video what it is that you are doing.
*Assume that you are making this video for another student who has never tried the exercise you are going to demonstrate.
*You CANNOT use the same video for any other PE Skills and Techniques assignment, including both quarters.

After you have created your video, watch the video and critique yourself, bearing in mind the correct way to perform this exercise. Answer the following questions (remember to put your answers in bold, answer in complete sentences or paragraphs, save a copy, and paste into the assignment submission window), and go to Topic 3 to submit your answers:

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  1. According to the website explaining the exercises, what are the critical cues for the exercise you chose?
  2. What did you see in the video that you were doing well?
  3. What did you see in the video that you could improve on?
  4. What did you see yourself doing that you didn't realize until you watched the video?

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INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR VIDEO:

You will need a computer with a connection to the Internet and your digital video content (under 2 minutes, please). You can choose between "YouTube" or "Photobucket" to host your video assignments. You will need to create an account for either resource. Follow the instructions to upload and share your videos.

"YouTube" will take a little longer to upload. In YouTube, you need to make your video "available to the world." When you go to the "My Videos" section of your YouTube account, play the video you want to submit. At this point you can either copy the address in the URL and send it to your teacher via your email account, or click on the "Share" link to send an email to the teacher from the page your video is on.

Photobucket is very similar.

If you don't have a video camera, you can use still images in a slide show with narration that is converted to digital video.

01.02 Typical Family Earnings Quiz (Financial Literacy)

Compare income in various geographical areas.

image from Wikimedia Commons, Steve Polyak, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Genericimage from Wikimedia Commons, Steve Polyak, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic BACKGROUND

The estimated wages you calculated in assignment 01.01 would be much higher for a whole family (or “household”) than it was for just you. Even Tiff's and Cameron's combined wages of $30,000 may sound like a lot, but it was too little. This assignment helps you estimate how much money you may need to support a whole household in YOUR county in Utah.

VISIT the URL #1 for assignment 01.02 below. (The Real Median Household Income in the US and Utah is shown. Write down the UTAH median income "Number," you will need this number to answer TWO questions on the quiz.

VISIT URL #2 to read about surprise expenses.  (Ignore the adds and comments in this URL.)

01.02 Typical Family Earnings Quiz (Financial Literacy)

computer-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

You will now complete a 10-question online quiz. You MUST score at least 8 to receive credit for the assignment but don't worry if you don't get at least 8 the first time since you can retake the quiz as many times as you need. Only your last quiz attempt counts. You may continue to increase your score if you want (7 or less = try again, 8 = B, 9 or 10 = A).

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.02 Vocabulary Set 2 (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

The house skulks behind a beech hedge.: Ben Harris, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsThe house skulks behind a beech hedge.: Ben Harris, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

You will be given three sets of ten words to learn and use in this course. Personally, when I need to find a definition for a word, I first look to a thesaurus. Sometimes dictionaries are hard to understand, and a single word of the same meaning is sometimes more helpful to develop understanding of a new word. Feel free to use whatever resources you find most helpful. For each set of words you will complete an activity and a quiz. There will be vocabulary questions on the final test as well.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment and then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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Vocabulary Set 2

1. ascertain
2. cogent
3. expunge
4. finite
5. nonchalant
6. omniscient
7. scrupulous
8. skulk
9. supercilious
10. uncanny

Set 2 Activity (10 Points): Using “Google” or a similar search tool*, find an example of each word used in a sentence. Include each sample sentence in your assignment. Using the context clues to guide you, write a definition or synonym for each vocabulary word. Use other resources for help if the context does not make the meaning clear.

(*Note: I clicked on the “News” button in the Google search engine which made it much easier to find a sentence rather than just a plethora of dictionary sites)

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Assignment Example

1. The angry customer shouted at the waitress until she burst into tears. Angry means upset or irritated.

Vocabulary Set 2 Rubric

5 Points= each vocabulary word is used in a sentence (1/2 point each)

5 Points= each vocabulary word is defined by the student (1/2 point each)

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.02.01 Career connections to professional photography.

Find out what an average photographer makes here in Utah and in the United States. Look up information about the job prospects for professional commercial photographers.

Required reading

Find out about what classes are recommended by the Utah Futures website that you can take in high school to prepare for a career as a professional photographer. Questions from the Utah futures website will be on the test.

Click on the link to see an interview with a professional photographer and see what the job outlook is for the future of photography.

01.02.01 Body composition assignment (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 90 minutes

Well, it’s time to get to work. This assignment is designed to help you get a general idea of your body composition, as an indicator of your general fitness. Please understand that these are not exact indicators, and their accuracy may vary with body type. Do these with interest, then discuss how you believe they may serve as valuable indicators in relation to your general fitness and propensity to develop some of the problems we have discussed. Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. Tasks: We estimate our body composition all the time, in a variety of ways. When we stand on the scales, the information we receive allows us to 'estimate' our body composition, usually in terms of excess body fat. For this assignment, you will estimate your body composition in terms of percent body fat. Notice that the word "estimate" is used. The various methods available can only give us an estimate that we can then use to compare with other factors, such as height/weight ratio and body type, to consider our body composition, and then use all of these to make inferences about what our body needs. *************************************************************************** Name:_______________________________ Date:_________________________

1. Find your approximate % body fat. You may use any ONE of the following four methods. DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS.

Method #!: Skinfolds using calipers. (Self-Assessment 7, as described on pages 226-227 if you use the optional textbook): Two skinfold measurements (triceps and calf). A physical education teacher may have access to calipers. _____ = first triceps skinfold (mm) _____ = first calf skinfold (mm) _____ = second triceps skinfold (mm) _____ = second calf skinfold (mm) _____ = third triceps skinfold (mm) _____ = third calf skinfold (mm) Method #2 Page 249 in the textbook: Body Measurements. (This method may be less accurate). Method #3 Body Fat Device or Machine. There are some scales or hand held devices that have methods of determining your body fat percentage. You may find one at a gym, from a doctor, or they may be purchased from a sporting goods store. You may also contact the PEAK academy at the University of Utah (585-7325) to make an appointment to have your body composition assessed. Method #4 Go to the link below and use one of the 6 methods described there.

Be sure to indicate here which method you used. Estimated % body fat ______ (5pts.) Method Used _____________

 

Question: Why would a “skin fold" measurement from these areas be an indication of percent fat in your whole body? (5pts.)

 

Question: Which of these methods would you think would be the most accurate? Why? (5pts.)

 

2. Complete the height-weight assessment as described on page 228 of your text, or use the height/weight chart at the link below. This is an assessment of height relative to weight using the height-weight tables. Take your height and weight measurements without shoes. Write your results in the spaces below. _____ = height (in feet and inches) ______ = weight (in pounds) A. Are you within the normal weight range for a person your height and age? (5pts.) Understand that there is a difference between “Normal” and “Optimal”. Normal is the “usual” or the “average”. “Optimal” is the best. If there is one fast race car in a group of slow cars, slow would be 'normal', but fast would still be 'optimal'.

3. Measure your waist-to-hip ratio and waist circumference (pg. 250, if you have the textbook) and enter the data in the chart below. Then, compare your information to the critical values. STEP 1: _____ measure your waist circumference (the width of your waist at the umbilicus or belly button) STEP 2: _____ measure your hip circumference (while viewing the hips from the side—rather than the front—measure the width at the widest point) STEP 3: _____ use your waist circumference (STEP 1) as the numerator and your hip circumference (STEP 2) as the denominator and divide out the fraction (STEP 1 / STEP 2) to get your waist-to-hip ratio What is your waist/hip ratio? (5pts.) ________________ Refer to your book or to the chart at the link below to determine your health risks based on this ratio.

4. Complete Table 1: Comparison of My Body Composition Values to Critical Values

Risk Factors My Values Critical Values
Body fat percent   Males: 10-20%
Females: 15-25%
Height/weight
(are you in the normal range?)
Yes/No See chart on p. 228 or at website
BMI (you found this in assignment 1)   Less than 25 kg/m2
Waist/hip ratio   Males: less than .90 is good; .91-1.0 is borderline; over 1.0 is higher risk
Females: less than .8 is good; .80 - .85 is borderline; over .85 is higher risk

Note: You may want to review the short video about Aerobic fitness and Intensity (from the lesson above) before completing the following questions:

Complete the following discussions and questions:

5. Discuss with your parents, peers, or a teacher, the values you have discovered regarding your approximate % body fat, your height/weight ratio, your hip/waist ratio, and your genetic body type. (If you so desire, you may wish to use Facebook or some other form of social media as base for your discussion. If you do, remember you are trading some aspects of privacy for a broader, quicker, audience.)

* Discuss the relationships between each of these measurements, and what that says about you. * Discuss the difference between what these say about “Normal” body composition, and your “Optimal” body composition. * As a result of these discussions, how far do you believe you are away from your 'Optimal' body weight? (Indicate who was involved in the discussion, any disagreements you may have had, and explain your reasoning for your final conclusions.) (5pts.)

6. As a result of your discussions, and what you have learned from the Power Point presentation, briefly describe what you believe you need to do to achieve the body composition that is right, and most healthy, for you. (5pts.)

7. Suppose your friend asks you to develop a workout for them. They have a specific purpose in mind. Develop the workout, and provide the following information.

A. Describe the purpose of the workout. (Example: Lose weight, prepare for a marathon, prepare for ski season, develop a better jump shot, etc.) (2 pts)

B. Describe the workout. (Present the workout schedule.) (3pts)

C. Indicate which components describe which aspects of the FITT principles. (3pts)

D. Describe which components are aerobic, and which are anaerobic. Explain why they fit that definition. (3pts)

E. Describe which components are health related, and which are skill related. (4 pts.) (You don’t have to have both. Just explain where each component fits, in specific terms as presented in the Unit 1 power point presentation.)

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.02.01 Fitness Testing (PE Individualized Lifetime Activity)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 30 minutes

You need to complete the following, and I need an e-mail from a parent or guardian verifying that you completed this portion of the class. Have them e-mail me the results, and where and when you completed the fitness testing. Be sure they include your EHS username and have the e-mail subject line be: Fitness Testing The three things you will be tested on are as follows: Sample Push Up: This is the proper position for push ups.Sample Push Up: This is the proper position for push ups. 1. A mile run 2. Push-ups from your feet, not on your knees. (How many you can do during a two minute time period? You can rest during the testing period, but not in the down position) 3. Sit-ups--hands behind your head, or accross your chest and all the way up to your knees. Someone can hold your feet. (How many you can do during a two minute time period? You can rest during the testing period, but not in the down position).

 

Performance Points 1 Mile Run Sit-Ups Push-Ups ** 500 Yard Swim
Male: Age 17 - 19 Years
10 8:15 109 92 6:30
8 9:00 102 86 7:15
6 9:45 90 76 8:20
4 11:00 62 51 11:15
2 12:30 50 42 12:45
** The 500 Yard Swim may replace the 1 Mile Run

 

Performance Points 1 Mile Run Sit-Ups Push-Ups ** 500 Yard Swim
Female: Age 17 - 19 Years
10 9:29 109 51 6:45
8 11:30 102 47 8:30
6 12:30 90 42 9:35
4 13:30 62 24 13:00
2 15:00 50 19 14:15
** The 500 Yard Swim may replace the 1 Mile Run

 

01.02.02 Activity log week 2 (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 65 points possible 100 minutes

Submit your activity log. To submit your work, scan or take a photo of your log and the form. Save as a .jpg, .pdf or .gif and go to Topic 3 on the main class page to upload the files. IMPORTANT: Please do not email logs, as this delays the grading process, since emails do not become submitted into the instructor's grade book. As a last resort, you may mail copies to your teacher's physical address.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.02.02 Individual and Team Activities (PE Skills)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 60 minutes

Choose one team sport and one individual activity to research for this assignment. You may want to go through Pioneer Library to World Book Encyclopedia for some of your research, or use other websites, books, or interviews with coaches or players.
Copy and paste the assignment (between the lines of asterisks) into a word processing document on your computer. Please put your answers in bold. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself.
Go to section 3 "Assignments, Quizzes, Tests" on the homepage of the class. Then click on "01.2.2 Assignment" to turn in this assignment. Copy and paste your work into the submission window.

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NAME:

DATE:

Answer in complete sentences or paragraphs, using boldface for your answers. Do not copy from your sources - summarize in your own words.

Part A: Team sport

  1. What team sport did you choose to research, and why?
  2. What sources did you use to find information? (Be specific. "The internet" is not a sufficient answer.)
  3. Describe briefly how this sport is played.
  4. List at least four rules players must follow in this sport, and the penalty for breaking the rule.
  5. List at least three basic movement skills a player needs in this sport. (For instance, if swimming were a team sport, you might list flutter kick, flip-turn, and crawl stroke.)
  6. Choose ONE of the basic movement skills, and explain critical cues for that movement.
  7. What are some strategies used in this game to try to win or get an advantage over the opponent?
  8. Discuss how team play is important in this game. How can players work together more effectively than one 'star' player trying to do things on his/her own? Be specific.

Part B: Individual activity

  1. What individual physical activity did you choose to research, and why?
  2. What sources did you use to find information? (Be specific. "The internet" is not a sufficient answer.)
  3. Describe briefly how this activity is done.
  4. Discuss in what ways this activity is competitive, or not.
  5. List at least two basic movement skills a participant needs in this activity.
  6. Choose ONE of the basic movement skills, and explain critical cues for that movement.
  7. Why would you choose (or not choose) this activity rather than other individual activities? Evaluate it on the basis of fun, expense, time constraints, needed resources, and benefits.
  8. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of individual activities compared to team or group activities.

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01.02.02 Standard One Assignment (PE Individualized Lifetime Activity)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 420 minutes

You will spend a total of SEVEN HOURS doing different kinds physical activities of your choice. You may include the time it takes you to find the rules for any new activity as part of your hours, and the time it takes you to fill out your ACTIVITY WORKSHEETS. NOTE: There are rules and guidelines for all activities, even walking and biking. Make sure you look them up and tell me what you found in the appropriate spot.

Below is a list of optional physical activities, but you are not limited to these. Anything not on the list needs to be approved by the teacher, though. Just e-mail if you want to get an okay to do an activity that is not listed below.

Golf, archery, bowling, weight training, aerobics, walking, jogging, social dance, rope jumping, disc golf, disc football, in-line skating, biking,martial arts, yoga, climbing, skiing, tennis, hiking, step class, croquet, badminton, horseshoes, soccer, basketball, baseball, aquatics.

You must try at least two different activities, but you are not limited to only two.

You must spend at least THREE hours doing each activity you choose, and you must complete a total of SEVEN hours. You may use the internet to find the needed rules and/or equipment you need if you are trying a new activity. REMEMBER that safety comes first with whatever activity you choose. After each activity you must copy and paste the following worksheet into a word document or write them down on a piece of paper, then complete the worksheet.

Once you complete your SEVEN HOURS of activity and the worksheets for each activity, you will send me BOTH OF THE WORKSHEETS BY SUBMITTING THEM IN THE SUBMISSION BOX IN SECTION 3 FOR THE TOTAL SEVEN HOURS AT THE SAME TIME, OR THEY WILL NOT BE GRADED! Please put your answers in BOLD, or ALL CAPS.

Use the Activity Calorie Calculator to find out how many calories you burn for different activities. Find out how many calories you burn while you sleep; go to the calorie counter to find out. You need this information for Assignment One. Just plug in your weight and the amount of time you normally exercise, and then click "show me." You will have to find where it tells you how many calories you burn while you are sleeping. You will use this information to answer question #3 on Worksheet #1. Here are the two required worksheets:

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ACTIVITY WORKSHEET #1

1. Your Name And Date:

2. What age did the "Longevity Game" say you would live to be?

3. How many calories did the "Calorie Calculator" say you burn while you are sleeping (you only need to answer this question once)?

4. What activity did you choose to do?

5. Is this the first time you have tried this activity?

6. How many hours did you spend doing this activity? (Be specific in telling me what days you did the activity and for how long each day. If you went hiking, walking, biking etc, tell me where you went and also how far.)

7. Did you enjoy the activity? Please tell me why or why not, and what you did and/or did not like about this activity. Do you think you would try this activity again (I DO NOT WANT ONE WORD ANSWERS ON THIS QUESTION)?

8. Did anyone participate in this activity with you? If yes, who?

9. What equipment did you use for this activity?

10. What are the rules or guidelines for this activity and how did you find them out? (You need to find out the rules or guidelines for any of these activities; they exist for all of them, even walking.)

11. Did you use gross motor skills and/or fine motor skills for this activity? Be specific in what the gross or fine motor skills were.

ACTIVITY WORKSHEET #2

1. Your Name And Date:

2. What activity did you choose to do?

3. Is this the first time you have tried this activity?

4. How many hours did you spend doing this activity? (Be specific in telling me what days you did the activity and for how long each day. If you went hiking, walking, biking etc, tell me where you went and how far also.)

5. Did you enjoy the activity, please tell me why or why not, what you did and/or did not like about this activity, and do you think you would try this activity again (I DO NOT ACCEPT ONE WORD ANSWERS ON THIS QUESTION.)?

6. Did anyone participate in this activity with you? If yes, who?

7. What equipment did you use for this activity?

8. What are the rules or guidelines for this activity and how did you find them out? ( You need to find out rules or guidelines for any activities, they are there for all of them, even walking.)

9. Did you use gross motor skills and/or fine motor skills for this activity? Be specific in what the gross or motor skills were. ***********************************

01.03 Education and Earnings (Financial Literacy)

Describe the correlation between income and a worker's skills and education.

College graduation ceremony: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Hkeely, CC Attribution 3.0 UnportedCollege graduation ceremony: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Hkeely, CC Attribution 3.0 Unported

BACKGROUND

When you share responsibility for supporting a household, you need more money. How much you need depends on things like where you live, family size, personal interests, hobbies, health, and other factors. Tiff and Cameron focused on earning for present needs without thinking long-term. They thought education was too expensive and time-consuming; but the truth is: education pays for itself over and over. See how education affects your earnings.

VISIT URL #1 to read the entire web page. New information will appear when you move your cursor over the different educational levels. This will reveal answers to the assignment questions below.

01.03 Education and Earnings (Financial Literacy)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

Exit the web page and submit your assignment as usual.

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ASSIGNMENT 1.03 - (12E) (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

1. Q: Please answer the following: a. Which of the listed education levels do YOU desire? > ANSWER:

b. After moving the cursor over your preferred educational level, what is the average 1-year income for that level? > ANSWER:

2. Q: What is the average 40-year income for that level of education? > ANSWER:

3. Q: List one way you think increased income will improve YOUR family life: > ANSWER:

4. Q: Describe the type of job learning/training you might seek after high school: > ANSWER:

5. Q: (1.03): Write your first and last name and today's date. > ANSWER:

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.03 Glossary of Terms (Basic Photography)

Identify basic photography terms, camera parts and functions.


Ambient Light
The available light completely surrounding a subject. Light already existing in an indoor or outdoor setting that is not caused by any illumination supplied by the photographer.

Angle Of View
The area of a scene that a lens covers or sees. Angle of view is determined by the focal length of the lens. A wide-angle lens (short-focal-length) includes more of the scene-a wider angle of view-than a normal (normal-focal-length) or telephoto (long-focal-length) lens.

Aperture
The lens opening. Th opening in a camera lens through which light passes to expose the film. The size of aperture is either fixed or adjustable. Aperture size is usually calibrated in f-numbers-the larger the number, the smaller the lens opening. Aperture settings on the camera control F stops. For low light conditions, one needs to open to a camera setting such as F4. On bright, sunny days, close down the aperture to F 16.

Aperture Priority
An exposure mode on an automatic or autofocus camera that lets you set the aperture while the camera sets the shutter speed for proper exposure. If you change the aperture, or the light level changes, the shutter speed changes automatically.

Autofocus (AF)
System by which the camera lens automatically focuses the image of a selected part of the picture subject.

Automatic Camera
A camera with a built-in exposure meter that automatically adjusts the lens opening, shutter speed, or both for proper exposure is called an automatic camera.
A shutter-speed setting on an adjustable camera that allows for time exposures. When set on B, the shutter will stay open as long as the shutter release button remains depressed.

Background
The part of the scene that appears behind the principal subject of the picture.

Backlighting
This is the light coming from behind the subject, toward the camera lens, so that the subject stands out vividly against the background. Sometimes produces a silhouette effect.

Balance
Placement of colors, light and dark masses, or large and small objects in a picture to create harmony and equilibrium.

Blowup
An enlargement; a print that is made larger than the negative or slide.

Bounce Lighting
Flash or tungsten light bounced off a reflector (such as the ceiling or walls) to give the effect of natural or available light.

Bracketing
The process of taking additional pictures of the subject through a range of exposures-both lighter and darker-when unsure of the correct exposure.

Camera Angles
Various positions of the camera (high, medium, or low; and left, right, or straight on) with respect to the subject, each giving a different viewpoint or effect.

Candid Pictures
Un-posed pictures of people, often taken without the subject's knowledge. These usually appear more natural and relaxed than posed pictures.

ccd sensor
(Charged Coupled Device) to sense light color and intensity. The part of a digital camera used to record the image instead of film.

Close-Up
A picture taken with the subject close to the camera-usually less than two or three feet away, but it can be as close as a few inches.

Close-Up Lens
A lens attachment placed in front of a camera lens to permit taking pictures at a closer distance than the camera lens alone will allow.

Composition
The composition is the pleasing arrangement of the elements within a scene-the main subject, the foreground and background, and supporting subjects.

Contrast
The range of difference in the light to dark areas of a image the brightness range of a subject or the scene lighting.

Contrasty
Higher-than-normal contrast including very bright and dark areas. The range of density in a image is higher than it was in the original scene.

Cropping
Printing only part of the image, usually for a more pleasing composition. May also refer to the framing of the scene in the viewfinder.

Darkroom
Light-tight area used for processing films and for printing and processing papers; also for loading and unloading film holders and some cameras.

Dedicated Flash
A fully automatic flash that works only with specific cameras. Dedicated flash units automatically set the proper flash sync speed and lens aperture, and electronic sensors within the camera automatically control exposure by regulating the amount of light from the flash.

Definition
The clarity of detail in a photograph.

Density
The blackness of an area in a image. Sometimes referred to as contrast.

Depth of Field
The amount of distance between the nearest and farthest objects that appear in acceptably sharp focus in a photograph. Depth of field depends on the lens opening, the focal length of the lens, and the distance from the lens to the subject. It means what else in the photograph is in acceptable focus besides the subject? Is some of the foreground and all of the background in focus? Then you have alot of depth-of-field. If only the subject is in focus and the foreground and background are out of focus, then you have very little depth-of-field.

Diffuse Lighting
Lighting that is low or moderate in contrast, such as on an overcast day.

Diffusing
Softening detail in a print with a diffusion disk or other material that scatters light.

Digital zoom
An enlargement or interpolation of a cropped portion of the digital image. This type of enlargement is done with software, and not a lens.

Double Exposure
Two pictures taken on one frame of film, or two images printed on one piece of photographic paper.

DPI
digital images are essentially made up of little "dots". We use DPI (Dots Per Inch) as a measure of resolution. Generally speaking, the higher the number, the higher the resolution. 300 DPI is considered (by most of us) to be photo quality. Generally speaking, you won't notice much difference in quality by going higher than 300 DPI. In fact, if an image is being used on the web or for computer screen purposes, then it needs to be 72 DPI, since that's all most computer screens can display anyway.

Emulsion
Micro-thin layers of gelatin on film in which light-sensitive ingredients are suspended; triggered by light to create a chemical reaction resulting in a photographic image.

Emulsion Side
The side of the film coated with emulsion. In contact printing and enlarging, the emulsion side of the film-dull side-should face the emulsion side of the photo paper-shiny side.

Enlargement
A print that is larger than the negative or slide; blowup.

Enlarger
A device consisting of a light source, a negative holder, and a lens, and means of adjusting these to project an enlarged image from a negative onto a sheet of photographic paper.

Existing Light
Available light. Strictly speaking, existing light covers all natural lighting from moonlight to sunshine. For photographic purposes, existing light is the light that is already on the scene or project and includes room lamps, fluorescent lamps, spotlights, neon signs, candles, daylight through windows, outdoor scenes at twilight or in moonlight, and scenes artificially illuminated after dark.

Exposure
The quantity of light allowed to act on a photographic material; a product of the intensity (controlled by the lens opening) and the duration (controlled by the shutter speed) of light striking the CCD.

Exposure Meter
An instrument with a light-sensitive cell that measures the light reflected from or falling on a subject, used as an aid for selecting the exposure setting. The same as a light meter.

File size
File size refers to how big the image will be printed. The size of an image can be measured in inches or pixels. To determine the size of a digital image, open image through Photoshop elements under "file" and "image size".

Graininess
The sand-like or granular appearance of a image, negative, print, or slide. Graininess becomes more pronounced with faster film and the degree of enlargement.

High Contrast
A wide range of density in a image.

Highlights
The brightest areas of a subject and the corresponding areas in a image.

Hot Shoe
The fitting on a camera that holds a small portable flash. It has an electrical contact that aligns with the contact on the flash unit's "foot" and fires the flash when you press the shutter release. This direct flash-to-camera contact eliminates the need for a PC cord.

Interpolation
a digital process of increasing file size. Software doubles the pixels, care must be taken as quality of final image may be compromised.

ISO Speed
The emulsion speed (sensitivity) of the camera as determined by the standards of the International Standards Organization. We have found that higher ISO numbers in digital cameras result in increased noise.

Lens
One or more pieces of optical glass or similar material designed to collect and focus rays of light to form a sharp image on the film, paper, or projection screen.

Lens Shade
A collar or hood at the front of a lens that keeps unwanted light from striking the lens and causing image flare. May be attached or detachable, and should be sized to the particular lens to avoid vignetting.

Lens Speed
The largest lens opening (smallest f-number) at which a lens can be set. A fast lens transmits more light and has a larger opening than a slow lens

Light meter
An instrument with a light-sensitive cell that measures the light reflected from or falling on a subject, used as an aid for selecting the exposure setting. The same as a light meter.

Macro Lens
A lens that provides continuous focusing from infinity to extreme close-ups, often to a reproduction ratio of 1:2 (half life-size) or 1:1 (life-size).

Megapixel
A picture made up of one million pixels, or one million picture elements.

Motor Drive
A mechanism for advancing the film to the next frame and re-cocking the shutter, activated by an electric motor usually powered by batteries. This is popular for action-sequence photography and for recording images by remote control.

Negative
The developed film that contains a reversed tone image of the original scene.

Normal Lens
A lens that makes the image in a photograph appear in perspective similar to that of the original scene. A normal lens has a shorter focal length and a wider field of view than a telephoto lens, and a longer focal length and narrower field of view than a wide-angle lens.

Optical zoom
controls the lens on the digital camera that provides magnification of the subject being photographed.

Overexposure
A condition in which too much light reaches the CCD. (Charged Coupled Device) to sense light color and intensity. The part of a digital camera used to record the image instead of film.

Panning
Moving the camera so that the image of a moving object remains in the same relative position in the viewfinder as you take a picture.

Panorama
A broad view, usually scenic.

Pixel
An abbreviation for "picture element". The smallest unit of measurement for a digital image.

Polarizing Screen (Filter)
A filter that transmits light traveling in one plane while absorbing light traveling in other planes. When placed on a camera lens or on light sources, it can eliminate undesirable reflections from a subject such as water, glass, or other objects with shiny surfaces. This filter also darkens blue sky.

Positive
The opposite of a negative, an image with the same tonal relationships as those in the original scenes-for example, a finished print or a slide.

Print
A positive picture, usually on paper, and usually produced from a negative.

Processing
Developing, fixing, and washing exposed photographic film or paper to produce either a negative image or a positive image.

Program Exposure
An exposure mode on an automatic or autofocus camera that automatically sets both the aperture and the shutter speed for proper exposure.

Reflector
Any device used to reflect light onto a subject.

Resolution
Resolution is the sharpness and clarity of a digital image that can refer to the number of dots per inch dots in inch. The term is most often used to describe monitors, printers, and bit-mapped graphic images. In the case of dot-matrix and laser printers, the resolution indicates the number of dots per inch. For example, a 300-dpi (dots per inch) printer is one that is capable of printing 300 distinct dots in a line 1 inch long. This means it can print 90,000 dots per square inch.

Saturation
An attribute of perceived color, or the percentage of hue in a color. Saturated colors are called vivid, strong, or deep. Desaturated colors are called dull, weak, or washed out.

Selective Focus or limited Depth-of-Field
Choosing a lens opening that produces a shallow depth of field. Usually this is used to isolate a subject by causing most other elements in the scene to be blurred.

Shutter
Blades, a curtain, plate, or some other movable cover in a camera that controls the time during which light reaches the CCD.

Shutter Priority
An exposure mode on an automatic or autofocus camera that lets you select the desired shutter speed; the camera sets the aperture for proper exposure. If you change the shutter speed, or the light level changes, the camera adjusts the aperture automatically.

Side Lighting
Light striking the subject from the side relative to the position of the camera; produces shadows and highlights to create modeling on the subject.

Simple Camera
A camera that has few or no adjustments to be made by the picture-taker. Usually, simple cameras have only one size of lens opening and one or two shutter speeds and do not require focusing by the picture-taker.

Single-Lens-Reflex (SLR) Camera
A camera in which you view the scene through the same lens that takes the picture (single lens reflex) This is a camera where the photographer sees exactly the same image that is exposed to through the lens to the ccd sensor or the film. A mirror flips up out of the way, the shutter opens and the image is exposed onto the sensor or film.

Slide
A photographic transparency (positive) mounted for projection.

Soft Focus
Produced by use of a special lens that creates soft outlines.

Soft Lighting
Lighting that is low or moderate in contrast, such as on an overcast day.

Stopping Down
Changing the lens aperture to a smaller opening; for example, from f/8 to f/11.

Telephoto Lens
A lens that makes a subject appear larger on film than does a normal lens at the same camera-to-subject distance. A telephoto lens has a longer focal length and narrower field of view than a normal lens.

Through-The-Lens Focusing
Viewing a scene to be photographed through the same lens that admits light to the film. Through-the-lens viewing, as in a single-lens-reflex (SLR) camera, while focusing and composing a picture, eliminates parallax.

Through-The-Lens Metering
Meter built into the camera determines exposure for the scene by reading light that passes through the lens during picture-taking.

Time Exposure
A comparatively long exposure made in seconds or minutes.

Tone
The degree of lightness or darkness in any given area of a print; also referred to as value. Cold tones (bluish) and warm tones (reddish) refer to the color of the image in both black-and-white and color photographs.

Transparency
A positive photographic image on film, viewed or projected by transmitted light (light shining through film).

Tripod
A three-legged supporting stand used to hold the camera steady. Especially useful when using slow shutter speeds and/or telephoto lenses.

Underexposure
A condition in which NOT ENOUGH light reaches the CCD. (Charged Coupled Device) to sense light color and intensity. The part of a digital camera used to record the image instead of film.

Unipod
A one-legged support used to hold the camera steady.

Vignetting
A fall-off in brightness at the edges of an image, slide, or print. Can be caused by poor lens design, using a lens hood not matched to the lens, or attaching too many filters to the front of the lens.

Wide-Angle Lens
A lens that has a shorter focal length and a wider field of view (includes more subject area) than a normal lens.

White balance
White balance refers to the color balance of the light, which is measured in degrees kelvin. For example, sunlight is 5,000 degrees kelvin. Florescent light is 3200 degrees kelvin. Different types of indoor lighting may cause an image to appear green. The white balance control helps to achieve proper color balance.

Zoom Lens
A lens in which you adjust the focal length over a wide range. In effect, this gives you lenses of many focal lengths.

01.03 Individual and Team Activities (Participation Skills and Techniques)

When choosing a sport to participate in, it is important to think about whether you want to participate in a team sport, an individual sport or maybe you would like to do both. Hopscotch is an example of an individual sport, while kickball is an example of a team sport.

To get a better idea of what types of sports/activities are team sports, and which ones are individual activities, click on the "Team Sports" and "Individual Activities" links to get a better idea. In the assignment you will be asked to describe the CRITICAL CUES that are associated with that exercise.

What are critical cues for movement skills? The critical cues are the specific directions you give or get to make sure that you perform the movement/exercise correctly--the criteria by which your teacher or coach might evaluate whether you are performing the skill or activity correctly. Examples of a few critical cues in different activities:

  • In archery: As you prepare to release an arrow, the fingers of your left hand should be relaxed and open, not clenched tightly around the bow.
  • In horseback riding: Your heels should be down, stirrups on the ball of your foot, toes pointing ahead or slightly out, knees bent.
  • For push-ups: Your back should be straight, your toes, the balls of your feet and the palms of your hands on the floor, with your hands about the same width apart as your shoulders
  • To begin demi-plie in first position in ballet: Stand straight and in alignment, heels together and legs turned out to a 180 degree angle

Of course, these are just brief examples--there are lots more considerations for each of these movements--but you get the point. After reading the Links continue to the assignment Individual and Team Activities.

teacher-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

This assignment should be completed by WEEK 2 of this class

Choose one Team sport and one Individual activity to research for this assignment.

You may want to go through Pioneer Library to World Book Encyclopedia for some of your research, use other websites, books, and/or conduct interviews with coaches or players. Be specific where you got your information in your assignment submission. You need to identify the Critical cues for each sport or activity you choose.

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word-processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work by pasting it in to the assignment submission window for this assignment. Please put all answers in bold or UPPER CASE.

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Individual and Team Activities 01.03

NAME:

DATE:

Answer in complete sentences or paragraphs, using boldface or CAPS for your answers. Do not copy from your sources--summarize in your own words. BE THOROUGH IN YOUR ANSWERS. A ONE-SENTENCE ANSWER IS USUALLY NOT SPECIFIC ENOUGH! And will not receive full credit.

Part A: Team sport

  1. What team sport did you choose to research, and why?
  2. What sources (Give at least TWO) did you use to find your information? (Be specific. "The internet" is not a sufficient answer.)
  3. Describe briefly how this sport is played.
  4. List at least FOUR rules players must follow in this sport, and the PENALTY for breaking each rule.
  5. List at least THREE basic movement skills, a player needs in this sport. (For instance, if swimming were a team sport, you might list flutter-kick, flip-turn, and crawl-stroke.)
  6. Choose ONE of the basic movement skills, and explain the CRITICAL CUES (you may want to go back into the URLS and figure out what these are) for that movement.
  7. What are some strategies (Give at least TWO examples) used in this game to try to win or get an advantage over the opponent?
  8. Discuss how team play is important in this game. How players can work together more effectively than having one 'star' player trying to do things on his/her own? Be specific.

Part B: Individual activity

  1. What individual physical activity did you choose to research, and why?
  2. What sources (Give at least TWO) did you use to find information? (Be specific. "The internet" is not a sufficient answer.)
  3. Describe briefly how this activity is done.
  4. Discuss in what ways this activity is competitive, or not.
  5. List at least TWO basic movement skills a participant needs in this activity.
  6. Choose ONE of the basic movement skills, and explain CRITICAL CUES for that movement.
  7. Why would you choose (or not choose) this activity rather than other individual activities? Evaluate it on the basis of: fun, expense, time constraints, needed resources, and benefits. (Make sure you evaluate on each basis for full credit.)
  8. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of individual activities compared to team or group activities.

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.03 Let The Research Begin - English 10

Participate in conversations and collaborations with different people. Integrate and evaluate information from diverse formats. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view and reasoning.

Are you ready to get to work?: fotopedia by Ed YourdonAre you ready to get to work?: fotopedia by Ed Yourdon

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

THE CHALLENGE

It is fairly easy to analyze and define your own thoughts, per our last mind mapping activity, but moving out of your own realm of existence can sometimes be a challenging pursuit. To do so, we will be taking baby steps. Let's first contemplate your family at large and the impact they have to your personal and cultural outlook on life.

For this activity, you will begin a bit of research that will eventually lead you to a greater understanding of who you are and what culture means in your life.

To better understand your history and your cultural background, interview three members of your family using the following format.

01.03 Stress management (Health II)

Stress can be defined as the body’s reaction to a demanding situation. These demands can be positive (eustress) or negative (distress). Although the causes of stress are varied, the body’s physiological reaction is the same. First, the brain signals the attack of the stressor. The hypothalamus then responds by producing cotropin-releasing factor (CRF). The CRF activates the pituitary gland, which secretes adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) into the circulatory system. The adrenal glands then secrete adrenaline.

Effects of the adrenal hormones:

-- Increases release of cortisol, epinephrine and norepinephrine
-- Increases glucose
-- Increases heart rate
-- Increases blood fats
-- Increases blood pressure
-- Reduces protein stores
-- Increases contractility of the heart
-- Reduces white blood cells
-- Increases cardiac output
-- Increases body core temperature
-- Causes copious sweating

As you look at the effects of the adrenal hormones listed above, consider how they may impact performance and/or health. An athlete may use this stress response to prepare for a competition, as the body is physiologically prepared for action. Too much stress, over a long period of time, could contribute to a greater susceptibility to illness, as the body becomes exhausted.

Symptoms of chronic stress may include two or more of the following symptoms:

-- Upset stomach, diarrhea, or indigestion
-- Headaches, backaches
-- Insomnia (inability to sleep)
-- Eating too much or too little
-- Feeling hostile, angry or irritable
-- Feeling anxious
-- Avoiding other people
-- Crying
-- Feeling frustrated with things that normally bothered you a little

STRESS MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

The following strategies may help you manage stress in your life:

TALK

Communicate with family members; make certain they are aware of all the demands you face each day. Share your feelings with others. If you cannot talk to someone, write a letter or e-mail, or express your feelings on paper.

GET AWAY FOR AWHILE

Have you ever felt so frustrated trying to follow assembly instructions that you felt like breaking something? Leaving for a minute or two and clearing your head makes the instructions much easier to follow when you return. There are situations that are best left for awhile: an escalating disagreement, a baby that continues to cry despite your best efforts, or an injustice that you have no control over.

WORK IT OFF

Have you ever been angry when you began a physical task? Before you knew it, the job was done and you felt better than when you started? Stress causes the body to prepare for fight or flight. However, some stresses such as disagreements or failing a test do not require your body to respond. "Working off" that type of stress can be a very effective release. Exercise, especially aerobic exercise, can be the best stress reliever, as the body releases endorphins that make us feel better.

GIVE IN ON OCCASION

This might be best said as "pick your battles." There are arguments you will never "win" and do not have to. It is sometimes okay for others to be right, even when you do not agree.

DO SOMETHING FOR OTHERS

Sometimes, simply gaining perspective can be a great stress reliever. Providing help to others makes us feel better about ourselves. It also allows us to see that others face even greater demands or challenges than we do.

TAKE ONE TASK AT A TIME

Imagine standing in front of a class of 40 people, each holding a tennis ball. How many could you catch if each person tossed you a tennis ball, one at a time? How many could you catch if everyone threw the tennis balls at the same time? We can accomplish any number of things if we complete one task at a time. Prioritizing those tasks, and doing what is most important first, is a great way to reduce stress in our lives.

AVOID A SUPER PERSON IMAGE

We all like to do things well. However, no one can be perfect in all areas. Do important tasks to the best of your ability; focus on the process rather than the outcome. Allow yourself to be no better than adequate in some areas.

BALANCE WORK AND RECREATION

Make time for work AND fun every day. Play is a vital ingredient in developing a healthy self. As George Shehann stated, "We will do anything, for any length of time, if we think it is play." Find ways to enjoy all that you do. Remember the simplicity of playing for the sake of play.

RELAXATION

Yoga, deep breathing, watching clouds go by, stretching or gentle exercise can be great stress relievers. A small amount of time each day is all that is needed to make a difference in your stress levels.

LAUGHTER

Have you ever got the "giggles" at an inappropriate time? When a friend falls or gets hurt, or at a funeral? Why? Because laughter is a tremendous stress reliever. Use your sense of humor and ability to laugh. Your mind and body will be healthier as you laugh.

SLEEP

Most Americans do not get enough sleep. In order to meet the challenges of each day, adolescents require 8-10 hours of sleep each night. Your body responds best if you sleep the same hours each night. For example, make a habit of getting to sleep each night at 10 o'clock and getting up at 6 o'clock in the morning.

01.03 Stress management (Health II)

01.03 Stress management story for assignment (Health II)

Read the story below You will need to identify the stressors in Jeff's life in your next assignment.

Jeff is the second son in a very successful family. His older brother, David, is attending Yale on an academic scholarship. Jeff's father is extremely proud of his oldest son's accomplishments, and expects the same success from Jeff. His mother is very socially conscious and loves the status her oldest son has brought the family. Additionally, David was a very neat, well-organized child, and Jeff's mom cannot understand why he cannot keep his room as clean as David did.

Jeff has a passion for art and is a very talented artist. He does well in school, but struggles in chemistry. He expects himself to live up to his brother's example in all things, and would like to make his parents proud of him.

March 1st

Jeff wakes up to his alarm that has been going off for the past 30 minutes. Frustrated with himself for oversleeping, he rushes into the bathroom. As he looks in the mirror, he hates what he sees. He has dark circles under his eyes from staying up most of the night drawing. "If only I could take more art classes, and fewer science. I'd have less homework, and time in school to do what I love," he thought. His hair is a mess, he needs more sleep, his shirt is wrinkled, and he can't find his back pack.

Arriving to school late, he rushes to first period only to find he got a "B" on his calculus test. A "B", he thought, my dad will never understand. My brother never got a "B" in anything.

At lunch he sees the girl he has been interested in all term and wishes he had the nerve to ask her out. His best friend sees who he is looking at and encourages him to go talk to her, but there is no way he could do that--but he had to do something soon. The prom was only a month away, and he had to find a date. The only thing was, if he asked her and she said no, he would never be able to show his face again.

In science he walked in only to remember the homework he had completely forgotten about last night. The teacher also decided to give a pop quiz on their reading assignment. Jeff couldn't remember anything because he was so tired when he read it last night.

English was no better; Jeff's teacher assigned them a 2000 word essay, typed, double spaced that would have to be turned in Monday at the beginning of class. I'm never going to get any of this done, Jeff thought, I don't have any free time. I have to work this weekend to get enough money for the drafting table I want more than anything.

The track meet after school was close, Jeff's school was tied for first place, and it was the last race. It was the 4X400 meter relay. Jeff was running the final leg, and he was in the lead when he got the baton. He went out hard, keeping his lead for most of the race. Near the end, the other runner pulled up along his side. Jeff strained to regain the lead, but his efforts were useless as the other runner took the lead and won the race, winning the meet for his team. Jeff's heart sank. He had let his entire team down. It was all his fault the team lost the meet. What good was he, anyway?

After the meet Jeff got to his car only to find the battery dead. I must have left the lights on this morning, he thought. Why does all this have to happen to me?

As Jeff arrived home, he saw his mother was already angry. As usual, he had left his bed unmade, dishes in the sink, and was late for dinner. If only he was more like David. He quickly apologized to his mom and sat down to eat. His dad asked how his day was, and he didn't know where to start. He knew his day would be even more disappointing to his dad than it was to him. As Jeff told him of his difficulty in calculus, he could see his dad's mounting anger. "Your brother struggled in calculus at first, but you didn't see him giving up," scolded his father. Jeff figured he may as well go for broke, and told his dad of his love for art. His mother was mortified. What would the neighbors think if her son dropped out of his AP classes to take art? His dad was disgusted. How could he ever make a living doodling? Completely frustrated, Jeff left the table and went to his room.

After giving up on dinner, the only thing that appealed to Jeff now was sleep. I'm so tired, he thought, but I can't sleep. I have at least four hours of homework left to do today. Jeff sat down in a chair to rest for a few minutes before he started on his homework. He was thinking about what to do first when he fell asleep.

01.03 Unit 1 study guide (Fitness for Life)

U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Damon J. Moritz, Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsU.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Damon J. Moritz, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Study Guide: Unit 1

1. Understand the difference between health-related and skill-related fitness, including the various components of each. Be ready to recognize each component in a life scenario. For example:

a. Question: As you walk to school, your arm becomes fatigued as you try to carry a large load of books, so you must repeatedly shift them from one arm to the other. What aspect of fitness is most likely causing your discomfort? Answer: Static muscular endurance.

2. Understand the four FITT principles. Be ready to evaluate their application to a life scenario. 3. Understand the application principles of specificity, overload, and reversibility. For example:

a. Question: Your friend lifts 3 sets of 7 reps of a given lift 3 days each week. When they are able to increase to 8 reps, they increase the weight so they go back to only 7 reps. What principle are they applying? Answer: Overload.

4. Understand the difference between aerobic and anaerobic work, and be ready to recognize or apply those principles in a real life scenario.

5. Understand the nature of such bone conditions as osteoporosis, scoliosis, kyphosis, and lordosis, and how they respond to exercise.

6. Understand the relationship between diabetes and exercise.

7. Be prepared to analyze and apply the RICE principles to Hyperkinetic (overuse) injuries.

01.03 Vocabulary Set 3 (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Raw garlic has a pungent odor.: Donovan Govan, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons.Raw garlic has a pungent odor.: Donovan Govan, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license via Wikimedia Commons.

You will be given three sets of ten words to learn and use in this course. Personally, when I need to find a definition for a word, I first look to a thesaurus. Sometimes dictionaries are hard to understand, and a single word of the same meaning is sometimes more helpful to develop understanding of a new word. Feel free to use whatever resources you find most helpful. For each set of words you will complete an activity and a quiz. There will be vocabulary questions on the final test as well.

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment and copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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Vocabulary Set 3

1. altruistic
2. clemency
3. dearth
4. diffident
5. discrepancy
6. infallible
7. pungent
8. repose
9. temerity
10. unfeigned

Set 3 Activity (10 Points):

Write a short, creative story using each of the vocabulary words. If the meaning of the word is not clear in its usage, you will lose points. Please do not use sentences like “I don’t know what the word corpulent means.”

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Vocabulary Set 3 Rubric

5 Points= Each word has been used correctly in a sentence (1/2 point each)

3 Points= Story is in paragraph form

2 Points= Writing contains few mistakes

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.03.01 Assignment 023 (Adult Roles)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 3 minutes

Assignment Twenty-three: Write a short essay describing the difference between a long-term goal and a short-term goal.

01.03.01 Stress management assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 49 points possible 40 minutes

What to do: Complete Sections I, II, and III, following the instructions provided below.

Points Possible:  
Complete Section I: Fill in an appropriate way to deal with stress for each of the letters (1 point per letter) 19
Complete Section II: List your top five stressors (1 point for each) Tell how you can deal with your top five stressors in a healthy way (1 point for each) 10
Complete Section III: List each of Jeff's stressors in the story (1 point for each) Tell how Jeff could deal with each of his stressors in a healthy way (1 point for each) 20
Total Points Possible: 49

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. ***************************************************************************** Section I: Make a list of appropriate ways to manage stress and express emotions for each letter listed below. The suggestions on your list should begin with each of the letters. (Each good suggestion is worth 1 point for a total of 19 points in this section).

H O W
T O
D E A L
W I T H
S T R E S S

Section II: List the top five stressors in your life AND tell how you can best manage them (1 point for the stressor listed and another for the healthy way to deal with it). Section III: After reading the story in 01.3.1, list the stressors Jeff encounters during his day. For each stressor listed, give one or more ways he could best manage the situation. (You will earn one point for each of his stressors listed and one point for a healthy way that he could deal with it). ******************************************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.03.01 Unit 1 quiz (Fitness for Life)

computer-scored 15 points possible 10 minutes

Go to Topic 3 on your main class page to take this quiz. You may take it multiple times, but you must score at least 90%.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.04 Explore a Career (Financial Literacy)

Develop career plans that include educational requirements, skill development, and income potential.

Secret Service officers: Public domainSecret Service officers: Public domain BACKGROUND

Right now, you don't know for sure which jobs you will have during your lifetime. One thing is for sure--your occupation will greatly affect your ability to pay for your lifestyle (as Tiff and Cameron found out). Now you will investigate a job that interests you. You will learn about preparing for that job, its skill requirements, future job potential, and more. As you select an occupation, consider the saying, “Since you're going to be working for the rest of your life, you might as well do something you really enjoy.”

VISIT URL #1. Scroll down to the “A-Z index” and choose a letter that corresponds to the career choice you are interested in. Search the list and then click on one of the links that is closest to your interest. Read the entire section about a career of interest that is consistent with your skills, income needs, education plans, and goals.

01.04 Explore a Career (Financial Literacy)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Exit the web page and submit your assignment as usual.

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ASSIGNMENT 1.04 - (12E) (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

1. Which occupation did you choose? > ANSWER:

2. Scroll to the “Work Environment,” or "What is this job like" (or a similar topic) to find one thing from the site that sounds enjoyable AND one that does not: a. (Enjoyable) > ANSWER: b. (Not Enjoyable) > ANSWER:

3. Q: Please answer the following: a. Scroll to “Job Outlook.” or a similar topic from the web site, to find future employment possibilities for this job: > ANSWER: b. How would greater demand for your job affect your salary? > ANSWER:

4. Q: Scroll to “pay,” or "How much would this pay?" (or a similar topic) to tell your potential earnings in this job? > ANSWER:

5. Q: (1.04): Write your first and last name and today's date.> ANSWER:

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.04 Let The Research Begin, Again - English 10

Write so readers can follow a particular line of reasoning. Participate in a range of conversations with different people. Integrate and evaluate information presented in an oral format. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks.

What is your family history?: Fillster.com "Funny Pictures for Myspace"What is your family history?: Fillster.com "Funny Pictures for Myspace"

*All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

Your Task

Choose three family members and have them each answer all of the questions below. You might be surprised by what you learn.

Copy and paste the list of questions between the rows of asterisks below, three times into a word document. Provide responses for each of the prompts. You are also welcome to add some of your own questions if you would like.

Don't forget the advice I have included at the bottom of the list. Remember that even though this is 'just family,' you are practicing for future interviewing opportunities, and the individuals are taking time away from their own schedules to accommodate your needs.

Happy hunting!

***************************************************************************************************

Interview Prompts

1. What is their name, birth place, and family relationship information?
2. What was their childhood like?
3. What schools did they attend and what did they do for fun?
4. What was dating and courtship like for them, and did they get married?
5. Do they have children and, if so, when were they born? What is their general philosophy about raising children?
6. What has their health been like? Have they had any accidents or illnesses?
7. How is the world different today than it was when they were little?
8. What friends did they have growing up?
9. What places have they visited?
10. What are their favorite things: hobbies, interests, adventures, experiences, etc.?

* Listen! Record the interview, if you need to, but be sure to also write down their information.
* Thank them.

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Illustrations

Once you have interviewed your chosen relatives, choose a picture of an object, place, symbol, etc., that best represents each of them and explain the connection.

Save the picture with the corresponding relative’s information along with an explanation of why you chose that particular picture. Be sure to document the source of the picture.

* All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

01.04 Mental disorders and mental health (Health II)

Everyone experiences life a little differently. Humans' perception and processing of reality vary from one person to the next, and most people fall somewhere into what we think of as a 'normal' range. Most of us have periods of feeling depressed or manic, anxious or obsessive. If we go long enough without sleep, we may even experience hallucinations. Some of us, though, have persistent or recurring symptoms over extended time periods that seem to go beyond the 'normal.' We use the term 'mental disorder' (or mental illness) to name problems that seem to originate in or affect the mind, rather than the body.

There have been individuals with mental disorders throughout history. They were sometimes regarded as being possessed by demons, or gifted by the gods. If they were fortunate, others regarded them as odd but harmless. If they were unfortunate, they might be burned as witches, or banished from their communities. Even now, when effective treatments may be available, people with mental disorders are often avoided, put down, or accused of being fakers or lacking self-discipline. Odds are very high that you know at least a couple people who live with mental disorders--though they may not talk about it. Mental illness is still stigmatized unlike most physical illnesses. People may fear that they will lose their job, friends, spouse, or children if others know they have a mental disorder. Many health insurance plans don't provide coverage for mental disorders as extensively as they do for physical disorders.

Some mental disorders tend to run in families, so there is some genetic influence on a person's chance of developing a mental health problem. However, genetics do not determine every outcome. You may inherit the genes, but still not develop the problem. Some interactions between the person's genetic make-up and his or her environment and experiences apparently cause the mental disorder to develop in some people but not in others.

Some risk factors for developing mental disorders include physiological problems in the nervous system, a 'difficult temperament' (someone who tends to be irritable, moody, angry and/or unhappy more than most people), chronic physical illness, serious marital problems in the family, low socioeconomic status, living in crowded conditions, parents with a history of criminal behavior or mental illness, substance abuse, low birth weight, or lack of good education. On the other hand, protective factors can help protect against the development of mental disorders: a strong support system of stable family and friends, involvement in enjoyable group activities or meaningful hobbies, regular exercise, and good education are examples.

Read the articles at the links below. There will be quiz questions over this material, and you will find it useful in the next assignment.

01.04 Mental disorders research paper (Health II)

teacher-scored 35 points possible 120 minutes

You will write a researched essay about a type of mental disorder chosen from the topics listed below. Overview of assignment

Purpose: to inform
 Audience: teens and young adults
 TOPIC CHOICES:

Anxiety Disorders (phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorders, anxiety disorders) Somatoform Disorders (hypochondria) Affective Disorders (clinical depression, manic-depressive disorder) Personality Disorders (antisocial personality disorder, schizophrenia)

Do a web search for information on the topic you chose from the list above. Use at least two of the websites listed for the previous lesson (01.4) and at least two other sources you find yourself. You may choose a full group of disorders to research or a specific disorder from one of the listed categories. Either is fine. Length: at least five paragraphs and at least 400 words, plus a list of your sources. Write a report (12 point font, double or single spaced and at least five paragraphs covering the material listed below) on your chosen topic that includes the following information:

1. What the disorder is, 2. How it affects the person living with the disorder, 3. How the disorder is best managed, community resources that can help, and 4. Who is most likely affected by this disorder (is there a known risk factor for certain populations??).

REMEMBER TO WRITE IN YOUR OWN WORDS, CITE YOUR SOURCES ON ALL RESEARCHED OR QUOTED WORK (this means within the paper, as well as a works cited section at the end)! and make sure to PROOFREAD and EDIT your report before submitting it.Organizing your essay

Content by paragraph Structure
1. Begin by naming the disorder and giving a brief description or definition of it. Then explain why it is important. You might include the prevalence (how many or what percentage of people have it). If you have any personal experience from knowing someone with this disorder, you could summarize that here. Introduction: One paragraph - write at least three complete sentences. If you use information or quotes from your research, remember to include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of the sentence.
2. Explain the symptoms of the disorder, and how it affects the person living with it. Use information or quotes from your research (One-two paragraphs) Topic sentence, then three+ sentences with supporting details and examples; include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of a sentence/section where you have used information or quotes from your research.
3. Explain how the disorder is best managed. Use information or quotes from your research. Include information about resources available in your school or community to help individuals cope with this disorder. (One-two paragraphs) Topic sentence, then three+ sentences with supporting details and examples; include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of a sentence/section where you have used information or quotes from your research.
4. Explain who is most likely affected by the disorder, and the age or time of life when it is usually diagnosed. Use information or quotes from your research (One-two paragraphs) Topic sentence, then three+ sentences with supporting details and examples; include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of a sentence/section where you have used information or quotes from your research.
5. Sum up the long-term effects on individuals and on society of this disorder, and/or the prospects for a cure or more successful treatment in the future. What can we do to remove the stigma from this disorder? You might include something from your research, but be sure to make your own generalizations. Conclusion: (One-two paragraphs) write at least four complete sentences; include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of a sentence/section if you have used information or quotes from your research.
6. List your sources (authors; book, magazine, or article titles; exact url for internet sources) See a writer's guide for the correct format in which to list sources

Overview of grading
:Ideas and content 15 points:

Clearly state your chosen topic, and cover all requested information

Documented research and citations 15 points:

Support your paper with documented research Cite your sources within the body of the text so that it is clear where you obtained all of your information (worth 5 points). Include a works cited section at the end of your paper (worth 5 points). Introduce in your own words, put in quotation marks, cite, and comment on (again, in your own words) any researched material used in your paper (worth 5 points).

Conventions 5 points:

Proof, spell check and edit your work before sending it (worth 5 points).

***DO NOT copy and paste material directly from a website, DO NOT leave any links to other websites in your paper, and DO NOT plagiarize or cheat in any way. Papers suspect to plagiarism or cheating will result in an automatic ZERO with no chance of corrections.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.04 Standard 0ne in Action (Participation Skills and Techniques)

As you get more active, it is likely that you will improve your agility, balance, speed, strength and coordination. Click the first link, "Agility," below, and read the definitions of agility, balance, speed, strength, and coordination. Many people say that they don't have time for physical exercise, but there are plenty of ways to incorporate exercise into your daily activities.

Click the second link, "Increase Your Physical Activity," below, to learn about other ways you can work physical exercise into your daily life; you might be doing some of these things already. Make sure you scroll to the bottom and click on the links of the different ways you can increase your physical activity.

It is often thought that you must go to a gym to exercise, and although gyms are a great place to do that, you can do many exercises right in your own home. The last link, is an article about three exercises that you can do from home. As you read the article pay attention to the 'critical cues' for each exercise (see explanation below in previous lesson). Practice the exercises given in the article, as they will help you practice your agility, balance, strength and coordination. Get familiar with these exercises as you will be asked to do them in the assignment section.

You will want to get started right away on the three-week exercise part of the assignment. Please read the third link, "Easy Exercises for Teen," below. Then continue to the assignment: Standard One in Action.

teacher-scored 35 points possible 240 minutes

PLEASE NOTE: THIS ASSIGNMENT IS BROKEN UP INTO TWO (2) PARTS.

This assignment should be started by WEEK 1 of this class.

THIS ASSIGNMENT WILL TAKE THREE WEEKS TO COMPLETE.

You will need to complete and SUBMIT 01.04A by WEEK 1 of this class. The DATE you submit is your start date for this assignment! You will also need to complete and submit the three questions along with the start date.

You will need to complete and SUBMIT 01.04B by the CONCLUSION of WEEK 3 along with the TWO questions and your 3 week exercise log relating to the assignment. You many continue on with your other assignments while you are working on this assignment. Please put all answers in bold or UPPER CASE.

You may use Microsoft Office (Excel) or Open Office (which you can download free) to create your own spreadsheet but it needs to look like the one that I have provided for you in the link "Easy Exercises for Teens Log Spreadsheet." When you open this Google Doc you can Click on "File" and then "Download as" and download it into any of the programs that you have access to work on it.

"TO USE THE SPREADSHEET I HAVE PROVIDED"

Click on the Easy Exercises For Teens Log Spreadsheet to view how to get started on your log. You will need to click on "File" and then "Make A Copy." Make sure that you rename your Log Copy of Easy Exercises For Teens Log.firstname.lastname You should be able to access this document through your gmail in the "Document" tab anytime you like.
When you have completed the log, click on the BLUE "Share" button in the top right hand corner of the document. Make sure that it is "ANYONE YOU HAS THE LINK," in the area that lists; "Who has access."
Then you can copy and paste the URL into the submission box for this assignment and send it to me. Or you can upload it as a google doc. Make sure that you have completed the class, and only send it to me when you are ready to take the final for this course.

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01.04A Standard One in Action

NAME:

START DATE:

Answer in complete sentences or paragraphs, using boldface text for your answers.

1. Give me: 1>an example of a sport or physical activity that requires balance, 2>an activity that requires coordination, 3>an activity that requires agility, and 4> an activity that requires all three.

2. What things do you do to include physical activity during the day? (This could include chores, soccer, taking the stairs, etc.)

3. What do you think you could do to increase your physical activity? List at least THREE options, and EVALUATE each of them.

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01.04B Standard One in Action

In Topic 2 under STANDARD ONE, you read an article titled "Easy Exercises For Teens," and the article gave you an example of three different exercises: sit backs, chair squats, and butterfly breath.

ASSIGNMENT - You must PERFORM these THREE different exercises (sit backs, chair squats, and butterfly breaths) for the log! You will perform each exercise for the required rep and then increase your reps each week throughout the 3 week process. Please use the Easy Exercise for teens LOG that is available in the link above or make your own that is similiar to the log given! Make sure you submit the LOG and the QUESTIONS when you submit your 01.04B assignment.

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01.04B Standard One in Action

NAME:

START DATE:

END DATE:

Answer in complete sentences or paragraphs, using boldface text for your answers.

4. ***LOG*****                                                                                                                             *FIRST WEEK do each of the exercises listed above TEN times a day for any five out of the 7 days in the week.                                                                                                                                 *SECOND WEEK do each of the exercises listed above FIFTEEN times a day for any five out of the 7 days in the week.                                                                                                                       *THIRD WEEK do each of the exercises listed above TWENTY times a day for any five out of the 7 days in the week. Therefore, this assignment will take you THREE weeks to complete.

5. What got easier or harder by the third week? (Be specific and detailed in your answers! This was a 3 week assignment!)

6. What did you like or dislike about each exercise? (Be specific)

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.04 Standard 1 video (PE Individualized Lifetime Activity)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 40 minutes

Sandboarding: by Steven J. Weber, US Navy, public domainSandboarding: by Steven J. Weber, US Navy, public domain

Standard One Video INSTRUCTIONS: You will need to submit an instructional video demonstrating the basic skills for one of the activities you choose to do for your assignment. If you are unable to make a video, you can submit a set of pictures showing the basics skills for the activity/sport you have chosen.

  • Your video needs to be at least one minute long and no longer than two minutes long. If you would rather take pictures and use a video editor program to make a video/powerpoint to create your video, you can.
  • You will be the star of your video, so you might need to get a friend to do the filming. You will also be the narrator of the video.
  • Assume that you are making this video for another student who has never tried your particular activity/sport.
  • You CANNOT use the same video for another Individualized Lifetime Activity Video assignment, including both quarters.

Example: If the activity you choose was tennis, you would need to show the basic skills of tennis, such as:

How to grip the tennis racket
How to serve a tennis ball
What a backhand swing looks like and how to accomplish it, etc.

You may not have enough time to show all the skills of your activity/sport, but, just show what you can.

Video Assignments technical details
You will need a computer with a connection to the Internet and your digital video content (under two minutes please).
You can choose between "YouTube" or "Photobucket" to host your video assignments. You will need to create an account for either resource. Follow the instructions to upload and share your videos. "YouTube" will take a little longer to upload. In YouTube, you need to make your video "available to the world." When you go to the "My Videos" section of your YouTube account, play the video you want to submit. At this point you can either copy the address in the URL and send it to your teacher via your email account or click on the "Share" link to send an email to the teacher from the page your video is on. Photobucket is very similar. If you don't have a video camera, you can use still images in a slide show with narration that is converted to digital video.

01.04.02 Mental disorders quiz (Health II)

computer-scored 25 points possible 30 minutes

You may take this quiz multiple times, but you must score at least 90%. Go to the link in Topic 3 on the main class page to take the quiz.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.04.05 Two-Variable Statistics -- Assignment 6 (PreCalc)

teacher-scored 70 points possible 120 minutes

Complete

Unit 01 -- Two-Variable Statistics -- Assignment 6
More Real Data

The instructions for this assignment are in the attached .pdf file. The final product will be a Google Earth (GE) .kmz file.

After you have completed the assignment, save it according to the instructions in the attached file, and upload the GE .kmz file using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

You should complete this assignment after reading Lesson 4.

You may need to use the links below to complete this assignment.



01.05 Applying Your Skills: Video 1 (Participation Skills and Techniques)

In the assignment following this "lesson" you will apply what you have been learning as you practice and demonstrate a physical skill of your choice.

teacher-scored 30 points possible 60 minutes

This assignment should be completed by WEEK 3 of this class

You will need to submit an instructional video demonstrating one of the three exercises shown in the article “Easy Exercises for Teens,” located in lesson 01.04. These THREE exercises can include one of the following: SIT BACKS, CHAIR SQUATS, or BUTTERFLY BREATHS.

If you are unable to make a video, you can use a powerpoint to create a presentation USING pictures of YOURSELF demonstrating the basics skills (Critical Cues) for the exercise you have chosen. (There needs to be as many pictures as there are CRTICAL CUES for each exercise.) For instance for a Sit Back Powerpoint there are 7 cues, so you will need 7 pictures depicting each CUE. You can find these CUES in Lesson 01.04 in the link, Easy Exercises for Teens.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE VIDEO:

*There are three exercises you can choose from: (You only need to demonstrate one exercise. Do NOT do all three in one Video!)

Sit Backs

Chair Squats

Butterfly Breath

 

*Your video needs to be AT LEAST ONE minute long and NO longer than TWO minutes. If you would rather take pictures and use a video editor program to make a video/powerpoint to create your video, you can. *YOU Must be the star of your video, (meaning the video has to be of YOU performing the skill or exercise!) So you might need to get a friend to do the filming. You will need to explain the Critical Cues and how to perform the exercise in the video, and demonstrate the correct way to perfrom the exercise.

 

*Assume that you are making this video for another student who has never tried the exercise you are going to demonstrate.

 

*You CANNOT use the same video for any other PE Skills and Techniques assignment, including both quarters.

OBSERVATION QUESTIONS: After you have created your video, watch the video and critique yourself, bearing in mind the correct way to perform this exercise. Answer the following questions. MAKE SURE YOUR ANSWERS ARE IN COMPLETE SENTENCES OR PARAGRAPHS. Please put all answers in bold or UPPER CASE.

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01.05 Observation questions for Video 01.05

1. What activity did you choose?

2. According to the website explaining the exercises, what are the critical cues for the exercise you chose?

3. What did you see in the video that you were doing well?

4. What did you see in the video that you could improve on?

5. What did you see yourself doing that you didn't realize until you watched the video?

6. Name and date:

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INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR VIDEO: You will need a computer with a connection to the Internet and your digital video content (under two minutes, please). You can choose between "YouTube" or "Photobucket" to host your video assignments. You will need to create an account for either resource. Follow the instructions to upload and share your videos. "YouTube" will take a little longer to upload.

In YouTube, you need to make your video "available to the world." When you go to the "My Videos" section of your YouTube account, play the video you want to submit. At this point you can either copy the address in the URL and send it to your teacher via your email account, or click on the "Share" link to send an email to the teacher from the page your video is on. Photobucket is very similar. If you don't have a video camera, you can use still images in a slide show with narration that is converted to digital video.

 

IF you decide to NOT use PHOTOBUCKET or YOUTUBE... I can only view the following video formats...

.mov, .mp4, .m4v, .3gp, .mpv

Please make sure your video is in this format or you will have to redo the video.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.05 Correlation and Causation (PreCalc)

In this lesson we discuss the relationship between correlation and causation.

You can download the attached file, or you can read the same content below.



01.05 Couch Potato Workout (PE Individualized Lifetime Activity)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 60 minutes

by LAIntern at the wikipedia project, public domain, via Wikimedia Commonsby LAIntern at the wikipedia project, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Get Off the Couch!!

Did you know????

Kids and teens ages 8-18 spend an average of four hours a day in front of some type of screen media (T.V., DVDs, Computer, etc.), not counting school work. The more T.V. you watch, the more likely you are to snack.

The average person consumes almost 200 extra calories for every hour of T.V. watched!

Advertisers use kid/teen programming to promote fast food restaurants and many other extremely unhealthy foods (which makes you more likely to want them).

Too much television takes away from valuable physical activity time, which over time will get you into a lazy routine and you will never want to work out.

On average how much television do you watch per day? ____________(Be honest)

Why do you think a lot of teenagers spend so much time watching television or in front of the computer? Explain your answer. _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________

Here is an idea to get both: T.V. and exercise – The Couch Potato Workout

Here is what you do:

1. Choose a show

2. Watch it

3. During each commercial break do an exercise (there will be at least three)

Here is your workout: DO as many reps as you can during the commercials for each exercise

Commercial #1 – Incline Push Ups Incline PU (feet on the couch, hands on the floor)

Commercial #2 - Decline Push Ups Decline PU (hands on the couch, feet on the floor)

Commercial #3 – Regular Push Ups Regular PU

Commercial #4 – Curl ups Regular CU

Commercial #5 – Sit ups Regular SU (Chest touches your knees)

Commercial #6 – Chair Dips Dips (hands on the edge, dip down until you but almost touches the floor and back up)

 

Repeat: DO this work out 3 times on 3 different days – Check off each day and write in your reps

Day 1 Date: ____ Length of Show: ____ Time of Day: ____

Incline PU ____  Decline PU ____ Regular PU ____ Regular CU ____ Regular SU ____ Dips ____

Day 2 Date: ____ Length of Show: ____ Time of Day: ____

Incline PU ____ Decline PU ____ Regular PU ____ Regular CU ____ Regular SU ____ Dips ____

Day 3 Date: ____ Length of Show: ____ Time of Day: ____

Incline PU ____ Decline PU ____ Regular PU ____ Regular CU ____ Regular SU ____ Dips ____

 

01.05 Grief and Loss (Health II)

Imagine making a nametag for yourself. Imagine decorating it in a fashion that tells others a little bit about you. For example, my nametag may have my name written in red or yellow. I would decorate it with pictures of family and friends, athletes, and pictures of beautiful places.

Imagine or make a tear in your name tag for each of the following events you have experienced:
-- The loss of a loved pet.
-- Moving to a new home
-- The divorce of parents/grandparents/siblings
-- A brother or sister moving away
-- Changing schools
-- The death of a friend
-- The death of a family member
-- The loss of an ability due to injury or illness (paralysis, loss of a limb)
-- A parent being diagnosed with a debilitating illness.

The list could continue on. However, look at your imaginary nametag. Does it look the same as it did before you read through the list? If you are a typical adolescent, you have not escaped events that may cause grief in your life.

Although we all respond differently to the above situations, most of us have grieved at some level after the experience. You can tape your nametag back together; however, it will still show the tears and rips, albeit repaired. Grief is like this. Events that cause tremendous grief in our lives never go completely away, but they do eventually fade. For example, think of a bad cut or broken bone you have had. The initial pain was horrible, but it probably didn’t hurt as badly as having the bone set, or the cut cleaned and stitched. As much as it hurts, you know you must get it treated or it will only get worse. For a while, it hurt most of the time; eventually, it only hurt when you moved a certain way, then only when you bumped it. Now you may have a scar and when you look at it, you remember the injury. Sometimes it even makes a great story.

Severe grief is like an injury. The initial news is painful, but shock keeps someone from immediate suffering. Going through the grief is very painful, but if you don’t go through it, the pain will fester and grow until it controls you. After a while, the sadness or grief only returns when you are reminded of the loss. However, just like the scar from having a cut stitched, the loss will always be a part of you. If the loss was the death of a loved one, birthdays, anniversaries, and other important dates will bring back the memory of their death. With time, you will also be able to remember the happy times and the love.

Psychiatrist Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, MD, describes FIVE STAGES OF GRIEF that people often experience after a serious loss. They are as follows:

1) DENIAL AND ISOLATION
At first you may deny that the loss has taken place. You may need to gather more information before the loss can sink in.

2) ANGER
The next stage is anger. You may feel furious at the person who caused your sadness, even if that person is dead. You may feel anger at your belief system, yourself, the world. You may feel responsible in some way for letting the event take place, even if there was nothing you could have done to change the outcome.

3) BARGAINING
At this point in the grieving process, you may feel unable to face what has happened. You may make bargains with your higher power to change the events that caused your sadness. It is natural to want to avoid facing up to your loss.

4) DEPRESSION
During this time, you may feel numb, with anger and sadness just below the surface. You are not certain how or what to feel. This stage may last a few days to a couple of months.

5) ACCEPTANCE
This is the last stage of grieving. At this point, you are able to accept the reality of the loss. As you move through the grieving process, you are able to have more and more pleasant memories and move back into the routine of daily life.

It is important to understand that people handle grief in many ways. Some will want to talk about their feelings, the loss, and the events surrounding the loss. Others will withdraw and isolate themselves. Some want to move on quickly, almost act as if the loss did not occur, while others seem to not want to get past it. Some direct their anger inward and engage in self-destructive behaviors, or use drugs and alcohol to numb their feelings. There are no right or wrong feelings when confronted with a loss; however, there are helpful, appropriate ways to process the emotions associated with loss.

Moving through the grief process is a very individual endeavor. It is important to understand that all feelings are acceptable, and you should be allowed to feel and process them. The death of a loved one is probably the most difficult loss to endure. The strategies listed below may be helpful ways for someone to cope with and eventually process the grief associated with the death. Many of these strategies are from my own experiences, books on grief and grief counselors.

Strategies for Coping with Grief

WHAT IS NORMAL?

In a 1994 publication, Marilyn Gootman writes "Don’t judge yourself or others by the way you act or the way they act. Pain is pain, no matter how it looks on the outside. Don’t waste your time comparing one person’s reactions to anothers or one person’s pain to anothers. You all hurt, and you all have the right to express it in your own special ways." Do not blame yourself if you feel nothing, or if you are overly emotional. You are allowed to feel whatever you experience. If you feel like returning to work or school immediately, return. If, when you get there, you find you are not ready, leave. Give yourself permission to function and feel moment by moment.

TAKE TIME TO GRIEVE

Allow yourself to grieve where and when you need to. Share your feelings. Earl A. Grollman writes, "Grief is a process. Recovering is your choice. Grief is the price you pay for love, but you don’t have to go on paying forever. Time does not automatically heal your pain. It is your willingness to touch your pain--to accept it, to work with it, to understand your change of moods and behavior, and then to begin to reorganize your life. Healing happens as you allow feelings to happen. Time does not completely heal a broken heart; it only teaches you how to live with it." Forgive yourself and others. You give yourself the opportunity to place behind you those past agonies that diminish your strength and vigor. You give yourself new energies to move on to meet new challenges. You give yourself permission to live in an unfair, disappointing world.

WRITE

Put your feelings in writing. Keep a journal. Write a letter to the loved one that has died. If you are angry, say why. If you feel guilt, or responsibility, express it and ask forgiveness. Tell the person you love them, what you might do differently, and how you are going to remember them.

CREATE MEMORIES

Plant a tree, create and bury a time capsule, make a monument or scrapbook. Share your memories with others. "Remember to live your life to the fullest. Try to think of something positive from your friend, something funny that happened when you were together, or a pleasant time you shared. Know that a part of your friend will always remain with you." -- Marilyn Gootman

SURROUND YOURSELF WITH LOVED ONES

As was said in the remarks at my nephew’s funeral, "You cannot be a human being and live in isolation." No one can truly know what is going on in your head or heart, but others can support you in your pain.


SUPPORT FOR OTHERS IN THEIR GRIEF

Perhaps one of the most difficult aspects of grief is what to do for loved ones who are grieving. A friend had experienced the death of her eight year old son told me the most difficult aspect of his death was the isolation she felt afterward. After his funeral, people stopped dropping by, they looked the other way when driving down the street, even avoided her at church. I do not think her friends, neighbors, or church members meant to be thoughtless; they just did not know what to do, so they avoided the situation.

The following are suggestions for supporting others in grief from my health students based on classroom discussions and their personal experiences with death:

BE THERE
Sometimes words cannot possibly communicate the feelings you or your friend is experiencing. As a friend, Being near, not feeling compelled to talk, not trying to fix things, and not feeling the need to take the pain away can help more than anything else.

LISTEN
Your friend may not want to talk. He or she may want to go on as if their life has not been changed by the death. Allow them to move on, but be willing to listen and ask prompting questions when they do choose to talk. For example, ask how that makes them feel, or what might they do to work an issue through. Offer suggestions if asked, but once again, do not assume you know what is best for them.

SAY THE NAME OF THE LOVED ONE

Don't try to avoid talking about the lost loved one.
Terry Kettering wrote a poem entitled "The Elephant in the Room." Read it at the link at the bottom of this lesson.

PROVIDE SUPPORT
Little things may not seem to matter. Be on hand to take care of little tasks such as laundry, dishes, purchasing and preparing food. Your friend may want help with missed schoolwork, or for you to do the work with him/her for a little while. School may not be the most important thing on your friend’s mind, but he/she will need to keep his/her head above water.

01.05 Grief and Loss assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

PART I: Respond in essay form (complete sentences and paragraphs) to the following question based on what you’ve learned from unit lesson 01.5, life experiences and research you’ve done:

1. What have you learned about life while thinking and reading about loss and grief? What are some healthy ways to deal with change and loss?

PART II: Based on information read in the lesson portion of this unit, answer in essay form ONE of the questions below (same criteria as above). MAKE SURE YOU INCLUDE EXAMPLES FROM THE LESSON MATERIAL SO THAT I CAN TELL WHAT YOU'VE LEARNED.

2. How does your own experience with grief relate to the information contained in the lesson? In what ways do you agree or disagree with the "research?" What helped you the most through the grieving process? OR... 3. What might you do for a best friend that has experienced the death of a family member? Would your actions reflect the stages of grief? Be specific, and use information contained in the lesson.

Grading summary

Respond in paragraph form to question #1, based on the information you've read in the lesson.
  • 5 points for spell checking, editing and composing your essay in a grammatically correct paragraph form.
  • 5 points for referring to what you've read in the lesson material and relating it to your own life, while also answering the question completely.
10
Respond in paragraph form to EITHER question #2 or #3, based on the information you've read in the lesson.
  • 5 points for spell checking, editing and composing your essay in a grammatically correct paragraph form.
  • 5 points for referring to what you've read in the lesson material and relating it to your own life, while also answering the question completely.
10
Total Points Possible: 20

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.05 Language "Work Outs"

Students will practice editing for spelling and grammar mistakes in a short paragraph.

You will edit three paragraphs in the next three assignments.

There are spelling mistakes, punctuation mistakes, missing punctuation, word usage problems, etc. Your job is to correct as many conventions problems as you can. You need to find and correct at least ten mistakes (most of the paragraphs have between 15 and 20 errors).

You need to somehow 'highlight' your corrections (underline, bold, different color, number, etc.).

Copy and paste the paragraph into a word processing document and correct from there, then copy and paste the changes into the submission box.

01.05.01 Discussion of Correlation (PreCalc)


http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ice-cream.jpg

Did you know that there is a positive correlation between ice cream sales and drowning rates? It is true. When ice cream sales go up, the rates of people drowning also go up.

Does this mean that ice cream causes drowning?

Did you know that there is a positive correlation between water usage and crime rate? It is true. When the average water usage in a city increases, so does violent crime in the city.

Does this mean that water use causes violent crime?

Okay, one last one. Did you know that world wide, there is a positive correlation between tobacco use and life expectancy. It is true. World wide, people who use tobacco live longer than people who do not.

Therefore, tobacco use increases life expectancy?

Now, I suspect that with the first correlation you wondered, “if you eat ice cream before you go swimming, are you more likely to have cramps and drown?”

With the second, you may have wondered, “are violent criminals more likely to strike homes with green lawns?”

However, with the third, I suspect you thought, “seriously! I mean seriously!?”

Here is the deal. Not one of the correlations are above are causational. Eating ice cream will not make you drown. Watering your lawn will not make you more of a target for criminals. And, no, smoking does not make you live longer.

The point of this entire lesson is that two variables can be correlated without one variable causing the other variable.

In these examples, there is an underlying causational factor for each of these relationships. The first four variables are all caused by the same thing: summer. In the summer, it is hot, so people eat more ice cream. Therefore, ice cream sales increase in the summer. In the summer, people swim, boat, kayak, and expose themselves to situations where they might actually drown more frequently. Therefore, the rate of drowning increases in the summer. Ice cream sales increase in the summer. Drowning rates also increase in the summer. If we plot drowning rates vs ice cream sales, we will see a positive correlation. It is probably a fairly strong correlation - but ice cream does not cause drowning. Likewise, drowning does not cause ice cream sales.

I said the first four variables have the same underlying cause. In the summer, water usage increases as people try to maintain their yards and prevent their lawns, flower beds and gardens from drying up and dying in the hot sun. That shouldn't surprise anyone. Therefore, we could also observe that there is a positive correlation between water use and ice cream sales, or water use and drowning. Of course, I chose a somewhat more interesting variable to compare that with: crime rates. Crime rate, particularly violent crime, does actually increase in the summer. One possible reason is that the heat increases people's irritability, making them more likely to become violent. There are other possible explanations. This relationship is a bit less clear than some of the others.

At any rate, both water usage and violent crime increase when it is hot. These are correlated, but there is no reason to think that they are causational.

The final two variables also have an underlying causation. It is not that smoking increases life expectancy. There have been too many studies in the United States that demonstrate that smoking causes cancer and other diseases for anyone to believe that smoking increases your life expectancy. However, notice that I specifically said world wide there is a correlation between tobacco use and increased life expectancy.

Can you guess what the underlying causal factor is? Think about this. We are not just talking about the U.S. We are discussing developing countries as well – places where tobacco is a luxury item.

Figured it out? The issue is a wealth vs. poverty one. In many places in the world, tobacco is a luxury item. The only people who use tobacco are people who are wealthy. People who do not use tobacco do not use it because they are too poor to afford it.

The longer life span is associated with the good health that wealth affords. The shorter life span is associated with the poor health of poverty. The tobacco usage is merely an indicator of wealth, not an indicator of health.



01.05.02 Further Thoughts on Correlation (PreCalc)

In the previous examples, I selected variables that are not themselves related, but rather have a common underlying relationship, and compared them to each other. In your assignment with the climate data sets, you did something similar. You took data that was available and looked to see if there was any correlation. In my example for that assignment, there was good reason to believe that temperature and evaporation rate would be correlated. We know from science that water evaporates faster off of a hot surface than off of a cold surface. However, recall that this correlation was not 1.0, it was 0.92. Strong, but not perfect. There are other factors involved in evaporation besides temperature. I suspected that wind speed might be related to evaporation (again, from science, we get things to dry faster by blowing on them) but that correlation was very weak, so it may have been a contributing factor, but not a major factor.

When we are performing a science experiment, we can control all the variables. If we are actually successful in controlling all the variables, and if our tests show a correlation, we can assume causation. In the EHS science classes, students regularly perform labs where they test one variable against another, keeping everything else that might affect the system constant. In one lab in the physics class, students add identical objects to a spring and measure how far the spring stretches. Because the student was able to control any other variables that might affect the results, the student would have good grounds to say that the additional mass causes the spring to stretch. However, even then, there is an underlying variable that you don't see. It is really the additional force of gravity on the more massive object that causes the spring to stretch. Even scientists in fields where they can control all the variables will have a hard time stating that one variable causes another variable. Any claims of a causational relationship can only be as a direct result of the experimental procedure.

What about scientists in fields where they have nearly no control over the variables? Consider nutritional science. This is a hot topic in our society. Everyone wants to know: Which foods will keep me thin? Which foods will reduce my risk of heart disease? Which foods will lower my blood pressure? Which foods will keep my complexion clear?

In the past few years, the media have claimed that...

…. walnuts decrease the risk of heart disease, dark chocolate lowers blood pressure, cranberries prevent chronic stomach inflammation, olive oil prevents colon cancer, quinoa prevents type II diabetes. What you don't see is the researchers making these claims - just the media.

The researchers actually report the correlation they observed between these diseases and the consumption of the food in question; they do not claim that the food caused the health benefits. The researchers also reported the things that they did to attempt to control the variables. However, there are two basic problems with experiments involving food consumption and health. First, most changes in health are slow things that take many years. You cannot eat a walnut today and know tomorrow that you have avoided a heart attack. This is something that really must be done over the long term if it is to have any measurable results.

That brings us to the second problem: controlling variables. You want to know how the addition of a certain food changes a person's health. Therefore, you get test subjects and you ask some of them to eat food A, and you ask others to... do what? Continue in the same diet they were eating before? Eat potato chips? Also, you cannot control for the other foods that the subjects might be eating. You cannot control for their home lives, their stress level, their exercise levels, any number of things that probably affect a person's health.

We use a process we loosely call “garbage in, Gaussian out.” This means that if we get a wide enough distribution of people, all the other things besides what we are testing for will average out. The down-side of this is that the thing we are testing for also averages out. Thus, we are left with very little correlation.

Consider the walnut study. This study was done over a period of several years. This takes care of the fact that you really cannot test for short term health benefits. It used a very large sample, which takes care of the variations in individuals. It was self-reported. The problem with self-reported studies is that people lie. Maybe not intentionally or maliciously, but they do anyway. People forget things, people tend to remember that they eat healthier than they really do, they remember that they eat less than they really do, etc. There is not much you can do about that. You cannot find a large number of people who are willing to give up large periods of their lives to determine whether or not eating walnuts is good for you. You cannot afford to hire a large number of researchers working for many years keeping tabs on a large number of people in order to determine whether or not eating walnuts is good for you.

What they found was that the people that continued reporting that they snack on walnuts for the full period of the study had lower rates of heart disease, and heart disease indicators, than people who never snacked on walnuts, or who stopped snacking on walnuts during the study, or who started snacking on walnuts during the study. Could it be that walnuts reduce your risk of heart disease? Or could it be that people who snack on walnuts do not snack on potato chips, and snacking on potato chips increases your risk of heart disease?

There you go: a very well organized study that probably has pretty good results, but is probably not completely accurate, and may or may not demonstrate that eating walnuts decreases your chances of getting heart disease.



01.05.03 Moral of the Story (PreCalc)

You do not often read morals in a math class. However, you realize that mathematics is more than arithmetic. Mathematics was developed to solve problems. Part of solving a problem is understanding the solution. It is fine if you can solve a problem and get an answer. It is useless if you do not know, and cannot explain, what that answer means.

Statistics have a moral. The moral is that you should not believe everything you hear. The walnut study (which was a good study) did not actually prove that walnuts caused the lowered risk of heart disease. I am not saying that you shouldn't eat walnuts. Even if the health benefit was that you snacked on walnuts instead of something really bad for you, it is a health benefit. I am saying that when you read that eating onions will clear up your acne, you shouldn't be disappointed if it doesn't. There may be a very good correlation between eating onions and not having acne, but correlation does NOT imply causation.

Next time you read something on Facebook, or watch something on Youtube, be skeptical. Don't assume that eating ice cream causes drowning, or that smoking will make you live longer. Find out more. Look into the original study, check out the original data set. Take ownership of your mathematical understanding of statistics. Don't be fooled by statistics.



01.05.04 Two-Variable Statistics -- Assignment 7 (PreCalc)

both teacher- and computer-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

Complete

Unit 01 -- Two-Variable Statistics -- Assignment 7
Correlation and Causation

Work on this quiz/assignment at the link below this lesson. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do the assignment and provides immediate feedback.

Complete this assignment after reading Lesson 5.



01.06 Aging, Death and Dying (Health II)

As a young person, you probably have not yet had any reason to think about your own old age or death. You might not even have experienced the death of a close loved one. If your grandparents are alive and nearby, you probably have witnessed at least a few of the problems of aging. In any case, you know that all of us will die eventually, and most of us will grow old. In our culture, we try to remain young as long as possible, and tend to avoid thinking about aging or death. Although staying active and healthy is certainly a good thing, sometimes avoiding a subject just makes it even more of a scary bogeyman in the dark closet.

More than likely, you will someday have to cope with issues relating to your parents' aging, and then your own. Some important questions about aging and death are best addressed before the issues arise. Will there be enough money to support you when you can no longer work? If you were badly injured or had a serious heart attack or stroke, would you want to be kept on life support indefinitely even if there seemed to be no hope of recovery? How long would you want to be kept on life support? Would you want (for yourself or an elderly loved one) a 'do not resuscitate' order? Would you want your organs, or a loved one's organs, donated? Should people who are terminally ill have the right to doctor-assisted suicide? When our pets are suffering or very infirm, and we can't 'cure' the problem, we often consider it kind to euthanize them. Should the same be true for people? Should a person dying or in extreme pain be hospitalized, or should 'hospice' care be available at home? If a terminally ill patient is in such great pain that only dangerously high doses of painkillers can keep them comfortable, should we risk giving such high doses of drugs?

Read the 'required' links below. You may find the 'supplemental' links useful for your next assignment.

01.06 Death & dying research paper (Health II)

teacher-scored 35 points possible 120 minutes

You will write a researched essay about an issue related to death, aging and dying chosen from the topics listed below. Overview of assignment

Purpose: to inform
 and persuade Audience: teens and young adults
 TOPIC CHOICES:

Hospice Care, Euthanasia, Living Wills, Doctor Assisted Suicide, or Organ Donations

Search Pioneer Library, SIRS Knowledge Source, for information on the topic you chose from the list above. Use at least one of the websites listed for the previous lesson (01.6) and at least one source from Pioneer Library. Length: at least 550 words, plus a list of your sources. Write a two-page paper (12 point font, double or single-spaced, 1" margins, at least 550 words) clearly stating your position on the chosen topic, with research to support your claims (more sources than just Wikipedia are required, though it may be used minimally if you’d like). More quality sources are encouraged. BE SURE TO CITE YOUR SOURCES OF INFORMATION FROM YOUR RESEARCH throughout the paper, as well as a works cited section included at the end. REMEMBER TO WRITE IN YOUR OWN WORDS, CITE YOUR SOURCES ON ALL RESEARCHED OR QUOTED WORK (this means within the paper, as well as a works cited section at the end)!! and make sure to PROOFREAD and EDIT your report before submitting it.Organizing your essay

Content by paragraph (you may have MORE than one paragraph on each of these) Structure
1. Begin by stating your position on the issue. Explain any historical background or context for the issue. Then explain why it is important and list at least two reasons for your position. Introduction: write at least three complete sentences. If you use information or quotes from your research, remember to include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of the sentence.
2. Give one reason for your position on the issue. Use information or quotes from your research. Use logic, an analogy or give an example from experiences of family, friends, or news stories. Topic sentence, then three or more sentences with supporting details and examples; include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of a sentence/section where you have used information or quotes from your research.
3. Give another reason for your position on the issue. Use information or quotes from your research. Use logic, an analogy or give an example from experiences of family, friends, or news stories. Topic sentence, then three or more sentences with supporting details and examples; include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of a sentence/section where you have used information or quotes from your research.
4. Give another reason for your position. Use information or quotes from your research. Use logic, an analogy or give an example from experiences of family, friends, or news stories. OR You might explain opposing positions and tell why those positions are wrong or less important. Topic sentence, then three or more sentences with supporting details and examples; include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of a sentence/section where you have used information or quotes from your research.
5. Sum up the long-term effects on individuals and on society of this issue You might include something from your research, but be sure to make your own generalizations. End with another definite statement of the position you took, but not in exactly the same words as in your introduction. Conclusion: write at least four complete sentences; include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of a sentence or section if you have used information or quotes from your research.
6. List your sources (authors; book, magazine, or article titles; exact url for internet sources) See a writer's guide for the correct format in which to list sources

Overview of grading
:Ideas and content 15 points:

Clearly state your opinion on the chosen topic, and cover all requested information

Documented research and citations 15 points:

Support your paper with documented research, including a source from Pioneer Library Cite your sources within the body of the text so that it is clear where you obtained all of your information (worth 5 points). Include a works cited section at the end of your paper (worth 5 points). Introduce in your own words, put in quotation marks, cite, and comment on (again, in your own words) any researched material used in your paper (worth 5 points).

Conventions 5 points:

Proof, spell check and edit your work before sending it (worth 5 points).

***DO NOT copy and paste material directly from a website, DO NOT leave any links to other websites in your paper, and DO NOT plagiarize or cheat in any way. Papers suspect to plagiarism or cheating will result in an automatic ZERO with no chance of corrections.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06 DOL Refresher Course

teacher-scored 7 points possible 15 minutes

Do You Remember DOLs?

Before you start revising your own writing, let's practice some of the skills of revision by completing the following "Daily Oral Language" exercise.

This will get you in the mindset of finding mistakes that can make writing confusing. You will, in turn, need to employ these same skills when you are reading, re-reading, and revising your own writing.

Copy and paste the practice below between the rows of asterisks into a word document.

Make a list of the needed corrections and explain why those corrections are needed, then place your work into the assignment submission area after you have saved it to your hard drive. (DOL obtained from W.O.W. and D.O.L. - Wolfe County Schools wolfe.k12.ky.us)

*******************************************************************

DOL Practice *Correct seven errors in the following paragraph:

My Brother and me sing in a chorus, and every December we sing the Messiah by George F Handel. This piece was first performed in Dublin, Ireland in 1742. My brother Ray doesn’t sing, but he do play the trumpet. This year he will have the pleaseure of performing the famous trumpet solo.

List the mistakes and their needed corrections (explain) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

*******************************************************************

Grading Criteria: 1. Find all seven mistakes in the paragraph above and explain the grammar rule behind the corrections. Submit this assignment now. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06 The Value of Health Insurance (Financial Literacy)

Discuss the value of health insurance.

X-rays can cost hundreds of dollars: NARA image, public domainX-rays can cost hundreds of dollars: NARA image, public domain BACKGROUND

The average family spends several thousand dollars a year for medical expenses. PLUS, expenses are rising over 10% per year. So health insurance is one of the most valuable employee benefits. Tiff and Cameron did not realize the importance of this benefit. Review the three insurance terms below before proceeding: Deductibles: Insurance policies usually state a dollar amount you must pay before the insurance will start paying for such things as surgical procedures, lab tests, or hospitalizations. This can vary from company to company. Routine office visits are usually not subject to the deductible. A common deductible might be $1000. These can be annual, personal, or family deductibles that YOU pay before the insurance pays. Co-pays: Insurance “co-pays” are the amounts you pay each visit before the insurance pays. The good news is that if you make a copay, the insurance company usually pays the balance even if you haven’t met the overall deductible. The copay might be a percentage (e.g. 20%) or a certain number of dollars (e.g. $30) per visit. Coverage: Even the same kinds of insurance cover different things with different limits as you will see in a moment. Major organ transplants like heart, liver, and bone marrow, for example, might be covered under some policies but not by others. This affects monthly premiums that may run from $75 to $160 per month for a healthy young single person.  Visit URL #1 and #2 to learn more about insurance and how premiums and dedcutibles work.

Health insurance becomes even more important when you have a family: US DOD image, public domainHealth insurance becomes even more important when you have a family: US DOD image, public domain  Employee benefits are benefits offered and paid in part by employers.  Common employee benefits are: paid vaction holidays, paid sick days, health insurance, disability income insurance, life insurance, dental/vision insurance, profit sharing, payroll savings plan, tuition reimbursement, etc.  Visit URL #3 to learn more about employer health insurance and individual health insurance.

You may have heard about the Affordable Care Act that passed into law on March 23, 2010.  Many people also refer to this Act as "Obamacare," they are the same thing.  The ACA open enrollment starts October 1, 2013 and ends March 2014, and coverage will begin in January 2014.  This is a highly debated topic in America.  It is important for you to do your own research about ACA, so you can understand how it will affect you.

01.06 The Value of Health Insurance (Financial Literacy)

computer-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

You will now complete a 10-question online quiz. You MUST score at least 8 to receive credit for the assignment but don't worry if you don't get at least 8 the first time since you can retake the quiz as many times as you need. Only your last quiz attempt counts. You may continue to increase your score if you want (7 or less = try again, 8 = B, 9 or 10 = A).

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06 Unit 1 Review Quiz (Participation Skills and Techniques)

computer-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

Remember you may RETAKE the quiz as many times as you like, but you must score at least 80%. 8 out of 10.

This assignment should be completed by WEEK 3 of this class

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06.02 Thoughts & feelings on death assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 40 minutes

You will write your imagined obituary following the guidelines below, and then complete the questions in part II. First write the obituary in a word processing document on your computer. Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks below the obituary, in the same document. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. Overview of assignment

Purpose: to create an 'obituary' for your future self, and consider how you feel about death Audience: your future friends and family
 TOPIC :

Write your own obituary. Focus on the things that you want to accomplish in life, as opposed to looking at the negatives of writing out your own death. You may choose all the details that people actually have no control over. For example, you could die at age 305, in space while defending the universe, if you choose. However, you must include the following information in your obituary.

  1. Age and way you die
  2. Accomplishments
  3. Survived by (who would still be living after you die?)
  4. Preceded in death by (who in your family or close associates would have died before you?)
  5. Funeral Arrangements

(WRITE THESE ITEMS OUT IN PARAGRAPH FORM, AS THEY WOULD APPEAR IN A LOCAL PAPER. DON'T JUST FILL OUT THE FACTS ABOVE). Length: at least 200 words.************************************************************************ PART II:(10 points possible, 1 point per answer) Complete the following statements.

  1. Death is
  2. I want to die at
  3. I don’t want to live past
  4. I would like to have at my bedside when I die
  5. When I die, I will be proud that when I was living I
  6. My greatest fear about death is
  7. When I die, I will be glad that when I was living I didn’t
  8. If I were to die today, my biggest regret would be
  9. When I die, I will be glad to get away from
  10. When I die, I want people to say

******************************************************************************************* Overview of grading
:

Part 1:

Write Your Own Obituary including the five requirements listed above (2 points for each of numbers 1-5, and 10 points for spell-checking, editing and composing your obituary in paragraph form).

20 points
Part II: :

Complete the statements (1 point per completed statement)

10 points

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.07 Self-Employment & Entrepreneurs (Financial Literacy)

Identify the risks and rewards of entrepreneurship and self-employment.

Many artisans and artists are self-employed: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Joe Mabel, Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedMany artisans and artists are self-employed: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Joe Mabel, Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

BACKGROUND

Another way to earn money besides working for others is to be an “entrepreneur”--to be your own boss and own your own business. This can be full-time or part-time. Entrepreneurs cannot set any wage they want. They must make sufficient profit to pay their own wages and others as well. Nonetheless, many entrepreneurs earn far more than if they worked for someone else. But some make NO profit and incur great debt. So owning a business has risks AND rewards.

Anyone can be an entrepreneur, including students, parents, Tiff or Cameron, or someone that works full-time in a regular job. Many young people have a business on the side to bring in extra cash. It often begins when a person identifies some skill they have that fills other people's needs. Entrepreneurs have special skills, interests, or experience in providing a service or product others are willing to pay for.

VISIT URL #1 shown below to read the introductory paragraph and take the 7-question “Entrepreneur quiz.” Then click “submit” to read the evaluation of your answers. Then exit the web page and proceed to the URL #2 activity.

VISIT URL #2 shown below to take a short online questionnaire to compare your qualities with many successful entrepreneurs. After reading the instructions, click the button, which says “Click Here To See Your Score.” Then exit the web page to complete the assignment quiz,

This lesson has no assignment, only a quiz. Please proceed to the “Assignments, Quizzes, and Tests” section for 1.07.

01.07 This is your brain (Health II)

People used to believe that by the time you were a teenager, your brain was pretty much finished developing--you had all the brain cells you were ever going to have, and not much could change (unless you started killing cells off). NOT SO! Research using new technology shows that your brain isn't finished developing till you are in your mid-twenties, and even much older people's brains can still adapt and develop new cells on a smaller scale.

This is kind of a good news/bad news situation. The good news is that even if you have a hard time with, say, algebra, when you are 12, you can still reasonably expect to get better at it (so don't give up). The bad news is that any substance abuse before you are about 25 is likely to have more serious effects on your brain than substance abuse later in life. The good news is that if you have a stroke or brain injury later in life, there is still a chance your brain can heal or learn to work around the damage. The bad news is that the areas of your brain that help you make good decisions and responsible choices won't be mature till you are around 25--and there are a whole lot of decisions and choices to make between now and then!

Read or view the information at the links below. Yes, it will be on the quiz.

01.07 Unit 1 quiz (Health II)

computer-scored 25 points possible 30 minutes

Go to Topic 3 (Assignments, Quizzes and Tests) to take this quiz.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.08 Self-Employment Risks and Benefits (Financial Literacy)

Identify advantages and disadvantages of self-employment.

Entrepreneurs in cities have made businesses of walking other people's dogs: Image from Wikimedia Commons, revolution cycle, CC Attribution 2.0 GenericEntrepreneurs in cities have made businesses of walking other people's dogs: Image from Wikimedia Commons, revolution cycle, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic

BACKGROUND

There are many advantages as well as disadvantages and risks with self-employment:

Disadvantages: Working for yourself can be lonely. Most self-employed people work harder than their employees in the beginning so they work more than “9 to 5.” There are often not enough hours in the day. Cash flow problems are common (you may have to wait for months for payments). Business often involves planning, proposals, quotations, marketing, bidding, and more. It takes much time and effort. There is no guarantee you will be successful. It can be difficult to switch off and relax. There is often little security, particularly in the beginning. Difficult issues related to employees are common. Some times may be busy while others may not. Often, there is little money when you start.

Advantages: You are in charge and have control. The profits of your labor are yours. Any decisions about the business are yours. Seeing the business develop and grow can be immensely exciting and satisfying. You can keep your business and living costs to a minimum, especially if your home is used as the workplace. It is possible to make a great deal of money if you run a good business.

The activity below helps you further understand advantages and disadvantages of owning your own business.

VISIT URL #1 shown below to carefully read why small businesses fail.

01.08 Self-Employment Risks and Benefits (Financial Literacy)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

Assignment for lesson 01.08: This assignment is different from the others because EHS requires one writing assignment in each quarter. In this assignment you will write on the following topic:

To be a successful entrepreneur, you must have a passion for what you do. You must also strongly believe your products and services will meet customer needs.

Grading Criteria:
1. Assignment must contain 400-500 words (including your words AND those copied between the asterisks from the outline below). Do not exceed 500 words total. (Note: Visit "wordcounter.net"I If you don't have a word counter.)
2. Sentences must be complete with correct spelling, grammar and punctuation.
3. Quotations are not required; but any direct quote must be cited with the source identified.
4. Writing must be ORIGINAL, thoughtful, and accurate.

To begin: Copy the outline shown below between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document. Respond to each of the five parts to complete the assignment. A spellchecker and word-counter may be used. When finished, copy the assignment into the answer box and submit like all previous assignments.

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REMINDER: When this assignment is submitted, you must have 400-500 words between the lines of asterisks to receive a passing score.
1- Describe a "successful entrepreneur." Response:
2- Tell why entrepreneurs must have passion for what they do. Response:
3- Explain why entrepreneurs must strongly believe their products and services will meet customers' needs. Response:
4- Add any additional thoughts about qualities a successful entrepreneur should have. Response:
5- Answer the following:
a) 6 points: How many TOTAL words (including your own) are there between the lines of asterisks? Answer 400-500 (required for full credit):
b) 4 points: Has submission been spellchecked, and thoughtfully revised as necessary? Answer:
c) Write your first and last name and today's date. Answer:

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.09 The Cost of Living (Financial Literacy)

Compare income (salaries) to the cost-of-living in various cities.

Madison Avenue, in New York City: image from Wikimedia Commons, Leif Knutsen, Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedMadison Avenue, in New York City: image from Wikimedia Commons, Leif Knutsen, Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported BACKGROUND

One factor that affects the value of your salary, is the “cost of living.” The “cost of living” varies from city to city. For example, a person living in Salt Lake City, Utah, making $50,000 per year may have more buying power than someone earning $100,000 per year in San Francisco, California. Let’s compare some real-life examples.

VISIT URL #1 shown below to compare the costs of living in a Utah city with a different city in order to answer the assignment questions. Here are some brief instructions: 1. Under the words, "I live in", choose Utah and then a city close to you. 2. Under the words, "I want to live in", chose a different state and city. 3. A salary of $50,000 is already selected as the beginning salary in the first city. The comparable salary in the new location will automatically be shown.

01.09 The Cost of Living (Financial Literacy)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

Exit the web page and submit your assignment as usual.

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ASSIGNMENT 1.09 (12E) (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

1) Q: Using the website, Select the Utah city or one close by that you live in. Then, under "I want to live in," select the state “New York,” and select "New York (Manhattan)." Do not change the beginning salary of $50,000. Read the “results” and tell how much the website says you have to earn in “New York (Manhattan)” to have the same purchasing power as the Utah city you selected> ANSWER:
2) Q: Now choose another city outside your state where you personally might want to live to answer the following: a) What city and state did you choose to move to? > ANSWER: b) Do not change the beginning salary of $50,000. How much would you need to make in that city to have the same buying power as your current city?> ANSWER:
3) Q: In your own mind, identify one other expense that might be different in the new city you chose due to climate, location, etc. (answer not on website): > ANSWER:
4) Q: Why do you think living in a city where the salary is double your current salary may not double your purchasing power? > ANSWER:
5) Q: (1.09): Write your first and last name and today's date.> ANSWER:

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.10 Inflation (Financial Literacy)

Explain the effects of inflation on savings and investments.

US Inflation rates 1914-2009: Public domainUS Inflation rates 1914-2009: Public domain

BACKGROUND

Inflation reduces the value of your money. That means money won't buy as much. Inflation is an increase in the prices of goods and services. The annual rise in inflation over the past 25 years averaged 4.5%. That may not seem like much until you realize this makes things cost more than twice as much every 16 years. So a $50,000 salary today would be worth about $25,000 salary in 16 years. It is pretty certain that inflation will continue and greatly reduce the value of your money over time.

VISIT URL #1 shown below to see some pretty remarkable effects of inflation. Then use your brain (and a calculator if needed) to complete the assignment.

01.10 Inflation (Financial Literacy)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

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ASSIGNMENT 1.10 (12E)
(Copy everything between the asterisks.)
1) Q: How much would a $20,000 car in 2005 have cost in 1985? (Input 2005 as initial year and 1985 as final year.)> ANSWER:
2) Q: Figure out how much a $3.50 sandwich purchased in 2005 would cost one of your parents the year they were born. Input 2005 as the initial year; then input the year one of your parents was born (the “final” year). What was the cost of your parent’s sandwich?> ANSWER:
3) Q: If savings interest increases savings by 3%, but inflation reduces savings by 4%, then estimate how much the total value of savings goes down (hint: It is roughly like taking 3 steps forward and 4 steps backward). > ANSWER:
4) Q: Give at least one example of where you think inflation will probably impact you negatively in the future in a big way: > ANSWER:
5) Q: (1.10): Write your first and last name and today's date.> ANSWER:

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.11 Taxes (Financial Literacy)

Understand required income withholdings, reasons for taxation, uses of Social Security, Medicare, and employee payroll taxes.

US tax rates 1921-2009; brown line shows rates for people in highest income bracket; blue line, rates for those in lowest income bracket: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Quophnix, CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain DedicationUS tax rates 1921-2009; brown line shows rates for people in highest income bracket; blue line, rates for those in lowest income bracket: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Quophnix, CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication BACKGROUND

Taxes: Tiff and Cameron were disappointed when they received their first paycheck. They thought that working 40 hours at $8 dollars per hour (40 hrs. X $8/hr), gives you $320 - right? Wrong! Cameron only received $265 after the Social Security taxes, Medicare taxes, Federal Income taxes, and State Income taxes were taken out. He didn’t know that people spend more on taxes than on any other single item such as clothes, food, or cars. You, too, will pay taxes on income (wages, tips, and interest income.). Then, by April 15th of each year, you will file your income taxes. If you paid too much, you get a “refund.” If you paid too little, you owe more. In this lesson, you will examine:

  • Social Security
  • Medicare
  • Federal Income taxes
  • W-4 Forms (used by employers to calculate how much money to withhold from your check).
  • “Gross” vs.“Net” Pay. “Gross pay” is what Tiff and Cameron thought they'd get. “Net pay” (take-home pay) is what they really got after taxes.

More questions on test #1 come from this lesson than any other so read the material carefully and pay close attention to the website when you get to that part.

PAYROLL TAXES

What are “payroll taxes” and what is their purpose? And why do you care about this? Payroll taxes are taxes that will be withheld from your paycheck that include Social Security (also called FICA), Medicare, and Income tax. Here is a short description of each:

  1. Social Security taxes provide benefits for retired workers, the disabled, and their dependents.
  2. Medicare tax is used to provide medical benefits for individuals when they reach age 65. Workers, retired workers, and their spouses are eligible upon reaching age 65.
  3. Federal income taxes are used for national programs.

How will the Federal government spend the federal income tax portion of payroll taxes? It will use the money to pay for such things as national defense, foreign affairs, social programs, law enforcement, interstate highways, and to pay interest on the national debt. How will your employer know how much of your hard-earned money to withhold?

  • Social Security tax will be 6.2% of your total (gross) income.
  • Medicare tax will be: 1.45% of your total (gross) income.
  • Federal Income tax: It varies according to the “W-4” form you complete. The form determines how much income tax to withhold. If too much is withheld, you get some back when you file a tax return. If too little is withheld, you pay more when you file a tax return.

Here is a typical example of the taxes that could be withheld from a person’s $2000 paycheck:

  • Social Security tax (4.2 percent of your total [gross] pay) = $84 (note: your employer contributes an additional 6.2%). (Note: These numbers sometimes change and can vary over time.)
  • Medicare tax (1.45 percent of your total [gross] pay) = $29
  • Income tax (as indicated by your form W-4) = $220

Your take-home (net) pay is $1,667. Therefore, you don’t really have $2000 to spend after taxes. You may get less money if other things are withheld such as payments to retirement plans or health benefits. These, however, are not payroll taxes. U.S. Government IRS logo, public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsU.S. Government IRS logo, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons FILING A TAX RETURN

At the end of the tax year, most people are required to file an income tax return IF they earned over a certain amount of money for the year. Sometimes you get some of the tax money back if you paid too much. Sometimes you pay more if you didn’t pay enough. This will be determined when you complete and file a tax return. Often, young people earn too little money to pay taxes. That means that either they won’t have payroll deductions, or they will get all payroll deductions back. They will file their taxes using special forms provided by the IRS such as 1040, 1040A, and 1040EZ. What determines how much tax you get back OR how much you have to pay? There are many things that determine this. We will consider only two things that affect how much tax you pay. Your filing status is the first thing that affects how much you pay. Everyone must choose one of the following tax filing statuses: single, head of household, married filing a joint return, qualifying widow(er) with dependent child, or married filing a separate return. Each filing status has a different standard deduction. The size of that deduction affects how much total tax you will have to pay. “Deductions” refer to deductions from your income that reduce taxes. There are two kinds of deductions:

  1. the Standard Deduction (which is different for each filing status listed above)
  2. the Itemized Deduction (a list of personal deductions that sometimes total more than the standard deduction)

Most people should choose whatever deduction is larger so that they pay taxes on a smaller income; therefore, they pay less tax. Furthermore, you would choose to “itemize” deductions only if your itemized deductions total more than your standard deduction.

(Now VISIT URL #1 to learn more about taxes, and click through the 9 pages of the tutorial.) After reviewing URL#1 mentioned above, proceed to the “Assignments, Quizzes, and Tests” section for 1.11. to take an online quiz (rather than submit an assignment). The quiz submits itself automatically. You MUST score at least 8 to receive credit for the assignment, but don't worry if you don't get 8 or higher the first time since you can retake the quiz as many times as you need. Only your last quiz attempt appears in the grade book. You may continue to increase your score if you want (8 = B, 9 or 10 = A). Take the assignment 1.11 quiz now (in the Assignments, Quizzes and Tests area of the main class page).

01.12 Unit 1 Test (Financial literacy)

When you have finished the assignment 1.11 quiz and all the unit 1 assignments, you may take the 20-question Unit TEST 1. It requires no password. (In fact, only the final proctored test for 1st quarter will require a password.) Good luck as you now complete the Unit 1 test.

IMPORTANT NOTE: the test is not complete until you click the “submit button” at the end of the test. Many students forget and do not receive credit for the first test. Also, you may retake the unit 1 test (and all other unit tests) as many times as you like to raise your grade and better learn the material.

01.15.01 Destinos 5 Places Google Earth Tour

teacher-scored 50 points possible 90 minutes

Let's create a Google Earth Tour! This assignment comes right before the final review quiz for Unit 01.

Use the Google Earth (GE) Tour above called Example_Destinos_5_Places_PatLambrose.kmz as an example tour. For ideas about why these geospatial skills are important, view the Geospatial Revolution Episode 1 Video in links below. Download Google Earth if you do not have the program on your computer. See Google Earth links below for additional help.

Open Google Earth, then Select File, Open, and browse to the folder on your hard drive for the Example_Destinos_5_Places_PatLambrose.kmz file. Refer to this example tour as a guideline as you build your Destinos 5 Places Google Earth Tour.
Note: This file will be under Temporary Places in the Table of Contents screen.

Once all 5 places are located and placemarks created, save your GE Tour as follows: Destinos_5_Places-YourFirstNameYourLastname.kmz Be sure to save your kmz file on your hard drive where you will remember.

See detailed instructions for this assignment in the PDF file listed above. The file name is Destinos_5Places_GE_Span_Q1.pdf. Once your GE Tour is completed, submit the Google Earth Tour KMZ file to your teacher as an assignment.

01.2.3 Standard 1 Assignment (PE Skills)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 100 minutes

PLEASE NOTE: THIS ASSIGNMENT WILL TAKE THREE WEEKS TO COMPLETE. You many continue on with your other assignments, and submit this assignment at the end of the three weeks. You may want to complete the first part of the assignment and save it, as you just read the course material and hopefully still fresh in your mind.

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work by pasting it in to the assignment submission window for this assignment.

Please put all answers in bold or UPPER CASE.

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01.04 Standard One in Action

NAME:

DATE:

Answer in complete sentences or paragraphs, using boldface for your answers.

1. Give me an example of a sport or physical activity that requires balance, an activity that requires coordination, one that requires agility, and one that requires all three.

2. What things do you do to include physical activity during the day? (This could include chores, soccer, taking the stairs, etc.)

3. What do you think you could do to increase your physical activity? List at least three options, and evaluate each of them.

4. In Topic 2 under STANDARD ONE, you read an article titled "Easy Exercises For Teens," and the article gave you an example of three different exercises: sit backs, chair squats, and butterfly breath.
ASSIGNMENT
*FIRST WEEK do each of the exercises listed above ten times a day for any five days.
*SECOND WEEK do each of the exercises listed above fifteen times a day for any five days.
*THIRD WEEK do each of the exercises listed above twenty times a day for any five days.

Therefore, this assignment will take you THREE weeks to complete. After the three weeks, answer the following questions:

5. What got easier or harder by the third week?

6. What did you like or dislike about each exercise?

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02.00 Savings (Financial Literacy)

NOTE: This video can take from 3 to 12 minutes to load. I suggest you go ahead and try it, but feel free to open another screen and work on the next activity while it is loading. The video makes the class more interesting but does not contain critical information.
Your computer needs to have QuickTime installed to view this video. To view it, click the link then click the play button.

02.00.01 Discussion board participation (English 9)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 25 minutes

Topic for this unit: Why is it important to have a home?

 

One of the key skills in most jobs (and many family and volunteer situations) is the ability to listen carefully to other people's ideas, and respond with meaningful questions or elaborations. In the online environment it is difficult to have a live discussion, but we can use a discussion board--see the "Discussions" button on the left of the class-- to exchange ideas and respond to each other.

 

There will be a topic question posted, and your assignment is to post four times -

  • one initial, original response to the question
  • thoughtful responses to two other student's initial posts (choose at least one that has not yet had a response, if there are any), and
  • one additional response, either a reply to someone else's response to your initial post, or a reply to another student's reply to your response to their initial post (that was awkward to explain!).

 

Before you write your original response, look at the pictures and read the poems and articles in the links below. When your four posts are complete, copy and paste them into the assignments submission window, too.

Scoring:

Each of your required posts will receive a score of 1-5. OF COURSE, your posts should be courteous, respectful and constructive.
To receive maximum points, try to include at least three of the following in your initial post:

  • Respond directly to the topic question with a statement of what you believe and why.
  • Provide evidence for your belief in the form of personal experiences, examples from works of literature we've read in this class or you have read on your own, statistics, logic, examples from science or history, and/or short direct quotes (be sure to include the author/source of any quotes)
  • Clearly explain the reasoning or logic behind your belief; consider cause and effect or problem and solution
  • Be specific and concrete.
  • Ask authentic questions about your ideas. (An authentic question is one you don't know the answer to yourself, and that a person probably couldn't find an answer to by a quick internet search.)

 

To receive maximum points, try to include at least three of the following in your reply posts:

  • Summarize what you think the other person's main point was, in your own words. That way s/he will know whether you understood.
  • Ask questions about points you don't understand after carefully reading what the other person wrote.
  • Offer evidence [in the form of personal experiences, examples from works of literature we've read in this class or you have read on your own, and/or short direct quotes (be sure to include the author/source of any quotes)], either supporting or disagreeing with the other person's point.
  • Point out strengths or weaknesses in the person's reasoning/logic.
  • Make connections between the ideas of other students
  • Broaden the discussion by relating something in the other person's post to a more general topic.
  •  

Score Criteria
5 Includes at least three of the types of content (listed above); shows excellent depth of thought, understanding and originality; demonstrates exemplary conventions
4 Includes at least three of the types of content (listed above); shows depth of thought, understanding and originality; demonstrates mostly accurate conventions
3 Includes at least two of the types of content (listed above); may show some depth of thought, understanding or originality, but is more general or superficial; may contain some conventions problems, but also some correct conventions
2 Includes at least one of the types of content (listed above); lacks depth, detail and/or originality; may contain many conventions problems
1 Insufficient or irrelevant response; lacks depth, detail and/or originality; may contain many conventions problems

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.00.01 Warm-up Activity (Citizenship)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 60 minutes

One of the purposes of this class is to prepare you to vote. Write an essay (at least 250 words) and tell me why you think people closest to your age group (18-24) have the worst record in voting of any age group. State your position (the reason why you think 18-24- year-olds vote less than other age groups), and support it with evidence, examples and reasons. You will need to do some research to find evidence, but you should also think about it yourself, and use your experiences to help you understand this issue.

Structure Content Points possible
Introduction (one paragraph) Begin with the percentage of voters 18-24 compared to other age groups. (You will need to do some research to find this.) Then state your position (what you think is the most important reason). 5 points
Evidence (one paragraph) Explain at least one piece of evidence you find in your research that helps support your position. Be sure to document your sources. 5 points
Evidence or examples (one paragraph) Explain another piece of evidence, or specific examples from your own observations or research, that help support your position. Be sure to document your source. 5 points
Defend your position (one paragraph) Explain one piece of evidence or an example that seems to disprove your position, and why your position is still correct in spite of this. Be sure to document your sources. 5 points
Conclusion (one paragraph) Sum up your argument, and suggest at least one thing that could be done to improve voting participation among 18-24 year olds. 5 points
Works cited List all books and websites you used in researching this issue 5 points

 

A credible source of research is the SIRS Issue Researcher database in the Utah Pioneer Library. You can use keywords such as "voter apathy" or  subject headings such as "Voting, Statistics" to get to relevant research.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.01 Electronic Mail Presentation (Computer Technology)

Run this presentation while taking notes using the Email Module PowerPoint Guide. (See attachments.)

02.01 Flexibility (Fitness for Life)

By Shustov (Own work) CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0), via Wikimedia CommonsBy Shustov (Own work) CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0), via Wikimedia Commons

Watch the unit 2 presentation (PowerPoint attachment above, or links to online video version, below). If you have trouble downloading the PPTX file, right-click the file and tell it to download to your local computer and open it that way.

If you have the optional textbook, also read chapter 10.

Use these links to view the unit 2 presentation in video version online. It is split into parts so that it will download quickly. When the link opens, click the middle of the viewing box then the play icon in the lower left of the viewing box to start the video.

02.01 General safety issues (Horse Mgt)

General Safety Issues
Safety issues can be divided into two categories: keeping people safe while working with horses, and keeping the horses safe.

Keeping People Safe Around Horses

Horses are by nature timid animals, and few horses will deliberately hurt a human being, unless the horse is badly frightened and feels it cannot escape. However, because of the horse's large size, it can often hurt someone unintentionally. If you fall off a horse, or get stepped on, you may be hurt in spite of the fact that the horse did not intend to hurt you.

The most important safety issue while riding is to protect your skull, and the brain inside it, by wearing a helmet. Most deaths and serious injuries from riding are the result of head injuries. These are mainly preventable by the use of ASTM-approved helmets, which these days are comfortable, light weight and under $50. Helmets are far more important for horsemen than for bicycle riders, because of the simple fact that your head is much farther from the ground when you ride a horse than when you ride a bicycle. A law of physics says that the farther an object falls, the faster it will be going when it hits the ground. In the case of your head, a concussion or skull fracture is a likely result of a fall from a horse. Maybe you are willing to take your chances of dying from a head injury - but are you willing to live as a brain-damaged individual, with possible loss of coordination and/or ability to walk, talk, feed yourself and function mentally? Everyone who rides a horse should wear a helmet, every time they ride.

The next most important way to protect yourself while riding or handling horses is to make sure you will not be caught in the saddle or other equipment and dragged if you fall, or if the horse gets out of control. Wear a proper riding shoe or boot with at least a 1/2 inch heel whenever you ride in a saddle with stirrups, so that your foot will not slip through the stirrup and be trapped. Don't ever wrap reins, leadropes or anything else attached to the horse around any part of your body. A few years ago a teenager was killed when she tied her horse's leadrope around her waist because there wasn't a post to tie to, and the horse became frightened and dragged her. Consider whether jewelry or clothing you wear might get caught on something.

Whenever you are around horses, you should be alert and aware of what the horse is doing. Do not make sudden quick movements or loud noises which might startle the horse. If you are close to a horse, keep one hand on the horse so both of you are aware of each other. When you walk behind a horse, either walk at least 10 feet away (to be out of reach of a kick), or - with a horse you know to be gentle - put one arm over the hindquarters and walk right next to the horse, where you will not startle the animal, and if it did kick, you would probably just be pushed away without serious injury.

Don't engage in rowdy, wild play either around horses or while riding. Don't trot fast or gallop on paved roads. If you want to see how fast your horse can go, even if you are a good rider, do it on a race track, not out in a field or along a road where there may be unseen hazards. Always be mindful of other horses and riders in the area so that you don't cause problems for them, or vice versa.

If you need to lead a horse past something frightening, put yourself between the frightening object and the horse, so that if the horse jumps away, it will also be jumping away from YOU, not over the top of you. While working around a horse, keep your feet under you in case you need to move quickly - don't kneel or sit on the ground.

Most importantly, for your safety and the safety of the horse, you must understand how horses think and react, and anticipate what might cause problems so that you can prevent a situation from becoming dangerous.

Don't pressure a frightened horse.

Many accidents or injuries are caused by a person who misjudges the horse's state of mind, and continues trying to work, train, or handle a horse who has become too frightened or upset to think clearly. When teaching a horse something new, whether it is to load into a trailer, carry a rider, sidepass, follow a calf, or whatever, it is necessary to put some pressure on the horse - take him a little out of his comfort zone so he learns the correct response to an unfamiliar feeling or situation. A great horseman is someone who knows exactly how long or how far to push the horse before backing off, so that the horse learns something new without "losing it". A great trainer can bring the horse along without battles and blow-ups. The more frightened a horse it, the less likely it is that he is learning anything, and the more likely it is that WHAT he is learning is that he is stronger than you - and that one or both of you is about to get hurt.

Keeping Horses Safe

Many of the rules that apply to keeping you safe also help the horse. For instance, if you were to get hung up and dragged by a horse, the horse would be much more frightened and likely to get hurt than if it just got loose without anything dragging.

Clean up clutter in horse barns, corrals, pastures or walkways. Check for any sharp or jagged edges, protruding nails, baling wire or twine, and bent or broken fence posts. Horses should never be within reach of electrical wires or cords, or glass windows. Fences need to be high and strong enough to prevent horses from escaping, and gates should be securely fastened, preferably with at least two closed gates between the horses and any opportunity to get out on a road. Fences must also be easily visible so that a running horse has time to stop before hitting the fence.

Don't crowd too many horses into a small corral - they are more likely to kick or bite if crowded. Pay attention to the temperaments of horses kept together - a very aggressive horse should not be paired with a very timid horse who will be beat up, nor should two very aggressive horses be kept together. In large pastures, there is usually enough space for the 'lower-in-the-pecking-order' horses to get away from bossy horses, but corners, sheds, or gateways may be places where a horse can be trapped and kicked. As a general rule, it is better to keep geldings with geldings and mares with mares, but depending on individual personalities, a gelding and mare may get along fine with each other. Stallions need extra-high, extra-sturdy fences, especially during breeding season. Stallions have been known to crawl under fences, jump or climb over fences, or push through fences to get to mares! Electric stand-off wires are a good idea to keep horses from challenging fences.

Keep feed (especially grain) locked up so that horses can not get access to it if they happen to get loose.

Weather and Safety

Like humans, horses are sensitive to heat and cold. However, horses are meant to live in a slightly cooler environment than humans. Humans are most comfortable when temperatures are in the seventies. Horses are most comfortable when temperatures are in the fifties or low sixties, and in their natural winter coats, are fine even when temperatures are down into the teens or single digits as long as they have protection from wind or freezing rain (horses who have been clipped need to be blanketed and/or kept in stalls in cold weather). However, horses working in hot, humid weather (heat index over 90) need to be monitored closely for signs of dehydration, heat exhaustion or heat stroke, and offered regular drinks of plain water and water with dissolved electrolytes.

Lightning is a safety issue with horses. In places like Florida where there are many thunderstorms, horses are routinely brought into barns to protect them from lightning. A horse is often the tallest object in an open area, and so attractive to lightning. If you are riding and a thunderstorm catches you out in the open, try to tie your horse to a small tree or non-conductive fence, and then crouch in a low area well away from the horse until the lightning is over. I have known several horses killed by lightning.

Strong winds often make horses nervous and flighty, especially if there are things blowing across the ground or making noise. Wind storms can also bring down large branches or even trees, potentially striking a horse directly, or frightening it into bolting into a nearby fence.

Also take into consideration what weather has done to the footing. Slippery ground (mud, ice, and/or snow) increases the chances a horse may slip or fall, injuring itself or a rider.

See also 4-H Horses & Horsemanship pp. 42-44

Be sure to read the Equestrian Helmet Fact Sheet, link below

02.01 Introduction to Argument (English 9)

Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Patrick Henry addresses the Virginia Assembly, in the 1770's: Currier and Ives, copyright expired, via Wikimedia CommonsPatrick Henry addresses the Virginia Assembly, in the 1770's: Currier and Ives, copyright expired, via Wikimedia Commons

 

 

 

"Argument?" you say. "I'm good at that--just ask my parents!"

In current usage, "argument" means a discussion (often angry) between two or more people who disagree on something. However, that is not the way we will be using "argument" in this class.

The classical meaning of "argument" (remember that 'classical' refers to the Greek and Roman period, about 2000+ years ago) had to do with persuasion. The words "rhetoric" and "discourse" have related meanings. Many of our ideas about rhetoric are based on the work of the Greek philosophers/teachers/writers Plato and Aristotle.

 

Ethos, Pathos and Logos

Aristotle classified the techniques of rhetoric into three categories. Their Greek names are ethos, pathos and logos.

Ethos has to do with the speaker/writer himself (or herself).
Do you trust the speaker? Do you like him/her? Does s/he have a reputation for being honest and accurate? If you answer "yes" to those questions, you are more likely to be persuaded to agree with the speaker. An attractive, charismatic speaker who seems to have a strong belief in his/her message will persuade or motivate more listeners.

Pathos has to do with emotional reactions.
Appealing to listeners' concerns or hopes, the speaker tries to arouse fear, anger, shame, sorrow, happiness or sympathy, often using 'loaded language'--words calculated to 'push your buttons.' (If you're thinking of political speeches or commercial advertising, you're on the right track.) References to patriotism or loyalty to one's group; examples of wounded veterans, dying children, abused animals, or unemployed people losing their homes; or images of sexy models, happy families, beautiful scenery, or the trappings of wealth are all often used to manipulate viewers' and listeners' emotions. It is human nature to be easily swayed by emotion.

Logos has to do with logic, knowledge and facts.
The use of statistics, scientific studies, cause-and-effect relationships, and parallels from history are all examples of logos. Note, however, that logos can be used to mislead as well as to impart accurate information. A speaker who is working from false premises will arrive at false conclusions, even using logic.
Logos should be the most important basis for persuasion, but generally, people are more easily persuaded by personal appeal and emotion. Why do you believe the things you do? Probably, in most cases, because your family members or friends believe those things.

In this class, we will use 'argumentation' to mean logos--the use of logic and evidence in communication. Just as a poet or fiction writer uses carefully-chosen specific details to shape and clarify a poem or story, a writer of argument uses facts, examples and evidence to shape and clarify the meaning.

How is argument different from persuasion?

The purpose of persuasion is to convince others of something. The purpose of argument is to determine the truth about something. That said, argument may sometimes be used as part of persuasion.

How is an argument different from an opinion?

All of us have opinions. We may like school, or we may not like school. We may oppose abortion, or war, or higher taxes, or discrimination. We may think fried chicken is better than pizza or vice versa. Those are our views, or opinions. Sometimes your opinion may differ from someone else's opinion, and the two of you disagree. That is still not an argument. When we begin using logical reasons or evidence to determine whether a certain view is correct, then we are using argument.

For example:
From the Declaration of Independence:

"We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. That to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed. That whenever any form of government becomes destructive to these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shown that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such government, and to provide new guards for their future security."

OK, let's analyze:

Does it contain examples of the use of 'ethos'?
Not that we can see here. It doesn't mention anyone by name, and it wasn't delivered as a speech, so we can't pin it to any particular person's reputation or charisma.

Does it contain examples of the use of 'pathos'?
It does use some 'loaded' language (suffer, evils, abuses, usurpations, despotism). However, it doesn't contain any specific, graphic images, so it doesn't elicit strong emotions--the appeals to pathos are minimal.

Does it contain examples of the use of 'logos'?
Yes, for sure. It is constructed in a very logical manner. It starts with premises (the list of the unalienable rights, the purpose of government, and the rights of people to change their government); it proceeds to explain how human nature tends to put up with problems rather than make major changes; and it ends with the claim that people have a right and duty to change a government that does not respect their rights.

The graphic below illustrates another way of looking at disagreements. The top three levels fall into what we would consider 'argument.'
Graham's Hierarchy of Disagreement: Rocket000 image, Wikimedia Commons, public domainGraham's Hierarchy of Disagreement: Rocket000 image, Wikimedia Commons, public domain

 

Consider some examples, using the terms in the hierarchy:

 

Name-calling:  we all know what this is!  This is how pre-schoolers argue - "You're just mean!" "It's not fair!"  As people get older (but not necessarily more mature), this turns into "You're a *^&%*@(*&%!"

Ad hominem:  If we don't like someone, we are often suspicious of their ideas.  We see this both in personal life and in politics - "You can't believe a word he says!"  "If she opens her mouth, she's lying!"  It takes a certain amount of openness and maturity to be willing to admit that even people we don't like, do sometimes have good ideas and can be right occasionally.

Responding to tone:  It is easy to react to HOW someone says something instead of to WHAT they say.  We often reject ideas that are presented in an angry or accusatory tone, turning that tone back on the speaker. "If she expects us to listen, she should treat us with respect first!" Unfortunately, this often results in reverting to name-calling, but even if it doesn't, we need to look beyond the tone or emotions of the person presenting the argument to examine the facts and evidence.

 

Contradiction: At least a contradiction responds to the argument, rather than the person or tone, but a simple contradiction doesn't offer any reasons or evidence.  "You're wrong." "Mr. Jones' ideas about climate change are incorrect."

Counterargument:  Finally, this is getting into useful territory.  A counterargument includes a reason or evidence for why the argument is wrong.  "You're wrong. The bus trip will cost a lot more than you have budgeted."  "Mr. Jones' ideas about climate change are incorrect because his computer models are over-simplified."

Refutation: A refutation offers reasoning and evidence to explain why/how one aspect of the argument is wrong. "If you include the cost of fuel - $3.90 per gallon, to go 350 miles at 7 miles per gallon - the bus trip will cost much more than the $300 you have budgeted for a driver and meals."

Refuting the central point: If you can analyze the whole argument to identify the main idea supporting it, and then offer reasons and evidence why that main idea is wrong, that is more effective than just refuting one point in the argument. "Mr. Jones' ideas about climate change are incorrect not only because his computer models don't take the effects of heat on evaporation, ocean currents and prevailing winds, but more importantly, because his data only go back 20 years.  This is far too short a time to support any conclusions about climate, as short-term weather patterns can vary immensely and skew the results."

Logical Fallacies

Many people accidentally - and some people deliberately, especially if they are trying to sell something or win an election - use faulty logic.  There are common types of mistakes in logic, and many have been named ("ad hominem" is one).  Two more common logical fallacies are called

  • "bandwagon" (or "everybody's doing it): This fallacy suggests that something popular must be right or good:  "Join the millions of satisfied customers who already benefit from our product."  "Everyone is voting to re-elect our senior senator."
  • "begging the question" (or "circular reasoning"):  This fallacy occurs when your conclusion is no different than your reason:  "I don't have time to do my homework this weekend because I'm too busy." ("Too busy" and "don't have time" are two different ways of saying the same thing: neither is the cause of the other.)

Propaganda

Propaganda is persuasion gone over to the "dark side".  Propaganda deliberately uses deceptive persuasive techniques to try to change people's beliefs and actions (including how they spend money).

Propaganda tries to convince people of something. It is not a single technique, but a combination of persuasive techniques. The idea or feeling spread by propaganda may be true, partially true, or not true at all, but the purpose of the propaganda is to persuade people to believe regardless of whether the idea is true. The word "propaganda" comes from the same root as the word "propagate", which is much used in the plant industry, where propagate means to reproduce and grow many plants of the same kind. Propaganda reproduces and "grows" a particular idea.

The word for advertising originally had to do with spreading information, publicizing. Now we usually associate advertising with media that tries to persuade us to buy something (though it may serve other purposes - for example, persuading us to vote for a certain candidate, or to attend a certain event).
The work of advertising and propaganda overlap, and they use many similar techniques. A few of the common techniques are listed below.

  • REPETITION:

Probably the simplest propaganda technique is simple repetition, which is based on the proposition that if people hear something often enough, they will begin to believe it - or at least come to recognize and remember the name. Radio, TV, magazine and billboards may simply state (over and over again): "Silver Edition toothpaste is the best!" or "Jane Smith will make a great governor!" Repetition is often paired with the next technique:

  • GLOWING GENERALITIES:

Generalities are statements which make broad claims, without specific explanations, proof or examples. For instance: "Mr. Candidate is the best man for the job!" Best in what way? According to whose judgement?
Truth-in-advertising laws often make exceptions for claims like "The fastest service in the universe!" because we (the public) are expected to understand that the claim is an exaggeration, not intended to be taken literally.
Generalities in advertising are usually in glowing, positive terms like the two examples above. However, some ad campaigns may use negative generalities:
"Candidate G is irresponsible with public money!"
"Using other brands may ruin your reputation!"

Negative generalities may degenerate into name-calling. In the 50s and 60s, many people who opposed war were called Communists, or "red". Propaganda often tries to polarize the community, suggesting that everyone must be either on one extreme or the other. In recent years, many people who worked for compromises on environmental issues were labelled "tree-huggers" by those who opposed government regulations on land use, and accused of "selling out" by those who favored strict regulation.

  • EXPERT or CELEBRITY TESTIMONIAL

Some ads feature an expert(or group of experts) who testifies that the product is good:
"98% of doctors recommend BrandX painkiller."

This technique is most reasonable if the person testifying is actually an expert on the pertinent topic. Doctors may reasonably be considered experts on health matters; lawyers, on legal matters; a beauty queen might be an expert on make-up.

Often, however, the person featured in the ad is just famous (a celebrity).
Madonna uses Super Shampoo!
A rock star may recommend voting for a certain candidate for president. A sports star may recommend a certain brand of car. In these cases, the person is not really an expert. The advertiser hopes that we will believe people who are famous, just because they are famous. Closely related to this ploy is the next technique:

  • ASSOCIATION (also called TRANSFER)

Many ads that feature famous people don't actually have the celebrity make claims for the product - they simply show the celebrity wearing, using, or near the product. These ads hope we will associate the product with the famous person, and will want to buy it/vote for it so that we will feel more like this person we admire.

Many ads use association to try to connect their product with something we see as desirable, rather than with a famous person. Most ads show happy, beautiful, slender women or good-looking, well-built men in the hopes that we will associate the product with being happy or having a good-looking boyfriend/girlfriend. This kind of advertising implies that if we buy the product, we may become (or seem) more beautiful, sexy, glamorous, happy and successful. Advertisers or propagandists hope we will transfer our positive feelings about what we see or hear to the product. A recent example of political propaganda using association/transfer was in the 2008 election, when opponents of Obama made a point of calling him Barack Hussein Obama, hoping voters would associate him with Saddam Hussein, or with Muslim extremists in general. At the same time, opponents of McCain were trying to show Senator McCain with President Bush, hoping voters would associate McCain with some of the unpopular policies of the former President.

 

 

02.01 Making healthy food choices (Health II)

Nutrition Objectives Objective 1

a. Describe the primary nutrients and their functions. Lesson Material: Using the link listed at the bottom, go to the website and read about the six primary nutrients. (You may need to click on the subcategories within the text or at the bottom to find all the information you need.) After reading the information, complete the nutrients assignment 02.1.1. b. Evaluate how the United States Department of Agriculture’s Seven Dietary Guidelines and the most current Food Guide Pyramid can enhance proper nutritional choice. Lesson Material: Using the Dietary Guidelines link below, click on the pdf file for dietary guidelines. (Don’t print this document as it is 112 pages when printed. You may want to print out just the pages you need.) Read the following out of this file:

1. Executive Summary and Key Recommendations (pages viii – xi in the document; using the page counter at the bottom of the pdf file is pages 10-13) 2. Chapter 2--Balancing Calories to Manage Weight 3. Chapter 3--Foods and Food Components to Reduce

Use the MyPlate link below, click on the News and Media tab and watch Secretary Vilsack's video (2 minutes). Complete the assignment 02.1.2 on Dietary Guidelines. c. Analyze and employ health food choices (e.g. reading food labels, calculating caloric intake). Using the MyPlate link below, click on "Daily Food Plan". Fill out your information and get your personalized plan. Go complete the assignment 02.1.3 on daily caloric intake. Go to the Food Labels website and read about food labels. After reading this, complete the assignment 02.1.4 on food labels.

02.01 Movement (Participation Skills and Techniques)

Movement: Movement is the key to physical activity. Our muscles, bones, and joints work together whenever we move, even if it is a small movement. At a young age we practice getting control of our movements, such as when we learn to hold our heads up as a baby, learn to crawl, learn to walk, learn to hold a fork, etc. It is important to understand how our muscles, bones, and joints work, and it is more important to keep them healthy. *CLICK on the first link, "Bones, Muscles and Joints," to find out how important our muscles, and bones, and joints are and how they work together. Be sure to click on ALL the pages. You need to know how many bones we have, what makes them hard, how many muscles we have, what connects them, what kind of joints we have and what their names are.

*CLICK on the second link, "Strength Training," to learn more about the importance of strength training and the safe way to do it. Make sure you know what type of activity and exercise strength training includes. Make sure you click on each page of the article.

Warm Up, Cool Down, and Stretching: To keep our muscles, bones, and joints healthy, it is so important to warm up before beginning any activity, and cool down after any activity. Read the article know know the amount of time suggested to warm up. Our muscles love to be stretched, even though it doesn't feel that way sometimes, but it is critical to stretch correctly to avoid injury. *CLICK the third link, "Stretching," for instruction on warming up, cooling down, and stretching. Again, make sure you click on each page of the article to find the information needed to answer the questions on the quiz.

02.01 Movement (PESkills)

Go to Wikipedia and look up "movement."

Movement is the key to physical activity. Our muscles, bones, and joints work together whenever we move, even if it is a small movement. At a young age we practice getting control of our movements, such as when we learn to hold our heads up as a baby, learn to crawl, learn to walk, learn to hold a fork, etc.

It is important to understand how our muscles, bones, and joints work, and it is more important to keep them healthy.

READ THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE to find out how important our muscles, bones, and joints are, and how they work together. Be sure to check out the DIAGRAMS on the right hand side of the article.

02.01 Movement(PESkills)

02.01 Nutrients assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 46 points possible 45 minutes

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. ************************************************************************************************* Complete numbers 1-5 following the instructions below: 1. Using the information from the website on the six essential nutrients, make and fill out a chart like the one below. (33 points possible)

Nutrient Name Functions Sources Toxicity symptoms/Deficiency symptoms
A. ________      
B. ________      
C. ________ Type:1 Type:2 Type 1: Type 2: Type1: Type 2:  
D. _________ Type 1: Type 2: Type 1: Type 2: Type 1: Type 2:  
E. _________ Type 1: Type 2: Type 1: Type 2: Type 1: Type 2:  
F. _________      

Answer the following questions based on what you've learned from the lesson material (links) and chart: 2. What happens if the carbohydrate supply is too low for the body? (1 point possible) 3. What are kwashiorkor and marasmus? How are they caused, and what are the effects?(6 points possible) 4. How much water should an average adult person consume daily? What about an active teen?(1 point possible) 5. Should you consume more of saturated or unsaturated fats? Why? (2 points possible) 6. How might an individual’s physical, mental and social well-being be affected by not consuming enough of the nutrients? (3 points possible) *******************************************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.01 Political Parties (Citizenship)

Political Parties
Political cartoon featuring the Republican symbol (the elephant): "Judge" magazine, 1904, public domainPolitical cartoon featuring the Republican symbol (the elephant): "Judge" magazine, 1904, public domainPolitical cartoon featuring the Democratic symbol (the donkey): from "Harper's Weekly" magazine, 1870, public domainPolitical cartoon featuring the Democratic symbol (the donkey): from "Harper's Weekly" magazine, 1870, public domain

Political parties are not an 'official' part of our government. You may have noticed they are not mentioned in the Constitution. In fact, some of our Founding Fathers didn't like the idea of political parties, at least in theory.

In practice, though, political parties have always been part of the process of governing the United States. Forming groups of like-minded people seems to be human nature (think about the way students at your school seem to group themselves, and the gatherings of different religious groups in the world).

In the United States, we nearly always seem to have two major political parties (though, if you look back through history, it hasn't always been the same two, and if you look at other countries, some have only one major political party, and some have more than two). There are advantages and disadvantages to a two-party system.

For over a hundred years now, the Democrats and Republicans have been the two major parties in the United States. 'Red states' usually vote Republican, and 'blue states' usually vote Democratic. Each party tends to blame the other for whatever is currently going wrong. This is nothing new--it's been going on since early in our history.

Read/view the information at the links below to learn more about political parties, and why they are important.

Define each of the topics and vocabulary below to better understand this lesson:

political party two-party system
one-party system proportional representation
coalition independent voter
political patronage representative democracy
major parties minor parties

02.01 Recognizing types of persuasion and argument (English 9)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 30 minutes

At any given time, political candidates and elected officials are arguing various issues (and using other persuasive techniques). Your assignment is to find four examples of argument in current speech or nonfiction writing (within the past year), and analyze them to see what aspects represent ethos, pathos and logos. Your explanation of why you think the example is an example of one of these types is the most important part of this assignment. Make sure you find at least one example of each.

For this assignment, you need recent examples of persuasive or argumentative speech or writing.  Editorials (opinion pieces) and political speeches are likely to work.  Straight news stories or advertising are not good sources for this purpose.

Do NOT copy or analyze the whole speech, editorial or essay (unless it is very short!). DO select a paragraph or short section.

The links below are possible sources, but you may find other sources, also. Remember that an argument (logos) must contain evidence or reasons in support of a view or position on an issue.

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

**************************************************************************

1. Ethos

A. Explain or paste in the example.
B. Where did you hear or read this? (if internet, give the url)
C. Who was the speaker/writer?  What was his/her main point in the excerpt you chose?
D. What makes this an example of ethos?
E. Do you find this convincing? Why, or why not?

2. Pathos

A. Explain or paste in the example.
B. Where did you hear or read this? (if internet, give the url)
C. Who was the speaker/writer? What was his/her main point in the excerpt you chose?
D. What makes this an example of pathos?
E. Do you find this convincing? Why, or why not?

3. Logos

A. Explain or paste in the example.
B. Where did you hear or read this? (if internet, give the url)
C. Who was the speaker/writer? What was his/her main point in the excerpt you chose?
D. What makes this an example of logos?
E. Do you find this convincing? Why, or why not?

4. (may be Ethos, Pathos, or Logos - specify which)

A. Explain or paste in the example.
B. Where did you hear or read this? (if internet, give the url)
C. Who was the speaker/writer?  What was his/her main point in the excerpt you chose?
D. What makes this an example of logos, pathos or ethos?
E. Do you find this convincing? Why, or why not?

**********************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.01 Saving and the POWER of Compound Interest (Financial Literacy)

Describe the concept of the time value of money.

Compound interest (5% per annum) graph: image from Wikimedia Commons, Pfelton, public domainCompound interest (5% per annum) graph: image from Wikimedia Commons, Pfelton, public domain BACKGROUND

The power of “compound interest” helps your money grow more quickly than you might imagine! The ability of money to grow over time is called “The Time Value of Money.”

Visit the links below to learn more about the awesome power of “The Time Value of Money” and compound interest. Deposits in Banks and Credit unions are now insured for $250,000. Now you know the answer to one of the quiz questions! Visit URL #1 to read about the difference between simple and compound interest. (There are also two links on the page that you should click on and read ("Compounding Calculator" and "Millionaire Calculator ). Then exit the web page and continue to the next URL (URL #2). Visit URL #2 to learn about the power of 72, which tells you how long it takes for money to double by dividing the interest rate into 72. You can check your answers with the online calculator. Learning about how your money "grows" as you save, is important as you plan for retirement. Many people wait until they are "grow-ups" to begin saving for retirement, but using the power of compound interest and saving even a little bit now, will put you way ahead than if you waited to start saving 10 years from now.

This lesson has no assignment questions, only a quiz. Please proceed to the “Assignments, Quizzes, and Tests” section for 02.01.

02.01 Saving and the POWER of Compound Interest (Financial Literacy)

computer-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

You will now complete a 10-question online quiz. You MUST score at least 8 to receive credit for the assignment but don't worry if you don't get at least 8 the first time since you can retake the quiz as many times as you need. Only your last quiz attempt counts. You may continue to increase your score if you want (7 or less = try again, 8 = B, 9 or 10 = A).

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.01.01 Art Talks Color and color schemes (ArtFouii)

In your on line reading, you should have learned that colors can go together. These are called color schemes. There are several different color schemes. Colors that are spaced equally spaced on the color wheel such as red, yellow and blue are called a color triad. Another color scheme is called complementary. These would be two colors directly across from each other on the color wheel such as red and green. In the next step you will learn how to make a monochromatic color scheme. In real life, colors are not just one tone. They have a range of values. As light hits an object that has color, it can either be seen as a tint or a shade. For example, you might be wearing an all blue shirt today, as the light hits the fabric, you can see lighter areas of blue where the light hit directly. If any of the wrinkles of your shirt are in the shadows you will see the darker values of blue making it monochromatic. This monochromatic scheme will make your objects look like it has form and shape.

For fun, try the external link called "Color Matters". It works in most browsers. Try the activities about color--if you dare

02.01.01 Baseline Assessment of Health-Related Fitness Components (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 90 minutes

Introduction: One of the first steps in designing your own fitness program is to assess your current level of fitness. From this information, you can see where your strengths and weaknesses lie and design a program that will address your weaknesses. These tests are very basic and they should be used to gain an understanding and appreciation for each component of health and skill-related fitness. These tests should not be used to compare yourself to others, nor are there "norms" that would allow you to compare your values to those of students your age. (Note: the tests on pages 14-15 in your text are an excellent resource for completing these assessments.)

Essential Question: What is your body trying to tell you? Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. You might want to print out a copy to take with you to your workout. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Don't forget to highlight your answers. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

***********************************************************************************

Name:_______________________________ Date:_____________________

Tasks: Complete the following: DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS.

1. Cardiovascular Fitness

_____ Heart rate prior to exercise

_____Heart rate (beats per minute) after running in place for 1 minute (Note: If you have a physical condition that prevents you from running in place, choose another vigorous exercise that uses as many large muscles as possible that you can do to substitute for this part of the lab. Be sure to describe the exercise you used, and the reason for the substitution.)

_____ Heart rate (bpm) after resting for 1 minute after completing exercise. What do you believe the changes in your heart rate indicate about your level of physical fitness? (5pt)

2. Flexibility

With your heels together, bend forward and reach with your hands between your legs and behind your ankles. What do you believe your results indicate about your flexibility using these joints? Do you believe these results are consistent with other joints? (5pt.)

3. Muscular Endurance (Single Leg Raise)

High Knee jog. Run in place with knees coming above the belly button. Count your repetitions. Continue until knees can no longer be brought above belly button, or a maximum of 1 minute.

_____ How many high knee repetitions could you perform? (Goal: 20 repetitions.) What do you believe your results indicate about your level of muscular endurance? Explain your answer. (5pt)

4. Body Fatness (Arm Pinch)

Pinch the fold of skin on the back of your arm. (Do not include muscle, only a “folding” of the skin. Estimate the thickness of the fold. If you performed this task as a part of Assignment #2, enter that value.)

_____ How many inches was the fold of skin on the back of your arm? What do you believe your results indicate about your level of body fatness? Explain your answer. (5pt)

5. Muscular Strength (90-degree Push-Up)

If you have access to free-weights or a bench-press machine, determine your 10 rep max. If you do not, do push-ups with your fingers pointing forward, elbows out, and your hands placed at elbow width, forming a 90 degree bend at the elbow. Exercises like pushups can often serve as an indicator of either muscular strength or muscular endurance. If you can do 10 or less, it is an indication of lack of strength. 10 or more pushups is more of an indication of muscular endurance.

_____ How many push ups were you able to perform in one minute? What do you believe your results indicate about your muscular strength? Do you feel this is an accurate indication of other areas of your body? Explain your answer. (5pt)

6. Share your results with a group (2 or more) peers, your parents, or teachers.

If you so desire, you may wish to use Facebook or some other form of social media as base for your discussion. (If you do, remember you are trading some aspects of privacy for a broader, quicker, audience.) Discuss with them your strengths and weaknesses as indicated by these results. Be sure to include in your discussion the relationships these indicators have with overall fitness, how accurate you feel these are, and if there are other indicators that you feel also give you valuable information regarding your fitness. Describe the results of your discussion, including disagreements, and conclusions.(10 pts.)

7. Based on your discussion, what are some activities that you feel would be good for you to improve your physical fitness?

Explain why you chose these specific activities, and why you feel they would be best for you. (5pts.)

Before completing question 8, you may wish to review the short video clip at the link below.

8. Create a weekly workout schedule that incorporates those personal needs you have identified.

• Be sure to include flexibility guidelines.

• Indicate when and how you are going to incorporate those activities you have chosen with your 30+ minute aerobic workouts. (10pts.) This plan must include at least 30 or more minutes of aerobic (rhythmic, continuous) exercise at least three days per week. If you need to, go back to your group to discuss any modifications that are necessary to meet all these criteria. If you are unsure about exactly what constitutes aerobic exercise, contact your teacher. Briefly describe your plan here, then incorporate that plan as your workout plan, and log the experience for three consecutive weeks in your activity logs.

******************************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.01.01 Weights (PESkills)

Strength training/lifting weights is great exercise for your muscles, bones, and joints. You need to do aerobic exercise and strength training. You don't necessarily have to go to a gym or lift dumbbells to strength train. Activities like yoga are great for building muscle strength, and even though you are not lifting metal weights, you are lifting the weight of your own body.

Read the following article to learn more about the importance of strength training and the safe way to do it.

02.01.02 Dietary guidelines assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 23 points possible 50 minutes

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. Dietary Guidelines Assignment

What to do: Total Points Possible:
Complete Questions 1-4 following the instructions provided below. 23
Question 1 2
Question 2 1
Question 3 10
Question 4 10

****************************************************************************************************** Answer the following questions using information from the lesson material:

1. What are the two main concepts that the Dietary Guidelines encompass? a. b. 2. What are the daily caloric needs for someone of your age, gender and physical activity? 3. In two short paragraphs, summarize the key recommendations for the Guidelines of Balancing Calories to Manage Weight and Foods and Food Components to Reduce. 4. According to the information, the rate of obesity among teens in the United States has increased significantly in recent years. Many people who have weight problems in the teen years continue to have weight problems as adults. As you read, obesity is a risk factor for many diseases such as high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease and some types of cancer. What factors do you think have contributed to the increase in weight problems among teens? And how do you think following the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the Choose My Plate guidelines might help teens reverse this trend and reduce disease risks? Write in paragraph form. Be sure to explain your rationale.

*****************************************************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.01.02 Warm Up, Cool Down, and Stretching (PESkills)

To keep our muscles, bones, and joints healthy, it is so important to warm up before beginning any activity, and cool down after any activity. Our muscles love to be stretched, even though it doesn't feel that way sometimes, but it is critical to stretch correctly to avoid injury.

Read the following article for instruction on warming up, cooling down, and stretching.

02.01.03 Daily caloric intake assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 60 minutes

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. Daily Caloric Intake ASSIGNMENT

What to do: Total Points Possible:
Complete Questions 1-4 following the instructions provided below. 30
Question 1 1
Question 2 6
Question 3 15
Question 4 8

****************************************************************************************************** Read the information in the lesson portion of the course material for this assignment. Answer the following questions based on what you read: 1. What is your daily recommended caloric intake? 2. How many servings of each group should you eat?

Food Group Servings Suggested
Grains  
Vegetables  
Fruit  
Dairy  
Protein  
Fats/Oils  

3. Based on your suggested servings, plan a menu for one day. Be sure you include exactly and only your daily recommended amount--don’t go above or below. 4. Think about what a normal day of eating is for you. You can make a list of what you ate if you need to. Write a paragraph comparing and contrasting the menu you just created with a normal day of eating for you. How are they alike, how are they different? Which one is healthier etc… *****************************************************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.01.03 Standard 2 Quiz(PESkills)

computer-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

Go to section 3 "Assignments, Quizzes, Tests" on the homepage of the class. Then click on "pe.skills.Q1.standard2quiz " to take the quiz: (Note: you may retake the quiz as many times as you like)

02.01.04 Food labels assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 18 points possible 30 minutes

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. Food labels ASSIGNMENT

What to do: Total Points Possible:
Complete Questions 1-7 following the instructions provided below. 18
Question 1 1
Question 2 1
Question 3 1
Question 4 1
Question 5 3
Question 6 6
Question 7 5

******************************************************************************************************

Read the information in the lesson portion of the course material for this assignment. Use the food label to the left to answer the questions: Answer the following questions based on what you read: 1. How much is a serving size? _____________ 2. How many ounces are in the entire package? _____ 3. How many calories come from fat? ______ 4. What percentage of the total calories comes from fat? ____ 5. What percent of the DV is: Cholesterol _____ Sodium _____ Fiber _____ 6. Is this product high or low in “Limit these nutrients” and “Get Enough of these nutrients”? Explain in detail. 7. Without knowing what the product is, is it a healthy choice? Why or Why not? Write a paragraph explaining your answer.

*****************************************************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.01.07 Exercise Eleven (Teen Living)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

Exercise 11 -

Write a brief evaluation of your personal self-concept based upon what you read about self-concept and self-esteem. One short paragraph is sufficient.

02.01.07 Exercise Eleven

Look at these sites that teach you about Self-concept and Self-esteem. Then, please write a paragraph discussing the difference(s) between self-concept and self-esteem.

02.01.12 Exercise Sixteen (Teen Living 1)

teacher-scored 15 points possible 15 minutes

Exercise 16

As fast as you can, write down as many positive things as you can think of that would build positive self-esteem. Perhaps you may want to time yourself; set a timer for five minutes and try to write as many things as possible.

02.01.13 Exercise Seventeen (Teen Living 1)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 120 minutes

Exercise 17

Think of five things that you would like to change about yourself and write them on one side of a 3x5 card or a piece of paper. On the other side, write down five positive messages that you could give yourself to help you accomplish each goal. Work on this all week and write a one-half page report about what you learned and observed about this process. This is an important exercise; therefore, it is worth double the points.

PLEASE PUT ALL OF YOUR ANSWERS from your WORD-PROCESSING PROGRAM for unit one and two into the Submission Box that asks for them. Just keep hitting the Arrow at the bottom that says "Next" until you come to the Submission Box. Then, read what assignments it is asking for and paste them ALL into the box only one time. Each time you go in that box it activates it and I only want you to do that one time, when you are 100% finished with all of the work that is asked for in that Submission Box. :)

02.02 Finding and evaluating sources (English 9)

Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question

Orville Wright's diary from 1903, noting first successful airplane flight: Library of Congress image, public domainOrville Wright's diary from 1903, noting first successful airplane flight: Library of Congress image, public domain

At school, at work, and even in your personal life, you will often need to find information and determine whether it is accurate and useful. In many ways, internet search engines have made FINDING information much easier. Information you might once have needed to make trips to libraries, place phone calls, and mail inquiry letters to search out is now often just a few clicks away. However, EVALUATING information can be just as difficult and important as ever--sometimes more so.

Where can you find information?

Primary sources

  • Talk to someone who was there. Although even eyewitnesses often make mistakes in perceiving and remembering details about an experience or event, someone who has 'first-hand' knowledge of your topic is an extremely useful source. For obvious reasons, this may not be an option for something that happened a long time ago, or a long distance away.
  • Read an account written (or see pictures/video taken) by someone who was there. Newspaper articles (if the reporter was actually a witness of the event), diaries, letters, legal documents, web pages, journals, blogs, interviews, and other first-hand knowledge are considered primary sources, even if the person who recorded the thoughts is long dead--as long as the person actually experienced or witnessed the event.
  • Your own experiences

Secondary sources, written by anyone who was not an actual participant or eyewitness (in many cases, most or all of your information will be from secondary sources, in print or online)

  • Newspaper or magazine articles
  • Encyclopedia, almanac or other 'reference book' materials
  • Scientific or professional articles or journals
  • Videos, documentaries, news broadcasts
  • Books or websites
  • E-mail, letters, list-servs, blogs, tweets, social media
  • Conversations, radio broadcasts, TV, or speeches
  • Advertising, info-mercials

Why is it so important to carefully evaluate information and its sources?

Well, obviously you want to know whether your information is true and accurate (or not). I guess the real question is, "Why shouldn't you trust that all sources of information are good sources?" The following cautions apply to all sources of information, although it is still true that posting information on the internet is cheaper and easier than printing it in a book or magazine. Therefore, you should be especially careful about evaluating online sources.

  • The writer may be wrong. That is, even if the writer is trying to be accurate and truthful, s/he may be mistaken. Just about anybody can post a blog or web page, whether they really know their subject matter well or not.
  • The writer may be lying. That is, even if the writer KNOWS the truth, s/he may be offering false information. The writer may have a profit motive to promote inaccurate ideas.
  • The writer may be providing accurate but incomplete information (either deliberately, or accidentally). Sometimes knowing just part of the truth can lead you to draw completely wrong conclusions.
  • The writer may just be passing along information from someone else, without checking on it. (Lots of 'urban myth' misinformation gets around this way.) This is especially likely if the information supports the writer's personal biases. We are all more inclined to doubt or question information if it is in conflict with our beliefs. We are more likely to accept and remember information that supports our beliefs, or information we get from someone we like.
  • The information might have been accurate at the time it was posted/printed, but is now outdated by new developments.
  • Even photographs or videos can quite easily be 'photo-shopped' to show false images.

You can probably think of more possibilities, but these are enough to make it important to think critically about your sources of information.

Please read all the 'required' website links below. Yes, there will be quiz questions.

02.02 Avoiding Injuries assignment (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 60 minutes

Introduction: The purpose of this assignment is to help you learn more about injuries and injury prevention. Essential Question: What is your body trying to tell you? Tasks: Choose an exercise-related injury such as an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, achilles tendonitis, tennis elbow, ankle sprain, rotator cuff (shoulder) injury, muscle cramps or muscle strain that is common in a sport or activity in which you participate, or is common in the types of exercise you have planned for your workout in Assignment #3. You can be creative. Conduct some research on the internet and/or in the library to find answers to the questions below.

This should be submitted as a 5 paragraph research paper. Follow the paragraph structure shown below. Do not just answer the questions below without putting it in written (research paper) format. Be specific and write in full sentences. Include an image that contributes to the understanding of the injury.

Write your paper in a word-processing document on your computer, save a copy for yourself then copy and paste it into the assignment submission box. • "Do not cut and paste from articles on the internet! This is plagiarizing(cheating) and no credit will be given!" • Be sure to cite your sources (at least three, one of which might be a person who has experienced or treated this injury).

Structure Content
Paragraph 1: Introduction - a paragraph describing or defining the injury. What happens when a person gets this injury? (5 pts)
Paragraph 2: A paragraph going into more detail about the injury. What body parts are affected and how? (5 pts) What is/are the common cause(s) of this injury? (5 pts)
Paragraph 3: A paragraph describing treatment and prevention of the injury. How is this injury typically treated? (5 pts) How is this injury typically prevented? (5 pts)
Paragraph 4: A paragraph describing how specific exercises or stretches apply to this injury. Describe three different stretches or exercises that may affect, prevent, or rehab this injury. • Properly name each type. (5 pts)
Paragraph 5: Conclusion - a paragraph describing how you can apply this information. • Determine if you would, or would not, want to incorporate each one into your workout routine as a prevention and/or rehabilitation for this injury,(5 pts) …and explain why. (5 pts)

Works cited--a list of your sources, including authors, titles, and complete URL for internet sources.

Image

Where did you find your information? (HINT: Carefully document where you found your information and double-check that the sources are reliable and valid. Make sure that you list at least three sources.) (5 pts)

Include an image that contributes to the understanding of this injury. (5 pts)

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.02 Biomechanics, Performance and Safety (Participation Skills and Techniques)

"Biomechanics" is the application of mechanical knowledge (physics) to living things and how they move. In this class, you will be considering the biomechanical principles related to movement, sports performance, and safe exercising and lifting.

Read the material in the required links listed below. Yes, there will be a quiz. ;)

Math and physics may not be on your mind when you are dancing, running, or playing soccer, but your body and movement (as well as any ball or sports equipment you use) are all bound by the laws of physics. Physics affects ALL sports and movements.

Gravity keeps you on the ground most of the time, and brings down even a home run ball... eventually. Momentum makes it harder for you to speed up, slow down, or turn quickly. The combination of speed and weight create the force of a tackle. That golf club, bat or racquet you are using is a lever (for that matter, your arms and legs are levers). Air resistance makes it harder to throw a basketball a longer distance than a baseball.

We could go on and on. Many of the performance improvements in sports over the last hundred years have come from people figuring out how to use biomechanics to their advantage.

One of the most important concepts to understand is 'center of gravity' (also sometimes called 'center of mass', though it isn't quite the same). If you take physics, you will learn a more technical definition. For our purposes, you might think of it as the middle of your weight. If someone could stick a pin through your exact center of gravity, you would be balanced around that point. However, your center of gravity doesn't stay in one place - it shifts as you change position.

For example, if you are squatting down, your center of gravity will be much lower than if you are leaping to try to spike a volleyball. Your center of gravity is related to your balance. When your center of gravity is low - as when you take a low, wide stance with your knees bent and your feet apart - you are less likely to lose your balance and fall.

When your center of gravity is high - think of dancers with their arms stretched high over their heads - you are more likely to lose your balance or fall. Downhill skiers and snowboarders don't bend their knees and crouch low in their turns because it looks cool - they are keeping their center of gravity low to avoid falling (also to reduce wind resistance). Keeping your center of gravity low and your knees bent also lets you access more power for tackles, sprints, or jumps. Your center of gravity is also related to safety when lifting weights - either the kind you lift for building muscle, or the everyday lifting you do when you move things around the house or on a job site.

When you are about to pick something up, you want a low center of gravity - for two reasons; first so you won't be as likely to lose your balance and fall with the thing you are lifting, and second, so you can use the power of your legs to do most of the lifting. There are some things that are just too heavy to lift safely, and you need to use common sense when lifting to avoid injury. When you do lift something, bear in mind the suggestions for safe lifting on the website in the link below. Remember to read through all the Required Websites, they will help you with the Quiz!

02.02 Bowling Terms (PE Individualized Lifetime Activity)

by Xiaphias, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commonsby Xiaphias, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

CHECK OUT SOME BOWLING TERMS:

Strike:
Knocking down all ten pins with the first ball. The score for the frame is 10 plus the total number of pins knocked down by the next two balls. The symbol is "X".
Spare:
Knocking all the pins with two balls. The score for that frame is 10 plus the number of pins knocked down with the first ball of the next frame. The symbol is “/”.
Split:
A spare combination in which the head pin is down and the remaining pins have one or more intermediate pins down immediately ahead of or behind them. The symbol is “O”.
Foul:
Crossing or touching the foul line at delivery. It's penalized by a count of zero pins. If the foul occurs on the first ball of a frame, the bowler gets a second shot at a new rack.
Cherry or Chop:
Missing a spare cluster by taking the front pin or pins only; To knock down one pin of a spare leave, while the pin next to or behind it remains standing.
Turkey:
Three strikes in a row.
Gutter Ball:
A ball that goes into the gutter before reaching the pins.
Blow:
A missed spare.
Field goal:
Ball rolled between two pins of a wide split.
Follow-through:
Motion after release. Should be toward the pin you're aiming at.
Frame:
A tenth part of a game of bowling.
Handicap:
Pins awarded to individuals or teams in an attempt to equalize competition.
Hook:
A ball that breaks to the left for right-handers and to the right for lefties.
Open bowling:
Non-league or non-tournament play, for fun or practice.
Perfect game:
Twelve strikes in a row with a count of 30 pins per frame resulting in a score of 300. Also called 300 game.
Scratch:
Without benefit of handicap; actual score.

CHECK OUT THE LINK BELOW ABOUT BOWLING ETIQUETTE:

02.02 Electronic Mail Assignments (Computer Technology)

teacher-scored 35 points possible 60 minutes

Email Assignment (E1-4)

Follow the instructions on the attachment to complete the E1-E4 Email assignments. These are the only assignments that will be emailed to your instructor.

NOTE: Be sure to capitalize I in your emails and the first letter at the beginning of sentences. (Text messaging has not helped us follow these rules.)

You can continue working on other assignments while you wait for the reply email to be able to complete assignment E3.

Please list the assignment name and your name in the subject line for each e-mail in this unit.

02.02 Email Study Guide & Presentation

There are two files attached above.
a. Email PowerPoint Study Guide
b. Email PowerPoint presentaion

Fill out this study guide as you go through the Email PowerPoint presentation. NOTE: You do not need to submit the study guide, but it will be helpful on a future quiz.

Run this presentation while taking notes using the Email Module study guide.

02.02 Graduated Driver License - GDL (DriverEd)

Use the Don't Drive Stupid link listed below.

Select TEEN DRIVING LAWS tab.

Read all the information in the following sections.

  • TEEN DRIVNG LAWS,
  • GRADUATED DRIVERS LICENSE,
  • DUI LAWS,
  • MOTORCYCLE LICENSE,
  • DRIVERS LICENSE.

You will need the information for the quiz.

A conceptual designer's view of the future electric vehicle: By Igor Jurić, Dok-ing designer (Dok-ing official website free image),Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsA conceptual designer's view of the future electric vehicle: By Igor Jurić, Dok-ing designer (Dok-ing official website free image),Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

02.02 Graduated Driver License - GDL (DriverEd)

02.02 How to Save (Financial Literacy)

Analyze reasons to save.

Piggy Bank: By User Cornischong;  CC-BY-SA-3.0, via Wikimedia CommonsPiggy Bank: By User Cornischong; CC-BY-SA-3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

BACKGROUND

This lesson is about how to save. And here is some information of importance that is not on the website you will visit:


  • Financial planners suggest you save at least 10% of your income.
  • To open an account at a bank or credit union, you will probably need the following: Photo ID (maybe your school ID, or a driver’s license), Your Social Security number (a good number to memorize, NOT carry around with you), and Money to open the account.
  • Here is a note to remember from bankrate.com (and also the answer to #1 below): The minimum balance required to open a savings account is usually quite low, sometimes just $1 or $5, but don't let that fool you. Many institutions require a minimum balance of $100, $300 or more to avoid paying a monthly maintenance fee. Those fees can be stiff, $5 or even $10 a month, and will erode your money quickly.

VISIT URL #1 and read the first page. Then click and read the following links in the left margin
* "5 Simple Saving Tricks" (especially Trick #1 [Pay yourself First]) to answer question #2 .
* The 5-step Save/Spend Plan (especially sep #3 to see savings categories for question #3)
* How Banks Work
* About Savings Accounts (liquidity, safety, compound interest)
* The Truth about millionaires quiz (take this quiz).

02.02 Maintaining physical fitness for life (Health II)

Up until quite recently in human history, most people got plenty of exercise. Hunting, gathering, cultivating or harvesting food, building and maintaining shelter, gathering fuel to cook and keep warm and making clothing all required physical labor. Now, though, most of us could go for weeks without any real exercise if we wanted to. We have to deliberately make time for activities that help us stay physically fit. Is it worth the effort? Regular exercise improves your physical, emotional and mental health. Want to look, feel, and think better? Get active, and stay active!
Read and view at least the required links below, and then go on to the quiz.

02.02 Maintaining physical fitness for life quiz (Health II)

computer-scored 36 points possible 30 minutes

Go to Topic 3 on the main class page to take this quiz. You may take it multiple times, but you must score at least 90% to pass.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.02 Of Biomechanics, Performance and Safety (PE Skills)

"Biomechanics" is the application of mechanical knowledge (physics) to living things and how they move. In this class, you will be considering the biomechanical principles related to movement, sports performance, and safe exercising and lifting.
Read the material at the required links listed below. Yes, there will be a quiz.

Math and physics may not be on your mind when you are dancing, running, or playing soccer, but your body and movement (as well as any ball or sports equipment you use) are all bound by the laws of physics. Gravity keeps you on the ground most of the time, and brings down even a home run ball eventually. Momentum makes it harder for you to speed up, slow down, or turn quickly. The combination of speed and weight create the force of a tackle. That golf club, bat or racquet you are using is a lever (for that matter, your arms and legs are levers). Air resistance makes it harder to throw a basketball a long distance than a baseball. We could go on and on. Many of the performance improvements in sports over the last hundred years have come from people figuring out how to use biomechanics to their advantage.

One of the most important concepts to understand is the 'center of gravity' (also sometimes called 'center of mass', though it isn't quite the same). If you take physics, you will learn a more technical definition. For our purposes, you might think of it as the middle of your weight. If someone could stick a pin through your exact center of gravity, you would be balanced around that point. However, your center of gravity doesn't stay in one place - it shifts as you change position. For example, if you are squatting down, your center of gravity will be much lower than if you are leaping to try to spike a volleyball.

Your center of gravity is related to your balance. When your center of gravity is low - as when you take a low, wide stance with your knees bent and your feet apart - you are less likely to lose your balance and fall. When your center of gravity is high - think of dancers with their arms stretched high over their heads - you are more likely to lose your balance or fall. Downhill skiers and snowboarders don't bend their knees and crouch low in their turns because it looks cool - they are keeping their center of gravity low to avoid falling (also to reduce wind resistance). Keeping your center of gravity low and your knees bent also lets you access more power for tackles, sprints, or jumps.

Your center of gravity is also related to safety when lifting weights - either the kind you lift for building muscle, or everyday lifting you do when you move things around the house or on a job site. When you are about to pick something up, you want a low center of gravity - both so you won't be as likely to lose your balance and fall with the thing you are lifting, and so you can use the power of your legs to do most of the work. There are some things that are just too heavy to lift safely, and you need to use common sense about that. When you do lift something, bear in mind the suggestions for safe lifting on the website in the link below.

02.02 Physical Activities Assignment (PE Individualized Lifetime Activity)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 420 minutes

Climber summiting Island Peak: by Mountaineer, CC Attribution 3.0 Unported via Wikimedia CommonsClimber summiting Island Peak: by Mountaineer, CC Attribution 3.0 Unported via Wikimedia Commons

YOU MUST PICK TWO NEW ACTIVITIES THAT YOU DID NOT USE FOR STANDARD ONE.

You are going to spend a total of SEVEN HOURS doing different kinds of physical activities of your choice; you may include the time it takes you to find the rules for any new activity as part of your hours, and the time it takes you to fill out your ACTIVITY WORKSHEETS.

NOTE: There are rules and guidelines for all activities, even walking and biking. Make sure you look them up and tell me what you found in the appropriate spot. (Go to section 3, "Assignments, Quizzes, Tests," on the homepage of the class. Then click on "Standard 1 Assignment" to submit the worksheet.)

Below is a list of optional physical activities, but you are not limited to these. Anything not on the list needs to be approved by the teacher, though. Just e-mail if you want to get an okay to do an activity that is not listed below:

 Golf, archery, bowling, weight training, aerobics, walking, jogging, social dance, rope jumping, disc golf, disc football, in-line skating, biking,martial arts, yoga, climbing, skiing, tennis, hiking, step class, croquet, badminton, horseshoes, soccer, basketball, baseball, aquatics.

You must try at least two different activities, but you are not limited to only two. You must spend at least THREE hours doing each activity you choose and you must complete a total of SEVEN hours. You may use the internet to find the needed rules and/or equipment you need if you are trying a new activity.

REMEMBER that safety comes first with whatever activity you choose. After each activity you must copy and paste the following worksheet into a word document or write them down on a piece of paper, then complete the worksheet. Once you complete your SEVEN HOURS of activity and the worksheets for each activity you will send me BOTH OF THE WORKSHEETS BY SUBMITTING THEM IN THE SUBMISSION BOX IN SECTION 3 FOR THE TOTAL SEVEN HOURS AT THE SAME TIME, OR THEY WILL NOT BE GRADED!!!! Please put your answers in bold, or ALL CAPS.

*******************************

ACTIVITY WORKSHEET #3

1. Your Name And Date:

2. List the three "Tips" articles you choose to read from the course material, and list one new thing you learned from each article (you only need to answer this question once)? Note: If the links do not work, just choose any health or fitness related article. 

3. What activity did you choose to do? Is this the first time you have tried this activity?

4. How many hours did you spend doing this activity? (Be specific in telling me what days you did the activity and for how long each day. If you went hiking, walking, biking etc, tell me where you went and how far also.)

5. Did you enjoy the activity? Why or why not? What you did and/or did you not like about this activity, and do you think you would try this activity again? (I DO NOT ACCEPT ONE WORD ANSWERS ON THIS QUESTION.)

6. Did anyone participate in this activity with you? If yes, who?

7. What equipment did you use for this activity?

8. What are the rules or guidelines for this activity, and how did you find them out? ( You need to find out rules or guidelines for any activities, they are there for all of them, even walking.)

9. Did you use gross motor skills and/or fine motor skills for this activity? Be specific in what the gross or fine motor skills were.

ACTIVITY WORKSHEET #4

1. Your Name And Date:

2. What activity did you choose to do?

3. Is this the first time you have tried this activity?

4. How many hours did you spend doing this activity? (Be specific in telling me what days you did the activity and for how long each day. If you went hiking, walking, biking etc, tell me where you went and how far also.)

5. Did you enjoy the activity, please tell me why or why not, what you did and/or did not like about this activity, and do you think you would try this activity again? (I DO NOT ACCEPT ONE WORD ANSWERS ON THIS QUESTION.)

6. Did anyone participate in this activity with you? If yes, who?

7. What equipment did you use for this activity?

8. What are the rules or guidelines for this activity and how did you find them out? ( You need to find out rules or guidelines for any activities; they exist for all of them, even walking.)

9. Did you use gross motor skills and/or fine motor skills for this activity? Be specific in what the gross or motor skills were.

*****************************

02.02 Unit 2 Quiz 1 (Participation Skills and Techniques)

computer-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

After you have read the preceding lessons and links, Take the Quiz. You must score at least 80%, but you may take the quiz as many times as necessary.

This assignment should be completed by WEEK 4 of this class

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.02.01 Critical reading (English 9)

Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.

Clarklupine image, Wikimedia Commons, Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedClarklupine image, Wikimedia Commons, Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported


In unit 1, you had a lesson on what good readers do. In school, most of your reading is focused on understanding and remembering what you read. In science, math, history, literature or any subject, you often expect that you will be tested on the content of your reading.

In adult life, 'reading to remember' may still sometimes be a useful skill--you might need to remember how to operate a piece of equipment, or to follow correct procedure at your job. Certainly if you continue to higher education, you will need to be able to remember what you read. 'Reading for enjoyment' may also be part of your life (I hope so!). However, 'critical reading' is likely to be the MOST important reading skill you can carry with you into your adult life.

Critical reading goes beyond enjoying and/or remembering what you read. When you read critically, you need to consciously question what you are reading. Is this really true? How can I tell whether it's true? Does this make sense? Is it reasonable? Is this the whole story? How can I double-check on this? Is it up-to-date? Is this author knowledgeable, ethical, unbiased? Who else would know? All these questions, and more, need to be in the back of your mind as you read critically.


In many jobs--but especially in higher-paying jobs--a major part of your everyday work may be evaluating information. Is a new medication or therapy really the best for your patients? Should you invest your company's money in stocks? How does the law apply to your client's business? What do current trends mean for your industry's future? Which of competing claims is closer to the truth?

Even if you never needed critical reading in your job, every citizen has a responsibility to do his or her best to understand important issues and vote for candidates whose ideas are most likely to solve current problems. Sorting through the claims of political rhetoric requires hard work and dedication to parsing out complex issues, all the while filtering the emotionally-charged messages that bombard voters from all sides. Your country needs you to develop the skills of critical reading, listening and thinking. In your personal life, you will also need to evaluate claims and arguments as you make decisions like which car to buy, what medical treatment to undergo, or how to invest your money.

02.02.01 Development Stages and Learning Physical Activities (PE Skills)

Tapdance, football and swift-water kayaking are very different activities, but the process of learning them, or any other activity, can be described in similar steps. One way of classifying these steps names the developmental stages of skill acquisition as follows:

  1. Novice (beginner) - you are just starting to learn the basic rules and guidelines; everything is new to you
  2. Advanced beginner - you know the rules, and you can usually perform the basic skills, but you still have to think about it
  3. Competent - you've got the basic skills down, but you are still polishing the more advanced or difficult skills
  4. Proficient - you're good at the whole range of skills involved in your activity, and you can 'be your own coach' some of the time and begin to plan strategy
  5. Expert - you've become so good at your activity that the skills all seem natural, intuitive; you don't have to think about 'how' to it, and you can analyze problems, plan tactics and strategies, or create new approaches, skills, and tactics

Individual and Age-level Differences
We all know that human beings grow and change from birth onwards. A six-month-old baby may be ready to learn to crawl, but not to dribble a basketball! As we go through the years of 'growing up', we change from being weak, uncoordinated, small, and unable to communicate to being bigger, stronger, more coordinated and able to speak and understand each other. At each age or stage of development, appropriate activities help us get stronger, more coordinated and more confident. Inappropriate activities may cause injuries to our bodies or our confidence. Moreover, we each develop at our own rate. Some babies walk at nine months; some babies don't walk till much later. Some six-year-olds are ready to learn to swim like fish; others need to splash in the shallow end and learn the 'jellyfish float'. Even as teenagers, when we may have reached our adult height, there are big differences between individuals' skill levels.

What causes these differences? Partly it is genetic, partly past experience, physical fitness, or motivation. There is no doubt that some kids are born with the mental and physical talent to pick up certain skills more quickly and easily than most of us. However, good instruction, coaching, and practice (hundreds to thousands of hours over many years) are what create great athletes in any sport or activity. In the long run, the person who has the dedication to keep working at it will surpass most of the more talented individuals. As you participate in physical activities, be realistic and patient with yourself AND others. Bottom line: it takes time to develop new skills, and it takes more time for some people than for others.

First Things First

Recognize that when you are learning a sport or activity, you will need to learn and practice some basic skills before you can do the more advanced things. Often, the basic stuff seems boring or oversimplified, and you want to get on with the more exciting things. Spending time to learn the basics will pay off. If you learn incorrect form to begin with, it can take years to correct those bad habits. If you try moves you aren't ready for, you may be injured or just get frustrated. A good instructor will be able to break down complex skills into 'bite-size' components you can learn now and then put together successfully later.

Read the articles on skills below.

02.02.02 Argument and evaluating sources quiz (English 9)

computer-scored 21 points possible 10 minutes

Go to Module 3 on your main class page to take this quiz. You may take the quiz multiple times, but you must score at least 80%. The questions cover material (lessons and links) from lessons 02.01 and 02.02.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.02.02 Plan a Balanced Meal(F&N2)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

Assignment 2.3: Meals with the Food Guide System
Using the MyPlate website, create a balanced meal and then make this meal for your family. You will need to plan the meal and then prepare it. Then you need to search the Internet for a calorie counter and put the individual foods in that were part of your meal to determine how many calories your meal had for one person. You will then need to send a description of your meal and then the list of each food item with how many calories that food has along with the total calories for the entire meal. These are the things you will be graded on.

1. Planning the meal following the Food Guide System and the MyPlate website. (10 pt.)
2. Preparing the meal. (10 pt.)
3. Send a copy of the meal prepared through the digital drop box. (10 pt.)
4. Send a calorie breakdown indicating how many calories each food item has along with the total calories for the entire meal.(10 pt.)

Make sure that when you send your assignment it is labeled with the following:
Name
EHS Username
Class Name and quarter
Assignment name
Assignment information

02.02.02 Sports and Life Skills (PE Skills)

Stress Relief
Any physical exercise helps reduce the hormones associated with stress in your body. Any enjoyable activity helps reduce your feelings of stress. Put those together, and an enjoyable physical activity gives you a double dose of stress relief!

How Skills Learned in Sports Help in 'Real Life'

Slamming a hockey puck into a goal, or performing a 'pas de chat' on pointe, may not have much practical application in other areas of your life, but many of the basic aspects of sports or other physical activities do! Here are some attributes you can learn from sports that will help you in all your other endeavors:

teamwork, dedication, patience, cooperation,
goal-setting, following the rules, accepting criticism,
pushing your limits, self-assessment, sharing credit,
self-discipline, coming back from defeat.... I bet you can think of more.

On the other hand
It's up to you, your fellow participants, and your instructor or coach to make sure you focus on these positive qualities. The focus of your physical activities should be having fun, improving yourself, and encouraging others. If you get too focused on having to be the best, or winning at any cost, many of the benefits slip away. Just look at the number of famous athletes who have been involved in steroids or other 'doping', those who are injured pushing themselves too hard, those who quit because they can't be the very best, and those involved in selfish play or cheating.

Read the article below. It's aimed at parents, but you can apply it to your own experiences.

02.02.03 Standard 2, quiz 2 (PE Skills)

computer-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

After you have read the preceding lessons and links, go to Topic 3 on your class topic outline page to take this quiz. You must score at least 80%, but you may take the quiz as many times as necessary to get a good score.

02.03 Aerobic and Anaerobic Exercise (Participation Skills and Techniques)

Staying healthy includes exercise and eating healthy. It is important to understand what kinds of results you will get from different types of exercise. For example, do you want to burn fat, or do you want to build muscle? Use the link to read the differences between aerobic and anaerobic exercise. Make sure you can identify the difference between "Aerobic Exercise"(or more often called a CARDIO workout) and "Anaerobic Exercise." Read the following articles to learn how food affects your health and well-being.

In the article "Tip and Resources" pay close attention to the "Tips to help you" at the end of the article, these "Tips" will help you in your next assignment. Read the article titled "Why Is Physical Activity Important?" This article will explain the benefits from physical activity.

teacher-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

02.03 Assignments Aerobic & Anaerobic Exercise 

This assignment should be completed by WEEK 4 of this class

After reading the information provided and viewing the links, answer the questions below.

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02.03 Aerobic & Anaerobic Exercise Assignment

1. Define Aerobic (Cardio) Exercise:

2. Define Anaerobic Exercise:

3. How does Aerobic exercises differ from Anaerobic exercises or vice versa?

4. List an example of an Aerobic Exercise?

5. List an example of an Anaerobic Exercises?

6. From the Reading about the different types of exercise, which one will benefit you the most?

7. List 5 Tips from the "Nutrition Tips" link that will help you improve your Nutrition.

     a.

     b.

     c.

     d.

     e.

8. List 4 Benefits from Physical Activity according to the link, "Why is Physical Activity Important."

     a.

     b.

     c.

     d.

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.03 Arm, Leg and Trunk Flexibility (Fitness for Life)

by Lambtron, CC-BY-SA-3.0, via Wikimedia Commonsby Lambtron, CC-BY-SA-3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

If you have the textbook, see pages 159-161 for instructions. Otherwise, use the links below with the next assignment.

02.03 Arm, Leg and Trunk Flexibility assignment (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 60 minutes

Introduction: The purpose of this assignment is to introduce you to some of the ways you can assess your own site-specific flexibility. Essential Question: What is our body trying to tell us? Tasks: Recruit a friend, your parent, a sibling, or a teacher to help you with this test as they can help you measure and record some of your results. Jog or walk for 5 to 10 minutes to warm up your cardiovascular and muscular system. This is important, since physical inactivity can cause flexibility to be lost, both in the long term, and in the short term. (Just sit through a long lecture, then try to stand up straight!) Conduct Self Assessment test: You may use “Self Assessment #10" from the text, found on pages 159-161, or the on-line descriptions found in the previous lesson links. This self-assessment asks you to complete six flexibility tests: arm lift, zipper, wrap around, trunk rotation, knee to chest, and ankle flex. For each assessment, stretch and hold the position one time for 2 seconds while a friend, your parent, or your brother or sister checks your performance. Report your score for 1 repetition of each exercise. Answer the following questions relative to your performance on the flexibility exercises. Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. You might want to print out a copy to take with you to your workout. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Don't forget to highlight your answers. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. ******************************************************************************** Name:_______________________________ Date:_________________________ DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS. Arm Lift Test:

To perform the arm lift test, first lie stomach down on the ground with legs straight behind you and arms stretched overhead. Next, grab hold of a yardstick (or broomstick) so that your palms are approximately shoulder width apart. Have a partner stand right in front of you with another yardstick (or tape measure) that is placed perpendicular to the one that you are holding, with the zero measurement starting at the ground. Then, while keeping your chin fully rested on the floor, lift your arms up as high as you can go along the perpendicular yardstick. Your partner then takes this measurement as your score. Repeat the process three times and then use your best result. 1. While performing the "arm lift" test, how many inches were you able to lift your arms off the ground? _____ inches. • What is your fitness rating for the "arm lift" test? (2 pts) o Good = 8 to 10 inches or higher o Marginal = 5 to 7 inches o Low (Needs Improvement) = 0 to 4 inches

Shoulder Mobility (Open hands) or Zipper test

2. On the "zipper test" with your right elbow up, were you able to touch or overlap your fingers? • Yes or No (2 pts.) 3. Repeat the Zipper test, this time using the left shoulder. On the "zipper test" with your left elbow up, were you able to touch or overlap your fingers? • Yes or No (2pts.)

Active Chest Flexibility, or Wrap Around Test:

4. On the "wrap around" test, with your right elbow up, were you able to touch the corner of your mouth? •Yes or No (2 pts.) 5. On the "wrap around" test, with your left elbow up, were you able to touch the corner of your mouth? •Yes or No (2pts.)

Hip roll, or Trunk Rotation Test:

6. On the "trunk rotation test," were you able to touch the center of the target or beyond with your right hand? • Yes or No (2pts.)

Thomas Test, or Knee to Chest test

7. When you perform the "knee-to-chest" test with your left leg pulled to your chest, was your right calf one inch or less from the floor? o Yes or No? (2 pts) 8. When you perform the "knee-to-chest" test with your right leg pulled to your chest, was your left calf one inch or less from the floor? o Yes or No? (2pts.)

Straight Knee Foot Raise, or Ankle Flex Test:

9. When performing the "ankle flex" test with your right foot, was the sole of your foot angled 90 degrees or more? • Yes or No (2 pts.) 10. When performing the "ankle flex" test with your left foot, was the sole of your foot angled 90 degrees or more? • Yes or No (2pts.) Additional questions: 11. With the person you recruited to help you measure and record these results, discuss why you think you may or may not be as flexible as you should be. • Describe some of the ideas you discussed, and explain some of your conclusions. (10pts) 12. Discuss any imbalances you might have in flexibility. These imbalances may be from side to side, opposing muscles across the same joint, or muscles that may affect your posture in certain positions. • Why do you think you have those imbalances? (These could be hereditary, results of exercise of lack of it, injury, or maybe something else.) (10pts.) 13. Describe three different stretching exercises designed to increase flexibility. (2 pts)

• Discuss the principles of overload for each exercise. (2 pts) • Describe what you think are the strengths of each one, (2 pts) • …and what precautions should be taken. (2 pts) • Explain your suggestions. (2 pts.)

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.03 Email Activities (1-4)

teacher-scored 35 points possible 45 minutes

Email Activities (E1-E4) Follow the instructions on the attachment to complete the E1-E4 email assignments. These are the only assignments that will be emailed to your instructor. It is important that you do this assignment in the correct order and follow the instructions.

NOTE: Use proper grammar and structure. Be sure to capitalize "I" in your emails and the first letter at the beginning of sentences. (Text messaging has not helped us follow these rules.) Remember, email is often official and professional communication. Complete instructions for this assignment are in the attachment.

Be sure to follow the guidelines for these four assignments found in the attached PDF entitled 02_03 Email Module Assignments. [E1] - Create a signature block [E2] - Send a message (the specific instructions are in the PDF) [E3] - Open an attachment, answer the questions in the attachment(you can do this after you receive the email from your instructor) [E4] - Compile Netiquette rules, attach to your reply You can continue working on other assignments while you wait for the reply email to be able to complete assignment E3. Please follow the assignment instructions when entering the subject line for each e-mail in this unit. Your E1-E4 asssignment scores will be recorded in the grading program AFTER you have completed all four parts of the assignments, and the evaluation has been graded.

READ THE ENTIRE 02_03 EMAIL MODULE ASSIGNMENTS PDF BEFORE SENDING YOUR INSTRUCTOR AN EMAIL.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.03 Emergency Savings (Financial Literacy)

Understand the importance of emergency savings.

Are you financially prepared for emergencies?: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Huhu Uet, CC Attribution 3.0 UnportedAre you financially prepared for emergencies?: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Huhu Uet, CC Attribution 3.0 Unported

BACKGROUND

Tiff and Cameron would have been better off to have “EMERGENCY SAVINGS” for accidents, theft, repairs, job loss, etc. These savings are usually in a bank or credit union where money is quickly available in short-term, liquid accounts. (“Liquid” means you can get cash quickly.)

Visit URL #1 to learn about the importance of Emergency Savings.

02.03 Emergency Savings (Financial Literacy)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

****************************************

Assignment 02.03 Questions: (12E)
(Copy everything between the asterisks.)
1) Q: From the web site, how many months should your emergency fund cover> ANSWER:
2) Q: How quickly should you be able to access emergency funds?> ANSWER:
3) Q: Many employers will deposit your check into the bank automatically. What could you tell the bank to do in order to help you save automatically? (answer not on website)> ANSWER:
4) Q: Why do you think checking is a bad place to keep emergency funds? > ANSWER:
5) Q: (02.03): Write your first and last name and today's date.> ANSWER:

****************************************

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.03 Let's Chat - Comparative Writing - English 10

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. Develop, revise, and strengthen writing as needed. Use technology, to produce and publish writing, drawing supportive evidences from literary or informational texts.

How do cultures compare?: fillster.com/images/pictures "Funny Pictures for Myspace"How do cultures compare?: fillster.com/images/pictures "Funny Pictures for Myspace"Up close and personal.: I’m talking to you! by Ilya Khamushkin FotopediaUp close and personal.: I’m talking to you! by Ilya Khamushkin Fotopedia“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed, citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”
― Margaret Mead

HOW DO THESE CULTURES COMPARE?

Write an essay using the answers you have provided about the two community garden reading experiences from above and the outlining activity below.

Your writing must have a purpose and be supported with references from the texts. Use the lists of information that you have gathered from these readings as your points of comparison.

Your comparisons should be focused on the idea of “Community Influence” or “Community Affects” using your study notes and any additional information you choose to document and include as supporting evidence.

Use the following "Grammar Girl" podcast found in the URL listed below to learn the difference between "effect" and “affect.” Use this distinction to improve your writing.

How to Write a Compare-and-Contrast Essay

A compare-and-contrast essay may sound like an easy type of paper to write but it can be a bit of a challenge once you get into the process. It is more than simply stating what is alike and what is different. It is up to you to argue and explain why those similarities and differences matter.

The following steps will guide you through the process of writing an effective compare-and-contrast essay in order to ensure that it has something valuable to say.

Copy and paste the outlining activity between the rows of asterisks below into a word document. Address the questions, then place your work into the assignment submission area after you have saved it to your hard drive.

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Steps of Comparative Writing

Complete the following steps and outline of comparative writing by answering each of the prompts below, in relation to the information you have compiled thus far from “Seedfolks” and “Growing Together”.

1) Why does comparison matter? A good paper will not simply offer a summary of themes, characters, or plot. Your job is to think about how the comparisons and contrasts, of similarities and differences, create meaningful connections to larger issues.

What are three meaningful connections to larger issues that can be seen in both stories?

a.

b.

c.

2) Present a thesis statement. Why is the comparison and contrast noteworthy? What is a reason for your efforts and a compelling case for your audience’s attention.

List three important issues to compare and/or prove using these stories.

a.

b.

c.

3) Select a pattern. There are two ways you can write a compare-and-contrast paper. You can present your arguments in a "tandem" pattern or an "alternating" pattern.

• Tandem

Separate your pros and cons/likenesses and differences, for each story, into two camps. Once you have your lists, the body of your paper will address everything you have discovered about one topic/issue then everything about the other topic/issue.

Create contrasting lists for each story, below.

Pro./Likenesses

a.

b.

c.

Con./Differences

a.

b.

c.

• Alternating

This option aligns the pros and cons/likenesses and differences side by side in the same body of text in each part of the essay. Creating the list of likenesses and differences will be handy here as well, but in using this method, you will continually address two ideas, “back and forth”, as you compose the body of your paper.

Provide three sets of comparisons below from both of the community garden stories together.

Contrasting Comparisons

a.

b.

c.

4) How to decide on a pattern. A good rule for selecting one method over another is length. For longer papers with multiple pages, you should probably go with the alternating pattern to help your readers retain all of the important information about each side of your argument. For shorter papers, the tandem pattern will probably be the best option.

5) Support your facts and comparisons with primary text. Provide primary textual support; in this case, the primary sources are the “Seedfolks” and the New York Times article “Growing Together”.

For each point you address, offer textual evidence for your positions either by directly quoting from the text or by paraphrasing it. Be sure to properly cite each one. Include at least one direct quote, with its reference, from each text. All other paraphrased information should be cited accordingly.

Below, provide at least two of the paraphrased references and one direct quote from each text that you will be using in you paper. Be sure to provide the proper citation for each one.

Text 1

a.

b.

c.

Text 2

a.

b.

c.

6) Include your own interpretation of the thesis you are writing about. Your view of the topic will enable your paper to have your voice.

Include your interpretation of three topics from each text that you wish to compare. DO NOT USE PERSONAL PRONOUNS LIKE "I" TO EXPRESS THIS PERSPECTIVE.

a.

b.

c.

7) Conclusion

Provide three options for a conclusion that summarize the points of comparison you have made in your paper and restate your thesis from the beginning of your paper.

a.

b.

c.

8) Review. Revise. Repeat. To avoid having your compare-and-contrast essay become convoluted, a tight check must be kept on your writing. Review your work often to make sure you have not digressed into plot summarizing, soap-boxing, or wandering pointlessly in a writer's wilderness. Move or delete text if you have to; don’t keep trying to pound a piece of evidence into the essay puzzle if it clearly doesn’t fit.

***************************************************************************************************************************************************************

Write

Use your reading notes and outline of your essay above, write the first draft of your comparison/contrast paper.

* All of the above information and work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

The above writing steps provided by:
enotes.com/topics/how-write-compare-contrast-essay

02.03 Readings in argument (English 9)

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings.

Executions in the United States, 1930-2004: Wikimedia Commons, released into public domain by authorExecutions in the United States, 1930-2004: Wikimedia Commons, released into public domain by author

Before you read:

Write a paragraph explaining what you believe about the death penalty, and why. Save the paragraph--you will need it later.

Next, read the three articles (links below) about issues surrounding the death penalty in the United States.

While you read:

Copy or summarize four to six statements or examples that seem especially good to you. Be sure to include at least one from each article.

02.03 Recycle City(Geo4Life1)

Introduction:
Image from Open Clip Art Library, CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain DedicationImage from Open Clip Art Library, CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication
Think about the items you throw away in an average day. Make a list of these items and keep this list with you throughout this lesson. You will need your list at the conclusion of this lesson. Did you know that it was predicted that by the year 2000, about half of the landfills in America would be filled to capacity? Well, we have passed the year 2000, and we do suffer a pollution problem. The reason landfills are overflowing is because the garbage in them is not decomposing. With the increase of population comes an increase in waste. The United States and Canada rank high in their standard of living. With a high standard of living comes a lot of waste. The United States is the largest producer of wastes in the world. Just look in the mail each day. How much junk mail does your family receive in a week? What do you think we can do to stop the problem? If you are not sure, don't worry. By the end of this lesson, you will be a recycling genius.

Go to Recycle City (link below)
Click on Go to Recycle City. Before entering the city, scroll down and click on the history of Recycle City. Read about the history of Dumptown to answer the first question.

02.03 Standard 2 video (PE Skills)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 45 minutes

Standard Two Video

INSTRUCTIONS: You will need to submit an instructional video demonstrating the basic skills for one of the activities you choose to do for your assignment. If you are unable to make a video, you can submit a set of pictures showing the basics skills for the activity/sport you have chosen.

*Your video needs to be at least one minute long and no longer than two minutes long. If you would rather take pictures and use a video editor program to make a video/powerpoint to create your video, you can.
*You will be the star of your video, so you might need to get a friend to do the filming. You will also be the narrator of the video.
*Assume that you are making this video for another student who has never tried your particular activity/sport.
*You CANNOT use the same video for another other Individualized Lifetime Activity Video assignment, including both quarters.

Example: If the activity you choose was tennis, you would need to show the basic skills of tennis, such as:

How to grip the tennis racket.
How to serve a tennis ball.
What a backhand swing looks like and how to accomplish it.
Etc.

You may not have enough time to show all the skills of your activity/sport, but just show what you can.

After making and viewing your video, answer the following questions. Copy and paste the section between the asterisks into your word processor, complete your answers, and save a copy for yourself. Then go to Topic 3 to submit your work to your teacher.

*****************************************************************************************

According to the information you obtained about your activity, what are the critical cues for the movement or skill you chose to show in the video?
What did you see in the video that you were doing well?
What did you see in the video that you could improve on?
What did you see yourself doing that you didn't realize until you watched the video?

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INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR VIDEO:

Video Assignments

You will need a computer with a connection to the Internet and your digital video content (under 2 minutes please). You can choose between "YouTube" or "Photobucket" to host your video assignments. You will need to create an account for either resource. Follow the instructions to upload and share your videos.

YouTube will take a little longer to upload. In YouTube, you need to make your video "available to the world." When you go to the "My Videos" section of your YouTube account, play the video you want to submit. At this point you can either copy the address in the URL and send it to your teacher via your email account, or click on the "Share" link to send an email to the teacher from the page your video is on.

Photobucket is very similar.

If you don't have a video camera, you can use still images in a slide show with narration that is converted to digital video.

02.03 Weight management: energy in, energy out (Health II)

Objective 1: Explain how caloric intake and energy expenditure affect body weight.

What is metabolism? It’s a series of chemical reactions within our body’s cells. Metabolism changes the fuel in our food to energy that our bodies need to do our daily activities. These activities may range from exercising vigorously to reading a book.
Metabolism is a continuous process that begins before we were born and ends when we die. It is an important process for all living organisms--not just humans. If metabolism ceases, living things die. After we eat food, enzymes break it down into simpler substances that can be released by our bodies for energy or stored in our liver, muscles, or body fat for use at a later time.
Metabolism, in its simplest form, is something that affects how easily our bodies gain or lose weight. This is where the discussion of calories begins. A calorie is a unit that measures how much energy a specific kind of food provides to the body. A candy bar has more calories than an orange, so it provides the body with additional energy. Sometimes that can be too much of a good thing. Just like a truck stores gas in the gas tank until it is needed to run the engine, the body stores calories--mainly as fat. If we overfill a truck's gas tank, it overflows onto the pavement. Similarly, if we eat too many calories, we "overflow" in the form of excess body fat.

The number of calories we burn in a day is influenced by how physically active we are, the amount of fat, in comparison to muscle, in our bodies, and our basal metabolic rate. The basal metabolic rate (BMR) is a calculation of the rate at which our bodies "burn" energy, in the form of calories, while at rest. The BMR can play a role in our tendency to gain weight. For example, if we have a low BMR (we burn fewer calories while at rest or sleeping) we will be inclined to gain more pounds of body fat over time, compared with a same-sized person with an average BMR who eats the same amount of food and gets the same amount of exercise.
Are we stuck with the BMR we inherited from our parents without a chance to change it, or can we change it? Fortunately, we can definitely change our BMR! Exercising and becoming more physically fit will raise our BMR. Also, if we have more muscle and less fat, we will have higher BMRs.
If we take in more calories than our bodies burn, we will gain weight. If we take in the necessary amount of calories for our bodies, we will maintain a healthy weight if we already have a nutritious diet and we exercise regularly.

02.03 Weight management: Fighting Fat viewing assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 45 minutes

You will view the video "Fighting Fat - New Ways to Win" (link below), but before viewing, answer the first set of questions. Keep the "During Viewing" questions handy while you watch so you can write down the answers. Then finish the rest of the assignment. Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. ********************************************************************************************************** Before Viewing

1. What is a healthy diet? 2. How do you check to see if your diet is healthy? 3. How does advertising affect your food intake? Name some fast food commercials and explain their purpose. 4. List diseases that are associated with being overweight.

During Viewing

1. Name three forms of fuel for our bodies. 2. What does BMI mean? 3. Currently, what are four ways to lose weight (including medical procedures)?

Activity You are hungry, and your friend has just volunteered to pick up your favorite fast food meal. What would you order?

1. Select a restaurant from the following: Arby’s, Burger King, KFC, Taco Bell, or Wendy’s and write your order here (you'll fill out the other information next):

Item How many? Calories in each item Percent fat
       
       

2. Now that you have your order, go to the nutritional information Web page for your selected restaurant. Web addresses of popular fast-food restaurants are listed below. 3. On the lines next to each item you ordered, write the number of calories and percent fat for that item.

Analyzing the Data

1. Total the calories of your meal. 2. How much of your recommended daily calories (2,000) did you use on this one meal? 3. How many calories do you have left for two more meals and any snacks? 4. Did you stay within the recommended amount of fat (less than 30% of calories from fat)?

******************************************************************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.03.09 Matrices -- Assignment 5 (PreCalc)

teacher-scored 95 points possible 80 minutes

Complete

Unit 02 -- Matrices -- Assignment 5
Using Matrices

Print out the attached assignment and complete the assignment on additional and with an appropriate spreadsheet program. Once you have completed the assignment, scan it into the computer and convert it to an image file such as .pdf or .jpg. Also, save and upload your spreadsheet. You may need to practice scanning pencil drawings so that you produce a clear, easily readable image. Finally, upload the image using the assignment submission window for this assignment. Alternately, you may wish to type the answers into a word processing document, convert this to an .rtf file, and upload this. If you do this, be sure to include the questions as well as the answers.

This assignment is worth 95 points.

Complete this assignment after reading Lesson 3.



02.04 Development Stages and Learning Physical Activities (Participation Skills and Techniques)

Tapdance, football and swift-water kayaking are very different activities, but the process of learning them, or any other activity, can be described in similar steps. One way of classifying these steps is

The Developmental Stages of Skill Acquisition. They are listed below:

  1. Novice (beginner) - you are just starting to learn the basic rules and guidelines; everything is new to you
  2. Advanced beginner - you know the rules, and you can usually perform the basic skills, but you still have to think about it
  3. Competent - you've got the basic skills down, but you are still polishing the more advanced or difficult skills
  4. Proficient - you're good at the whole range of skills involved in your activity, and you can 'be your own coach' some of the time and begin to plan strategy
  5. Expert - you've become so good at your activity that the skills all seem natural, intuitive; you don't have to think about 'how' to accomplish it, and you can analyze problems, plan tactics and strategies, or create new approaches, skills, and tactics

Individual and Age-level Differences We all know that human beings grow and change from birth onwards. A six-month-old baby may be ready to learn to crawl, but not to dribble a basketball! As we go through the years of 'growing up', we change from being weak, uncoordinated, small, and unable to communicate to being bigger, stronger, more coordinated and able to speak and understand each other. At each age or stage of development, appropriate activities help us get stronger, more coordinated and more confident. Inappropriate activities may cause injuries to our bodies or our confidence. Moreover, we each develop at our own rate. Some babies walk at nine months; some babies don't walk until much later. Some six-year-olds are ready to learn to swim like fish; others need to splash in the shallow end and learn the 'jellyfish float.' Even as teenagers, when we may have reached our adult height, there are big differences between individuals' skill levels. What causes these differences? Partly it is genetic, past experience, physical fitness, or motivation. There is no doubt that some kids are born with the mental and physical talent to pick up certain skills more quickly and easily than most of us. However, good instruction, coaching, and practice (hundreds to thousands of hours over many years) are what create great athletes in any sport or activity. In the long run, the person who has the dedication to keep working at it will surpass most of the more talented individuals. As you participate in physical activities, be realistic and patient with yourself AND others. Bottom line: it takes time to develop new skills, and it takes more time for some people than for others. First Things First Recognize that when you are learning a sport or activity, you will need to learn and practice some basic skills before you can do the more advanced things. Often, the basic stuff seems boring or oversimplified, and you want to get on with the more exciting things. Spending time to learn the basics will pay off. If you learn incorrect form to begin with, it can take years to correct those bad habits. If you try moves you aren't ready for, you may be injured or just get frustrated. A good instructor will be able to break down complex skills into 'bite-size' components you can learn now and then put together successfully later. Read the article on the difference between Skill, Technique, and Ability below.

teacher-scored 30 points possible 440 minutes

This assignment should be completed by WEEK 4 of this class

You are going to spend a total of SEVEN HOURS doing at least TWO different physical activities of your choice; you may include the time it takes you to find the rules for any new activity as part of your hours, and the time it takes you to fill out your ACTIVITY WORKSHEETS (But this time should only add up to about 30 min. Below is a list of optional physical activities, but you are not limited to these: Use your imagination and have fun learning and finding new exercises and sports.

Golf, archery, bowling, weight training, aerobics, walking, jogging, social dance, rope jumping, disc golf, disc football, in-line skating, biking, fishing, martial arts, yoga, climbing, skiing, tennis, hiking, step class, croquet, badminton, horseshoes, soccer, basketball, baseball, Frisbee and aquatics.

You must try at least TWO different activities, but you are not limited to only two. You must spend at least THREE hours doing each activity you choose, and you must complete a total of at least SEVEN hours.

You may use the internet, books, or instructors/coaches to find the needed rules and/or equipment you need if you are trying a new activity. REMEMBER, safety comes first with whatever activity you choose. After each activity you must complete the worksheet. Please put your answers in bold. Once you complete your SEVEN HOURS of activity and the worksheets for each activity, you will send me BOTH OF THE WORKSHEETS FOR THE TOTAL SEVEN HOURS AT THE SAME TIME, OR THEY WILL NOT BE GRADED! Here are the worksheets:

MAKE SURE your answers are thorough, detailed, and complete! Remember to always include the questions with your answers!

****************************************

ACTIVITY WORKSHEET #1

NAME:

DATE:

# OF HOURS OF ACTIVITY:

1. What activity did you choose to do, and WHY?

2. What did you do to warm up for the activity? (Just stretching is not detailed enough!)

3. What did you do to cool down for this activity? (Just stretching is not detailed enough!)

4. How did you use your joints for this activity?

5. Would you consider your activity an aerobic exercise, a strength training exercise, or a combination of two or three? Explain.

6. Why is it important to have your Center of Gravity low when performing exercises, please Explain the importance of your center of gravity for at least ONE movement in this activity.

7. Where are you in the stages of skill acquisition (Developmental Stage) for this activity? (Refer back to 02.04 Lesson to make sure you have the right stages!)

8. Design and explain THREE different practice sessions that could help you improve your skills for this activity. (Make sure you are thorough and detailed in how you would conduct a practice sessions to become better at this skill or exercise!)

ACTIVITY WORKSHEET #2

# OF HOURS OF ACTIVITY:

1. What activity did you choose to do, and why?

2. What did you do to warm up for the activity? (Just stretching is not detailed enough!)

3. What did you do to cool down for this activity? (Just stretching is not detailed enough!)

4. How did you use your joints for this activity?

5. Would you consider your activity an aerobic exercise, a strength training exercise, or a combination of two or three? Explain.

6. Explain the importance of your center of gravity for at least ONE movement in this activity.

7. Where are you in the stages of skill acquisition (Developmental Stage) for this activity? (Refer back to 02.04 Lesson to make sure you have the right stages!)

8. Design and explain THREE different practice sessions that could help you improve your skills for this activity. (Make sure you are thorough and detailed in how you would conduct a practice sessions to become better at this skill or exercise!)

****************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.04 Flexibility exercise program (Fitness for Life)

Introduction: The purpose of this assignment is to have you perform a workout that emphasizes flexibility. Once you perform this type of workout, you can decide how to incorporate flexibility activities into your overall workout program.

Essential Question: What is our body trying to tell us?

Jog or walk for 5 to 10 minutes to warm up your cardiovascular and muscular system.

For this assignment, you will experience a Flexibility Exercise Program as described on pages 167-172 of the optional textbook, or you may use the on-line demonstrations provided at the links below. This workout asks you to complete ten flexibility exercises:

knee-to-chest, backsaver sit-and-reach, spine twist, sitting stretcher, zipper, arm pretzel, hip stretcher, chest stretch, arm stretcher, and calf stretcher. For each exercise, follow the directions.

First, a few notes:

  • For this assignment, do not complete the ballistic stretches. Only conduct ballistic stretches under the direction of a qualified physical education teacher or coach.
  • If you have noticeably weakened muscles or joints, do not stretch them until the connective tissue has healed. Simply make a note of that difficulty on the assignment.
  • As you apply some of these flexibility exercises to your workout, note that muscles and other connective tissues should be stretched daily (for optimal flexibility and performance.) Although they do NOT increase strength or cardio fitness, proper stretching will help increase performance and avoid injuries.
  • For those who experience chronic back pain, it is often caused by decreased flexibility of the hip flexor muscles, a result of sitting too much at a desk. This puts an unnatural strain on the back. Flexibility exercises, done properly, can often decrease chronic back pain.

02.04 Flexibility exercise program activity (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 60 points possible 75 minutes

Complete the log as you finish each exercise and at the end of your activity, answer the questions relative to your performance on the flexibility exercises. Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. You might want to print out a copy to take with you to your workout. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Don't forget to highlight your answers. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. ************************************************************************** Name:_______________________________ Date:_________________________ DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS. 1. Backsaver sit-and-reach:

As described in the book, or go to Seated Lower Back Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the backsaver sit-and-reach static stretch for 10-15 seconds. Make sure you stretch both your right and left side. (1 pt)

Backsaver PNF Stretch:

As described in the book, or go to PNF Seated Glute Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the backsaver sit-and-reach PNF stretch. Make sure you stretch both your right and left side. (Push heel to the floor and contract the hamstrings for 3 seconds, relax, then grasp your ankle with both hands and pull your nose to your knee. Hold for 10-15 seconds.) (1 pt)

2. Knee to chest static stretch procedure:

As described in the book, or go to Lying Hamstring Stretch(see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the knee-to-chest static stretch for 10-15 seconds. Make sure you stretch both your right and left side. (1 pt) Knee-to-chest PNF Stretch: As described in the book, or go to PNF Lying Hamstring Stretch(see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the knee-to-chest PNF stretch. Make sure you stretch both your right and left side. (Squeeze buttocks muscles for 3 seconds, relax by lowering your hips to the floor, place hands under knee and gently pull knee to chest; and hold for 10-15 seconds.) (1 pt)

3. Spine twist static stretch procedure:

As described in the book, or go to Lying Crossover Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the spine twist static stretch for 10-15 seconds. Make sure you stretch both your right and left side and repeat so each side is stretched twice. (1 pt)

4. Sitting Stretcher static stretch procedure:

As described in the book, or go to Seated Hamstring Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the sitting stretcher static stretch for 10-15 seconds. (1 pt) Sitting Stretcher PNF stretch: As described in the book, or go to PNF Seated hamstring Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the sitting stretcher PNF stretch. (1 pt)

5. Zipper Static:

As described in the book, or go to Overhead Triceps stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the zipper static stretch for 10-15 seconds. (1 pt) Zipper PNF stretch: As described in the book, or go to PNF Overhead Triceps Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the zipper PNF stretch. (1 pt)

6. Arm Pretzel static stretch:

As described in the book, or go to Side Deltoid Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the arm pretzel static stretch for 10-15 seconds. Repeat this exercise so you stretch these muscles twice. (1 pt)

7. Hip Stretcher static stretch:

As described in the book, or go to Lunging Hip Flexor Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the hip stretcher static stretch for 10-15 seconds. Repeat this exercise so you stretch these muscles twice. (1 pt)

8. Static Arm stretcher:

As described in the book, or go to Seated Biceps stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the static arm stretcher stretch for 10-15 seconds. Repeat this exercise so you stretch these muscles twice. (1 pt)

9. Static Chest stretch procedure:

As described in the book, or go to Behind Head Chest Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the static chest stretch for 10-15 seconds. (1 pt) PNF Chest Stretch: As described in the book, or go to PNF Behind Head Chest Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the PNF chest stretch. (1 pt)

10. Calf Stretcher:

As described in the book, or go to Lunging Straight Leg Calf Stretch (see link in lesson above) ______ Check here after you complete the static calf stretcher for 10-15 seconds. Repeat this exercise so you stretch these muscles twice. (1 pt)

Questions

1. Discuss which stretches seemed to work the best for you and which stretches did not.• Describe the criteria that caused you to reach that conclusion. What were you feeling, and what was your body telling you?(10 pts.)

2. Did you feel you got a better stretch using static or PNF stretching? • Describe the physical response that makes you feel that way? (Note: You are not being asked which you like the best or which you will use. You are being asked about the relative quality of the muscle stretch.) (10 pts.)

3. Select 5 stretches from the above stretches performed that you think would be optimal to include in your workouts, and explain why you chose that stretch:  (4 pts each)

Stretch 1:

Why did you choose that particular stretch?

Stretch 2:

Why did you choose that particular stretch?

Stretch 3:

Why did you choose that particular stretch?

Stretch 4:

Why did you choose that particular stretch?

Stretch 5:

Why did you choose that particular stretch?

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.04 Standard 2 Assignment(PESkills)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 420 minutes

You are going to spend a total of SEVEN HOURS doing different kinds of physical activities of your choice; you may include the time it takes you to find the rules for any new activity as part of your hours, and the time it takes you to fill out your ACTIVITY WORKSHEETS. Copy the worksheet below (between the lines of asterisks) and paste into a word processing document on your computer. Complete the worksheet and save a copy for yourself. Go to section 3 "Assignments, Quizzes, Tests" on the homepage of the class. Then click on "Standard 2 Assignment" and 'edit my submission' to paste in and submit the worksheet.
Below is a list of optional physical activities, but you are not limited to these:

Golf, archery, bowling, weight training, aerobics, walking, jogging, social dance, rope jumping, disc golf, disc football, in-line skating, biking, fishing, martial arts, yoga, climbing, skiing, tennis, hiking, step class, croquet, badminton, horseshoes, soccer, basketball, baseball, Frisbee and aquatics.

You must try at least two different activities, but you are not limited to only two. You must spend at least THREE hours doing each activity you choose, and you must complete a total of at least SEVEN hours.

You may use the internet, books, or instructors/coaches to find the needed rules and/or equipment you need if you are trying a new activity. REMEMBER, safety comes first with whatever activity you choose.

After each activity you must copy and paste the following worksheet into a word document and complete the worksheet. Please put your answers in bold. Once you complete your SEVEN HOURS of activity and the worksheets for each activity, you will send me BOTH OF THE WORKSHEETS BY SUBMITTING THEM IN THE SUBMISSION BOX IN SECTION 3 FOR THE TOTAL SEVEN HOURS AT THE SAME TIME, OR THEY WILL NOT BE GRADED!!!!

Here are the worksheets:

******************************************************************************

ACTIVITY WORKSHEET #1

NAME:

DATE:

1. What activity did you choose to do, and why?

2. What did you do to warm up for the activity?

3. What did you do to cool down for this activity?

4. How did you use your joints for this activity?

5. Would you consider your activity aerobic exercise, strength training, or both? Explain.

6. Explain the importance of your center of gravity for at least one movement in this activity.

7. Where are you in the stages of skill acquisition for this activity?

8. Design and explain three different practice sessions that could help you improve your skills for this activity.

ACTIVITY WORKSHEET #2

1. What activity did you choose to do, and why?

2. What did you do to warm up for the activity?

3. What did you do to cool down for this activity?

4. How did you use your joints for this activity?

5. Would you consider your activity aerobic exercise, strength training, or both? Explain.

6. Explain the importance of your center of gravity for at least one movement in this activity.

7. Where are you in the stages of skill acquisition for this activity?

8. Design and explain three different practice sessions that could help you improve your skills for this activity.

**************************************************************************************************

02.04 The effects of poor nutrition and inactivity (Health II)

Explore the short and long term effects of poor nutrition and inactivity (e.g., obesity, chronic diseases).
Obesity is an epidemic among teens. One-third of youth ages 2-19 are overweight or obese. This can lead to serious health problems when teenagers become obese adults. Some of these include short-term effects like lethargy, depression, and low self-esteem. Long-term effects are arthritis, heart disease, high blood pressure, strokes, diabetes, and cancer.

HOW DO PEOPLE BECOME OBESE? When people continue to eat more calories than they can burn, more fat builds up in their bodies. If this habit of poor nutrition, combined with physical inactivity, continues, they become overweight or obese.

WHY DO PEOPLE BECOME OBESE? Even though genes impact our body types and sizes, environment plays a huge role! Many of us consume fast foods high in fat and sugars. High-calorie, low-nutrient snacks and drinks, larger portions of food, and less-active lifestyles are all adding to the obesity epidemic.

NEGATIVE EFFECTS OF OBESITY: Obesity is not only bad for a person’s body, but also for their minds. Obese individuals are more likely to be depressed and have a lower self-esteem. It can make someone lethargic, feeling like they have no energy to do anything.
Obesity’s negative effects on the body are many, but we will mention the main ones. Carrying extra weight puts added stress on the body, especially the bones and joints of the legs. Wear and tear on the joints from carrying extra weight can cause painful arthritis at a young age. As overweight kids and teens get older, they are more likely to develop chronic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. They are also more prone to develop high blood pressure and high cholesterol levels which can cause strokes.

WHAT CAN I DO TO OVERCOME OBESITY? Fortunately, we can do easy things to combat obesity. Things such as exercising, eating a nutritious and balanced diet, controlling portion sizes, and limiting TV, computer, and video game time can help teenagers overcome obesity and maintain a healthy weight.

See also the information at the links below.

02.04 Viewing assignment "The Diabetes Cure" (Health II)

teacher-scored 36 points possible 75 minutes

View "The Diabetes Cure – Creating Hope" found at the link below, under the HUMAN HEALTH tab, but first complete the "Before Viewing" questions. Then answer the other questions and complete the activity. Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. ********************************************************************************************************************************** Background: Glucose is broken down from food in the digestive system. Glucose enters the blood stream and is the major source of energy in animals. To convert glucose in the blood into energy, the body needs the hormone insulin, which is produced in the pancreas. Before Viewing

1. What is diabetes? 2. Who is at risk of getting diabetes? 3. What do you know about diabetes, and what are some of its symptoms, consequences and treatments?

Symptoms Consequences Treatments

4. Can dogs and other animals get diabetes?

After Viewing

1. What are the two types of diabetes? How do the different types of diabetes differ? Do both types have to be treated with insulin injections? 2. What does the acronym INGAP stand for? Where would you find INGAP?


Activity A. Write a 500-word paper (this is about two pages) on diabetes. Your paper should include a description of diabetes, an explanation on the different types of diabetes, causes, complications, risks and prevention, as well as treatments. Write the paper in your own words--DO NOT copy and paste. Include references where you obtained your information for your paper. ***************************************************************************************************************

Structure Content Points possible
Introduction (one paragraph) Basic description, and reasons why diabetes is important 3 points
one to two paragraphs Describe the types and causes of diabetes 3 points
one to two paragraphs Describe the risks and possible complications of diabetes; if you know people with diabetes, describe how it affects their lives 3 points
one to two paragraphs Describe prevention and treatments of diabetes 3 points
Conclusion - one paragraph Describe how diabetes would affect your life (or how it does, if you already have it), and what you would be willing to do to prevent it 3 points
Works cited - list Include authors, titles, publication dates of your sources; include url if it was an internet source 3 points
Editing Correct any spelling, punctuation, capitalization or other conventions errors 3 points

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.04 Writing an argument essay (English 9)

Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Death penalty map:: Dark Blue: no death penalty; Light Blue: death penalty not applied for over 10 years; Brown: death penalty only used in wartime; Orange: used against adults; Red: used against adults and adolescentsDeath penalty map:: Dark Blue: no death penalty; Light Blue: death penalty not applied for over 10 years; Brown: death penalty only used in wartime; Orange: used against adults; Red: used against adults and adolescents
An argumentative essay presents reasons and evidence (facts, statistics, examples, logical analysis, quotes, etc) with regard to an arguable topic. Although it is possible to argue almost anything, it is most practical to argue topics for which there is reasonable evidence for at least two different viewpoints, without depending mainly on opinion or emotion. We won't be writing arguments on topics like what perfume smells best or what is the most beautiful kind of music because those are matters of opinion. We won't argue topics like whether gravity exists because there is so little evidence to the contrary. If you are asked to choose a topic (note that in this class, the topic will be assigned), it may be better not to choose a topic on which you already have a passionate opinion because it could be difficult for you to deal with opposing evidence and avoid getting emotional.

Pre-Writing

Once you have a topic, you will need to do some brainstorming and research. List what you already know (or think you know) about the topic and any questions you have. Search for information, opinions, and quotes about the topic. Are there two sides to the argument, or (more likely) is it more complicated than that? Whenever you find interesting evidence, copy/write it down and note down the source. Get more evidence than you think you need, and remember to write down opposing evidence as well as supporting evidence. Make an evaluation of how reliable each source is--you don't want to build your essay on a 'fact' that turns out to be bogus.

When you have collected lots of information, think about ways to categorize it. What pieces of information belong together? How do they relate? What claim(s) could you support based on what you have found? What counterclaims? Narrow it down to one significant claim and counterclaim on which to focus your essay. Sketch out an informal outline for what order you will use to present your ideas and evidence.

Composing

When you sit down to compose the first draft of your essay, remember that it doesn't have to be perfect the first time! You'll be aiming to write an introduction that will give your reader some background (how much depends partly on your intended audience--how much does your audience already know?) and a brief version of your claim (thesis) and the main kinds of supporting evidence.

The main part of your essay will develop your claim(s) and counterclaim(s), including and analyzing reasons, evidence, examples, and/or expert opinion for each claim or counterclaim. Not all evidence is equal! Part of your job as the writer is to select and identify the strongest evidence, and also to point out weaknesses in logic or evidence. It's better to fully develop a few important reasons than to mention dozens. To help your reader follow your reasoning, divide your writing into paragraphs that help clarify the relationships between the claims and evidence.

At the end, you will write a conclusion that draws on the reasons and evidence you presented earlier to clarify the argument, point out the importance of the topic, and emphasize the main 'take-home message'.

Revising

Ideally, after you finish the first draft, you will put it away for a day or two and/or ask some friends to read it and let you know what strengths and weaknesses they notice, especially if there is something they don't understand. When you are ready to revise, look for things you can improve:

  • Is there strong evidence to support each reason? If not, add evidence.
  • Is there anything that doesn't seem relevant? If so, either re-write to show how it is relevant, or take it out.
  • Read back over with an eye for sequence--do you have everything in the most logical, effective order? If not, use cut and paste to rearrange sentences or paragraphs.
  • Check the transitions between ideas and between paragraphs. Use words, phrases or clauses that help show the relationships between ideas or paragraphs.
  • Is the tone consistently formal, or appropriate for the audience? Make sure you have used objective language and precise vocabulary.

Editing

Finally, once your essay says what you want it to say, use your computer's spellcheck and your own eyes (and the eyes of any willing friends or family) to look for spelling, punctuation, capitalization and grammar or usage errors. Fix them! (There is nothing wrong with fixing errors you notice while composing or revising, too, but always finish up with editing so you catch anything you might have missed earlier.)

02.04.02 activity log week 3 (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 65 points possible 100 minutes

by Fabinou74, CC Attribution Share-Alike 3.0, via Wikimedia Commonsby Fabinou74, CC Attribution Share-Alike 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Submit your activity log. To submit your work, scan or take a photo of your log and the form. Save as a .jpg, .pdf or .gif and go to Topic 3 on the main class page to upload the files.

IMPORTANT: Please do not email logs, as this delays the grading process, since emails do link into the instructor's grade book. As a last resort, you may mail copies to your teacher's physical address.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.05 Body composition measurement (Health II)

Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various body-weight indicators (e.g., Body Mass Index [B.M.I.], waist circumference, body fat percentage calculators).

BMI
If we go to our doctor’s office to inquire the status of our weight, our doctor will measure our height and weight to get our BMI. BMI is our weight in kilograms divided by our height in meters squared. The BMI measure is a quick and easy way to determine if we are underweight, at the ideal weight, overweight, or obese.
A weakness of the BMI is that it doesn’t distinguish between fat weight versus muscle weight. We can have an unhealthy BMI reading even though we may be in top physical condition just because we have a large mass of muscles. It would also give an inaccurate reading for a pregnant mother. Another weakness is that it doesn’t distinguish between weight that’s centered around the midsection or belly of a person to the weight that’s centered around the lower body of another person. People with the greater amount of weight around the belly, or with a higher waist circumference, have a greater risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes than those with the weight in the lower body.

Waist circumference
A strength of the waist circumference (WC)test then, is that it has a high correlation between risks of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and colon cancer to men with a WC > than 102 cm and women with a WC > than 88.
The major weakness of the WC test is the high ethnic variability that exists. There are different healthy cutoff numbers, depending on your ethnicity.

Body fat calculators
A strength of the body fat percentage calculator is that it gives general readings for body fat percentages for men and women of different ages. Calculators that ask for specific data and a wide range of body measurements would be more accurate than those that just ask for your age, gender, height, weight, and waist circumference.
A weakness of the calculators is that it isn’t ultimately the most accurate way to determine your body fat percentage. Underwater weighing and the U of U’s BOD POD may give more accurate readings.

02.05 Eating disorders (Health II)

Examine the causes, symptoms, and the short and long-term consequences of eating disorders.

Eating disorders are a serious health problem that affects around 1 to 2% of teens. Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder in which individuals have a fear of gaining weight. Teens who have this disorder go long periods of time without food, and any food eaten is in very small amounts. Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder in which teens binge (eat a very large amount of food) and then purge (a forced vomit, or laxatives may be used) to prevent any weight gain. Binge eating disorder is characterized by eating very large amounts of food at a time, and at least three times a week.

Causes
There are several causes of eating disorders. Teens (most often girls, but boys may also be affected) who develop an eating disorder typically are between the ages of 13 and 17 years old. This is a time when there’s pressure to do well in school, there’s peer pressure, and it’s a time when many physical and emotional changes occur in a teen. For girls, it’s entirely normal and necessary to gain some weight in fat during puberty. Some of them feel the pressure to look like petite movie stars or celebrities. They may feel pressure to get rid of this new weight any way possible. Teens who experience depression, anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, and the need for control may also have an eating disorder. There is also some evidence that a tendency for eating disorders may be genetic although this is difficult to determine because individuals learn behaviors from their families.

Symptoms and Consequences
Symptoms of anorexia include becoming very thin, nothing but “skin and bones” thin. These individuals are obsessed with weight control, they intentionally avoid social activities where food is present, they portion food carefully, and they believe they are fat even when they become dangerously thin. Short term consequences of anorexia include loss of hair, lower blood pressure, lightheadedness and inability to focus. Long term consequences include osteoporosis, anemia, decreased kidney functioning, dehydration, low potassium, and death.

Symptoms of bulimia are feeling depressed with body size, shape, and weight. Individuals with bulimia eat a lot of junk food (binge) and then, secretly, go and use the bathroom soon after the binge (so they can vomit the food out of their bodies). They may also exercise excessively to rid themselves of any weight gain. Short term consequences of bulimia include mood swings, getting tired easily, loss of hair, feeling cold often, dry skin, and constipation. Long term consequences include damage to the stomach, kidneys, and throat because of vomiting stomach acid, tooth decay because of stomach acid, and loss of potassium that can lead to heart problems and death. Recovered bulimics often cannot eat acidic foods or foods that are spicy for the remainder of their lives because their throat and stomach are permanently damaged.

Possible binge eating consequences would be obesity leading to diabetes, heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and cancer.

02.05 Savings vs. Investments (Financial Literacy)

Compare long-term and short-term savings and investments.

Dow Jones Industrial Index average, 1900-2008: Public domainDow Jones Industrial Index average, 1900-2008: Public domain

BACKGROUND

In this unit, you will study investments. Savings (like bank savings, CD's, and bank "money market" accounts) are different from investments (like stocks, bonds, and mutual funds). Each has advantages and disadvantages. Sometimes low-interest savings are better than investments because the risk with savings is lower, and the money is more liquid. Sometimes higher returns with higher risk are preferable--that’s when investments are preferred. This assignment compares savings and investments.

Savings vs. Investments

> Rate of return: Investments usually have higher potential rates of return. Savings rates tend to be lower.
> Risk: Investments are not guaranteed and may even go down. Savings are usually insured with guaranteed growth.
> Length of time: Investments are generally for longer times. Savings are generally for shorter times.
> Purpose: Investments are used for long term goals like education and retirement where there is a long-term need to increase the value of money and protect earnings against inflation. Investments should not be used as emergency funds since they are often more risky and not as accessible. Savings ARE more for suitable for emergencies and items that are too expensive to purchase from one paycheck.
> Costs & Fees: Investments are usually more complex than savings. Hence, there are investment fees to pay for advisors and those who offer advice and sell the investments. In addition, there are often costs for transactions such as for buying stocks, managing mutual funds and annuities, purchasing bonds, etc. Savings, on the other hand, do not generally involve so many fees but are just one of the standard services offered by banks, credit unions and similar institutions.
> Liquidity: Savings are usually more liquid than investments. For example, a savings account is much easier to convert to cash than your house. Cash is more liquid than real estate. Investments are usually not as liquid.

Complete the three URL Activities below. Read the instructions for each activity carefully to make sure you visit all the required web pages but do not visit more than is necessary. All three parts include pages from the same web site.

Visit URL #1: to read the site information until you reach the “Detour” sign. Then exit and proceed to the next URL.

Visit URL #2: to read the site information until you reach the “Detour” sign. Then exit and proceed to the next URL.

Visit URL #3: to complete “Getting Ready to Invest” (Skip the “Bloomberg” link.) Stop when you reach the “Detour” sign. Then exit and proceed to the “Assignments, Quizzes, and Tests” section.

02.05 Savings vs. Investments (Financial Literacy)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

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ASSIGNMENT 02.05 Questions (12E)
(Copy everything between the asterisks.)
1) Q: What do you think happens to the value of investments that grow slower than inflation? > ANSWER:
2) Q: List only two of the several LONG-TERM (not short-term) places the web page says you can save to avoid having savings eaten away by inflation: (answer is in the 1st URL)

 

ANSWER:
ANSWER:

3) Q: The web page says people should pay off high-interest loans and credit before starting long-term investments. What do you think happens to your total earnings if you pay higher interest on loans than you earn on investments? > ANSWER:
4) Q: Experts say people should save about 10% of their income; how many dollars per month do you think you should save as a minimum?> ANSWER:
5) Q: (02.05): Write your first and last name and today's date.> ANSWER:

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.05 The influence of the media on body image (Health II)

Analyze the influence of media on body image.

Body image is how we feel about our own physical appearance. Self esteem is how much we value and respect ourselves. Body image and self esteem are linked together during the teen years because it’s during this time that teens care most about how others view them. Some teens may have a poor self esteem and body image when they go through puberty because their bodies go through many changes. Going through these changes, along with the desire to be accepted, leads teens to compare themselves with others. Often teens also compare themselves with celebrities on TV, in movies, or in magazines.

It is normal to occasionally feel critical of your own body. You may wish to be better-looking, more muscular, thinner, taller, or shorter. You may wish you had higher cheekbones, narrower hips, wider shoulders, darker eyes, clearer skin, longer legs, or whatever. It is healthy to set realistic goals for change, but not to obsess about things you can't change.

In a short video clip, a professional photographer explains how 99% of pictures of celebrities in magazines have been photoshopped. Many teens look at pictures of celebrities in these magazines and view them as perfect. The truth of the matter is that celebrities don’t look perfect and in many cases, have several physical flaws that get photoshopped out of their pictures.
To overcome a negative body image of ourselves, it’s important to understand that no one, celebrities included, looks perfect. We all have flaws that we may or may not be able to change. If it’s something that can be changed, like lack of muscle tone, then we can do our best to change it. On the flipside, we all have positive qualities. It’s important to focus some of our energy into what we do well and what makes us happy in life. If we focus on what we do well, then naturally, our self esteem will improve.

The media (and especially advertising) also suggest that in order to find happiness, we need to be good-looking and sexy. In commercials, movies and TV shows, tall, muscular, good-looking men and slender beautiful women fall in love, get married, have successful careers and plenty of money, own nice homes, and have happy families. This is unrealistic. Being good looking does not mean you will have a happy life. Lacking good looks doesn't mean you will end up poor, unemployed, single or unhappy! This is common sense, and we hear constantly about celebrities who have tremendous good looks going through drug addiction, terrible divorces or suicide--but we are also bombarded by media images suggesting otherwise.

Watch the video clips below.

02.05 The influence of the media on body image assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 60 minutes

After viewing both body image videos (links above), please answer question number one and write a persuasive essay for number two. Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. ************************************************************************************************************

1. List ten ways that photographed images could be altered (for 10 points) Include examples from the videos. 2. Write a persuasive essay of 250 words or more, on whether or not you think the media is being deceptive in their methods of altering photographed images, and whether you think this is a problem. Your essay must contain three to five examples to support your opinion. You must also list references at the end of your essay.

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Structure Content Points possible
Introduction - one paragraph Clearly state your opinion about whether you think the media is deceptive in altering images, and whether this is a problem or not, in general terms 3 points
One paragraph First argument - give at least one reason and one example supporting your opinion about whether the media is being deceptive 4 points
One to two paragraphs Additional arguments - give at least two reasons and at least two examples of whether or how altering images creates problems or not 6 points
Conclusion - one to two paragraphs Reinforce your most important reason with examples from personal experience, and finish with a recommendation about what should be done (or not done) 4 points
Works cited List at least two sources (author, title, and url if from internet); one may be a video from the lesson, but one should be another source you found 2 points
Editing Correct conventions errors (spelling, punctuation, capitalization, etc) 1 point

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.05 Unit 01-02 Review Quiz

computer-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Assessment 02.05 Review Quiz 01-02

Complete

01-02 Review Quiz
Foundations of Civilizations and Ancient Egypt

This assignment is found under Review Quiz 01-02 on the course website. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do and will provide immediate feedback.

Complete this assignment after you finish reading lessons 1 and 2.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.05 Unit 2 Quiz 2 (Participation Skills and Techniques)

After you have read the preceding lessons and links, Take the Quiz. You must score at least 80%, but you may take the quiz as many times as necessary to get a good score.

02.05 Unit 2 Quiz 2 (Participation Skills and Techniques)

computer-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

Remember you may RETAKE the quiz as many times as you like, but you must score at least 80%. 8 out of 10

This assignment should be completed by WEEK 5 of this class

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.05.01 Unit 2 quiz(Fitness for Life)

computer-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

by Nemonoman, GNU General Public License, via Wikimedia Commonsby Nemonoman, GNU General Public License, via Wikimedia Commons

Take the quiz using the link in Topic 3 of the main class page. You may take it multiple times, but you must score at least 90%.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.05.03 Unit 2 quiz (Health II)

computer-scored 25 points possible 30 minutes

Go to Topic 3 (Assignments, quizzes and tests) to take this quiz.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.06 Applying your Skills: Video 2 (Participation Skills and Techniques)

02.06 Applying your Skills: Video 2. (Participation Skills and Techniques)

02.06 Applying your Skills: Video 2. (Participation Skills and Techniques)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 60 minutes

This assignment should be completed by WEEK 5 of this class

Standard Two Video INSTRUCTIONS:

You will need to submit an instructional video demonstrating how to perform a basic skill for ONE of the activities you choose to do on your assignment 02.04. If you are unable to make a video of YOURSELF, you can use powerpoint to create a presentation USING pictures of you demonstrating the basics skills for the exercise you have chosen. (There needs to be as many pictures as there are CRTICAL CUES for each exercise.) 

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE VIDEO:. *Your video needs to be at least one minute long and NO longer than two minutes. If you would rather take pictures and use a video editor program to make a video/powerpoint to create your video, you can but you must have a minimum of 6 pictures.

*You MUST be the star of your video, the video needs to be of YOU teaching and demonstrating how to perform the skill or exercise, so you might need to get a friend to do the filming. You will also be the narrator of the video.

*Assume that you are making this video for another student who has never tried your particular activity/sport.                           

*You CANNOT use the same video for another other PE Skills and Techniques, including both quarters. Example: If the activity you choose was tennis, you would need to show the basic skills of tennis, such as:

How to grip the tennis racket. How to serve a tennis ball. What a backhand swing looks like and how to accomplish it. Etc.

OBSERVATION QUESTIONS: After you have created your video, watch the video and critique yourself.  Answer the following questions. MAKE SURE YOUR ANSWERS ARE IN COMPLETE SENTENCES OR PARAGRAPHS. Please put all answers in bold or UPPER CASE.

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1. According to the information you obtained about your activity, what are the CRITICAL CUES for the movement or skill you choose to demonstrate in your video?

2. What did you see in the video that you were doing well?

3. What did you see in the video that you could improve on?

4. What did you see yourself doing that you didn't realize you were doing until you watched the video?

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INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR VIDEO: Video Assignments You will need a computer with a connection to the Internet and your digital video content (under two minutes please). You can choose between "YouTube" or "Photobucket" to host your video assignments. You will need to create an account for either resource. Follow the instructions to upload and share your videos. YouTube will take a little longer to upload. In YouTube, you need to make your video 'available to the world.' When you go to the "My Videos" section of your YouTube account, play the video you want to submit. At this point you can either copy the address in the URL and send it to your teacher via your email account, or click on the "Share" link to send an email to the teacher from the page your video is on. Photobucket is very similar. Click on the links below to access either site to get started. If you don't have a video camera, you can use still images in a slide show with narration that is converted to digital video.

IF you decide to NOT use PHOTOBUCKET or YOUTUBE... I can only view the following video formats...

.mov, .mp4, .m4v, .3gp, .mpv

Please make sure your video is in this format or you will have to redo the video.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.07 Google Earth Tour: Photos of Three Favorite Buildings (Basic Photography)

Become a map maker by creating a Google Earth Tour of your three favorite buildings in your community.

1- Take your camera to each building and photograph the outside of each structure. Don’t make this a drive by photo shoot. Get out of your car. Get permission. Remember do not be a public nuisance. If allowed take your camera inside. Look for the line, shapes and texture.
2- Upload your three best jpg photos to a photo sharing website such as Google Photos, Flickr, Facebook, Shutterfly, or Snapfish.

Have fun learning how to locate each building in Google Earth!

02.07.01 Google Earth Tour: Photos of Three Favorite Buildings (Basic Photography)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 90 minutes

Use Google Earth to create a map tour of three of your favorite buildings in your community.

Select three buildings in your community. (These buildings cannot be someone’s home that you don’t know. Please do not select your own home either.) Take your camera to each one and photograph the outside of each structure. Don’t make this a drive by photo shoot. Get out of your car. Get permission. Remember do not be a public nuisance. If allowed take your camera inside. Look for the line, shapes and texture.

Print out the pdf file called Photos_3Favorite_Buildings_DigPhoto_Q1.pdf and carefully follow the detailed instructions. It may take some experimenting to get it just right! For additional help refer to the Google Earth links on the last page of this PDF.

Once your Google Earth Buildings tour is completed, submit your saved .kmz file to your teacher as an assignment.

02.08 Investment Principles (Financial Literacy)

computer-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

You will now complete a 10-question online quiz. You MUST score at least 8 to receive credit for the assignment but don't worry if you don't get at least 8 the first time since you can retake the quiz as many times as you need. Only your last quiz attempt counts. You may continue to increase your score if you want (7 or less = try again, 8 = B, 9 or 10 = A).

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.12 Google Earth Tour of My Three Favorite Restaurants (DigitalPhoto1)

02.12 Google Earth Tour of My Three Favorite Restaurants (DigitalPhoto1)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 150 minutes

See example Restaurant Tour attached above. Click on the tour to download. Next, download Google Earth if you don't already have it on your computer. (See link below for the download.)

Launch Google Earth, then open the Sample My Favorite Three Restaurants Tour. Use this sample Tour as a guideline as you build your Google Earth Tour.

Geospatial Assignment: (For ideas about why these skills are important, view the Geospatial Revolution Episode 1 Video in links list below.)
1-Take a picture of three favorite restaurants in your community. Photograph the outside of each restaurant. You will have three different photos to upload.

2-Save these three images as a jpg in the "Cloud". You will need to then upload and save the three images in the "Cloud" (online) using Google's Picasa Web Albums or Flickr Photo Sharing(See links below). If you do not have an account at one of these sites, please get a free one so that you can upload all of your images in the "Cloud". (See links below to get your account.)
3-Maximize Google Earth on your desktop so that you use all of your screens real estate.
4-How do I locate each restaurant? Use the Search box in the top left to type in each Restaurant's name, city, and state. Zoom into each restaurant and create your own Placemarks. Do not use the placemarks that are returned from your Search.
5-How do I add my own placemarks? Locate the yellow push pin on the top menu bar. Click it to Add Placemark. You will have three placemarks in this tour.
6-In each Placemark pop-up form, you need to include the following information:

1-Change Untitled Placemark to the name of the restaurant
2-Include the photograph you took of the outside of restaurant
(See links list below for help adding images.)
3-In the Description section add the following:
-Address of Restaurant, with the city and zip code
-Describe why this is one of your favorite restaurants and tell us what you usually eat.
-On a scale of 1-10, with 10 being the best, rate the food at the restaurant.

7-Next you need to add a Folder. Go to the top menu bar and select Add. Next select Folder.
Name this folder the following: My Three Favorite Restaurants-YourFirstName YourLastname
8-Drag your three restaurant placemarks into this new My Three Favorite Restaurants folder.
9-How do I save my kmz file? Highlight the My Three Favorite Restaurants folder, right click on it and choose Save Place As
10-Save this .KMZ file somewhere on your hard drive where you will REMEMBER!
11-Submit your saved Google Earth .KMZ file of your My Three Favorite Restaurants tour, to your teacher as an assignment.
Note: The saved file name is the name of your folder so DO NOT CHANGE the file name.
Refer to the links below for additional tutorial help on how to add Placemarks and create Google Earth Tours.

03.00 Spending (Financial Literacy)

NOTE: This video can take from 3 to 12 minutes to load. I suggest you go ahead and try it, but feel free to open another screen and work on the next activity while it is loading. The video makes the class more interesting but does not contain critical information.
Your computer needs to have QuickTime installed to view this video. To view it, click the link, then click the play button.

03.01 Ancient Middle East Journal Assignment(WorldCiv1)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

"History consists, for the greater part, of the miseries brought upon the world by pride, ambition, avarice, revenge, lust, sedition, hypocrisy, ungoverned zeal, and all the train of disorderly appetite." (Burke par. 242) Burke, Edmund. "Reflections on the French Revolution." Paras. 225-249. Burke, Edmund. 1909-14. Reflections on the French Revolution. The Harvard Classics. Bartleby.com Great Books Online, 2012. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. Votive figure from Mesopotamian temple, c. 2750-2600 B.C.: Wikimedia Commons, Rosemaniakos, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 GenericVotive figure from Mesopotamian temple, c. 2750-2600 B.C.: Wikimedia Commons, Rosemaniakos, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic Assignment 3.01: Journal Entry Are there any actions that don't have consequences? In the long run, can you really 'get away with' anything? If every action has a consequence, how does that knowledge affect the way you live? Edit and submit your assignment to your instructor in the Topic 3 area on the front page of the course.

 
5- Accomplished
3- Satisfactory
2-Developing
1-Beginning
Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.01 Cardiovascular Fitness (Fitness for Life)

Bike riding can improve your cardiovascular fitness.: By Jbyrne1701 (Own work) ,CC0, via Wikimedia CommonsBike riding can improve your cardiovascular fitness.: By Jbyrne1701 (Own work) ,CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

Cardiovascular fitness has to do with how efficiently your heart circulates oxygen through your body. View the unit 3 presentation (PowerPoint attached above, or links to online video version, below) and the Respiration video (use the Pioneer Library username and password when prompted). If you have the optional textbook, read chapters 6-7.

Note: The images in the PowerPoint version of this presentation were found at Wikimedia Commons, and are in the public domain or under a Creative Commons Share-Alike license. Images in the video version were created specifically for this class, and are under a 'share-alike' license.

Use these links to view the unit 3 presentation in video version online. It is split into several parts so that it will download quickly. When the link opens, click the middle of the viewing box, then the play icon in the lower left of the viewing box to start the video.

03.01 Digital Camera Types, and components

This Video shows the basic components of several Digital cameras. The advantages and disadvantages of each. Topics include how to turn on the camera, where the battery and SD cards go, where the basic controls of the camera are, different types of memory and different types of batteries.

The second video filmed at the Lincoln Memorial in our nations capital Washington DC shows three different types of DSLR (Digital Single Lens Reflex) lenses. The first one is normal, wide-angle, and telephoto, the video shows the different images taken with these three different types of lenses.

03.01 Exercise and Food (Participation Skills and Techniques)

NUTRITION:
In this course we have talked a lot about how important exercise is for the body, and while that is true, exercise can't do it alone. Besides exercising, we need to eat healthy.
*CLICK the first link, "A Guide to Eating for Sports," to learn about eating healthy and exercising.

BODY COMPOSITION:
It is important to maintain a healthy weight. It is unhealthy to be overweight or underweight. As a teenager, there is a broad spectrum for a healthy weight because you are continually growing.
*CLICK on the second link, "What's The Right Weight For My Height?" to learn about having a healthy weight. In the article you will find a formula to calculate your healthy weight, called the Body Mass Index. MAKE SURE THAT YOU do this calculation, as you will use it in your assignment.

GOALS/LOG:
When you decide to get active or improve your physical fitness, it helps to set goals. A great way to hold yourself accountable to your physical fitness goals is to keep an exercise log.
*CLICK the third link, "Exercise Log," to learn how to keep a useful exercise log.

teacher-scored 30 points possible 120 minutes

This assignment should be completed by WEEK 6 of this class

You will now be required to keep an Exercise and Food log for a ONE week period of time.

Use the following information to keep your records, create your own log, or USE THE ONE I PROVIDED.

Click on "Exercise and Food Log" and then go to "File" and Select, "Download as." You can download this google doc into any program you have and use it as a spreadsheet.

You can also use this google doc and send it to me as a google doc. To do this; once you have completed your information, Select "File" and then select "Make a Copy." save it as "Copy of Exercise and Food Log 03.01.firstname.lastname." Then you will need to share it with me by selected "Unlisted" in the Share options. Then you can copy and paste the URL in the submit text box.

Make sure you answer each question completely and include any required information. Be very detailed on the log!! Below is the information you will need to have in your own copy if you are making your own log.

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  1. Keep a log of what you eat for a week, and list below. Make sure you include EVERYTHING you eat, Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Snacks! - BE VERY DETAILED!!

    Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

  2. What healthy eating habits do you already practice?
  3. What changes could you make to improve your eating habits?
  4. What is a goal for healthy eating you will work on?
  5. What was the result of the BMI calculation you did in the lesson?
  6. According to the information in that lesson, is your BMI low, high, or healthy?
  7. How would you rate your muscle strength? Give reasons.
  8. How would you rate your endurance? Give reasons.
  9. How would you rate your flexibility? Give reasons.
  10. After studying the exercise log in lesson 03.1,List your exercise goals for a day of the week. Include at least the type of activity or exercise, and the repetitions for that activity or time goals to complete the activity.

    Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

  11. How do you think keeping an exercise log would help someone achieve their physical fitness goals?

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.01 Exercise and Food (PESkills)

In this course we have talked a lot about how important exercise is for the body, and while that is true, exercise can't do it alone. Besides exercising, we need to eat healthy.

Read the following article about eating healthy and exercising.

03.01 Media & Technology Misuse and Safety (Health II)

Objective: Examine the dangers of inappropriate use of current technology.

a. Discuss use and misuse of current technology (e.g., internet, email, websites, instant messages, cell phones).
b. Determine the short and long term dangers of sharing private information when using current technologies.
c. Explore personal and legal consequences for using technology inappropriately and discuss school and LEA policies.
d. Analyze violence in the media and how it impacts behavior.

Watch/read at least the 'required' resources listed below. Take notes so you will be able to use the information on the assignment.

03.01 Media & Technology Misuse and Safety assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 35 points possible 60 minutes

After you have read the lesson and watched the required video, using the information in the video, write an essay on the dangers of inappropriate use of technology (12 point font, double or single-spaced, at least 600 words). You must include at least the following information:

How is current technology used and misused? (include all types e.g., internet, email, websites, instant messages, cell phones; and give examples from your own - or friends' and family's - experience). What are the short and long term dangers of sharing private information when using current technologies? How can sending via cell phone, email, etc… or posting inappropriate pictures of yourself on social networking sites affect you now and in the future? What are some legal consequences for using technology inappropriately? What are your school and LEA (district) policies? Analyze violence in the media and how it impacts behavior. Include facts from the video and/or other sources, and express your own opinion about how violence in the media may impact behavior.

Scoring: Content 30 points (Cover the 6 items listed, 5 points each), Conventions 5 points (spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar etc)

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.01 My Pyramid Websites (PE Individualized Lifetime Activity)

Whitewater kayaking: by Truello, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic, via Wikimedia CommonsWhitewater kayaking: by Truello, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic, via Wikimedia Commons

Many people say they don't have time to exercise, but there are many ways you can include physical activity in your daily life. Read the article titled, "Tips For Increasing Physical Activity," located under LINKS, to get some helpful tips on how you can get active!
Some people wonder why physical activity is important. There are many benefits to physical activity; read the article titled, "Why Is Physical Activity Important," to find out what they are.

It is important to understand how much you should exercise. It is possible to over-exercise. It is also possible to under-exercise when you are trying to meet certain health and/or weight goals. Read the article titled, "How Much Physical Activity Is Needed?," located under LINKS, to get an idea of how much time you need to spend exercising to meet your goals.

03.01 The Great Calcium Adventure (PE Individualized Lifetime Activity)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 60 minutes

The Great Calcium Adventure

Along with the correct amount of physical activity, everyone needs to build strong, healthy muscle and bones. Not only is the type of exercise important, but the proper amount of calcium intake is vital. Follow the steps below in the "The Great Calcium Challenge" and see how close you are to getting enough calcium every day.

This assignment has three parts:

1st - Calculate the amount(mg) of calcium in the food you eat for a week period (7 days). Nutritional Facts labels the information needed to determine the amount of calcium in the food product. The label will give a "%DV", or percent of the Daily Value for the calcium. Adults need 1,000 milligrams (mg) per day of calcium, while teens need 1,300 mg. If you don't get enough calcium during your teen years, you can't make it up later in life. The majority of teens have finished thier growth spurts around 17 years of age. At that point 90% of their adult bone mass has been established. Follow the steps below to calculate the amount of calcium in the food from percentage to milligrams.

* Convert %DV into mg, multiple the %DV by 10 or add a zero to %DV. Example - 8% DV equals 80 mg. 8 x 10 = 80 or .8 and a zero = 80

* Once you have converted your intake of calcium into mg, you can figure out your daily calcium intake. Each day should add up to 1300 mg of calcium.

2nd - Create a spreadsheet that will track your calcium intake for the seven day period for each meal and daily total.

3rd - Answer the following questions:

* Did keeping track of your calcium intake influence the foods and beverages you ate and drank? Explain.

* After tracking your calcium intake, were you surprised that you were taking in more or less calcium than you need? Explain.

03.01 The writing process, and the six-trait system of evaluating writing (English 9)

03.01.01 Body Composition (PESkills)

Body Composition

It is important to maintain a healthy weight. It is unhealthy to be overweight or underweight. As a teenager, there is a broad spectrum for a healthy weight because you are continually growing.

Read the following article to learn about having a healthy weight. In the article you will find a formula to calculate your healthy weight, called the Body Mass Index - MAKE SURE THAT YOU do this calculation.

03.01.01 Writing an Equation, example 1 -- Planning a Birthday Party (Math I)

Ashley's birthday is in July. She wants to spend the day with her family and friends at the local water park. They have a group rate for $100 for the first five people, and $17 per person for each additional person.

Ashley has four people in her immediate family, and she wants to invite her three BFF's. What will it cost for Ashley's birthday group to get into the park?

Okay, how do we solve this problem? Well, we know that there are seven people total. We also know that the first five cost $100, total. That leaves two people we still need to pay for. They cost $17 each. Therefore, the two additional people will cost $34. The total price is $134.

Of course, in real life, it is possible that all the problems will not have been solved. What if Ashley's brother gets sick? Or if Ashley's favorite cousin is visiting? Will Ashley's aunt, uncle and all four cousins want to come also? Or maybe Ashley's aunt will take a day off and send the kids with dad, but stay home herself? And what if Ashley's brother wants to bring a friend? Or what if one of Ashley's BFFs is stuck babysitting her little sister, and either has to stay home or bring the sister along?

These are the real problems that occur in my family. How about yours?

How awesome would it be if we didn't have to go through the logic of the problem every time we added or subtracted a person or six from the group? This is one of the reasons people first started writing equations: so they didn't need to solve the same problem over and over. They could just solve it once, then plug in different numbers to get the rest of the answers.

Consider Ashley's birthday party. Say after counting siblings and friends and adult relatives and cousins, Ashley has a caravan of 12 people going to her party. We will work through the solution again, but this time paying careful attention to what happens to the number 12.

To begin with, the first five people cost $100, so we need to subtract 5 people from the total of 12, but we also need to add $100 at the end. Okay. Now, after subtracting 5 from 12, we have 7 people we still need to pay for. Each of these 7 people cost $17, so we need to multiply 7 by $17, which gives us $119. Finally, we add that original $100 to this. The total cost is $219. Okay?

Next we want to write this as an equation. The first thing we did was pay $100 for 5 people

upfront cost for 5 people = $100 (eq. 1)

Next we subtracted 5 from 12 to get the number of people we still needed to pay for. Write that down,

additional people = (12 – 5) people. (eq. 2)

The next thing we did was multiply that answer by $17 to get the total cost for the additional people. So write that,

cost of additional people = ($17 per person)[(12 – 5) people]. (eq. 3)

Finally, we added the original $100 to that value to get the total cost, and I am just going to call that c, for “cost”. Now finally we have

c = ($17 per person)[(12 – 5) people] + $100. (eq. 4)

Now, to really write this out as an equation that I don't have to redo every time someone gets sick or has to babysit, we will replace the number 12 with a letter: how about p for “people?”

c = ($17 per person)(p – 5 people) + $100. (eq. 5)

Okay? Now, the advantage of this is, when Ashley's mom decides that her brother cannot bring a friend, Ashley doesn't have to work through the process again; she can just replace the p with 11.

The cost of bringing 11 people to the water park is

c = ($17 per person)[(11 – 5) people] + $100 (eq. 6)
= ($17 per person)(6 people) + $100 (eq. 6a)
= $102 + $100 (eq. 6b)
= $202 (eq. 6c)

Your turn. How much will it cost to bring 9 people to the water park? The answer will be at the end of the next section.

You may have noticed that this equation could have been simplified. Start by multiplying the first term through by the factor ($17 per person),

c = ($17 per person)(p – 5 people) + $100 (eq. 5)
= ($17 per person)(p) + ($17 per person)(-5 people) + $100 (eq. 5a)
= ($17 per person)(p) + (-$85) + $100. (eq. 5b)

Next, combine like terms. This phrase means to add together anything that can be added together. In this problem, the last two terms can be added together,

c = ($17 per person)(p) + (-$85) + $100 (eq. 5b)
= ($17 per person)(p) - $85 + $100 (eq. 5c)
= ($17 per person)(p) + $15. (eq. 5d)

This is a simpler equation, but the relationship between the equation and the problem is less obvious.

03.01.02 Exercise and Goals (PESkills)

When you decide to get active or improve your physical fitness, it helps to set goals. A great way to hold yourself accountable to your physical fitness goals is to keep an exercise log.

Read the following article to learn how to keep a useful exercise log.

03.01.02 Overweight & Obesity: Let's Analyze Map Data

teacher-scored 40 points possible 30 minutes

There is a rising concern for obesity in the United States based on the data collected by the CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The national obesity trends show that approximately one-third of U.S. adults (33.8%) are obese. Your task is to analyze and evaluate the data and statistics for “U.S. Obesity Trends” by state from 1985-2010. As you review the maps for the past 20 years from the CDC link below, think about why the states have seen such rapid increases in obesity. What are the causes for these dramatic increases? Open the “Obesity Map Analysis” WORD file for instructions. Answer the analysis questions, rename the Word file with your name at the end, and upload the completed Word file to your teacher as an assignment.

03.01.02 Overweight & Obesity: Let's Analyze Map Data Website

03.01.03 Self-assessment and goals (PE Skills)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 60 minutes

Copy and paste the questions below (between the asterisks) into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, save a copy for yourself, and then go to this assignment in Topic 3 to paste in and submit your work.

***************************************************************************

  1. Keep a log of what you eat for a week, and list below.
    Monday
    Tuesday
    Wednesday
    Thursday
    Friday
    Saturday
    Sunday
  2. What healthy eating habits do you already practice?
  3. What changes could you make to improve your eating habits?
  4. What is a goal for healthy eating you will work on?
  5. What was the result of the BMI calculation you did in lesson 03.1.1?
  6. According to the information in that lesson, is your BMI low, high, or healthy?
  7. How would you rate your muscle strength? Give reasons.
  8. How would you rate your endurance? Give reasons.
  9. How would you rate your flexibility? Give reasons.
  10. After studying the exercise log in lesson 03.1.2, list your exercise goals for a week. Include at least the type of activity or exercise, and repetitions or time goals.
    Monday
    Tuesday
    Wednesday
    Thursday
    Friday
    Saturday
    Sunday
  11. How do you think keeping an exercise log would help someone achieve their physical fitness goals?

****************************************************************************

03.02 Budgeting Principles (Financial Literacy)

Learn how a budget helps individuals be financially responsible

Budget planning: USN image, public domainBudget planning: USN image, public domain

BACKGROUND

Budgeting doesn't mean you never get what you want. Instead, it is a powerful tool for getting exactly what you want--with what you have. Everyone needs to learn how to spend less than they earn while trying to obtain what they want. Budgeting helps you do this. It is best learned when you start to receive money in any form (allowances, gifts, and jobs).

Visit URL #1 (“Wealth-Building Priorities.”) You will NOT need to do the activities on the “detour” pages.

Visit URL #2: You will not need to do the activities on the “detour” pages.

This lesson has no assignment, only a quiz. Please proceed to the “Assignments, Quizzes, and Tests” section.

03.02 Computer Basics Vocabulary

Computer Basics Vocabulary

Attached is a PDF of basic computer terms. This file contains a list of the terms and definitions for the Computer Basics Unit. Please review these terms to make sure you understand these concepts as you complete the activities in this unit.

03.02 Heart rates (Fitness for Life)

Introduction: The purpose of this lesson is to help you understand resting heart rate, maximal heart rate, target heart rate, and recovery heart rate. Please read the information below and submit the last page of this assignment.

Essential Question: What is our body trying to tell us?

Your heart rate tells you how hard you are working during exercise. It is important to learn to monitor your heart rate so you can tell if you are working too hard, or not working hard enough. People typically take their heart rate while resting, exercising or recovering from exercise. You can measure your heart rate at the carotid artery (on your neck) or the radial artery (on the thumb side of your wrist). The textbook has photos of the proper way to take heart rate at the carotid and radial arteries on page 8, or see the links below.

Resting Heart Rate

Your resting heart rate is the number of beats per minute (bpm) that your heart beats while relaxing. The best time to take your resting heart rate is early in the morning, as soon as you wake up. If you forget to take it then, you can also lie or sit down and take it after a five minute rest. A good reason to regularly take your resting heart rate is because you can tell how fit you are currently, and you can tell whether or not you are overtraining. The average resting heart rate for men is typically lower than that for women (e.g., men = 70 beats per minute; women = 75 beats per minute). If you are physically fit, your resting heart rate will typically be below 60 beats per minute. If you take your heart rate at the beginning of this class and it is 70 beats per minute, you would expect that your resting heart rate would decrease as you increase your physical activity level and become more fit. Your heart becomes more efficient as you exercise more regularly, thus, it beats fewer times each minute and pumps more blood with each beat. If, during one week, your resting heart rate is 60, and you are also working 40 hours a week, taking several exams in school, and getting 5 hours of sleep per night, your resting heart rate might show an increase. Any time your resting heart rate goes up, despite continued training, this is typically a sign that you are overtraining.

Maximal Heart Rate

Your maximal heart rate is the maximal number of beats per minute that your heart can beat during a hard exercise bout. As you age, your maximal heart rate declines, mostly due to a decrease in physical activity, but also due to a less efficient heart. Just as a car motor becomes less efficient with age, so does your heart.

The only way to truly assess your maximal heart rate is to have an EKG test. Since that is not practical for most of us, an easy formula can be used to estimate your maximal heart rate. To estimate your maximal heart rate, subtract your age in years from 220. For example: If you are 15 years old, your estimated maximal heart rate is 220 - 15 or 205.

Target Heart Rate Range

Now that you know how to find your resting heart rate and your maximal heart rate, you can use this information to calculate your target heart rate range. Your target heart rate range is the range of heart rate values you want to keep your heart rate in while you're exercising. If you work out such that your heart rate stays within this specific range, you should be working out hard enough to see improvements in your fitness, and you should not be working so hard that you risk injury, excessive soreness, or exercise burnout.

There are two ways to calculate your target heart rate range. (NOTE: Additional examples of calculating target heart rate zone are contained on pages 84 and 85 in the optional text.) To use the heart rate range method, subtract your resting heart rate from your maximal heart rate. This value is your heart rate range. Multiply your heart rate range by .50, assuming that 50% of your maximal heart rate is the minimal level at which you should exercise. Add your resting heart rate back to this value for the threshold heart rate, or your minimal level of intensity.

EXAMPLE:

205 (maximal heart rate)
-70 (resting heart rate)
-----------
135 (heart rate range)
x .50 (minimal level of exercise or percentage of maximal heart rate)
-----------
67.5
+70 (resting heart rate)
-----------
137.5 (threshold heart rate or minimum heart rate at which you should workout)

You should also calculate your target ceiling rate, or the highest intensity level at which you should exercise. Once again using your heart rate range,, multiply your heart rate range by .85, assuming that 85% of your maximal heart rate is the maximum level at which you should exercise. Add your resting heart rate back to this value for the target ceiling rate, or your maximal level of intensity.

EXAMPLE:

205 (maximal heart rate)
-70 (resting heart rate)
-----------
135 (heart rate range)
x .85 (maximal level of exercise or percentage of maximal heart rate)
-----------
114.75
+70 (resting heart rate)
-----------
184.75 (target ceiling rate or maximum heart rate at which you should workout)

To summarize the above information, the threshold heart rate at which this 15 year old should workout is 137.5 bpm and the target ceiling rate is 184.75 bpm. Athletes and those already in good physical condition can (and do) workout at intensities higher than 85% of maximum heart rate, however, this is most effectively done with a coach or fitness trainer.

Also, some trained athletes have hearts that have become so strong that they cannot reach their calculated target heart rate. Their heart beats so strong it simply refuses to beat that fast, and other limiting factors such as muscle fatigue or oxygen exchange in the lungs will limit the intensity of the exercise before the heart becomes a factor.

Another way to calculate your recommended heart rate during exercise is using the percent of maximal heart rate method. This method is much simpler than the previous method, but it is less accurate given that a persons' fitness level (e.g., resting heart rate) is not considered when using this formula.

To calculate the lower end of the percent of maximal heart rate method, multiply your estimated maximal heart rate by .60, which represents 60% of your maximal heart rate.

EXAMPLE:

205 (estimated maximal heart rate for a 15 year old)
x .60
-------------
123 = lower end of heart rate range.

To calculate the upper limit of the percent of maximal heart rate method, multiply your
estimated maximal heart rate by .90, which represents 90% of your maximal heart rate.

EXAMPLE:

205
x .90
-----------
184.5 = upper end of heart rate range

Therefore, using the percent of maximal heart rate method, a 15 year old student should get his or her heart rate up to at least 123 bpm, but not higher than 184.5 bpm.

Recovery Heart Rate

Immediately after exercising, it is important to track your recovery heart rate. The higher your level of fitness, the more quickly your heart rate will drop after exercise. For example, if you finish a mile run and your exercise heart rate is 160 bpm, and one minute later your heart rate is down to 100 bpm, you are very physically fit and your body is used to being physically challenged on a regular basis. If, on the other hand, you run a mile and your post-exercise heart rate of 160 bpm drops only to 140 after one minute, you have a lower level of fitness and regular training should improve the speed with which you recover from hard exercise.

03.02 Heart rates assignment (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 90 minutes

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. You might want to print out a copy to take with you to your workout. Complete your work and save a copy for yourself. Don't forget to highlight your answers. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. ************************************************************************* Name:_______________________________ Date:_________________________ DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS. 1. What is your resting heart rate (bpm), and your estimated maximal heart rate?

Resting Heart Rate: ______ Estimated maximal heart rate (220 - age): ______ (5pts)

2. In the space below, calculate your target heart rate range using the heart rate range method. SHOW YOUR WORK!

Threshold HR = Target Ceiling HR = (5pts)

3. In the space below, calculate your target heart rate range using the percent of maximal heart rate method. SHOW YOUR WORK!

Lower Limit = Upper Limit = (5 pts.)

4. Are your target heart rate ranges different in questions 3 and 4, using the two methods of calculation? ___________ Which method do you believe would be most relevant for you, and for your situation? Why? (5pts.) Oxygen Exchanges: The purpose of your cardiorespiratory system is to move oxygen from the atmosphere to the cells of your body, where it is used to produce energy. To complete that process, three oxygen exchanges must take place.

  • The first is between the lungs and the blood. When this exchange is under duress, we experience increased or labored breathing.
  • The second exchange is between the blood and the muscle. When we require increased oxygen to the muscles we experience increased heart rate and blood pressure, similar to what we have discussed earlier in this assignment.
  • The third exchange is getting enough oxygen inside the cell. When there is not enough oxygen getting inside the cell, a substance called lactic acid is produced, causing a burning or painful sensation inside the specific muscle. (This is what happens when your legs burn while running, or when you get a side stitch during exercise.)

5.  As you perform the activities below, see if you can feel sensations that indicate each of those oxygen exchanges in your body. Perform each of the activities below for three minutes. Record your heart rate: (5 pts)

  • Immediately at the end of each exercise,
  • 1 minute after completing each exercise, and
  • 3 minutes after completing each exercise.
ACTIVITIES Immediately after exercising After one minute of rest After three minutes of rest
a) sitting      
b) standing      
c) walking briskly      
d) exercising fairly intensely      

 

 

6. During which activity was your heart rate the highest? (5 pts.)

A. Describe any patterns you see. Do these tell you anything about how your body responds to the demands of exercise? B. Describe any sensations you experience regarding any of the three oxygen exchanges. C. How fast was your recovery from intense exercise? D. Did your heart rate get below 100 bpm after 1 minute or after 3 minutes?

7. During your regular, scheduled, aerobic workout, monitor and record your heart rate at 5 minute intervals (Pay attention to other limiting factors such as breathing or muscle fatigue.): (5 pts.)

_____* Immediately prior to beginning exercise. _____* 5 minutes. _____ * 10 minutes. _____ * 15 minutes. _____ * 20 minutes _____ * 25 minutes _____ * 30 minutes _____ * 5 minutes after completion of exercise

8. Share your results with a parent, peer, or teacher. If you so desire, you may wish to use Facebook or some other form of social media as base for your discussion. (If you do, remember you are trading some aspects of privacy for a broader, quicker, audience.) Discuss the changes you see in your heart rate throughout your exercise. (5 pts.)

•Compare changes in heart rate to the heart rate you recorded with the individual exercises. What similarities and differences did you note? •Describe how your body was responding at each interval, and discuss how that describes your body’s response to exercise.

9. Imagine you are visiting with someone who believes they are at risk for a heart attack because their family has a history of CVD. Describe how you would counsel them regarding:

•The difference between atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis. (5 pts.)

•How to modify their life style to prevent each. (5 pts.)

*************************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.02 Implications of substance abuse (Health II)

SOME GENERAL INFORMATION ON DRUGS AND THEIR EFFECTS

What is a drug?

A drug is "any" chemical substance that brings about physical, emotional, or mental changes in people. Alcohol, tobacco, and even caffeine (in coffee, tea, cocoa, and cola drinks) are drugs. However, the term "drug" is more typically used to refer to marijuana, amphetamines, barbiturates, tranquilizers, narcotics, cocaine, phencyclidine (PCP), volatile chemicals (glue and other inhalants), LSD, and heroin.

What is Drug Misuse?

Drug misuse is the improper use of a legal chemical substance. Examples include using an expired drug, sharing prescription drugs with those other than the person their prescribed to, or taking more or less than the recommended dose. For example, "Two Advil works okay on my headache, so I'll take four this time to really help it feel better." Or, using a prescription drug prescribed for someone else, but because you have similar symptoms, you assume it will also work for what you have.

What is Drug Abuse?

Drug abuse is the use of a chemical substance, legal or illegal, which causes physical, mental, emotional, or social harm to a person or to people close to him or her.

Are All Drugs Harmful?

All drugs can be harmful. The effect of any drug depends on a lot of things, including how much is taken and how often, the way it is taken (smoking, taking pills, ect.), whether other drugs are taken at the same time, the user's personality, and the setting (the place). This is true whether the drug is 'natural' or manufactured.

Do People Often Take More Than One Drug?

Many do. Multiple drug use is very common and very dangerous. People who use one kind of drug are more likely to use other kinds of drugs too, whether by taking various drugs one after another or at the same time. Greater risks exist when a combination of drugs or a mixture of unknown pills is taken. A good example of multiple drugs use is the use of alcohol and sleeping pills taken togther, which can lead to respiratory failure and coma or death.

What is Drug Potentiating?

When a person increases the dose (amount of a drug taken at one time), two things happen. The side- effects of the drug are increased or amplified in strength, and additional side-effects are experienced that only happen at the higher dose.

This effect is called "drug potentiating". Example: Look at the side effects listed on a box of Advil (over-the-counter) and the side effects printed out by the pharmacist for Motrin (prescription). It's the same, exact drug, only different doses.

When two drugs are taken at the same time, one or two different things happen - never 1 + 1 = 2.

WHAT IS AN ANTAGONISTIC EFFECT?
Sometimes you get an "antagonistic effect", 1 + 1 = 1. Example: Tetracycline (antibiotic) taken simultaneously with alcohol--you only get the effect of the alcohol.

WHAT IS A SYNERGISTIC EFFECT?
Sometimes you get a "synergistic effect", 1 + 1 = 3. Example: Valium taken with a martini, or 1 + 1 = 5 (prescription sleeping pills taken with alcohol). If you want testimonials, ask Marilyn Monroe, Jimi Hendrix, Chris Farley, John Candy, John Belushi, or Jim Morrison (Oh, I guess you can't--they're all dead).

EFFECTS OF PSYCHOACTIVE DRUGS
Psychoactive drugs are drugs that affect the neurotransmitters in the brain. All senses are interpreted by brain cells sending and receiving neurotransmitters. Although you have many senses, the five major ones are sight, sound, taste, feel and smell. Psychoactive drugs come to us as illicit street drugs, prescription drugs, over-the-counter drugs, herbal drugs and synthetic drugs. Each type impairs human perception and performance. Psychoactive drugs be classified as Uppers (stimulants), Downers (depressants), All-arounders (hallucinogens), or Inhalants (solvents).

UPPERS
Uppers send extra neurotransmitters from one cell to the other. The amount and type depend on the strength and amount of the drug. The brain on uppers makes an individual thinks he/she has more energy, is faster, smarter, isn't hungry, or is better-looking than normal. Examples of uppers are cocaine, crack, methamphetamine, speed, crank, ice, caffeine, nicotine, diet pills, ecstacy or mini thins.

DOWNERS
Downers slow down the neurotransmitters being sent and blocks some from being sent at all. Again, the amount stopped or slowed down depends upon strength amount of drugs used. The brain on downers doesn't think as quickly as it should or can. Examples of downers are alcohol, sleeping pills, valium, heroin; morphine, opium or pain killers,

ALL-AROUNDERS
All-arounders send the neurotransmitters to the wrong place. An individual on all arounders can hallucinate in any of their senses. Typical all-arounders are LSD (acid), PCP (angel dust), Peyote, Mushrooms, Mescaline or Marijuana.

DISSOLVERS
Dissolvers literally dissolve the brain cells. It is like pouring gasoline into a styrofoam cup: the cup just disappears. Examples of dissolvers are gas, glue, paint or any other inhalants.

List of chemicals found in tobacco & tobacco smoke:

-- Acetaldehyde (used as a solid fuel)
-- Acetone (paint stripper)
-- Acetic Acid (vinegar)
-- Acrolein (tear gas)
-- Acrylonitrile (poisonous liquid)
-- Ammonia (toilet and floor cleaner)
-- Arsenic (rat poison)
-- Benzene (carcinogen)
-- Benzo(a)pyrene (car exhaust)
-- Butane (lighter fluid)
-- Cadmium (batteries)
-- Carbon Monoxide (car exhaust)
-- Cresol (explosives)
-- Dimethylamine (agricultural fungicide)
-- DDT/Dieldrin (pesticides)
-- Ethanol (alcohol)
-- Formaldehyde (body tissue preservative)
-- Furfural (industrial solvent)
-- Hexamine (barbecue lighter)
-- Hydrogen cyanide (gas chamber poison)
-- Hydrogen Sulfide (toxic sewer gas)
-- Hydroquinone (photographic developer)
-- Isoprene (synthetic rubber)
-- Methane (swamp and sewer gas)
-- Methanol (rocket fuel, antifreeze)
-- Methylamine (rocket propellant, explosives)
-- Napthalene (mothballs)
-- Nicotine (insecticide)
-- Nitrogen dioxide (deadly poison)
-- Phenol (plywood adhesive)
-- Propane (tractor fuel)
-- Pyrene (coal tar)
-- Stearic Acid (candle wax)
-- "Tar"
-- Toluene (industrial solvent)

The Harmful Effects of Smoking

On the BRAIN:
Nicotine, the highly addictive chemical in cigarettes and tobacco, stimulates the pleasure centers in the brain creating pleasure and alertness. Nicotine initially stimulates the brain, then acts as a tranquilizer and sedative.

Nicotine directly affects, alters, and takes control of specialized receptor cells in the brain responsible for regulating well-being, mood, and memory. The drug remains active 20-40 minutes, then withdrawal symptoms begin. Mood changes, irritability, anxiety, and discomfort become more severe--stimulating intense cravings for more nicotine. Regular and long-term use lead to addiction.

THROAT:
Smoking irritates the membranes of the throat, and can cause cancer of the larynx and esophagus.

HEART:
Nicotine raises the heart rate, increases blood pressure, and constricts blood vessels. Carbon monoxide (deadly gas produced from cigarette smoke) decreases the delivery of oxygen to the heart, increasing risk of heart attack and strokes. It also causes a weakening of the heart muscle's ability to pump blood, leading to death. And aortic aneurism (blood-filled sac in aorta) and pulmonary heart disease are common in smokers.

LIVER:
Smoking can lead to cirrhosis of the liver.

ADRENAL GLANDS:
Smoking stimulates adrenaline production, speeding up the heart and increasing blood pressure.

VERTEBRAE:
Increased risk of vertebral cancer.

REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM:
Nicotine reduces sex drive and increases risk of impotence in males. In females, it increases the chance of cervical cancer, infertility, and the early onset of menopause. Smoking increases the chance of miscarriage, pregnancy complications, bleeding, and premature delivery. Smoking during pregnancy may cause impairment of the baby's growth, intellect, and emotional development.

CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM:
Nicotine stimulates adrenaline production. This increase of adrenaline does have positive effects such as hunger supression and the reduction of anxiety and pain. But, the bad effects far, far outweigh the good. For instance, in smokers, the heart rate goes up 15-20 beats per minute which increases blood pressure. Smoking also constricts blood vessels, reduces sex drive, inhibits urine formation and irritates the mouth and throat. It is also a major cause of heart attack, lung diseases, strokes, and death.

MOUTH:
Smoking dulls the taste buds and irritates the membranes of mouth. It causes bleeding and receding gums, gum disease, foul breath, and numbness of the mouth. It stains the teeth, causes tooth decay and the loss of teeth. Smoking is also the leading cause of cancer of the mouth.

LUNGS:
Smoking causes the progressive limitation of airflow in and out of lungs leading to chronic Obstructive Lung Disease. It damages and destroys tiny air sacs of the lung, reducing the lungs' ability to bring in oxygen and remove carbon dioxide. It causes emphysema. It inflames and thickens the bronchial tubes, and increases mucus, resulting in narrowing of air passage--creating chronic bronchitis. Tar and other particles settle in bronchial tubes causing lung cancer. Tar and smoke destroy tiny cells that clean, protect, and remove foreign particles from lungs.

STOMACH AND DUODENUM:
Smoking causes stomach and duodenal ulcers to form, creating burning pain.

KIDNEYS:
Smoking reduces the kidney's ability to process fluids and waste, inhibiting the formation of urine. I can lead to cancer.

BLOOD VESSELS:
Nicotine causes blood vessels to constrict, increasing blood pressure and risk of heart attack.

BLADDER:
Smoking can cause cancer of the bladder.

BONES:
Smoking increases the risk of early onset of osteoporosis (weakening, softening and thinning of the bone).

03.02 Implications of substance abuse quiz (Health II)

computer-scored 25 points possible 30 minutes

You may take this quiz multiple times, but you must score at least 90% to pass. Go to the link in Topic 3 on your main class page to take the quiz.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.02 Physical Activities Assignment (PEActivity)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 420 minutes

3D archery shoot: by Byp, CC Attribution 3.0 Unported via Wikimedia Commons3D archery shoot: by Byp, CC Attribution 3.0 Unported via Wikimedia Commons

YOU MUST PICK TWO NEW ACTIVITIES THAT YOU DID NOT USE FOR STANDARD ONE OR TWO.

You are going to spend a total of SEVEN HOURS doing different kinds physical activities of your choice. You may include the time it takes you to find the rules for any new activity as part of your hours, and the time it takes you to fill out your ACTIVITY WORKSHEETS.

NOTE: There are rules and guidelines for all activities, even walking and biking. Make sure you look them up and tell me what you found in the appropriate spot.

Go to section 3 "Assignments, Quizzes, Tests" on the homepage of the class. Then click on "Standard 1 Assignment" to submit the worksheet.

Below is a list of optional physical activities, but you are not limited to these. Anything not on the list needs to be approved by the teacher, though. Just email if you want to get an okay to do an activity that is not listed below:

 Golf, archery, bowling, weight training, aerobics, walking, jogging, social dance, rope jumping, disc golf, disc football, in-line skating, biking,martial arts, yoga, climbing, skiing, tennis, hiking, step class, croquet, badminton, horseshoes, soccer, basketball, baseball, aquatics.

You must try at least two different activities, but you are not limited to only two. You must spend at least THREE hours doing each activity you choose and you must complete a total of SEVEN hours. You may use the internet to find the needed rules and/or equipment you need if you are trying a new activity.

REMEMBER, that safety comes first with whatever activity you choose. After each activity you must copy and paste the following worksheet into a word document or write them down on a piece of paper, then complete the worksheet.

Once you complete your SEVEN HOURS of activity and the worksheets for each activity you will send me BOTH OF THE WORKSHEETS BY SUBMITTING THEM IN THE SUBMISSION BOX IN SECTION 3 FOR THE TOTAL SEVEN HOURS AT THE SAME TIME, OR THEY WILL NOT BE GRADED!

Please put your answers in bold, or ALL CAPS. Here are the worksheets:

ACTIVITY WORKSHEET #5

1. Name and Date and Class Name:

2. What activity did you choose to do?

3. Is this the first time you have tried this activity?

4. How many hours did you spend doing this activity? (Be specific in telling me what days you did the activity and for how long each day. If you went hiking, walking, biking etc, tell me where you went and how far also.)

5. Did you enjoy the activity? Why or why not? What did you like or dislike about this activity, and do you think you would try this activity again (I DO NOT WANT ONE WORD ANSWERS ON THIS QUESTION)?

6. Did anyone participate in this activity with you? If yes, who?

7. What equipment did you use for this activity?

8. What are the rules or guidelines for this activity and how did you find them out? ( You need to find out rules or guidelines for any activities, they are there for all of them, even walking.)

9. Did you use gross motor skills and/or fine motor skills for this activity? Be specific in what the gross or motor skills were.

ACTIVITY WORKSHEET #6

1. Your Name And Date:

2. What activity did you choose to do?

3. Is this the first time you have tried this activity?

4. How many hours did you spend doing this activity? (Be specific in telling me what days you did the activity and for how long each day. If you went hiking, walking, biking etc, tell me where you went and how far also.)

5. Did you enjoy the activity? Why or why not? What did you like or dislike about this activity, and do you think you would try this activity again (I DO NOT WANT ONE WORD ANSWERS ON THIS QUESTION)?

6. Did anyone participate in this activity with you? If yes, who?

7. What equipment did you use for this activity?

8. What are the rules or guidelines for this activity and how did you find them out? ( You need to find out rules or guidelines for any activities; they are there for all of them, even walking.)

9. Did you use gross motor skills and/or fine motor skills for this activity? Be specific in what the gross or motor skills were.

03.02 Standard 3 Assignment(PESkills)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 420 minutes

You are going to spend a total of SEVEN HOURS doing different kinds of physical activities of your choice. Do NOT repeat any of the activities you did in previous units. You may include the time it takes you to find the rules for any new activity as part of your hours, and the time it takes you to fill out your ACTIVITY WORKSHEETS. Copy the worksheet below (between the lines of asterisks) and paste into a word processing document on your computer. Complete the worksheet and save a copy for yourself. Go to section 3 "Assignments, Quizzes, Tests" on the homepage of the class. Then click on "Standard 2 Assignment" and 'edit my submission' to paste in and submit the worksheet.
Below is a list of optional physical activities, but you are not limited to these:

Golf, archery, bowling, weight training, aerobics, walking, jogging, social dance, rope jumping, disc golf, disc football, in-line skating, biking, fishing, martial arts, yoga, climbing, skiing, tennis, hiking, step class, croquet, badminton, horseshoes, soccer, basketball, baseball, Frisbee and aquatics.

You must try at least two different activities, but you are not limited to only two. You must spend at least THREE hours doing each activity you choose, and you must complete a total of at least SEVEN hours.

You may use the internet, books, or instructors/coaches to find the needed rules and/or equipment you need if you are trying a new activity. REMEMBER, safety comes first with whatever activity you choose.

After each activity you must copy and paste the following worksheet into a word document and complete the worksheet. Please put your answers in bold. Once you complete your SEVEN HOURS of activity and the worksheets for each activity, you will send me BOTH OF THE WORKSHEETS BY SUBMITTING THEM IN THE SUBMISSION BOX IN SECTION 3 FOR THE TOTAL SEVEN HOURS AT THE SAME TIME, OR THEY WILL NOT BE GRADED!!!!

Here are the worksheets:

******************************************************************************

ACTIVITY WORKSHEET #1

NAME:

DATE:

1. What activity did you choose to do, and why?

2. What did you do to warm up for the activity?

3. What did you do to cool down for this activity?

4. How can stretching and flexibility help you in this activity?

5. Would you consider your activity aerobic exercise, strength training, or both? Explain.

6. What precautions do you need to take for safety and injury prevention in this activity?

7. Where are you in the stages of skill acquisition for this activity?

8. Design and explain three different practice sessions that could help you improve your skills for this activity.

ACTIVITY WORKSHEET #2

1. What activity did you choose to do, and why?

2. What did you do to warm up for the activity?

3. What did you do to cool down for this activity?

4. How can stretching and flexibility help you in this activity?

5. Would you consider your activity aerobic exercise, strength training, or both? Explain.

6. What precautions do you need to take for safety and injury prevention in this activity?

7. Where are you in the stages of skill acquisition for this activity?

8. Design and explain three different practice sessions that could help you improve your skills for this activity.

9. Which of your exercise goals from assignment 03.1.3 did you complete?

**************************************************************************************************

03.02 Unit 3 Quiz 1 (Participation Skills and Techniques)

After you have read the preceding lessons and links, Take the Quiz. You must score at least 80%, but you may take the quiz as many times as necessary to get a good score.

03.02 Unit 3 Quiz 1 (Participation Skills and Techniques.)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

Remember you may RETAKE the quiz as many times as you like, but you must score at least 80%. Must score 8 out of 10.

This assignment should be completed by WEEK 6 of this class

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.02.01 Memory Assignment (Psychology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 45 minutes

Remember to use the grading rubric to score yourself on your assignment. Put the score you believe you have earned for the assignment at the top of your assignment. The instructions for this assignment are below. When you are ready to submit your assignment, click on the assignment number link, copy and paste your paper into the text box and hit submit.

Grading Rubric:

10– Quality of work reveals student has a thorough understanding of his or her own learning style, intelligence and has explored steps in improving learning. Extra research, creativity and thought are shown in the assignment beyond what is in the course materials. Work includes all elements required and is well developed, masterful and meaningful. Extra effort is obvious in its production.

9 -- Quality of work reveals student has a thorough understanding of his or her own learning style, intelligence and has explored steps in improving learning. Extra research, creativity or thought is shown in the assignment beyond what is in the course materials. Work includes all elements required and is well developed and meaningful.

8 -- Quality of work reveals student has a good understanding of his or her own learning style, intelligence and has explored steps in improving learning. Work includes all elements required and is well developed and meaningful.

7 -- Quality of work reveals student has a basic understanding of his or her own learning style, intelligence and has explored steps in improving learning.

1 – Quality of work reveals student does not have a basic understanding of his or her own learning style, intelligence and has explored steps in improving learning. Work does not include enough required elements. Assignment must be re-done.

Activity: Trying to Improve Your Learning
Go to one of the websites above and skim through the steps or topics. Choose 2 of the steps or items that you would like to improve in yourself. Then do the following:

1. Choose two steps or items that you are going to work on.
2. For two weeks, implement these two steps in your schoolwork and see how they help.
3. Write a summary of each item you chose, and how you implemented it in your schoolwork.
4. Conclude with your opinion of the two different techniques .

03.02.01 pe.skills.Q1.standard 3 quiz (PE Skills)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

Go to section 3 "Assignments, Quizzes, Tests" on the homepage of the class. Then click on "pe.skills.Q1.standard1quiz " to take the quiz: (Note: you may retake the quiz as many times as you like, but you must score at least 80%.)

03.02.02 Mexican Foods(Geo4Life1)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 180 minutes

Mexican Foods

Introduction: Mexican cooking began with the early Indian inhabitants. The Indians gave the world wonderful foods that were unknown in Europe before the Spanish conquest. The following foods came from Mexico: maize (corn), squash, sweet potatoes, avocados, peppers, different kinds of beans, chile, vanilla, chocolate and tomatoes. Maize or corn was very important to the Indians. They made tortillas and cornmeal pancakes. Tortillas are still very important to the Mexican diet. Some people call them the bread of Mexico. The Indians ate a lot of vegetables, but along with this diet, they ate turkeys and even small dogs. Along the coasts of Mexico, fish, shrimp and shellfish were eaten. Fruit was also used in recipes in this area. Cacao (cocoa) bean pods ripening on a tree: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Piekfrosch, public domainCacao (cocoa) bean pods ripening on a tree: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Piekfrosch, public domain Cocoa came from the Aztecs. During this time it was mainly used as a beverage. Wines and drinks were made from the white pulp around the seeds of the cocoa pod, and the beans were used to make hot and cold chocolate drinks. Cocoa beans were also used as a currency (money). The oily layer floating in the chocolate drink (cocoa butter) was used to protect the skin from the sun. For the Aztecs, cocoa had a religious significance. They believed that the cocoa tree was a bridge between heaven and earth. The Aztecs believed that in exchange for human sacrifices, the gods gave them chocolate. During marriage ceremonies, the wedded couple would drink a cup of chocolate and exchange cocoa beans. They also believed that drinking chocolate would bring mortals some of Quetzalcoatl's (the Aztec god) wisdom. The area of Mexico has produced many foods we eat each day. The world has been able to enjoy wonderful meals because of the Indian people. You are going to have the chance to make two important food items that come from Mexico. So get ready, put on your chef hat and get in the kitchen.

Materials:

Flour

Vegetable shortening

Salt

Baking powder

Warm water

Unsweetened chocolate Milk

Ground cinnamon

Vanilla

Assignment:

  1. You are going to make Aztec chocolate drink and homemade tortillas.
  2. Go to the link below and follow the recipe for making tortillas.
  3. After you have made your tortillas, find three different people to eat one.
  4. When they have finished eating, have them write three complete sentences on lined paper describing how they taste.
  5. When they have finished their description, they need to sign their name at the end of their description.
  6. After all three people have written about the tortillas, you need to write a paragraph about what it was like making them, and how you think they taste. Remember to use complete sentences.
  7. Now make the Aztec Chocolate Drink.
  8. Follow the same instructions by having three people drink it and write descriptions.
  9. You will again write a paragraph about what it was like making it and how it tastes and how you think the drink has evolved over the years.

Aztec Chocolate Drink

3 oz. unsweetened chocolate

2 cups milk

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

3 drops of vanilla

Put the milk in a saucepan and slowly warm it up. Add the rest of the ingredients and stir until the chocolate is melted and ready to drink.

After you taste the drink the Aztecs used to make, take a moment to think about how the taste of different foods have evolved over time. The Aztecs really liked this drink. What have we done to change the taste of the chocolate drink?

Your final activity for this lesson:

Go to the link below as a resource.

What are the following Mexican dishes? Explain the main ingredients of all ten Mexican meals. Write in complete sentences.

Mexican Food

  1. Escamoles
  2. Gusanos de Maguey
  3. Caracoles
  4. Chalupas
  5. Cochinita Pibil
  6. Mole Poblano
  7. Patlache
  8. Leche Quemada
  9. Mixiotes de Pollo
  10. Chimbo

What to turn in when you are finished:  two paragraphs (describing what it was like to make them), six people's descriptions of the food (three for tortillas and three for the drink), and the ten Mexican dishes.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.02.02 Places to participate in physical activity (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 60 minutes

Some physical activities (say, walking, stretching or doing sit-ups) you can do nearly anywhere, but where you live and the time of year do limit your choices. For instance, you might be really interested in surfing, but living in Utah, you aren't likely to get the chance to surf on a regular basis. Conversely, if you were living in Southern California, you wouldn't have many chances to ski or snowboard. During the Utah summer (well, most summers) skiing isn't a local sport; moreover, if you live in Florida, whitewater kayaking wouldn't be an easy option. If you live in a big city, you may not be able to ride horses. And, if you live in a remote, rural area, you may not be able to work out in a well-equipped gym. You get the idea. For this assignment you will document some of the places in your neighborhood or community where you can participate in physical activity, including some places where you have completed activities for this class. Note, right up front, that for safety/privacy reasons, you should NOT identify your home specifically on a map.

There are two options for completing this assignment (choose only 1):

OPTION 1: Submit 5 pictures of places where you participate in physical activity. Include a written paragraph briefly describing each location. 

OPTION 2: Pinpoint 5 locations for recreation or activity on a map such as Google Maps or create a Google Earth Tour following the directions below. Follow these instructions, and refer to the links below and the attachment. You will need to download Google Earth if you don't already have it on your computer. (See link below for the download.) See "Sample Horse History Tour" in the attachment below. Click on the attachment to download. Launch/Open Google Earth, then open the sample KMZ Tour called "Horse History Three Events-PatLambrose." Use this sample KMZ Tour as an example when you build your Google Earth Tour. Geospatial Assignment: (For ideas about why these skills are important, view the Geospatial Revolution Episode 1 Video in links list below.)

Locate at least five places in your community where you might participate in a physical activity.

Write a paragraph in each placemark evaluating that place and explaining the kinds of activities available there. At least two of the places should be places where you have actually participated in activity. Comment on what you have done there.

HOW TO CREATE THE GOOGLE EARTH TOUR: 1-Launch/Open Google Earth 2-How do I locate each place? Use the Search box in the top left to type in each place's name, address, city or county. Zoom into each search result and create your own placemarks. Do not use the placemarks that are returned from your Search. 3-How do I add my own placemarks? Locate the yellow push pin on the top menu bar. Click "Add Placemark." You will create five placemarks in this tour. 4-In each Placemark pop-up form, you need to include the following information:

1-Change "Untitled Placemark" to the name of the place or resource. 2-In the Description section add the following:

a-Include an image about the resource or event for at least two of the placemarks. (See the link “Using Placemarks with Google Earth-How to Add Images”. You may use Wikimedia Commons for your images, or take your own pictures.) b-Give credit for each image by adding the following text below each image: (Wikimedia Commons, public domain) - or your name if they are your images. c-Write the paragraph in each placemark (as described above, in the three options).

5-Next you need to add a Folder. Go to the top menu bar and select Add. Next select Folder. Name this folder the following: CommunityActivityResources-YourFirstName YourLastname. In the Description section add your name as the creator, such as:by Pat Lambrose. 6-Drag your six placemarks into this new CommunityActivityResources(FirstLast) folder. 7-Highlight this CommunityActivityResources(FirstLast) folder, right click on it and choose Save Place As 8-Save this .KMZ file somewhere on your hard drive where you will REMEMBER! 9-Submit your saved Google Earth .KMZ file of your CommunityActivityResources tour to your teacher as an assignment. Note: The saved file name is the name of your folder so DO NOT CHANGE the file name. Refer to the links below for additional tutorial help on how to add Placemarks and create Google Earth Tours.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.02.03 Designing Your Exercise Program (PE Individualized Lifetime Activity)

teacher-scored 60 points possible 420 minutes

Designing Your Exercise Program

Name:_________________________________

Age:_________ Height:________ Weight:_________ Resting Heart Rate:___________

Date You Will Begin the Program:_____________________

Exercise Goals:

Step 1: List your personal fitness goals. Make a goal for each area of physical fitness:

1. Strength

2. Flexibility

3. Cardiovascular

4. Body Composition

5. Relaxation

Step 2: complete a chart using the items below:

Make specific goals. How are you going to achieve the goals? What are you going to do day to day?

Goal #

Fitness Area

Specific Activity or Sport

Frequency

Intensity

Time

Place from above (#of days)

(Heart Rate)

(How Long) 

Now that you have your goals, prepare a daily and weekly activity schedule that includes current and possibly new activities that can contribute to the development of your personal fitness.

1. Identify current activities in which you regularly participate.

Next to each activity list what fitness components they fulfill. (Cardio, Strength, Flex, Body Comp) Current Activities: Sports: General Exercise Activities: (walking, running, biking, weights)

2. List other fitness activities in which you would like to start participating and list the specific purpose you want to try that activity.

 

Activities Outline:

Now keep track of your daily activities for two weeks. Use the following chart. Think about the goals you just made and try to fit those into your daily activities for the next two weeks.

Daily Exercise Log: 

Name:

Class:

TARGET HEART RATE: 60%______ 85%______ RESTING HEART RATE:________

Date Type of Exercise Fitness Area Place Time Heart Rate If Muscular or Flexibity, # of reps

Comments

Goal Evaluation: 

1. How did you do in completing your fitness goals?

2. List any changes or modifications you feel you should have made to be able to meet your goals.

3. List and describe any behavioral changes you have noticed in regards to fitness awareness.

4. If you were to be graded on achieving your goals, what do you think your overall grade would be? Tell me why? Now you can turn in the whole assignment. You are graded according to the following: 

Exercise goals: 15 points

Activity outline: 10 points

Exercise Log: 20 points

Goal Evaluation: 15 points

Total: 60 points.

03.03 Unit 3 video (PE Individualized Lifetime Activity)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 40 minutes

Unit 3 Video INSTRUCTIONS: You will need to submit an instructional video demonstrating the basic skills for one of the activities you choose to do for your assignment. If you are unable to make a video, you can submit a set of pictures showing the basics skills for the activity/sport you have chosen.

  • Your video needs to be at least one minute long and no longer than two minutes long. If you would rather take pictures and use a video editor program to make a video/powerpoint to create your video, you can.
  • You will be the star of your video, so you might need to get a friend to do the filming. You will also be the narrator of the video.
  • Assume that you are making this video for another student who has never tried your particular activity/sport.
  • You CANNOT use the same video for another Individualized Lifetime Activity Video assignment, including both quarters.

Example: If the activity you choose was tennis, you would need to show the basic skills of tennis, such as:

How to grip the tennis racket How to serve a tennis ball What a backhand swing looks like and how to accomplish it, etc.

You may not have enough time to show all the skills of your activity/sport, but, just show what you can. Video Assignments technical details You will need a computer with a connection to the Internet and your digital video content (under two minutes please). You can choose between "YouTube" or "Photobucket" to host your video assignments. You will need to create an account for either resource. Follow the instructions to upload and share your videos. "YouTube" will take a little longer to upload. In YouTube, you need to make your video "available to the world." When you go to the "My Videos" section of your YouTube account, play the video you want to submit. At this point you can either copy the address in the URL and send it to your teacher via your email account or click on the "Share" link to send an email to the teacher from the page your video is on. Photobucket is very similar. If you don't have a video camera, you can use still images in a slide show with narration that is converted to digital video.

03.03 Calculating energy expenditure (Fitness for Life)

By http://www.flickr.com/people/sigsegv/ CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0), via Wikimedia CommonsBy http://www.flickr.com/people/sigsegv/ CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0), via Wikimedia Commons

Introduction: In the 1990’s, several important statements were issued regarding the benefits of physical activity and the detrimental effects of a sedentary lifestyle. For example, the American Heart Association declared that a sedentary lifestyle is a risk factor for heart disease--along with cigarette smoking and high cholesterol. The Surgeon General’s Office issued a report that explained the relationship of physical inactivity to not only heart disease, but also diabetes, osteoporosis, colon cancer, and depression.

A key component of the research that led to these conclusions is the accurate measurement of physical activity. Physical activity can be measured in several ways, the most convenient (and least expensive) of which is through a questionnaire. Questionnaires, although easy to administer, are not necessarily as accurate as more direct tests such as measuring activity through a pedometer or observation. It is also important to know how many calories we use during the activities we participate in.

The purpose of this activity is to teach you how to calculate your energy expenditure and figure out how many calories you burn during various physical activities. Essential Question: What is your body trying to tell you?

Energy Calculation

1. For the following assignment, choose five physical activities listed in the “Compendium of Physical Activities” at the end of this lesson, or at the link provided (bottom of page). You will estimate the caloric expenditure of these activities, so choose activities that you like and regularly participate in. These activities should vary in intensity. Make sure one of your activities is light intensity (e.g., 3.5 – 4.5 METS), two are moderate intensity (4.6 to 7 METS) and two are vigorous intensity (> 7 METS). Because 1 MET equals the amount of energy you expend at rest, you will typically be working at 6-12 METS when you are exercising vigorously.

2. Participate in each activity for at least 20 minutes, and taking care to maintain the designated intensity (light, moderate, or vigorous).

3. Record each activity, the intensity of the activity (i.e., MET value from compendium), and the duration of each activity in minutes.

4. Convert your weight in pounds to your weight in kilograms. In other words, divide your weight in pounds by 2.2.

5. Convert the number of minutes of participation in each activity to a proportion of an hour. For example, if you ride your mountain bike for 1/2 hour, that converts to .5 of an hour (30 minutes / 60 minutes = .5). If you ride your mountain bike for 40 minutes, divide 40 by 60 and you get .67 of an hour. To perform this conversion accurately, always put the number of minutes you performed the activity over 60 (minutes). If you go longer than 1 hour, your number could be as high as 2.5 hours. If you go less than 1 hour, your number will be below 1.

6. Once you have the MET value of your activity, your weight in kilograms, and the amount of time in which you participated in your activity, multiply these values by each other to estimate your caloric expenditure for each of the nine activities.

7) Here is an example for calculating your energy expenditure:

Suppose I liked to mountain bike, so we will use mountain biking as an example. Mountain biking can be fairly vigorous, so, we will estimate my energy expenditure is 8.5 METS. (Of course, if I am just coasting down the canyon it would be less, so there must be some honest estimation of how hard I am working) Let's say I weigh 132 pounds or 60 kilograms (132 / 2.2 = 60). If I go mountain biking for 1 and 1/2 hours, my participation in mountain biking would be 1.5 hours. First, I'll multiply the MET value (8.5) by my weight in kilograms (60) to get a value of 510. Next, I'll multiply 510 by the duration of my activity (1.5 hours) to get a total caloric expenditure during the bike ride of 765 calories.

Now that is an estimation of my caloric expenditure DURING the exercise. Of course, as we’ve discussed elsewhere, there are a lot of other factors, including duration, post exercise activity, and diet, that will determine how many calories I keep burning after the exercise, but right now, we want to understand what is happening DURING the exercise. (Reference: Compendium of Physical Activities (Energy Expenditure) Compendium Values Adapted From: Ainsworth, B.E., Haskell, W.L., Whitt, M.C., Irwin, M.L., Swartz, A.M., Strath, S.J., O'Brien, W., Bassett, D.R., Schmitz, K.H., Emplaincourt, P.O., Jacobs, D.R., Leon, A.S. (2000). Compendium of physical activities: An update of activity codes and MET intensities. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 32(9 Suppl), S498-S516.)

Light Activities (< 4.5 METS)

Activity, MET value:

Hacky Sack 3.5
Badminton 4.5
Bicycling, < 10 mph
4.0 Boating, power 2.5
Fishing 3.0

Golf, walking and carrying clubs 4.5
Golf, with cart 3.5
Ironing 2.3
Mopping 3.5
Light cleaning 2.5
Washing dishes 2.5
Vacuuming 3.5
Putting away groceries 2.5
Scrubbing Floors 3.8
Sitting & Reading 1.5
Kickball 4.0
Playing a Musical Instrument 2.0
Snowmobiling 3.5
Stretching or hatha yoga 2.5
Treading Water 4.0
Walking, moderate pace 3.0

 

Moderate Activities (4.6 to 7 METS)

Activity, MET Value

Aerobics, low impact 5.0
Skiing, general 7.0
Canoeing, moderate effort 7.0
Dancing, ballroom 4.5
Hiking, moderate terrain 6.0

Hunting 5.0
Ice Skating, general 7.0
Mowing Lawn 5.5
Raking Lawn 4.3
Weeding Garden 4.5
Racquetball, general 7.0
Sailing or windsurfing 5.0
Shoveling Snow 7.0
Skateboarding 5.0
Skiing, cross country (light effort) 7.0
Softball or baseball 5.0
Stationary Cycling, 150 watts 7.0
Swimming, freestyle, moderate 7.0
Swimming, backstroke 7.0
Tennis, general 7.0
Tennis, doubles 6.0
Volleyball 4.0
Walking, uphill 6.0
Water Aerobics 4.0
Waterskiing 6.0
Weight Lifting 6.0

 

Vigorous Activities (> 7 METS)

Activity, MET Value

Aerobics, 6-8" step 8.5
Aerobics, 10-12" step
10.0 Basketball 8.0
Bicycling, 12 - 13.9 mph 8.0

Bicycling, mountain or BMX 8.5
Bicycling, 14 - 14.9 mph 10.0
Bicycling, 16 - 19 mph 12.0
Bicycling, > 20 mph (racing) 16.0
Calisthenics (pushups, situps) 8.0
Flag Football 8.0
Martial Arts 10.0
Rock Climbing, ascending 11.0
Rock Climbing, rappelling 8.0
Rollerblading 12.5
Rope Jumping, general 10.0
Rowing, 150 watts 8.5
Running, 12 min/mi 8.0
Running, 11.5 min/mi 9.0
Running, 10 min/mi 10.0
Running, 9 min/mi 11.0
Running, 8 min/mi 12.5
Running, 7 min/mi 14.0
Running, 6 min/mi 16.0
Skiing, cross country, moderate speed 8.0
Skiing, cross country, vigorous speed 9.0
Snow shoeing 8.0
Soccer, competitive 10.0
Swimming, freestyle fast 10.0
Swimming, breaststroke 10.0
Swimming, butterfly 11.0
Water Jogging 8.0
X-C Ski Machine 7.0

03.03 Calculating energy expenditure assignment (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 60 minutes

Task: Using the instructions and data given in the lesson, complete the chart below. Make sure you show your calculations, as shown in the example at the top of the chart. Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Don't forget to highlight your answers. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. ******************************************************************************* Name:___________________ Date: _____________________ DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS.

Conversion of Body Weight from lbs to kg (Divide your weight in lbs by 2.2) = ______ (3 pts.)

(2pts. for calculations for each exercise below: 10 pts. total)

Name of Activity 1. MET Value, Using Compendium 2. Body Weight in (kg) 3. Duration (in proportion of an hour) 4. Kcals Estimated: multiply values 1x2x3
Mountain biking 8.5 132/2.2 = 60 1.5 hours 8.5x60x1.5 = 765
1        
2        
3        
4        
5        

 

When answering questions 6, 7, and 8, discuss the questions, and your data, with a friend, parent, or teacher of your choice. If you so desire, you may wish to use Facebook or some other form of social media as base for your discussion. (If you do, remember you are trading some aspects of privacy for a broader, quicker, audience.) Ask them to describe to you similar situations from their own experience. Listen carefully to their thinking, and compare it to your own. Explain your thinking to them before writing your conclusion. Please consider each exercise individually, and provide complete answers for each exercise.

Remember, the inquiry here is to analyze what that exercise is doing for your body, and what your body is telling you about, and during, that exercise.

6. Which of the five activities you chose do you feel would work best as an aerobic workout? (30+ minutes, continuous, rhythmic, exercise that can raise the breathing and heart rate, but can be maintained at a steady pace.) Explain your reasoning: (5 pts.)

* Do you feel there is any significant cross-over with this exercise? In other words, you listed this as primarily aerobic, but do you feel it incorporates some benefits of cardiovascular or anaerobic exercise as well? Why?(4 pts.)

7. Which of the five activities you chose do you feel would best qualify as a cardiovascular workout? (exercise heart rate maintained for 12-20 minutes.) Explain your reasoning.(5 pts.)

* Do you feel there is any significant cross over with this exercise? In other words, you listed this as primarily cardiovascular, but do you feel it incorporates some benefits of aerobic or anaerobic exercise as well? Why or why not? (4pts.)

8. Which of the five activities you chose do you feel would best qualify as an anaerobic workout? (Short bursts of great intensity for approximately 30 second to 2 minute intervals.) Explain your reasoning.(5 pts.)

* Do you feel there is any significant cross-over with this exercise? In other words, you listed this as primarily anaerobic, but do you feel it incorporates some benefits of aerobic or cardiovascular exercise as well? Why or why not? (4 pts.)

9. Who was the person with whom you discussed this experience? Describe some of the insights they might have offered as a part of your discussion, or describe some of the things you had to explain to them so they could understand what you were doing. (2 pts.)

10. Provide definitions of the following modifiable CVD factors and explain what steps you might take to maintain them at healthy levels.

•Blood pressure. (2 pts.) •Triglycerides.(2 pts.) •LDL-C (2 pts.) •HDL-C (2 pts.)

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.03 Making Connections with Hammurabi's Code

teacher-scored 25 points possible 30 minutes

Early Mesopotamia Study Guide- Making Connections with Hammurabi's Code
Assyrian warship, 700-692 BC From Nineveh, probably built and manned by Phoenicians employed by Sennacherih: Wikimedia Commons, World Imaging, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 GenericAssyrian warship, 700-692 BC From Nineveh, probably built and manned by Phoenicians employed by Sennacherih: Wikimedia Commons, World Imaging, CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic

 

1. To start, please view the World Book Online entry about Hammurabi found in the links below. (Don't forget that you will need to log into the Pioneer Online Library first before you can access the World Book Online.)

 

2. As discussed in the article Hammurabi was a king of Babylonia who expanded his kingdom. He was also very influential because of his collection of laws which he revised and expanded. There is much debate today about laws and punishment. Please view Hammurabi’s Code at the Avalon Project (Yale Law School) found in the links below.

You do not need to read the introductory information. Skip to the laws. (It reads CODE OF LAWS.) You only need to read the laws 185-282 and choose one law that you feel would be beneficial in our society today.

3. Please write at least 200 words about the implications of this law today, and why you feel that this could help and benefit our society. Compare it with what actually happens to someone who commits this type of crime in our society (if you know).

 

 

Grading Criteria:
Informative: You obviously have read the law and have an understanding of what it means. You are able to transfer that knowledge and make connections to the law today.
Conventions: You should have no grammatical or spelling errors. It should be obvious that spell check was used.
Context: Your suggestion for following the law today makes sense, and would be beneficial for our society today.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


These links will be used with assignment 3.03 Making Connections with Hammurabi's Code. Use the instructions from 3.02 to access the Pioneer Online Library. The username and password can be requested from your teacher.

03.03 Standard 3 Get Active (Participation Skills and Techniques)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 440 minutes

This assignment should be completed by WEEK 7 of this class

You are going to spend a total of SEVEN HOURS doing different kinds of physical activities of your choice. Do NOT repeat any of the activities you did in previous units. You may include the time it takes you to find the rules for any new activity as part of your hours, and the time it takes you to fill out your ACTIVITY WORKSHEETS, but it cannot exceed more than 30 minutes.

Complete the worksheets along with the seven hours of activity. Make sure you complete both before submitting the assignment. Below is a list of optional physical activities, but you are not limited to these:

Golf, archery, bowling, weight training, aerobics, walking, jogging, dance, rope jumping, disc golf, disc football, in-line skating, biking, fishing, martial arts, yoga, climbing, skiing, tennis, hiking, step class, croquet, badminton, horseshoes, soccer, basketball, baseball, Frisbee and aquatics.

You must try at least TWO different activities, but you are not limited to only two. You must spend at least THREE hours doing each activity you choose, completing a total of at least SEVEN hours.

You may use the internet, books, or instructors/coaches to find the needed rules and/or equipment you need if you are trying a new activity. REMEMBER, safety comes first with whatever activity you choose. After each activity, record and answer the questions that apply. Please put your answers in bold.

Once you complete your SEVEN HOURS of activity and the worksheets for each activity, you will send me BOTH OF THE WORKSHEETS BY SUBMITTING THEM IN THE SUBMISSION BOX, along with the NUMBER of HOURS YOU SPENT COMPLETING THE ASSIGNMENT, OR THEY WILL NOT BE GRADED! Here are the worksheets:

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ACTIVITY WORKSHEET #1

NAME:

DATE:

# OF HOURS TO COMPLETE ACTIVITY:

1. What activity did you choose to do, and why?

2. What did you do to warm up for the activity? (Just stretching is not detailed enough!)

3. What did you do to cool down for this activity? (Just stretching is not detailed enough!)

4. How can stretching and flexibility help you in this activity?

5. Would you consider your activity an aerobic exercise, a strength training exercise, or a combination of two or three? Explain.

6. What precautions do you need to take for safety and injury prevention in this activity?

7. Where are you in the stages of skill acquisition for this activity? (Developmental Stage) for this activity? (Refer back to 02.04 Lesson to make sure you have the right stages!)

8. Design and explain THREE different practice sessions that could help you improve your skills for this activity. (Make sure you are thorough and detailed in how you would conduct a practice sessions to become better at this skill or exercise!)

 

ACTIVITY WORKSHEET #2

 

NAME:

DATE:

# OF HOURS TO COMPLETE ACTIVITY:

1. What activity did you choose to do, and WHY?

2. What did you do to warm up for the activity? (Just stretching is not detailed enough!)

3. What did you do to cool down for this activity? (Just stretching is not detailed enough!)

4. How can stretching and flexibility help you in this activity?

5. Would you consider your activity an aerobic exercise, a strength training exercise, or a combination of two or three? Explain.

6. What precautions do you need to take for safety and injury prevention in this activity?

7. Where are you in the stages of skill acquisition for this activity? (Developmental Stage) for this activity? (Refer back to 02.04 Lesson to make sure you have the right stages!)

8. Design and explain THREE different practice sessions that could help you improve your skills for this activity. (Make sure you are thorough and detailed in how you would conduct a practice sessions to become better at this skill or exercise!)

9. Which of your exercise goals from assignment 03.1 (Exercise Log) did you complete?

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.03 Standard 3 video (PE Skills)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 45 minutes

Standard Three Video

INSTRUCTIONS: You will need to submit an instructional video demonstrating the basic skills for one of the activities you choose to do for your assignment. If you are unable to make a video, you can submit a set of pictures showing the basics skills for the activity/sport you have chosen.

*Your video needs to be at least one minute long and no longer than two minutes long. If you would rather take pictures and use a video editor program to make a video/powerpoint to create your video, you can.
*You will be the star of your video, so you might need to get a friend to do the filming. You will also be the narrator of the video.
*Assume that you are making this video for another student who has never tried your particular activity/sport.
*You CANNOT use the same video for another other Individualized Lifetime Activity Video assignment, including both quarters.

Example: If the activity you choose was tennis, you would need to show the basic skills of tennis, such as:

How to grip the tennis racket.
How to serve a tennis ball.
What a backhand swing looks like and how to accomplish it.
Etc.

You may not have enough time to show all the skills of your activity/sport, but just show what you can.

After making and viewing your video, answer the following questions. Copy and paste the section between the asterisks into your word processor, complete your answers, and save a copy for yourself. Then go to Topic 3 to submit your work to your teacher.

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According to the information you obtained about your activity, what are the critical cues for the movement or skill you chose to show in the video?
What did you see in the video that you were doing well?
What did you see in the video that you could improve on?
What did you see yourself doing that you didn't realize until you watched the video?

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INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR VIDEO:

Video Assignments

You will need a computer with a connection to the Internet and your digital video content (under 2 minutes please). You can choose between "YouTube" or "Photobucket" to host your video assignments. You will need to create an account for either resource. Follow the instructions to upload and share your videos.

YouTube will take a little longer to upload. In YouTube, you need to make your video "available to the world." When you go to the "My Videos" section of your YouTube account, play the video you want to submit. At this point you can either copy the address in the URL and send it to your teacher via your email account, or click on the "Share" link to send an email to the teacher from the page your video is on.

Photobucket is very similar.

If you don't have a video camera, you can use still images in a slide show with narration that is converted to digital video.

03.03 Substance abuse prevention (Health II)

Given the difficulty and high cost (both in money and in human suffering) of rehabilitating people with substance abuse problems, it is far better to prevent these problems before they start. To prevent the problem, we first need to understand its causes.

SOME REASONS YOUNG PEOPLE USE/ABUSE DRUGS:

--Lack of information
--Lack of skills in making good decisions
--Difficulty in coping with strong emotions
--Low self esteem
--Curiosity
--Lack of clear standards/values
--Feels good
--Boredom
--Escape from problems
--Risk taking
--Recreation
--Advertising pressure
--Status/sexy/macho/grown-up
--Lack of refusal skills
--No clear consequences
--Modeling adult behaviors
--Peer acceptance


FACTORS THAT PREVENT DRUG USE/ABUSE:

--Practicing a religious/moral/ethical life code
--Having a healthy self image and positive self-esteem
--Being actively involved in worthwhile projects and activities that involve teamwork or service to others
--Exhibiting personal discipline and managing time well
--School programs meeting the individual interests and needs of the students
--Perceiving school as a positive place

03.03 Substance abuse prevention assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. ******************************************************************************************** Answer the following questions based on what you've learned from reading the course material for this assignment:

  1. Based on the list of reasons young people use/abuse drugs, what might you do personally to reduce drug use/abuse among your friends and peers? (2 points possible)
  2. How might the items listed under factors that prevent drug use/abuse actually prevent drug use? Do you agree with all the items on the list? What might you add or take off the list? (3 points possible, 1 point per answer)
  3. Make a list of 25 positive alternatives to drug use, based on at least two reasons you believe people use/abuse drugs. First give the reason, then list the healthy alternatives under it. (1 point for every 5 listed up to 25, 5 points total)
  4. List 10 places you could refer a friend who is struggling with drug related behaviors. For example: parent, teen line, …… Be specific, and name local resources. (1 point for every 2 listed up to 10, 5 points total)
  5. Why is professional intervention required when a person is suffering from an addiction to a drug or behavior? (2 points possible)
  6. How can what we know about development of the teenage brain (refer back to lesson 01.7) apply to substance abuse prevention? List at least three factors or ideas. (up to 3 points possible)

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Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.03.01 Diet Analysis(F&N1)

teacher-scored 40 points possible 60 minutes

Lesson 3.3: Diet Analysis

Create a balanced, daily diet and find the following information:
Part I: Nutrients in the Diet
Find some websites or resources to locate the following information for the balanced, daily diet you created. When you search the web to find this kind of information, you can search using terms such as "nutrition food charts," "nutrition charts," etc. You can list the following information for each food item or add everything together and do it for the complete day's diet.

calories/energy
total fat grams
total carbohydrates grams
protein grams
total fiber grams
individual vitamins present in each food item
individual minerals present in each foot item

For example, if you ate 3/4 cup cheerios with 1/2 cup 2% milk for breakfast, you would need to look up 3/4 cup cheerios and list the above information for cheerios and then look up 1/2 cup 2% milk and find the above information. You will need to do this for each item that you eat for the one day. The MyPyramid Tracker located at http://www.mypyramid.gov/index.html is one option for finding the information needed or you can search the web for other nutrition websites. If you choose to use the MyPlate site, here are instructions for using this site to get the nutrient information you need for a day's diet.

Go to the MyPlate (Mypyramid) website. Click on the Super Tracker and Other Tools at the top of the page. Click on Daily Food Plan midway down this page. Click on Super Tracker's MyPlan then at the top of the page click on Create Profile. Put in your information to create your own profile.

Once you've created your profile, click on Track Food and Activity at the top of the page then you will need to use the Food Tracker to input your foods and the Physical Activity Tracker to input your activities. For each of these, the page will change as you add the information. When you are done with the Food Tracker and the Physical Activity Tracker, print both of these pages.

Part II: Using MyPlate
List the amounts of servings for each of the food groups for the day's diet in part one. Keep in mind the servings recommended for you on the MyPlate website.

Other Group:
Dairy Group:
Meat & Bean Group:
Fruit Group:
Vegetable Group:
Grain Group:

Part III: Preparing a Well-balanced Meal
Prepare a well-balanced meal for your family or at least two other people. List all of the items in your meal and serving sizes. Include two names and phone numbers of those that tasted all of the food items.

Meal items
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
etc.

Taste tester #1 __________________________
Phone Number ________________________
Taste tester #2 __________________________
Phone Number ________________________

EXTRA CREDIT ASSIGNMENT:
There is one extra credit assignment available. This is not required but is available if you would like the extra points.

You need to make a food item that relates to something you learned during this class.
In 1-2 paragraphs summarize what you made and what you learned from the process.
Have 2 people do sensory testing on the item you made.

Submit a picture of what you made, the paragraph summary and the sensory testing results using the submission tool for this class.

03.03.02 Activity log week 4 (Fitness for Life)

teacher-scored 65 points possible 100 minutes

Submit your activity log. To submit your work, scan or take a photo of your log and the form. Save as a .jpg, .pdf or .gif and go to Topic 3 on the main class page to upload the files. IMPORTANT: Please do not email logs, as this delays the grading process, since emails do not become submitted into the instructor's grade book. As a last resort, you may mail copies to your teacher's physical address.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.04 Applying your Skills: Video 3 (Participation Skills and Techniques)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 60 minutes

Standard Two Video INSTRUCTIONS:

This assignment should be completed by WEEK 8 of this class

You will need to submit an instructional video demonstrating how to perform a basic skill for ONE of the activities you choose to do on your assignment 03.03. If you are unable to make a video of YOURSELF, you can use powerpoint to create a presentation USING pictures of you demonstrating the basics skills for the exercise you have chosen. (There needs to be as many pictures as there are CRTICAL CUES for each exercise.) 

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE VIDEO: *Your video needs to be at least one minute long and NO longer than two minutes. If you would rather take pictures and use a video editor program to make a video/powerpoint to create your video, you can but you must have a minimum of 6 pictures.

*You MUST be the star of your video, the video needs to be of YOU teaching and demonstrating how to perform the skill or exercise, so you might need to get a friend to do the filming. You will also be the narrator of the video.

*Assume that you are making this video for another student who has never tried your particular activity/sport.                           

*You CANNOT use the same video for another other PE Skills and Techniques, including both quarters. Example: If the activity you choose was tennis, you would need to show the basic skills of tennis, such as:

How to grip the tennis racket. How to serve a tennis ball. What a backhand swing looks like and how to accomplish it. Etc.

OBSERVATION QUESTIONS: After you have created your video, watch the video and critique yourself.  Answer the following questions. MAKE SURE YOUR ANSWERS ARE IN COMPLETE SENTENCES OR PARAGRAPHS. Please put all answers in bold or UPPER CASE.

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1. According to the information you obtained about your activity, what are the CRITICAL CUES for the movement or skill you choose to demonstrate in your video?

2. What did you see in the video that you were doing well?

3. What did you see in the video that you could improve on?

4. What did you see yourself doing that you didn't realize you were doing until you watched the video?

****************************************

INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR VIDEO: Video Assignments You will need a computer with a connection to the Internet and your digital video content (under two minutes please). You can choose between "YouTube" or "Photobucket" to host your video assignments. You will need to create an account for either resource. Follow the instructions to upload and share your videos. YouTube will take a little longer to upload. In YouTube, you need to make your video 'available to the world.' When you go to the "My Videos" section of your YouTube account, play the video you want to submit. At this point you can either copy the address in the URL and send it to your teacher via your email account, or click on the "Share" link to send an email to the teacher from the page your video is on. Photobucket is very similar. Click on the links below to access either site to get started. If you don't have a video camera, you can use still images in a slide show with narration that is converted to digital video.

IF you decide to NOT use PHOTOBUCKET or YOUTUBE... I can only view the following video formats...

.mov, .mp4, .m4v, .3gp, .mpv

Please make sure your video is in this format or you will have to redo the video.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


03.04 Quarter 1 essay (PE Skills)