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Lesson 06

01.01.06 Do you know the continents?

Download a map of the world from the "Outline Maps" web site. Color the seven continents, each continent a different color. Be careful to put the borders of the continents in the correct place. Making sure that you also include the major oceans that are in or around each continent. Make sure you have a compass rose, equator, prime meridian, tropic of cancer, and tropic of capricorn on the map. Put some of the major countries in also. A big HINT: the map above is not exactly correct as to borders and continents.

You will be graded on the completeness of the assignment. Make sure that the continents borders are correct (hint: Europe and Asia, No. America and So. America, etc.). Make sure to be neat and legible. Use a key if it will help make the map more understandable.

***70% or higher is required to pass any assignment***
Worlds Continents: The borders are not correct in this image.Worlds Continents: The borders are not correct in this image.

01.06 More Interactions: Design an Experiment (Earth Systems)

Introduction:
You have just completed an experiment that explored the interaction between an abiotic factor (fertilizer) and a biotic factor (algae). Now your task is to design and conduct an experiment that explores the interaction between an abiotic and biotic factor of your choice. WOW! How exciting is that! You get to choose, and the world is your laboratory.

The options are limitless. All you have to do is choose an abiotic factor and a biotic factor and design an experiment that tests how they interact.

I will give you an example of an experiment that explores the relationship between the abiotic factor sunlight and biotic plants. THIS IS ONLY AN EXAMPLE. You may NOT use this experiment for this assignment. [Most of you did this experiment in second grade!]

The question might be “What is the effect of sunlight on pansies?”
01.06 pansies01.06 pansies
The hypothesis might be “If I put pansies in a dark closet then they will not grow as well as pansies put on a lighted windowsill.”

The experimental plan could be:

1. Get six pansies (a type of flowering plant) that are the same species and as close to the same size as possible.

2. Put three pansies in the closet and three pansies on the windowsill in the sunlight.

3. Water all six plants the same.

4. Visually inspect the plants once a day for 14 days.

5. Daily measure the height of each plant and count the number of healthy leaves. Record your observations on a data table.

See how easy it is? Remember, you cannot do an experiment with sunlight and plants for two reasons. One, you already know what the result will be. You did this already in second grade! Two, I have already outlined the experiment. Part of what you need to learn in this class is how to design your own experiment. You cannot learn that by doing an experiment that I have already designed! So, off you go. Be creative. Design your own experiment. But wait! Be sure to read the directions before you do anything!!!!!

01.06 Solving Multi-Step Inequalities (Math Level 1)

Solve multi-step inequalities and justify the steps involved.

Something to Ponder

What are some things you need to consider as you write expressions or equations to model real-life situations and problems?

Mathematics Vocabulary

Inequality: an expression with an inequality sign (like < , ≤ , > or ≥) instead of an equals sign

Solve linear inequalities: perform the same operation on both sides of the inequality.

Note: When {\color{Red}multiplying } or {\color{Red}dividing } both sides of an inequality by a {\color{Red}negative } number, {\color{Red}reverse } the {\color{Red}inequality } {\color{Red}symbol }.

An inequality remains unchanged if:

  • the same number is added to both sides of the inequatily
  • the same number is subtracted from both sides of the inequality
  • both sides of the inequality are multiplied or divided by a positive number

Learning these concepts

Click each mathematician image OR click the link below to launch the video to help you better understand this "mathematical language."

Scroll down to the Guided Practice section and work through the examples before submitting the assignment.

01.06 Solving Multi-Step Inequalities - Explanation Video Link (Math Level 1)

01.06 Solving Multi-Step Inequalities - Explanation Videos (Math Level 1)

See video


01.06 The Greek Gods and the Trojan War (English 9)

Many of the assignments in the first semester will refer to a story first told in ancient Greece: The Odyssey, by Homer. You will understand it better if you know a little about the Greek gods, especially Zeus, Poseidon, Athena, Hera, Ares, Hephaestus, Hermes and Aphrodite. If you are already familiar with the Greek gods, you might want to skim this and go on.

The Greek gods were pretty much like regular people, except that they were immortal and had supernatural powers. They were not necessarily ethical, just, merciful or kind, and could be selfish and capricious. They sometimes had temper tantrums or did things on a whim. They definitely played favorites.

Zeus: (WMC, CC, from Väsk image)Zeus: (WMC, CC, from Väsk image)
Zeus was the king of the gods, and the most powerful. He could use lightning bolts to strike people he didn't like. He also liked to sleep around, and had dozens, maybe even hundreds, of children from mortal women. (The other male gods also occasionally had children with mortal women.)
Zeus' wife, Hera, was jealous (with good cause) and did not like these children of Zeus and his mortal lovers.

Poseidon with his trident and horses (fountain sculpture): (WMC,CC, Pacogq image)Poseidon with his trident and horses (fountain sculpture): (WMC,CC, Pacogq image)
Poseidon was Zeus' brother, and god of the ocean. As well as storms at sea, he could cause earthquakes by striking the earth with the trident he carried.

Hephaestus, another brother, was god of the forge, volcanoes and fire. He usually minded his own business and left mortals alone. He was married to Aphrodite, goddess of beauty and love, who was a flirt and an airhead.

A third brother, Ares, was god of war. He was short-tempered, cruel, impulsive and a bit of a coward and bully.

Hades, also brother to Zeus, was god of the underworld - where people went after death. He had a three-headed dog named Cerberus.

Athena: (WMC, CC, G.dallorto image)Athena: (WMC, CC, G.dallorto image)
Athena was Zeus' daughter, and goddess of wisdom, useful crafts and war. She was suppposed to have sprung full-grown from Zeus' head. Of all the gods, Athena was the one most likely to be reasonable and just. The city of Athens was named in her honor. In The Odyssey, Athena helps Odysseus because she likes his intelligence and courage.

Hermes was the messenger god, and could fly because he had winged sandals. He could be mischievious, but was usually good-humored.

Other important gods included Artemis (goddess of the hunt), Apollo (god of the sun), Dionysius (god of wine), Demeter (goddess of the earth & harvest), and Hestia (goddess of the hearth & home).

The Trojan War

Helen was the most beautiful woman in the world, and when she reached marriageable age, young men came from all around in hopes of becoming her husband.
One man who came courting Helen was Odysseus, who was already known for his intelligence and common sense. Odysseus could see that any man who married Helen would probably be attacked and killed by others who wanted to steal her, so he convinced all the men there to make a treaty of sorts - they all agreed that they would help defend whichever man Helen married.

Helen married Menelaus of Sparta, all the others went home, and everything went well for several years. Odysseus went home to Ithaca and fell in love with Penelope. They married and had a son, Telemachus.

Problems started with the gods. Athena, Hera and Aphrodite were tricked into an argument about who was the most beautiful, and Zeus named Paris, a good-looking young man, to be the judge.
Each of the goddesses tried to bribe him, and Aphrodite, who promised him the most beautiful woman in the world as wife, won the contest. She helped Paris to steal Helen from Menelaus.

Paris took Helen to Troy, and Menelaus called upon all the men who had once promised to help defend him.

These Greeks laid siege to Troy for ten years. Many famous battles and heroes had a part in the war, but in the end the Greeks won by a trick planned by Odysseus:
The Trojan horse: (WMC, public domain)The Trojan horse: (WMC, public domain)
The Greeks pretended to leave, but left a large, hollow wooden horse behind. Odysseus and a few soldiers hid inside the wooden horse, which the Trojans dragged into the city during their premature celebration. That night, the men snuck out of the horse and opened the city gates to let in the whole Greek army, who had come back under cover of darkness. The Greeks sacked Troy, Helen (no longer under Aphrodite's spell) went home with Menelaus, and all the Greeks started home.

The story of The Odyssey tells Odysseus' adventures on his journey home, which takes years.

01.06 Aging, Death and Dying (Health II)

As a young person, you probably have not yet had any reason to think about your own old age or death. You might not even have experienced the death of a close loved one. If your grandparents are alive and nearby, you probably have witnessed at least a few of the problems of aging. In any case, you know that all of us will die eventually, and most of us will grow old. In our culture, we try to remain young as long as possible, and tend to avoid thinking about aging or death. Although staying active and healthy is certainly a good thing, sometimes avoiding a subject just makes it even more of a scary bogeyman in the dark closet.

More than likely, you will someday have to cope with issues relating to your parents' aging, and then your own. Some important questions about aging and death are best addressed before the issues arise. Will there be enough money to support you when you can no longer work? If you were badly injured or had a serious heart attack or stroke, would you want to be kept on life support indefinitely even if there seemed to be no hope of recovery? How long would you want to be kept on life support? Would you want (for yourself or an elderly loved one) a 'do not resuscitate' order? Would you want your organs, or a loved one's organs, donated? Should people who are terminally ill have the right to doctor-assisted suicide? When our pets are suffering or very infirm, and we can't 'cure' the problem, we often consider it kind to euthanize them. Should the same be true for people? Should a person dying or in extreme pain be hospitalized, or should 'hospice' care be available at home? If a terminally ill patient is in such great pain that only dangerously high doses of painkillers can keep them comfortable, should we risk giving such high doses of drugs?

Read the 'required' links below. You may find the 'supplemental' links useful for your next assignment.

01.06 Basic Vocabulary for Parts of Speech & Usage review (English 9)

Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.

Louis Sergent, determined that he will finish high school and not work in the coal mines, does his homework, 1946, Kentucky.: Russell Lee image, NARA, public domainLouis Sergent, determined that he will finish high school and not work in the coal mines, does his homework, 1946, Kentucky.: Russell Lee image, NARA, public domain


Earlier in your school career, you have probably learned about parts of speech (nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, etc), clauses, and phrases. If you are not 100% sure about any of these, use the links below and/or the attachments to review; you will need to understand them to be able to work on some of the more advanced writing we will work on in this class. Mastering the use of various phrases and clauses will help you express your ideas as clearly as possible. As you read more complex works, you will sometimes find it easier to follow long, complicated sentences if you are able to break them down into their constituent parts.

For more help, do the Parts of Speech interactive lesson (from SAS). Then, try the other links.
To access the SAS lessons:
English: Word Classes, 942
To open this resource in SAS® Curriculum Pathways®:

1. Go to: http://www.sascurriculumpathways.com/login
2. Enter the student user name: farm9the
3. In the Quick Launch box, enter: 942

01.06 Composition and Variety Essay (ArtFouii)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 90 minutes

Directions: Refer to the reading material from earlier lessons. Open up a word processing document and create an essay using the information that answers the rubric below. Make sure you proofread your writing, save it as a PDF document and upload it in the next section for grading. If that is not possible, copy and paste your essay in the submission area for grading.

Structure Content Points possible
Introduction (one paragraph) In your own words, define variety and composition as they are used in a general sense (not in art). Give examples from your daily life. 3
Background (one paragraph) When you studied composition or variety before (it could be from another class, such as art, English, or a music class), explain what you learned. 3
Narrowing the topic (two paragraphs) Explain how variety and composition can be used in art. Include the four tips for composition. 6
Examples (two paragraphs) Use art museum websites on the internet to choose two images NOT used in the class lessons to illustrate variety and at least one of the composition tips. Do a "save image as" and insert the images into your paper (after re-sizing them to fit); if you can't do that, list the url for each image in your paper so the teacher will be able to see them. Explain how each image uses variety and the composition tip. 7
Process (one paragraph) Explain how you plan to apply the composition tips and the design principle of variety in your still-life drawing for Unit One 3
Conclusion (one paragraph) How and why are composition and variety important in visual art? Explain how you can use these concepts in the future. 3
Editing Proofread and edit your writing for mistakes in spelling, punctuation and other conventions. Up to five off if not done

01.06 Death & dying research paper (Health II)

teacher-scored 35 points possible 120 minutes

You will write a researched essay about an issue related to death, aging and dying chosen from the topics listed below.

Overview of assignment

Purpose: to inform
 and persuade; Audience: teens and young adults


TOPIC CHOICES:

Hospice Care, Euthanasia, Living Wills, Doctor Assisted Suicide, or Organ Donations

Search Pioneer Library, SIRS Knowledge Source, for information on the topic you chose from the list above. Use at least one of the websites listed for the previous lesson (01.6) and at least one source from Pioneer Library. Length: at least 550 words, plus a list of your sources.

Write a two-page paper (12 point font, double or single-spaced, 1" margins, at least 550 words) clearly stating your position on the chosen topic, with research to support your claims (more sources than just Wikipedia are required, though it may be used minimally if you’d like). More quality sources are encouraged. BE SURE TO CITE YOUR SOURCES OF INFORMATION FROM YOUR RESEARCH throughout the paper, as well as a works cited section included at the end. REMEMBER TO WRITE IN YOUR OWN WORDS, CITE YOUR SOURCES ON ALL RESEARCHED OR QUOTED WORK (this means within the paper, as well as a works cited section at the end)!! and make sure to PROOFREAD and EDIT your report before submitting it.

Organizing your essay

Content by paragraph (you may have MORE than one paragraph on each of these) Structure
1. Begin by stating your position on the issue. Explain any historical background or context for the issue. Then explain why it is important and list at least two reasons for your position. Introduction: write at least three complete sentences. If you use information or quotes from your research, remember to include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of the sentence.
2. Give one reason for your position on the issue. Use information or quotes from your research. Use logic, an analogy or give an example from experiences of family, friends, or news stories. Topic sentence, then three or more sentences with supporting details and examples; include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of a sentence/section where you have used information or quotes from your research.
3. Give another reason for your position on the issue. Use information or quotes from your research. Use logic, an analogy or give an example from experiences of family, friends, or news stories. Topic sentence, then three or more sentences with supporting details and examples; include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of a sentence/section where you have used information or quotes from your research.
4. Give another reason for your position. Use information or quotes from your research. Use logic, an analogy or give an example from experiences of family, friends, or news stories. OR You might explain opposing positions and tell why those positions are wrong or less important. Topic sentence, then three or more sentences with supporting details and examples; include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of a sentence/section where you have used information or quotes from your research.
5. Sum up the long-term effects on individuals and on society of this issue You might include something from your research, but be sure to make your own generalizations. End with another definite statement of the position you took, but not in exactly the same words as in your introduction. Conclusion: write at least four complete sentences; include the author's last name or the title in parenthesis at the end of a sentence or section if you have used information or quotes from your research.
6. List your sources (authors; book, magazine, or article titles; exact url for internet sources) See a writer's guide for the correct format in which to list sources

Overview of grading
:

Ideas and content 15 points:

Clearly state your opinion on the chosen topic, and cover all requested information

Documented research and citations 15 points:

Support your paper with documented research, including a source from Pioneer Library. Cite your sources within the body of the text so that it is clear where you obtained all of your information (worth 5 points). Include a works cited section at the end of your paper (worth 5 points). Introduce in your own words, put in quotation marks, cite, and comment on (again, in your own words) any researched material used in your paper (worth 5 points).

Conventions 5 points:

Proof, spell check and edit your work before sending it (worth 5 points).

***DO NOT copy and paste material directly from a website, DO NOT leave any links to other websites in your paper, and DO NOT plagiarize or cheat in any way. Papers suspect to plagiarism or cheating will result in an automatic ZERO with no chance of corrections.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06 DOL Refresher Course

teacher-scored 7 points possible 45 minutes

Do You Remember DOLs?

Before you start revising your own writing, let's practice some of the skills of revision by completing the following "Daily Oral Language" exercise.

This will get you in the mindset of finding mistakes that can make writing confusing. You will, in turn, need to employ these same skills when you are reading, re-reading, and revising your own writing.

Copy and paste the practice below between the rows of asterisks into a word document.

Make a list of the needed corrections and explain why those corrections are needed, then place your work into the assignment submission area after you have saved it to your hard drive. (DOL obtained from W.O.W. and D.O.L. - Wolfe County Schools wolfe.k12.ky.us)

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DOL Practice *Correct seven errors in the following paragraph:

My Brother and me sing in a chorus, and every December we sing the Messiah by George F Handel. This piece was first performed in Dublin, Ireland in 1742. My brother Ray doesn’t sing, but he do play the trumpet. This year he will have the pleaseure of performing the famous trumpet solo.

List the mistakes and their needed corrections (explain) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

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Grading Criteria: 1. Find all seven mistakes in the paragraph above and explain the grammar rule behind the corrections. Submit this assignment now. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06 Language "Work Out" 2

teacher-scored 12 points possible 30 minutes

Gold laurel wreath: Andreas Praefcke, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsGold laurel wreath: Andreas Praefcke, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Workout 2:

Gold

Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word processing document.

Complete the requirements for the assignment and copy and paste it back into the submission box.

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Gold has been valued threw out human history. Unlike silver it doesn't tarnish and it has a bright, yellow color and shine making it atractive.  Because it is nonreactive it is often found in pure form as nuggets or veins within rock.  Because it is very malleable it can be beaten into gold leaf or worked into jewlry or coins.  Kings and Queens of many cultures wore crowns of gold.  it has been associated with marriage for centuries first as a bridle crown and now as the traditional material for wedding rings.  The top prize at the Olympic games is the gold metal. Much early knowledge of chemistry came from alchemists attempts to turn lead into gold.  What they did not realize? Was that gold is an element. There attempts to create it from another element were doomed to failure.

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15 Corrections Possible; you need to find at least 10 for full credit 

Scoring Rubric

10 Points= At least 10 mistakes have been found (1 point each)

2 Points= Changes have been "highlighted" and are easy find in the submission

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06 Lesson 1F: Using ¿Cómo? and ¿Qué? (Spanish 1)

 

Lesson 1F
Using ¿Cómo? and ¿Qué?"

[A copy of this lesson is available in a PDF file!! If you prefer to use this type of document, just click on the following link to complete this lesson: SpI_Lesson1F]

 

           Lesson 1C was all about what to say when you first meet someone. After saying “Hello”, the next thing you want to do is ask questions!! In organizing the curriculum for this Spanish course, we felt that being able to form questions and understanding “interrogative words” was essential for being able to communicate in Spanish!! What we are finding in other textbooks and materials on the internet, is rarely are specific “question words” taught individually. Most resources group all of these words together in one presentation. So we asked ourselves, “Selves … maybe we shouldn’t change our plans??” But over time, we have decided that focusing on forming questions in Spanish, really helps us to feel comfortable in speaking and initiating conversations. It is essential!! So, we are continuing with our original plan and finding that “question words” taught in one presentation could be a great method of learning new words, reviewing words already taught, and introducing words for future lessons!! So we’ll be utilizing many different web links and video clips in our “question words” lessons that will include words we have learned, are learning, and will be learning later in the course!! Exciting!! So lets begin...

           Probably, the most commonly used “interrogative words” in English and Spanish are “¿cómo? – what/how? and “qué? – what/how?”. Notice that both of these words appear to have the same English translation, but they are not interchangeable!! Depending on the situation and information needed, only one of these question words is commonly used! Actually, you have already seen both of these words in asking some basic questions in the dialogues from lesson 1C!!

           Question word “¿Cómo?”: Usually the question word “¿Cómo?" is translated into English as “How?”. It is used to ask about something/someone and also to question the degree or intensity of something.

           Question word “¿Qué?”: Usually the question word “¿Qué?" is translated into English as “What?”. It is used to ask for a definition or an explanation.

           Here are a few basic rules for asking questions in Spanish:

           The following links are so easy to use and have lots of great information on proper greetings and introductory questions. I couldn’t seem to get the audio to work but maybe you can!! The information is a great review!!

           This is a great site that looks at Spanish words used to translate the English word “What?” This web page focuses on ¿Cómo? and ¿Qué? ... which is wonderful for helping to learn this lesson, but also introduces the question word ¿Cuál? ... getting us excited about words we will learn in later lessons!!

           Once again, our wonderful “Professor Jason”!! This is a great discussion of “question words”. His presentation includes not only the interrogative words in this lesson, ¿cómo? and ¿qué?, but covers many of the other important question words!! The first few minutes should be familiar to you as he discusses the concepts of this lesson, and a fabulous introduction of many of the other question words we will be learning!! So just sit back and enjoy your own private tutor session with “Professor Jason”!!

See video

 

           Summary of Lesson: The two interrogative/question words, ¿cómo? and ¿qué, are two of the most commonly used Spanish words in forming sentences that ask for information. Now there are all kinds of things you should be able to learn about your new Spanish speaking friend!!

           Practice Exercises: There are quite a few activities with question words but once again, they include lots of words that we haven’t learned yet!! These activities include practicing question words, along with introductory greetings!! When finished with each activity, close the window by clicking on the “X” button at the top, right corner of your internet browser to return to this page in do another activity!

01.06 Mathematical modeling (Calculus)

01.06 More Interactions: Design an Experiment (Earth Systems)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 180 minutes

If you need to review the basics about how to design an experiment, click on the "Experiment Guidelines" document above.

Materials:

· Whatever you decide

Assignment:

Click on the "Rubric Experiment" document above to find out how your experiment will be scored.

1. Determine what you want to find out when you do your experiment. Write down the QUESTION that you are trying to answer. If you are having trouble coming up with a question, look outside. Make a list of 10 biotic factors and 10 abiotic factors. Then think of ways that the biotic things interact with the abiotic things. Think of experiments you could do to test how the factors interact.

2. Predict what you think the outcome of your experiment will be. (Hypothesis)

3. Design an experiment to test your prediction. Remember to include a control. Be very specific. Tell me exactly what you plan to do. Tell me how much of everything you plan on using. Tell me how long you plan on running the experiment and how often you will check it. Tell me how you will record your data. I want details!!!

01.0601.06 4. STOP!!! Submit your experimental design to me via email before going any further. I promise to give you feedback on your design within three days. If the design is scientifically sound, you may go ahead and conduct your experiment. If it has flaws, we will work together until you have designed a valid, reliable experiment---then you may go ahead and conduct your experiment.

5. AFTER you have received my go-ahead, conduct your experiment. Be sure to keep detailed lab notes. Your lab notes should contain a record of everything you did as well as all the data you collected. Each entry on your lab notes should be dated. (Month/day/year) 6. Follow the directions below to submit your assignment.

ANALYSIS

1. Re-send me your original question, your hypothesis, and your experimental plan.

2. Send me your lab notes. I want to the observations that you recorded. Do not simply send me a summary of your results. I want to see a record of your observations.

3. Based on your observations, write a conclusion. What does your data tell you? What did you learn from your experimental results?

4. What kind of relationships did you find between biotic and abiotic factors? 5. Do your findings support your hypothesis? Why or why not? 6. If you were to do this again, what would you change? Why?

7. What additional experiments could be performed?

Please, send me the information requested in analysis questions A-G.

GOOD LUCK AND HAVE FUN!

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06 Natural Selection (Biology)

TO DO

Read: Chapter 6 Natural Selection in the EHS Biology Quarter 1 - Biological Diversity text book.

Explore:  The URLs found under the heading 01.06 Darwin's Finches (Biology).  

Complete: Once you have read the chapter and explored the URLs complete the following activities:

  • 01.06.01 Darwin's Finches - Assignment
  • 01.06.02 - Virtual Peppered Moth - Lab
  • 01.06.03 Natural Selction - Quiz
  • 01.06.04 Lesson Check 

 

01.06 Natural Selection (Biology)

Click on this link and listen to information about the scientists now studying on the Galapagos Islands and how the finches have continued to evolve. You must have iTunes and Quicktime installed on your computer to access this.

01.06 Nonverbal Communication: Differences in Males/Females Behavior

Women's and Men's Nonverbal Behavior
Listeners know that nonverbal use of space, posture, movement, touch, eye contact and facial expression can also communicate power or powerlessness, dominance or submission. As we recall the elements of nonverbal communication, listening to nonverbal messages, we can consider the ways women and men use each and which are the result of culture.

  1. Space can indicate power. In our culture women and people of lower status take up less space then men and people of higher status. Women are taught to keep the knees together, cross the legs at the ankle or knee, keep the elbows near the body and hold belongings on the lap. Men, on the other hand, habitually take up space by sprawling and spreading out their belongings.
  2. Height can also show power. The person who stands over the one who is seated communicates power. Men are generally taller than women, and thus appear to have more power. (Tall women, however, have not learned to use their height in a powerful way.)
  3. Smiling can show happiness, appeasement or submission. Dominant members of a hierarchy smile less than submissive members. Perceptive listeners are aware that women smile more frequently and for longer duration than men, but this does not signal happiness--it is a communication style.
  4. Eye contact is also used more often and for longer duration by women when they listen. They avert their eyes more often when looked at. Listeners must note the context in which eye contact is experienced. While eye contact may signal listening or giving respect, prolonged eye contact can deliver a threat or a sexual invitation.
  5. Nodding (and sometimes saying "yes" while nodding) is often employed by women listeners to mean, "I am listening." Men often presume this means agreement, because to them, silence means, "I am listening and agreeing."

As interesting as it is to speculate on what women and men signal by certain nonverbal cues, we must take care in interpreting them. "There is much potential for much misunderstanding in cross-sex communication exchanges. Both women and men listeners need to be able to identify very precisely those behaviors which seem intrusive or inappropriate."

01.06 Nonverbal Communication: Differences in Males/Females Behavior- Gender Differences

teacher-scored 15 points possible 30 minutes

Write a short but concise summary of how men and women may be different in how and what they communicate nonverbally, based on the information you have read.
Give two examples of how these differences may lead to misunderstandings in the workplace.

01.06 Parts of Speech review quiz (English 9)

computer-scored 15 points possible 10 minutes

You may need to review the information about parts of speech (see links above) before you take this quiz. If you are not confident with this material, you will have a very difficult time learning about phrases and clauses.
Go to Module 3 on your main class page to take this quiz. You may take the quiz multiple times, but you must score at least 67% to pass.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06 Self-Employment & Entrepreneurs (Financial Literacy)

Identify the risks and rewards of entrepreneurship and self-employment.

Many artisans and artists are self-employed: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Joe Mabel, Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedMany artisans and artists are self-employed: Image from Wikimedia Commons, Joe Mabel, Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported BACKGROUND

Another way to earn money besides working for others is to be an “entrepreneur”--to be your own boss and own your own business. This can be full-time or part-time. Entrepreneurs cannot set any wage they want. They must make sufficient profit to pay their own wages and others as well. Nonetheless, many entrepreneurs earn far more than if they worked for someone else. But some make NO profit and incur great debt. So owning a business has risks AND rewards. Anyone can be an entrepreneur, including students, parents, Tiff or Cameron, or someone that works full-time in a regular job. Many young people have a business on the side to bring in extra cash. It often begins when a person identifies some skill they have that fills other people's needs. Entrepreneurs have special skills, interests, or experience in providing a service or product others are willing to pay for.

VISIT URL #1 shown below to read the introductory paragraph and take the 7-question “Entrepreneur quiz.” Then click “submit” to read the evaluation of your answers. Then exit the web page and proceed to the URL #2 activity. VISIT URL #2 read the article and then take the short online questionnaire to compare your qualities with successful entrepreneurs. Then exit the web page to complete the assignment quiz, This lesson has no assignment, only a quiz. Please proceed to the “Assignments, Quizzes, and Tests” section for 1.06.

01.06 Self-Employment & Entrepreneurs links (Financial Literacy)

01.06 Self-Employment & Entrepreneurs Quiz (Financial Literacy)

computer-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

You will now complete a 10-question online quiz. You MUST score at least 8 to receive credit for the assignment but don't worry if you don't get at least 8 the first time since you can retake the quiz as many times as you need. Only your last quiz attempt counts. You may continue to increase your score if you want (7 or less = try again, 8 = B, 9 or 10 = A).
You may now take the quiz. Afterward, simply proceed to the next assignment.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06 Solving Equations, part 4 (Math I)

Common Core Standards: N.Q.1, N.Q.2, A.SSE.1a, A.CED.1, A.REI.1, A.REI.3; Standards for Math Practice: 1-8

In this lesson we learn to solve an arbitrary linear equation.

Please read the lessons below. All sections that start with the number 01.06 are part of this lesson. If you would like to print out the material, the same information is contained in the PDF attached above (Unit01Lesson6.pdf).



Common Core Standards: N.Q.1, N.Q.2, A.SSE.1a, A.CED.1, A.REI.1, A.REI.3; Standards for Math Practice: 1-8

In this lesson we learn to solve an arbitrary linear equation.

Please read the lessons below. All sections that start with the number 01.06 are part of this lesson. If you would like to print out the material, the same information is contained in the PDF attached above (Unit01Lesson6.pdf).



01.06 Solving Multi-step Inequalities - Extra Video (Math Level 1)

I highly recommend that you click on the link above before continuing.

You can watch the video that is under the PRESENTATION tab or work through the entire lesson.

Guided Practice
After watching the video try these problems. The worked solutions follow.

Solve the following and graph each solution:

Example 1: 5 + 4b < 21

Example 2: 3x + 4(6 - x) < 2

Example 3: 8z - 6 < 3z + 12

Example 4: 5(-3 + d) ≤ 3(3d - 2)

Answers

Solve the following and graph each solution:

Example 1: 5 + 4b < 21

Step 1: Subtract 5 from both sides:

4b < 16

Step 2: Divide both sides by 4:

b < 4

Example 2: 3x + 4(6 - x) < 2

Step 1: Clear the parentheses:

3x + 24 - 4x < 2

Step 2: Collect like terms:

-x + 24 < 2

Subtract 24 from both sides:

-x < -22

Step 3: Multiply each side by -1:

Example 3: 8z - 6 < 3z + 12

Step 1: Add 6 to both sides:

8z < 3z + 18

Step 2: Subtract 3z from both sides:

5z < 18

Step 3: Divide both sides by 5:

z < \frac{18}{5}

Example 4: 5(-3 + d) ≤ 3(3d - 2)

Step 1: Clear the parentheses:

-15 + 5d ≤ 9d - 6

Step 2: Add 15 to both sides:

5d ≤ 9d + 9

Step 3: Subtract 9d from both sides:

-4d ≤ 9

Step 4: Divide both sides by -4:

d ≥ -\frac{9}{4}

01.06 The Road to the American Revolution. (US History)

World Book briefly goes over the development of the constitution.

When using the World Book site please pay attention to the following instructions

1) Go to pioneer.uen.org in a new window or tab in your internet application.

2) Use the username and password provided for you by your teacher in response to the About Me assignment. KEEP THIS PAGE OPEN.

3) Right click the World Book link and as it to open in a new window or tab. 

Once you have done this you should have access to the World Book Encyclopedia US History information.

The PBS site is a fun resourse that can help you to test your knowledge as well as introduce you to important people and events leading to the American Revolutionary War.

01.06 The Road to the American Revolutionary War (U.S. History)

Investigate the events leading to the Revolutionary War.

In this section you will:

President George Washington, first President of the United States: Gilbert Stuart, 1797, Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsPresident George Washington, first President of the United States: Gilbert Stuart, 1797, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

  • Identify the causes of tension between the colonists and the British Government that led to the American Revolutionary War.

Lesson

 

In history there often seems to be a series of unfortunate events that lead to a huge, explosive event.  The Revolutionary War is no different.  Let’s take a look at the unfortunate events;

  1. Colonization: this is really a more indirect event.  As many of the states were colonized there wasn’t really a long term plan to how they were going to interact with the British government.  This lack of planning is the unfortunate event. The colonists had years to grow and as they expanded and became more independent (the British government basically let them do their thing as long as money was coming in.)  This independence lead to a desire for more rights. You’ve read it before, but these years of independence are known in history as salutary neglect.
  2. Enlightenment: In the 1700s Europe was being enlightened.  Although the Enlightenment had its roots in France, the ideas spread like a worldwide wildfire.  The scientific discoveries of Copernicus, Galileo, and Newton made people begin to look at the world around them for change.  Then the ideas of men like John Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Thomas Hobbes, and even Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson; inspired the colonists as well as many others throughout the world to look around them and question their situation and government. You’ll read more about their ideas later, as we discuss the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.
  3. French and Indian War: Also known as the Seven Years’ War (outside of the US).  This war became a huge expense for the British as they battled for land both in Europe and in the Americas.  The French didn’t settle in Canada as rapidly as the British did in the American Colonies, but they did treat the Natives more hospitably than the British colonists did.  The major area of dispute in the colonies was the Ohio River valley. When the French built Fort Duquesne, the Virginians, who had promised that land to others, sent a militia to kick the French out. The French defeated the colonists at the first battle led by then 22 year old George Washington.  The British sent Edward Braddock to assist the colonists and he and Washington tried again but were ambushed by French soldiers and Native American combatants; the British fled. (An interesting side-note; Washington, startled by the weakness of the British attempted to rally the troops and defeat the French.  In the process two horses were shot from beneath him along with four bullets blowing through his coat.  He obviously survived.)  The king George II sent William Pitt to lead the armies.  Pitt began to win some battles and because of that the British were able to gain some Native American allies, the Iroquois. After a series of victories, including the defeat at Quebec, the British were victorious and at the Treaty of Paris in 1763, gained most of Canada along with all the land east of the Mississippi.  This costly war made the British look at the role the colonies played and decided that there were enough people benefitting from the protection and wealth of Britain that they needed to pay their dues.
  4. Proclamation of 1763: A document signed by the British representatives to the American Colonies, with Pontiac, the Native American leader. This document said that the colonists would not cross the Appalachian Mountains.  This angered the colonists because they wanted to expand and had planned to do so across the mountains.  It said to them that there was dis-connect between them and the British government.
  5. George Grenville:  King George III’s prime minister who, in his attempt to repay the debts of the British, began to crack down on trade first to Massachusetts and then to all of the colonies. His ideas and actions, which included searching ships suspected to contain smuggled goods, angered the colonists.
  6. Sugar Act:  1764, prompted by Grenville.  The act cut the duty (tax) on molasses made outside of the colonies, hoping they would pay the tax instead of smuggling. (They were smuggling because they weren’t allowed to buy goods from other countries unless they’d gone through Britain.) The act added duties on items that had not previously been taxed. Lastly this the court that would try those who had gone against the act, would be a British court instead of a colonial court.  It is after this act was passed that the term “No taxation without representation,” is first heard.
  7. Stamp Act: 1765, the tax was placed on many printed documents.  The verification the tax was paid came in the form of a stamp on the document, hence “Stamp Act”.  The Sons of Liberty was formed in reaction and protest to this law. Many merchants boycotted until the act was repealed, they were successful in 1766.
  8. Townshend Acts: 1767, taxed goods imported from Britain, including lead, glass, paper, paint and tea.  Again they boycotted the act hoping to get the act repealed.  The British were just looking to make money, while the colonists were looking to have a say in what was going on.
  9. Boston Massacre: Tensions between the colonists and the British soldiers grew and came to a head outside the Boston Customs House.  Colonists upset by the Townshend Acts began to taunt the soldiers and the soldiers opened fire and killed five colonists.
  10. Boston Tea Party: The event which is known as both famous and infamous.  It was a reaction to the Tea Act and the Tea Act was a result of the repeal of the Townshend Acts and an attempt to save the British East India Company.  The act made it so that only the East India Company could sell tea to the colonists, but it was at a cheaper price. On December 16, 1773 the “Indians” of the tea party dumped 18,000 pounds of tea into the harbor.
  11. Intolerable Acts: The King was furious and asked parliament to do something.  These acts; shut down Boston harbor, required the quartering of soldiers, and a general was appointed the governor of Massachusetts.  General Thomas Gage put Boston under martial law.
  12. First Continental Congress: In reaction to the Intolerable Acts, 56 delegates met in Philidelphia and drew up a declaration that said they had the rights to run their own affairs, and if the British used force against them they would fight back.

 

Our series of unfortunate events exploded with the first Battle of the Revolution; Lexington and Concord, which is the beginning of the Revolutionary war

 

01.06 Two-Variable Statistics - Links (PreCalc)

The bottom 5 web-sites are online interactives that allow you to practice the concepts.

  • In the "Practice Graphing Data" website, practice graphing data on a scatter plot by typing values into columns a and b. Notice the regression line is drawn for you. The slope and y-intercept is given to you so you could use the slope-intercept formula to make an equation for the regression line. Please note that the standard error is not a correlation coefficient.

  • In the "Estimating a Regression Line" web-site, practice estimating a Regression Line by drawing a line through the data. Click the Draw regression line box to see how well you did. You can also try to guess the correlation coefficient r and click on the "Show r" button to see the answer.

  • You can use the "Find an Equation" web-site if you don’t remember how to find an equation from two points. You can use this tutorial to review.

  • Use the "Measuring Error" web-site to better understand how error is measured. This interactive allows you to move five points and a best fit line. Then you can see how the error is measured with three different methods. (If you can’t see the final answer, you could use a calculator to find out what it is.)




01.06 Unit 01 Test (Participation Skills and Techniques)

computer-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Remember you may RETAKE the test as many times as you like, but you must score at least 60%. 60 out of 100.

This assignment should be completed by WEEK 3 of this class

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06 Unit 1 Review (Participation Skills and Techniques)

After you have read the preceding lessons and links, Take the Test. You must score at least 60%, but you may take the test as many times as necessary to get a good score.

01.06.00 - FAMILY INTERACTION ESSAY

For this assignment, I’d like you to think about the people in your family and your relationships with them. In an essay, I’d like you to describe a specific interaction you have had with a member of your family who is (or has been) a significant part of your life.

Before you begin to write, you may want to spend some time brainstorming. Think about people in your family--a parent or step-parent, sibling, grandparent, aunt, uncle or cousin. Identify someone you believe has significantly influenced your life. Then, remember specific interactions you have had with that person (for example, a fishing trip, a cooking lesson, or Christmas morning when you were ten). Then narrow your list of interactions to one (or maybe two) that best reveals your relationship with this person. The interaction need not be a dramatic one. An experience that does not seem earthshattering at the time can leave a lasting impression when you have thought it through.

Your essay should lead your readers to gain insight into why this person is important in your life. This insight is the main idea or thesis of the paper. After you have chosen the “interaction,” between you and this person, describe the scene and participants so that readers can visualize them. Use dialogue to make the participants come alive for your readers.

As an alternative to a single, specific interaction, you may choose to identify a ritual or activity that occurs frequently (fixing Thanksgiving dinner or a summer family reunion) and describe that interaction as it typically occurs. You may also want to jot down some notes about what the person looked like, the setting of the event, your state of mind when the interaction took place, and your state of mind after reflecting on the interaction. Choose the details you wish to use and expand upon in order to develop your essay.

Each paragraph should contribute to the development of the main idea, so that the reader is led to the conclusions you wish to establish about this family member and why he or she is significant to you.

01.06.00 Quarter One Review Quiz (Algebra II - New)

Before taking the review quiz make certain that you can state without hesitation, that

  • I can define, compare, and recognize relations and functions.
  • I can represent relations and functions with graphs, tables, and sets of ordered pairs.
  • I can define domain and range.
  • I can identify the domain and range for relations described with words, symbols, tables, sets of ordered pairs, and graphs.
  • I can find the absolute value of numbers and expressions.
  • I can represent absolute values with numerical statements and on number lines.
  • I can find all possible solutions for absolute value equations involving variables and variable terms.
  • I can solve absolute value inequalities in one variable using the Properties of Inequality.
  • I can represent absolute value inequalities on a number line.
  • I can identify the domain and range of absolute value functions.
  • I can graph absolute value functions and the transformation of their parent functions.
  • I can solve a system of linear equations by graphing.
  • I can determine whether a system of linear equations is consistent or inconsistent.
  • I can determine whether a system on linear equations is dependent or independent.
  • I can determine whether an ordered pair is a solution of a system of equations.
  • I can solve application problems by graphing a system of equations.
  • I can solve a system of linear inequalities by graphing.
  • I can determine whether an ordered pair is a solution of a system of inequalities.
  • I can solve application problems by graphing a system of inequalities.
  • I can solve a system of equations using the substitution method.
  • I can recognize systems of equations that have no solution or an infinite number of solutions.
  • I can solve applications problems using the substitution method.
  • I can solve a system of equations when no multiplication is necessary to eliminate a variable.
  • I can solve a system of equations when multiplication is necessary to eliminate a variable.
  • I can recognize systems that have no solution or an infinite number of solutions.
  • I can solve application problems using the elimination method.
  • I can solve a system of equations when no multiplication is necessary to eliminate a variable.
  • I can solve a system of equations when multiplication is necessary to eliminate a variable.
  • I can solve application problems that require the use of this method.
  • I can recognize systems that have no solution or an infinite number of solutions.
  • I can solve a system of equations when no multiplication is necessary to eliminate a variable.
  • I can solve a system of equations when multiplication is necessary to eliminate a variable.
  • I can solve application problems that require the use of this method.
  • I can recognize systems that have no solution or an infinite number of solutions.
  • I can graph the equation y = x2 by plotting points.
  • I can define the terms "parabola", "vertex", and "axis of symmetry."
  • I can use the symmetry of parabolas to answer question about points on the parabolas.
  • I recognize "y = ax2 + bx + c" as the standard form of the equation of a parabola.
  • I understand how a, b, c affects the parabola.
  • I can find factors and x-intercepts of parabolas.
  • I can change from a parabolic equation in factored form to standard form and vice-versa.
  • I know the vertex form of a parabolic equation, f(x) = a(x – h)2 + k.
  • I can change a parabolic equation from vertex form to standard form and factored form.
  • I can identify the domain and range of the quadratic functions.
  • I can graph transformations of the parent quadratic function.
  • I can solve equations of the form ax2 - k = 0 and other variations.
  • I can solve equations of the form a(x + h)2 = k and other variations.
  • I can solve equations of the form ax2 + bx = 0 and other variations.
  • I can solve equations of the form ax2 + bx + c = 0 and other variations.
  • I can find the vertex and x-intercepts of an equation of the form: y = ax2 + bx + c.
  • I can factor perfect squares and solve equations.
  • I can complete the square for a quadratic where coefficient of leading term is 1.
  • I can complete the square for a quadratic where coefficient of leading term is not 1.
  • I can solve quadratic equations by completing the square.
  • I can convert from standard form to vertex form by completing the square.
  • I understand the derivation of the quadratic formula.
  • I know the difference between exact and approximate solutions.
  • I can rewrite an equation in order to use the quadratic formula to solve it.
  • I can find the discriminant and determine the number of solutions.
  • I can find the discriminant and graph of quadratic equations.
  • I can find the discriminant and number of x-intercepts.
  • I can use the discriminant to determine whether a quadratic equation can be written in factored form.
  • I can use quadratic formulas to describe projectile motion.
  • I can solve for the maximum height and length of a path.
  • Given the perimeter of and area of rectangles and triangles, I can find the length of sides.
  • I can use quadratic equations to find the maximum profit or minimum cost.



Otherwise, go back and review as needed!



01.06.01

teacher-scored 16 points possible 30 minutes

Assessment Rubric:

Content Main idea supported with appropriate detail and use of dialogue. /4
Support Supporting paragraphs include detail which is specific and directly supports the thesis. /4
Clarity Writing is clear, focused and well organized. /4
Conventions No significant errors in grammar, usage, punctuation or spelling. /4

01.06.01 Solving Multi-Step Inequalities - Worksheet (Math Level 1)

teacher-scored 54 points possible 30 minutes

Activity for this lesson.

1. Please print the worksheet.

2. Complete each problem showing all your work and highlighting your answer.

3. Digitize (scan or take digital photo) and upload your assignment.

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06.01 Darwin's Finches (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

Summary:

The theory of evolution consists of the following four major points:

1. Variation exists within the genes of every species (the result of random mutation).

2. In a particular environment, some individuals of a species are better suited for survival, so   leave more offspring (natural selection).

3. Over time, change within species leads to the replacement of old species by new species as less successful species become extinct.

4. There is clear evidence from fossils and many other sources that the species now on Earth have evolved (descended) from ancestral forms that are extinct (evolution).

 

Instructional Procedures:

Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.

Using URLs 1 – 4, answer these general questions about Diversity and Evolution (Please use your own wording--no cut and paste).

***************************************************************
ASSIGNMENT 01.06.01 - REVISION DATE: 7/29/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

1. Why is diversity (differences) among the finches important for their survival?

 

2. How did the different islands play a role in the diversity of the finches?

 

3. Why do you think scientists believe that the finches came from one species?

 

4. When would the importance of different beaks be important for the finches' survival?

 

5. What is your opinion about the variation in the sizes of the birds? How could one species be so much smaller or larger than another if they all came from one original species?

 

6. After reading the information below, write a paragraph explaining how diversity helps us to understand evolution.

 The theory of evolution consists of the following four major points:

1. Variation exists within the genes of every species (the result of random mutation).

2. In a particular environment, some individuals of a species are better suited for survival, so   leave more offspring (natural selection).

3. Over time, change within species leads to the replacement of old species by new species as less successful species become extinct.

4. There is clear evidence from fossils and many other sources that the species now on Earth have evolved (descended) from ancestral forms that are extinct (evolution).

 

 

 

 

 

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06.01 Five Themes/Maps/Continents Quiz

computer-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

Please pay attention to the questions because they will help you on the final test. This quiz is open notes, etc. if you need the help.

01.06.01 Lesson 1F: Using ¿Cómo? and ¿Qué? (Spanish I)

computer-scored 15 points possible 20 minutes

           **Assignment 01.06.01: Using ¿Cómo? and ¿Qué?**: You know the drill, find the button: and click on it!

01.06.01 Linear Regression - Review (PreCalc)

Businesses And Organizations Will Often Analyze Data To Find Cause-And-Effect Relationships

Example 1

A business collecting sales data may analyze buying trends. This information can be used to adjust their supply orders or advertised sales.

Candy Sales Increase During The Month of October




Example 2

An organization studying wild animal populations will collect data to look for cause-and-effect relationships.

A scatter plot can be used to see if a pattern exists for a given a set of data


Data Does Not Always Show A Pattern

If you were to gather data from people leaving the grocery store.



Their height (in inches) would not correlate with how much money they spent.

When Points are randomly scattered about...



There is no correlation between the items being graphed.


Sometimes Data Will Have A Perfect Correlation

All points that solve a linear equation have a perfect correlation.



If a company has a daily cost equation of C = 20X + 55, the cost of producing X amount of items is exactly C.


Correlation Patterns



When a correlation pattern exists, the correlation can be described as:

  • A strong correlation - if the values are fairly tight in following the pattern
  • A weak correlation - if the values are more widely scattered.




A correlation can also be described as:

  • Positive- if the values increase from left to right.
  • Negative- if the values decrease from left to right.






Correlation Measurements



The stronger the correlation, the better it will predict results.


I. Linear Regression Is A Method For Finding The Best-Fit Line For A Given Set Of Data


Creating a best-fit line


While formulas exist for creating a best-fit line, you can simply estimate where to draw a line with a slope that would best fit the middle of all the points.


Correlation Coefficients
While a correlation explains how tightly a set of points follows a pattern, a correlation coefficient measures how closely the points follow the regression line.

This coefficient is usually denoted by the letter r


Correlation Patterns

  • If the coefficient r = 0 there is no correlation.
  • If r = 1 that shows a perfect positive correlation.
  • If r = -1 that shows a perfect negative correlation.
  • The closer the coefficient is to 1 or -1 the stronger the correlation.



II. The Process Of Using Linear Regression To Analyze Data


The Process Of Using Linear Regression To Analyze Data

  1. Collect the data
  2. a. Identify the data to be analyzed
    b. Determine how to collect the data
    c. Create a table to record the data in


  3. Make A Scatter Plot From The Data>
  4. a. Identify the dependent and independent variables
    b. Determine how to mark the X and Y axis
    c. Graph your pairs of points


  5. Look for a correlation pattern
  6. a. Determine if the points follow a general pattern
    b. Determine if the values generally increase or decrease as you look from right to left
    c. Determine if the values fit tightly around a line or are they widely scattered


  7. Fit the data with a regression line
  8. a. Estimate where a best-fit line could be drawn to go through the middle of all the points
    b. See if this line be drawn through two points in which the X and Y values can easily be determined


  9. Find the equation for the line
  10. a. Use two points from the best-fit line to find the slope of the line
    b. Substitute the slope and one point from the line into the point-slope formula
    c. Simplify the equation by solving for y


  11. Calculate the correlation coefficient
  12. Use a graphing calculator or go to a web site to graph your data and get a best fit line.
    http://illuminations.nctm.org/ActivityDetail.aspx?ID=146


  13. Use the equation to predict outcomes
  14. a. Select a value for which you would like to make a prediction
    b. Substitute the value into the equation
    c. Solve for the unknown



III. The Following Is A Demonstration Of How To Use These Steps


**GAS PRICE**

Use the average price of gas from years past to estimate the price of gas in the future.


The Process Of Using Linear Regression To Analyze Data

  1. Collect the data
  2. a. Identify the data to be analyzed
    The average gas price from the years 1973 to 2003


    b. Determine how to collect the data
    Online data from the internet


    c. Create a table to record the data in
    See the next page



    The Average Price Of A Gallon of Gas From 1973 to 2003




  3. Make A Scatter Plot From The Data
  4. a. Identify the dependent and independent variables
    The independent X variable is the year.
    The dependent Y variable is the average gas price


    b. Identify the largest and smallest values
    The X values go from 1973 to 2003. the Y values go from .39 to 1.59


    c. Determine how to mark the X and Y axis
    The X axis will go from 1970 to 2005 and increment by 7.
    The Y axis will go from 0 to 2.0 and increment by .5


    d. Graph your pairs of points
    See the next page



    Graphing The Year Verses The Price




  5. Look for a correlation pattern
  6. Do The Points Follow A General Pattern?





    Do The Points Increase Or Decrease From Left To Right?





    Are The Points Fairly Tight In Their Grouping Or Are They Scattered?




  7. Fit the data with a regression line
  8. a. Estimate where a best-fit line could be drawn to go through the middle of all the points
    b. See if this line be drawn through two points in which the X and Y values can easily be determined



    Regression Line




  9. Make equation for the line
  10. Creating An Linear Equation From The Two Points (1991, 1.14) and (1971, 0.36)

    • Find the slope using two points

    • Use the slope and one of the points in the point-slope equation.

    • Simplify the equation




  11. Calculate the correlation coefficient

  12. This data was graphed and calculated at:
    http://illuminations.nctm.org/ActivityDetail.aspx?ID=146




  13. Use the equation to predict outcomes
    • What should the average gas price be for 2008?
    • Y = 80.32 - 78.5
      Y = 80.32 - 78.5
      Y = 1.82



    IV. Check The Logic Of The Answer


    You should always think about the answers you get from the calculation to see if they make sense.

    The answer is: Y = 1.82
    The average gas price for 2008 is not $1.82.
    What went wrong?



    The Sample Was Not A Good Representation Of Reality

    In this case, we didn't use enough data. As gas prices have risen dramatically lately, our sample was not large enough. We should include gas prices through 2007.





    • If we estimate the average gas price of 2005 to be 3. and the average gas price of 2007 to be 3.5, the data actually curves. We will have to fit the data with a different regression.





To Use An Equation To Predict new Outcomes, The Regression Sample Needs To Be An Accurate Representation Of The Actual Data Set!



01.06.01 Planning a Birthday Party, Revisited (Math I)

Do you remember Ashley? I hope so. She wanted to spend her birthday at the water park and needed to determine how much it would cost. We noted that it is unlikely that Ashley's mother will pay for an unlimited number of friends. It is more likely that she will be willing to pay a certain amount, and Ashley will then need to determine how many people she can invite with that limit.

In lesson 3 we used a data table and a graph to solve her problem. These worked well enough, but you may not wish to graph every possible data point to find the specific solution you need. It would be great if we could just solve the problem by manipulating the terms in the same way as we did with the equations in lessons 4 and 5.

Guess what? We can!

When solving a problem that involves both addition/subtraction and multiplication/division, we follow the same rules as we do for solving a problem that only involves one or the other. We just need to follow both sets of rules. We also must apply the order of operations, and other properties of arithmetic that we do when evaluating or simplifying an expression.

Consider Ashley's problem. We had previously determined that it could be described by the inequality

c ≥ ($17 per person)(p – 5 people) + $100, (eq. 1)



where c is the total cost Ashley's mother is willing to pay, and p is the total number of people. We had left it in this form, rather than simplifying. When written in this form, the parts of the equation more clearly represented the original problem.

However, to solve this, the first thing we want to do is simplify the inequality.

Start by distributing the factor ($17 per person) through the factor (p - 5 people),

c ≥ ($17 per person) p – ($17 per person)(5 people) + $100 (eq. 2)


c ≥ ($17 per person) p – $85 + $100. (eq. 2a)



Next add like terms, in particular add the second and third term,

c ≥ ($17 per person) p + $15. (eq. 3)



That is simplified enough.

Now we can begin solving for p. In this equation, p is multiplied by the factor ($17 per person). Also, the term that includes p is added to the term ($15).

To remove the factor ($17 per person), we need to multiply by the multiplicative inverse. The multiplicative inverse is the reciprocal of ($17 per person). To remove the term ($15) we need to add the additive inverse. The additive inverse is -$15.

The other thing we need to remember is that we need to do to the right-hand side of the equation whatever we do to the left-hand side.

Now, which do you want to do first?

It seems less complicated to start by adding the additive inverse. In other words, add -$15 to both sides,

c + (-$15) ≥ ($17 per person) p + $15 + (-$15) (eq. 4)


c – $15 ≥ ($17 per person) p + $15 – $15 (eq. 4a)


c – $15 ≥ ($17 per person) p. (eq. 4b)



Next, multiply by the multiplicative inverse. This means we want to multiply by

(eq. 5)


(eq. 5a)



And finally, reverse the order of the equation,

(eq. 5b)



We could separate this into 2 terms, but since 17 is not a “nice” denominator, that doesn't really improve the “look” of the equation, so let's just keep equation 5b.

Notice the direction of the inequality reversed when we reordered the equation. When solving an inequality, it is important to understand the meaning of the inequality. The expression including the number of people is less than or equal to the expression involving the cost. If we had multiplied by a negative number, we would also have needed to reverse the inequality.

Okay, back to the inequality. First, check the units. c has units of dollars. 15 also has units of dollars. These terms are added, so they should have the same units – check. The term has units of dollars divided by dollars per person. Remember that when we divide this is the same as multiplying by the reciprocal? This is true for units as well as for numbers and symbols. Therefore, the units are dollars over dollars times people. This simplifies to people. The units for p are people. These expressions must also have the same units – check.

Now that we have solved for p, we can enter whatever limit Ashley's mom set. If she set a limit of $200 we would find

(eq. 5b)


(eq. 6)


(eq. 6a)


p ≤ $10.8823.... (eq. 6b)



Of course, we cannot have 0.88 of a person, so we will round down. Therefore, Ashley can have up to 10 people at her birthday party.



Do you remember Ashley? I hope so. She wanted to spend her birthday at the water park and needed to determine how much it would cost. We noted that it is unlikely that Ashley's mother will pay for an unlimited number of friends. It is more likely that she will be willing to pay a certain amount, and Ashley will then need to determine how many people she can invite with that limit.

In lesson 3 we used a data table and a graph to solve her problem. These worked well enough, but you may not wish to graph every possible data point to find the specific solution you need. It would be great if we could just solve the problem by manipulating the terms in the same way as we did with the equations in lessons 4 and 5.

Guess what? We can!

When solving a problem that involves both addition/subtraction and multiplication/division, we follow the same rules as we do for solving a problem that only involves one or the other. We just need to follow both sets of rules. We also must apply the order of operations, and other properties of arithmetic that we do when evaluating or simplifying an expression.

Consider Ashley's problem. We had previously determined that it could be described by the inequality

c ≥ ($17 per person)(p – 5 people) + $100, (eq. 1)



where c is the total cost Ashley's mother is willing to pay, and p is the total number of people. We had left it in this form, rather than simplifying. When written in this form, the parts of the equation more clearly represented the original problem.

However, to solve this, the first thing we want to do is simplify the inequality.

Start by distributing the factor ($17 per person) through the factor (p - 5 people),

c ≥ ($17 per person) p – ($17 per person)(5 people) + $100 (eq. 2)


c ≥ ($17 per person) p – $85 + $100. (eq. 2a)



Next add like terms, in particular add the second and third term,

c ≥ ($17 per person) p + $15. (eq. 3)



That is simplified enough.

Now we can begin solving for p. In this equation, p is multiplied by the factor ($17 per person). Also, the term that includes p is added to the term ($15).

To remove the factor ($17 per person), we need to multiply by the multiplicative inverse. The multiplicative inverse is the reciprocal of ($17 per person). To remove the term ($15) we need to add the additive inverse. The additive inverse is -$15.

The other thing we need to remember is that we need to do to the right-hand side of the equation whatever we do to the left-hand side.

Now, which do you want to do first?

It seems less complicated to start by adding the additive inverse. In other words, add -$15 to both sides,

c + (-$15) ≥ ($17 per person) p + $15 + (-$15) (eq. 4)


c – $15 ≥ ($17 per person) p + $15 – $15 (eq. 4a)


c – $15 ≥ ($17 per person) p. (eq. 4b)



Next, multiply by the multiplicative inverse. This means we want to multiply by

(eq. 5)


(eq. 5a)



And finally, reverse the order of the equation,

(eq. 5b)



We could separate this into 2 terms, but since 17 is not a “nice” denominator, that doesn't really improve the “look” of the equation, so let's just keep equation 5b.

Notice the direction of the inequality reversed when we reordered the equation. When solving an inequality, it is important to understand the meaning of the inequality. The expression including the number of people is less than or equal to the expression involving the cost. If we had multiplied by a negative number, we would also have needed to reverse the inequality.

Okay, back to the inequality. First, check the units. c has units of dollars. 15 also has units of dollars. These terms are added, so they should have the same units – check. The term has units of dollars divided by dollars per person. Remember that when we divide this is the same as multiplying by the reciprocal? This is true for units as well as for numbers and symbols. Therefore, the units are dollars over dollars times people. This simplifies to people. The units for p are people. These expressions must also have the same units – check.

Now that we have solved for p, we can enter whatever limit Ashley's mom set. If she set a limit of $200 we would find

(eq. 5b)


(eq. 6)


(eq. 6a)


p ≤ $10.8823.... (eq. 6b)



Of course, we cannot have 0.88 of a person, so we will round down. Therefore, Ashley can have up to 10 people at her birthday party.



01.06.01 Quarter One Final (Algebra II - New)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 60 minutes




01.06.02 - Virtual Peppered Moth - LAB (Biology)

01.06.02 - Virtual Peppered Moth - Pre Lab (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

Summary:

Charles Darwin gathered a large collection of facts to support the theory of evolution by natural selection. One problem that he ran into was the inability to persuade people of his theory. All of the specimens he studied had a long life cycle and evolved over hundreds of years. He needed a specimen that had a short life cycle. A great example of natural selection can be seen in the peppered moth, Biston betularia. This moth has a short life cycle, making it easier to study natural selection. Unfortunately, Darwin didn’t realize natural selection was happening among smaller specimens, like the peppered moth, which were found in his home country of England.

​Instructional Procedures: 

Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and   all questions into a word document.

  Open URL 1 – Peppered Moths and Melanism
  Read the information found at URL 1. Use this information to answer PART 1 of the lab.
  Open and explore URL 2 – Peppered Moths, Black and White.
  Use the information from URL 2 to complete PART II of the pre lab.

***************************************************************

ASSIGNMENT 01.06.02 - REVISION DATE: 8/06/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

The Industrial Revolution brought on great changes. There were no environmental regulations, and the factories produced tons of ash and soot. It didn't take long until there was a blanket of soot darkening homes, trees, rocks, and anything else it could land on. It was under these conditions that the first dark colored moth was discovered. Today, in some areas, 90% or more of the-peppered moths are dark in color.

Instructions Part I: Open and read URL 1 - Peppered Moths and Melanism. Use the information found in the site to answer the questions.

1. What are the characteristics of the Peppered Moth? Why are the characteristics important when studying natural selection?

Instructions Part II: Open and explore URL 2 – Peppered Moths White and Black. Using the sections of the URL titled “Life Cycle”, “Impact of Polluitn” and “Kettlewells Experiments”. Answer the following questions.

1. What are the natural preditors of the peppered moth?

2. What is a lichen? Why is the lichen important to the survival of the peppered moth? You may have to do additional independent research to answer this question.

3. How is the larvae of the peppered moth protected?

4. How long does a peppered moth live?

5. Who is RS Edleston? Why was his discovery significant?

6. What is Natural Selection?

7. Who is J.W. Tutt? What was his theory?

8. In 150 words or more explain who Barnard Kettlewell is and his work as it deals with natural selection. You may have to do additional independent research on Kettlewell.

***************************************************************

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06.02 A Different Process (Math I)

In the previous example, we solved the addition part first, followed by the multiplication part. That is fine. However, it would also have been okay to solve the multiplication part first followed by the addition part.

Consider the following. The original simplified inequality was

c ≥ ($17 per person) p + $15. (eq. 3)



We wish to solve this inequality for p. Instead of adding -$15 as the first step, we could multiply by

(eq. 7)



Distribute the coefficient through the right-hand side

(eq. 7a)



Then simplify

(eq. 7b)



Now we can isolate p by adding to both sides

(eq. 8)



Combine the terms on the left over the common denominator,

(eq. 5a)



Reverse the order of the equation, and we again have equation 5b,



Two different techniques, same answer. Hmm, didn't we say something about this before.... So, there you go. Personally, I think this was a more complicated method, and therefore more likely to result in algebra and arithmetic errors--but it is not wrong.



In the previous example, we solved the addition part first, followed by the multiplication part. That is fine. However, it would also have been okay to solve the multiplication part first followed by the addition part.

Consider the following. The original simplified inequality was

c ≥ ($17 per person) p + $15. (eq. 3)



We wish to solve this inequality for p. Instead of adding -$15 as the first step, we could multiply by

(eq. 7)



Distribute the coefficient through the right-hand side

(eq. 7a)



Then simplify

(eq. 7b)



Now we can isolate p by adding to both sides

(eq. 8)



Combine the terms on the left over the common denominator,

(eq. 5a)



Reverse the order of the equation, and we again have equation 5b,



Two different techniques, same answer. Hmm, didn't we say something about this before.... So, there you go. Personally, I think this was a more complicated method, and therefore more likely to result in algebra and arithmetic errors--but it is not wrong.



01.06.02 Quiz Check Point (Math Level 1)

computer-scored 20 points possible 20 minutes

Quiz Check Point

You are given 3 attempts at this check point quiz. You must earn at least 16 points in order to pass the quiz. You may use all of your attempts to earn the score you are happy with.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06.02 Thoughts & feelings on death assignment (Health II)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 40 minutes

You will write your imagined obituary following the guidelines below, and then complete the questions in part II. First write the obituary in a word processing document on your computer. Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks below the obituary, in the same document. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

Overview of assignment

Purpose: to create an 'obituary' for your future self, and consider how you feel about death

Audience: your future friends and family


TOPIC :

Write your own obituary. Focus on the things that you want to accomplish in life, as opposed to looking at the negatives of writing out your own death. You may choose all the details that people actually have no control over. For example, you could die at age 305, in space while defending the universe, if you choose. However, you must include the following information in your obituary.

  1. Age and way you die
  2. Accomplishments
  3. Survived by (who would still be living after you die?)
  4. Preceded in death by (who in your family or close associates would have died before you?)
  5. Funeral Arrangements

(WRITE THESE ITEMS OUT IN PARAGRAPH FORM, AS THEY WOULD APPEAR IN A LOCAL PAPER. DON'T JUST FILL OUT THE FACTS ABOVE).

Length: at least 200 words.

*************************************************************  

PART II:(10 points possible, 1 point per answer) Complete the following statements.

  1. Death is
  2. I want to die at
  3. I don’t want to live past
  4. I would like to have at my bedside when I die
  5. When I die, I will be proud that when I was living I
  6. My greatest fear about death is
  7. When I die, I will be glad that when I was living I didn’t
  8. If I were to die today, my biggest regret would be
  9. When I die, I will be glad to get away from
  10. When I die, I want people to say

*************************************************************** 

Overview of grading
:

Part 1:

Write Your Own Obituary including the five requirements listed above (2 points for each of numbers 1-5, and 10 points for spell-checking, editing and composing your obituary in paragraph form).

20 points
Part II: :

Complete the statements (1 point per completed statement)

10 points

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06.03 - Virtual Peppered Moth - LAB (Biology)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 120 minutes

Instructional Procedures: 

Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and   all questions into a word document.

  Open and explore URL 2 – Peppered Moths, Black and White.
  Use the information from URL 2 to complete the lab.

***************************************************************

ASSIGNMENT 01.06.03 - REVISION DATE: 8/06/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)
 

Instructions: Open and explore URL 2 – Peppered Moths White and Black. Using the section of the URL titled “Birds Eye View” run the simulation for a dark and light forest, fill in the table and draw a conclusion.
  

  PERCENT OF DARK MOTHS PERCENT OF LIGHT MOTHS
DARK FOREST    
LIGHT FOREST    

1. Draw a conclusion. Your conclusion needs to contain at least 150 words.

***************************************************************

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06.03 Yet Another Process (Math I)

Now, what if you didn't want to take the time to simplify equation 1 before solving for p? That is fine, too. It will require you to take more steps in solving, but the overall process is the same. Recall equation 1,

c ≥ ($17 per person)(p – 5 people) + $100. (eq. 1)



When working with an unsimplified problem, you are still allowed to perform the steps in many different orders. You must remember to multiply/divide the entire expression on each side, and add or subtract terms from the entire expression. However, sometimes this results in an equation that is not very clean initially. People (students, teachers, mathematicians) are more likely to make algebra errors if the equation is complicated. Therefore, for a non-simplified expression, there really is a best order to solve it.

The best order to solve a non-simplified equation is to work from the outside in. This means that we do things in the reverse order from the order of operations we would use to evaluate the expression. So, for the sake of discussion, if you knew p, how would you evaluate the expression on the right-hand side of equation 1?

  1. The first thing you would do is subtract 5 people from p.
  2. Second, you would multiply that value by $17 per person.
  3. Finally, you would add $100.



Okay? So to solve for p, we work backwards. This means we start by removing the term $100. To do this, we need to add -$100 to both sides. This is the same as subtracting $100 from both sides.

c – $100 ≥ ($17 per person)(p – 5 people) + $100 – $100. (eq. 9)


c – $100 ≥ ($17 per person)(p – 5 people) (eq. 9a)



The second step is to remove the factor $17 per person. To do this, we need to multiply both sides by This is the same as dividing both sides by $17 per person.

(eq. 10)


(eq. 10a)



The final step is to remove the term -5 people. To do this we need to add 5 people to both sides.

(eq. 11)


(eq. 11a)



And as before, we can reverse the order of the inequality,

(eq. 11b)



At this point, you may notice that equation 11b does not look exactly like equation 5b. Yet I claim it is the same. What's the deal?

We need to combine the terms on the right-hand side. In order to do this, we need to find a common denominator. The denominator of the first term is $17 per person. The denominator of the second term is 1. The least common multiple for these numbers is $17 per person. That is already the denominator of the first term, so we do not need to change the second term. If we multiply 1 by $17 per person, we will get $17 per person. Therefore, we need to multiply the denominator of 5 people by $17 per person. We cannot do that and still have the same number. What we can do is multiply 5 people by any version of 1 we choose. How about That is a valid version of 1.

(eq. 12)



Now simplify this,

(eq. 12a)


(eq. 12b)



Finally, we can add the terms together,

(eq. 13)


(eq. 5b)



Now is it clear that these are the same equation? Awesome :)

Here is a problem for you to think about. Which technique did you prefer? Simplifying the expression initially, then solving for the desired quantity? Or solving for the desired quantity without simplifying the expression? Be prepared to justify your answer.



Now, what if you didn't want to take the time to simplify equation 1 before solving for p? That is fine, too. It will require you to take more steps in solving, but the overall process is the same. Recall equation 1,

c ≥ ($17 per person)(p – 5 people) + $100. (eq. 1)



When working with an unsimplified problem, you are still allowed to perform the steps in many different orders. You must remember to multiply/divide the entire expression on each side, and add or subtract terms from the entire expression. However, sometimes this results in an equation that is not very clean initially. People (students, teachers, mathematicians) are more likely to make algebra errors if the equation is complicated. Therefore, for a non-simplified expression, there really is a best order to solve it.

The best order to solve a non-simplified equation is to work from the outside in. This means that we do things in the reverse order from the order of operations we would use to evaluate the expression. So, for the sake of discussion, if you knew p, how would you evaluate the expression on the right-hand side of equation 1?

  1. The first thing you would do is subtract 5 people from p.
  2. Second, you would multiply that value by $17 per person.
  3. Finally, you would add $100.



Okay? So to solve for p, we work backwards. This means we start by removing the term $100. To do this, we need to add -$100 to both sides. This is the same as subtracting $100 from both sides.

c – $100 ≥ ($17 per person)(p – 5 people) + $100 – $100. (eq. 9)


c – $100 ≥ ($17 per person)(p – 5 people) (eq. 9a)



The second step is to remove the factor $17 per person. To do this, we need to multiply both sides by This is the same as dividing both sides by $17 per person.

(eq. 10)


(eq. 10a)



The final step is to remove the term -5 people. To do this we need to add 5 people to both sides.

(eq. 11)


(eq. 11a)



And as before, we can reverse the order of the inequality,

(eq. 11b)



At this point, you may notice that equation 11b does not look exactly like equation 5b. Yet I claim it is the same. What's the deal?

We need to combine the terms on the right-hand side. In order to do this, we need to find a common denominator. The denominator of the first term is $17 per person. The denominator of the second term is 1. The least common multiple for these numbers is $17 per person. That is already the denominator of the first term, so we do not need to change the second term. If we multiply 1 by $17 per person, we will get $17 per person. Therefore, we need to multiply the denominator of 5 people by $17 per person. We cannot do that and still have the same number. What we can do is multiply 5 people by any version of 1 we choose. How about That is a valid version of 1.

(eq. 12)



Now simplify this,

(eq. 12a)


(eq. 12b)



Finally, we can add the terms together,

(eq. 13)


(eq. 5b)



Now is it clear that these are the same equation? Awesome :)

Here is a problem for you to think about. Which technique did you prefer? Simplifying the expression initially, then solving for the desired quantity? Or solving for the desired quantity without simplifying the expression? Be prepared to justify your answer.



01.06.04 Babysitting Income, Revisited (Math I)

You should also recall Jeremy. He has a job babysitting for his neighbors 15 hours a month. If he is unavailable, his sister will fill in for him, but he has to pay her. Jeremy also has a couple of bills he needs to pay each month. Jeremy's problem was rather serious. If he asked his sister to babysit for him too often, he would be losing money each month. He needs to make sure that he doesn't have his sister fill in for him more often than he can afford.

Jeremy had found the following equation to describe his monthly income:

i = $65 – ($7 per hour)(h), (eq. 14)



where i was his net income, and h was the number of hours his sister worked for him. Jeremy needs to make sure that he doesn't end up with a negative income. Therefore, he needs to solve this equation for the number of hours his sister works.

The term that includes h is negative. Therefore, we may wish to start this problem by adding ($7 per hour)(h) to both sides of the equation.

i + ($7 per hour)(h) = $65 – ($7 per hour)(h) + ($7 per hour)(h), (eq. 15)


i + ($7 per hour)(h) = $65. (eq. 15a)



Using the method of working from the outside in, the next step would be to add -i to both sides of the equation, aka subtract i,

ii + ($7 per hour)(h) = $65 – i, (eq. 16)


($7 per hour)(h) = $65 – i. (eq. 16a)



Next we need to remove the coefficient ($7 per hour). We do this by multiplying by or dividing by $7 per hour,

(eq. 17)


(eq. 17a)



Again, we should check the units. i has unit of dollars. $65 also has units of dollars. These terms are added. Therefore these units should be the same. They are. h has units of hours. has units of dollars per dollars per hour. This simplifies to (dollars)(hours/dollar), which equals hours. This should have the same units as h, which it does, so we are good as far as units go.

Now that Jeremy has solved this problem for h in general, he can use this equation to determine the maximum number of hours his sister can work for him, for whichever income he wants. However, since the original concern was to not have a negative income, we may as well solve this for i = 0.

(eq. 17a)


(eq. 18)


(eq. 18a)


h = 9.2857.... hours (eq. 18b)


h ≈ 9.3 hours (eq. 18c)



Therefore, if Jeremy doesn't want to go into dept, he can't have his sister fill in for him for more than about 9.3 hours each month. By the way, this is more or less the answer we estimated from our graph in lesson 3.

What if Jeremy needs $50 to buy concert tickets? What is the maximum hours that his sister can work for him?

We already have this solved for h, so we just need to enter the numbers. This is the advantage of solving the problem with variables initially. We don't need to go back and resolve it every time we want to change the numbers.

(eq. 17a)


(eq. 19)


(eq. 19a)


h = 2.1428.... hours (eq. 19b)


h ≈ 2 hours (eq. 19c)



This means that if Jeremy wants to buy those tickets, he needs to make sure that he doesn't double book for more than 2 hours this month.

All right, do you think you can do this on your own?



You should also recall Jeremy. He has a job babysitting for his neighbors 15 hours a month. If he is unavailable, his sister will fill in for him, but he has to pay her. Jeremy also has a couple of bills he needs to pay each month. Jeremy's problem was rather serious. If he asked his sister to babysit for him too often, he would be losing money each month. He needs to make sure that he doesn't have his sister fill in for him more often than he can afford.

Jeremy had found the following equation to describe his monthly income:

i = $65 – ($7 per hour)(h), (eq. 14)



where i was his net income, and h was the number of hours his sister worked for him. Jeremy needs to make sure that he doesn't end up with a negative income. Therefore, he needs to solve this equation for the number of hours his sister works.

The term that includes h is negative. Therefore, we may wish to start this problem by adding ($7 per hour)(h) to both sides of the equation.

i + ($7 per hour)(h) = $65 – ($7 per hour)(h) + ($7 per hour)(h), (eq. 15)


i + ($7 per hour)(h) = $65. (eq. 15a)



Using the method of working from the outside in, the next step would be to add -i to both sides of the equation, aka subtract i,

ii + ($7 per hour)(h) = $65 – i, (eq. 16)


($7 per hour)(h) = $65 – i. (eq. 16a)



Next we need to remove the coefficient ($7 per hour). We do this by multiplying by or dividing by $7 per hour,

(eq. 17)


(eq. 17a)



Again, we should check the units. i has unit of dollars. $65 also has units of dollars. These terms are added. Therefore these units should be the same. They are. h has units of hours. has units of dollars per dollars per hour. This simplifies to (dollars)(hours/dollar), which equals hours. This should have the same units as h, which it does, so we are good as far as units go.

Now that Jeremy has solved this problem for h in general, he can use this equation to determine the maximum number of hours his sister can work for him, for whichever income he wants. However, since the original concern was to not have a negative income, we may as well solve this for i = 0.

(eq. 17a)


(eq. 18)


(eq. 18a)


h = 9.2857.... hours (eq. 18b)


h ≈ 9.3 hours (eq. 18c)



Therefore, if Jeremy doesn't want to go into dept, he can't have his sister fill in for him for more than about 9.3 hours each month. By the way, this is more or less the answer we estimated from our graph in lesson 3.

What if Jeremy needs $50 to buy concert tickets? What is the maximum hours that his sister can work for him?

We already have this solved for h, so we just need to enter the numbers. This is the advantage of solving the problem with variables initially. We don't need to go back and resolve it every time we want to change the numbers.

(eq. 17a)


(eq. 19)


(eq. 19a)


h = 2.1428.... hours (eq. 19b)


h ≈ 2 hours (eq. 19c)



This means that if Jeremy wants to buy those tickets, he needs to make sure that he doesn't double book for more than 2 hours this month.

All right, do you think you can do this on your own?



01.06.04 Linear Equations -- Supplemental Links (Math I)

These websites are intended for supplemental instruction, and the opportunity to practice some of the skills. They are optional links. Use them if you need additional help, or just another point of view.



These websites are intended for supplemental instruction, and the opportunity to practice some of the skills. They are optional links. Use them if you need additional help, or just another point of view.



01.06.04 Natural Selection (Biology)

computer-scored 5 points possible 20 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


01.06.04.01 Linear Equations -- Assignment 3 (Math I)

teacher-scored 75 points possible 90 minutes

Complete

Unit 01 --Linear Equations -- Assignment 3
Solving Equations

Print out the attached assignment and complete the applicable questions in the space provided. You may use additional paper if needed. Once you have completed the assignment, scan it into the computer and convert it to an image file such as .pdf or .jpg. You may need to practice scanning pencil drawing so that you produce a clear, easily readable image. Finally, upload the image using the assignment submission window for this assignment. Alternately, you may type the essay questions and answers into a word processing document, then save the file as an .rtf, and upload that.

Questions 1 and 2 will be worth 35 points each. Question 3 will be worth 5 points for a total of 75 points for the assignment.

You should complete this assignment after reading Lesson 6.



teacher-scored 75 points possible 90 minutes

Complete

Unit 01 --Linear Equations -- Assignment 3
Solving Equations

Print out the attached assignment and complete the applicable questions in the space provided. You may use additional paper if needed. Once you have completed the assignment, scan it into the computer and convert it to an image file such as .pdf or .jpg. You may need to practice scanning pencil drawing so that you produce a clear, easily readable image. Finally, upload the image using the assignment submission window for this assignment. Alternately, you may type the essay questions and answers into a word processing document, then save the file as an .rtf, and upload that.

Questions 1 and 2 will be worth 35 points each. Question 3 will be worth 5 points for a total of 75 points for the assignment.

You should complete this assignment after reading Lesson 6.



01.06.04.02 Linear Equations -- Assignment 4 (Math I)

teacher-scored 80 points possible 240 minutes

Complete

Unit 01 --Linear Equations -- Assignment 4
Linear Equations Project

The instructions for this assignment are in the attached file. This assignment should be completed using a word processing program with an equation editor. The formulas and images should be imbedded in the text. The final product must be converted to a .pdf file type. This could also be done as a slide show presentation, again with the final product converted to .pdf format.

Finally, upload the .pdf file using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

You should complete this assignment after studying Lesson 6.



teacher-scored 80 points possible 240 minutes

Complete

Unit 01 --Linear Equations -- Assignment 4
Linear Equations Project

The instructions for this assignment are in the attached file. This assignment should be completed using a word processing program with an equation editor. The formulas and images should be imbedded in the text. The final product must be converted to a .pdf file type. This could also be done as a slide show presentation, again with the final product converted to .pdf format.

Finally, upload the .pdf file using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

You should complete this assignment after studying Lesson 6.



01.07 The Design Brief (Pre-Engineering)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 90 minutes

The Design Brief

A design brief is a written explanation given by the client to the designer at the outset of a project. As the client, you are spelling out your objectives and expectations and defining a scope of work when you issue one. You're also committing to a concrete expression that can be revisited as a project moves forward. It's an honest way to keep everyone honest. If the brief raises questions, all the better. Questions early are better than questions late.

Why provide a design brief? The purpose of the brief is to get everyone started with a common understanding of what's to be accomplished. It gives direction and serves as a benchmark against which to test concepts and execution as you move through a project. Some designers provide clients with their own set of questions. Even so, the ultimate responsibility for defining goals and objectives and identifying audience and context lies with the client.

Another benefit of the design brief is the clarity it provides you as the client about why you're embarking on a project. If you don't know why, you can't possibly hope to achieve anything worthwhile. Nor are you likely to get your company behind your project. A brief can be as valuable internally as it is externally. If you present it to the people within the company most directly affected by whatever is being produced, you not only elicit valuable input, but also pave the way for their buy-in.

When you think about it, the last thing you want is for your project to be a test of the designer's skills. Your responsibility is to help the design firm do the best work it can. That's why you hired the firm. And why you give it a brief.

Budgeting and managing the process

If the briefing effort is thorough, budgeting and managing a project is easier. It takes two to budget and manage a design project: the client and the designer. The most successful collaborations are always the ones where all the information is on the table and expectations are in the open from the outset.

Design costs money. As one very seasoned and gifted designer says, "There is always a budget," whether it is revealed to the design team or not. Clients often are hesitant to announce how much they have to spend for fear that if they do, the designer will design to that number when a different solution for less money might otherwise have been reached. This is a reasonable concern and yet, it's as risky to design in a budgetary vacuum as it is to design without a goal. If your utility vehicle budget stops at four cylinders, four gears and a radio, there's no point in looking at Range Rovers.

If you have $100,000 to spend and you'd really like to dedicate $15,000 of it to something else, giving the design team that knowledge helps everyone. Then you won't get something that costs $110,000 that you want but cannot pay for. The trust factor is the 800-pound gorilla in the budgeting phase. Without trust, there isn't a basis for working together.

Assignment for the Design Brief
You are a engineer working for a design firm that develops Mouse Trap Cars. Creating the design brief does not mean building the project but to address the issues and design possibilities that will come later.
Use a google search for "Mouse Trap Cars"

The presentation is for the upper management in your company. Use a multimedia program (like powerpoint )to develop a 10 minute concise viewpoint of your research to present your idea. Include pictures and facts and why you are recommending it. Make sure you list the benefits and the budget to build the Mouse Trap Cars
submit the powerpoint.

A ten minute presentation would usually contain around 15 to 30 slides
Design Brief example http://www.technologystudent.com/designpro/problem1.htm

Take the Assessment for the Design Brief.

02.01.06 Climate Maps- Continents (World Geography)

teacher-scored 70 points possible 60 minutes

The seven continents of the world have many different climates. In this assignment you will put, on a map of the world (or map of each continent), the climates that each continent has. It will be important for you to pay attention to the different climates that is located on each continent. Climate is the average weather of a certain area over a long period of time. Each continent has many different climates because of latitude, elevation, landforms, closeness to an ocean or large body of water. For example: the climate of the Wasatch front (Ogden to Provo) is cold winters, and hot summers. Most of the precipitation arrives in the winter and spring. The summers and falls are generally dry. If you take someplace that has a similar latitude as the Wasatch front you will find that the climate can change because of the water and elevation factors. For example, San Francisco is about the same latitude as Salt Lake City. Only 3 degrees difference in latitude but because San Francisco is by the ocean and at sea level, it has a completely different climate. It has moderate winters and cool summers. Refer to the charts below for comparison.

San Francisco

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Avg. High 55° 58° 60° 64° 66° 70° 71° 72° 74° 70° 62° 56°
Avg. Low 41° 45° 45° 47° 48° 52° 54° 55° 55° 51° 47° 42°
Mean 48° 52° 54° 56° 58° 62° 64° 64° 65° 61° 55° 48°

Salt Lake City

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Avg. High 36° 44° 52° 61° 71° 82° 92° 88° 78° 66° 50° 37°
Avg. Low 18° 24° 31° 37° 45° 55° 64° 61° 51° 40° 30° 21°
Mean 28° 34° 42° 50° 58° 68° 78° 76° 65° 54° 41° 30°

Here you can see that the climate in San Francisco is milder than the climate in Salt Lake City.

Copy the outline maps and then click on the link for the climates of the world. Color each continent according to the climates that are there. Make sure you put a KEY on your map(s).

Outline maps: http://www.eduplace.com/ss/maps/ Click on the map you are going to do. Either the world or on each continent.

Climate map of the world: http://www.allcountries.org/maps/world_climate_maps.html

NOTE: you may have trouble attaching all of the maps. One student who was successful at doing so told me the following "You asked how I could fit so many maps into my submission. First, I scanned them at a low resolution and then I zipped them using WinZip into one file and uploaded that one file." Hope that helps. If not, send the maps that won't fit to me through e-mail.
You may also find this information from a fellow student who did an awesome job on this assignment helpful:
"You asked how I made my climate maps for assignment 2.6. Once I opened up a map on the site you gave us, I hit the screen print button at the top of my keyboard. I then opened up the Microsoft Paint application and hit Edit then Paste. The screen print came up and I was then able to crop the image down so I was just viewing the map. (To crop, I outlined the area I wanted to keep in the image with the flashing dotted lines used for cropping, then hit Image then Crop). Then I just painted in the colors to match the colored climate map on the website. To insert the keys, I made separate images on Paint with just the colored blocks I used in each map. The nice thing about using powerpoint is that I am able to insert multiple images into each slide. So I just matched the keys with the corresponding map and then inserted text boxes for all of the text

02.04 Online skills Introduction to the Moodle platform - Study Skills

We’ll review some basic study skills that you may be using already in the traditional classroom. However, due to the unique environment of learning online, you will definitely want to make sure you use ALL these strategies.

Reading and Note taking Strategies

In a traditional classroom, there are many activities that help you learn: assignments, reading, class discussions, etc. Online, you are somewhat left with just reading and assignments. READING becomes really important to be able to learn and succeed in an online class. If you only opened your textbook when you had to…or skimmed through it looking for an answer, not really ‘reading’…then you’ll need to make a change in your habits for online courses. There are ways to read the material, whether online or in a text that can help you remember and learn. One thing that is a MUST is to think about what you are reading as you go. It kind of takes the place of class discussions in a regular classroom except that you are coming up with all the comments by yourself in your head.

What should these conversations in your head be about? Several things really:

• Relate the new information you just read about to something that you already learned. For instance, have you ever seen the movie Stand and Deliver? At one point, a teacher who really wants a student to succeed in a chemistry class explains how a cell works is like being a member of the ‘hood’, something that the student can relate to.
• Put the information you’ve read into your own words, in several different ways so it will have more meaning to you
• Try to think of ways this new information is relevant or meaningful to your life or the world in general.
• Ask questions. Look at the information from different points of view. Be the ‘antagonist’…is it possible the information could be wrong? Etc.
• Who is saying it and why? It may surprise you to realize that there is a LOT of false information on the Internet because anybody can post anything they want. That is true even for Wikipedia…one of the most popular information websites in use. So you’ll want to check and see who the author is and if other websites agree with the information being presented.
• What perspective is the information from? Just imagine the different perspectives you could get about the Ku Klux Klan by reading the perspective of a KKK member versus an African American person who had a relative killed in a KKK raid? You know the story of little Red riding hood is from Red’s perspective right? Have you ever read the wolf’s perspective? Just for fun, you can read it on one of the links below.

Another thing that is a MUST is to take notes as you read. It’s like taking notes while a teacher is teaching in class, you can even read out loud if it helps you to learn and remember the material. Reading from the computer screen is generally hard on your eyes and results in blurring, eyestrain and visual fatigue. So limit how much time you read on screen or print out what you read if you need to. Be careful when scrolling down the screen to make sure that you don’t miss passages. When you take notes as you read, you will create your own study guide for the quizzes and proctored final…isn’t that a great idea?

To learn more about effective reading and note taking strategies, you will be visiting several websites. Take notes as you go, because there is a quiz for this section.
Dizzy Daizy Doesn'tDizzy Daizy Doesn't

02.04.00 Chapter 2 Example 3 - Dale's Hat's (C++)

After studying the example below, do the Chapter 2 Assignment 3 - Kathy's Candy Store assignment below and submit it under topic 3.

Example Instructions: At Dale's hat store, western hats sell for $10.25 each. All other hats are priced at $9.37. Write a C++ program to allow the user to enter the number of cowboy hats and the number of other hats to purchase. The program should then calculate and display the receipt. ( use .07 as the sales tax rate)

Example:

Dale's Hat Store

Enter the number of western hats: 2

Enter the number of other hats: 3

Dale's Hats

2 western hats @ $10.25 $20.50
3 other hats @ 9.37 $28.11
subtotal $48.61
tax (.07) $ 3.40

total $52.01

C++ Code:

/* Dale's Hats point of Sale program */
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;
int main ( )
{
    const double priceWHats = 10.25, priceOHats = 9.37, taxRate = .07; //constants
    int wHats, oHats;
    double costWHats, costOHats, subTotal, salesTax, totalCost;

    cout << " Dale's Hat Store \n " << endl;
    cout << " Enter the number of western hats: "; // enter number of items purchased
    cin >> wHats;
    cout << "\n Enter the number of other hats: ";
    cin >> oHats;

    costWHats = wHats * priceWHats; // calculate the cost of the western hats
    costOHats = oHats * priceOHats; // calculate the cost of the other hats
    subTotal = costWHats + costOHats; // subtotal equals the cost of all hats
    salesTax = subTotal * taxRate; // calculate the sales Tax
    totalCost = subTotal + salesTax; // total equals sub total plus sales tax

    cout.setf(ios::fixed);
    cout.precision(2);
    cout << "Dale's Hats \n " << endl;
    cout << wHats << "western hats @ $" << priceWHats << "\t \t $" << costWHats << endl;
    cout << oHats << " other hats @ $" << priceOHats << "\t \t $" << costOHats << endl;
    cout << "subtotal \t \t \t $" << subTotal << endl;
    cout << "tax \t \t \t \t $" << salesTax << endl; // display receipt
    cout << "\ntotal \t \t \t\t $" << totalCost << endl;
    system("Pause");
    return ( 0 );
}

02.05 Unit 01-02 Review Quiz

computer-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

Assessment 02.05 Review Quiz 01-02

Complete

01-02 Review Quiz
Foundations of Civilizations and Ancient Egypt

This assignment is found under Review Quiz 01-02 on the course website. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do and will provide immediate feedback.

Complete this assignment after you finish reading lessons 1 and 2.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.06 Improving Tone and Word Choice

What's your tone? (Is it off-key?) What words do you choose?

02.06 Water Quality (Earth Systems)

DON’T EAT YELLOW SNOW

Introduction:

Sometime in your life, someone (probably your mother) told you not to eat yellow snow. If you have ever hiked in Utah’s mountains, you should have been warned not drink out of the streams unless the water has been filtered, boiled, or treated in some way. If you have traveled out of our country, you were probably advised to drink only bottled water. So, why all these warnings about water? Because many, maybe even most, of our water sources are polluted in some way or another. In this assignment, you are going to examine and analyze data about water pollution.
02.0602.06

02.06 Improving Tone and Word Choice

02.06 Project (Math Level 1)

Use equations to solve real-world problems.

Connecting skill to real-life

Now, at the end of this unit, you have the opportunity to demonstrate that you:

  • can understand and apply the steps for solving problems.
  • can write linear inequalities to model real-life situations.
  • can write equations for solving problems involving travel.
  • can write equations for solving problems involving proportions.
  • can write equations for solving problems involving percent.
  • can use equations to solve real-world problems.

02.06 Project - Challenge (Math Level 1)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 45 minutes

Project for this unit

  1. Print the project description. Work all the problems showing ALL your steps.
  2. Digitize (scan or take digital photo) and upload your project.

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.06 Water Quality (Earth Systems)

02.06 2nd quarter week six - Mouse Trap links (Pre-Engineering)

02.06 Applying your Skills: Video 2 (Participation Skills and Techniques)

02.06 Applying your Skills: Video 2. (Participation Skills and Techniques)

02.06 Applying your Skills: Video 2. (Participation Skills and Techniques)

teacher-scored 30 points possible 60 minutes

This assignment should be completed by WEEK 5 of this class

Standard Two Video INSTRUCTIONS:

You will need to submit an instructional video demonstrating how to perform a basic STRETCHING skill. If you are unable to make a video of YOURSELF, you can use powerpoint to create a presentation USING pictures of you demonstrating the basics skills for the exercise you have chosen. (There needs to be as many pictures as there are CRTICAL CUES for each exercise.) 

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE VIDEO:. *Your video needs to be at least one minute long and NO longer than two minutes. If you would rather take pictures and use a video editor program to make a video/powerpoint to create your video, you can but you must have a minimum of 4-6 pictures.

*You MUST be the star of your video, the video needs to be of YOU teaching and demonstrating how to perform the skill or exercise, so you might need to get a friend to do the filming. You will also be the narrator of the video.

*Assume that you are making this video for another student who has never tried your particular activity/sport.                           

*You CANNOT use the same video for another other PE Skills and Techniques, including both quarters.

****Here is the list of acceptable activities you can choose from

*** You must choose an activity from THIS LIST

Calf stretch, Hamstring stretch, Quad stretch, Hip Flexor stretch, ITB Stretch, Knee-to-Chest Stretch, Shoulder stretch, Neck stretch

 

OBSERVATION QUESTIONS: After you have created your video, watch the video and critique yourself, bearing in mind the correct way to perform this exercise. Answer the following questions. MAKE SURE YOUR ANSWERS ARE IN COMPLETE SENTENCES OR PARAGRAPHS. Please put all answers in bold or UPPER CASE.

****************************************

02.06 Observation questions for Video 02.06

1. What activity from this list - Calf stretch, Hamstring stretch, Quad stretch, Hip Flexor stretch, ITB Stretch, Knee-to-Chest Stretch, Shoulder stretch, Neck stretch - did you choose?

2. According to the website explaining the exercises, what are the critical cues for the exercise you chose?

3. What did you see in the video that you were doing well?

4. What did you see in the video that you could improve on?

5. What did you see yourself doing that you didn't realize until you watched the video?

6. Name and date:

****************************************

INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR VIDEO: You will need a computer with a connection to the Internet and your digital video content (under two minutes, please). 

You can choose between 

"YouTube" - web based option

"Photobucket" - image hosting and video hosting website

"UPLOAD your video to your GOOGLE drive" to host your video assignments. 

You will need to create an account for YouTube or Photobucket. Follow the instructions to upload and share your videos. "YouTube" will take a little longer to upload.

WHICHEVER resource you decide to use to submit your video..... you need to Submit the LINK to your video with your Questions in the assignment Submission, so the questions and the Video are together to be graded. 

****DO NOT send the video to my EMAIL!!! *****

In YouTube, you need to make your video "available to the world." When you go to the "My Videos" section of your YouTube account, play the video you want to submit. At this point you need to click on the "Share this Video" then copy the URL address in the URL and paste it in the Text Entry with your Questions or the comment box and submit it WITH YOUR ASSIGNMENT

Photobucket is very similar. If you don't have a video camera, you can use still images in a slide show with narration that is converted to digital video.

IF you decide to NOT use PHOTOBUCKET or YOUTUBE... You can upload your video or power point to your GOOGLE drive and share it and then copy the link, and paste it into the text entry submission page with your Questions and submit it.

Please make sure your video is in one of the following formats or you will have to redo the video.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.06 Color(IntDes1)

HISTORY OF COLOR

Overview: Color is one of a designer’s most effective and cost-efficient tools. A good understanding of color will enable a person to be more competent in interior design. HISTORY OF COLOR: Colors are often symbolic. In China, yellow had a religious significance and remains the imperial color today. In Greece and Rome, red was believed to have protective powers. Long ago, purple was restricted for use by nobility. Egyptians adorned the walls of tombs and temples with brilliant colors of blue, tangerine, green and carmine. Greece and Rome were decorated with colored marble floors, brightly painted walls and ceilings, and rich tapestries and silks. Early Christians used gloriously colored stained-glass windows. Today these windows remain as a supreme creative achievement of Western culture. Italian Renaissance colors were vibrant reds, greens, golds and blues. During the Rococo period, feminine taste had a great influence and colors became less vibrant. When Marie Antoinette dominated the court of Louis XVI, colors became even more delicate and softly pastel. Throughout the 17th and 18th centuries, France influenced the western world. French colors were vogue wherever beauty and luxury were cherished. The eighteenth century in England was one of great elegance. Colors were rich, showing a strong Chinese influence in the use of red and gold. The excavation of Pompeii inspired the Adam brothers to introduce the neoclassic look. Colors became more delicate, with Adam Green being the favorite. The Victorian era was a period of eclecticism known for its abundance of "things." Colors were predominantly dull reds, greens, browns, and mauves. This era is referred to as the Mauve Decades. The 20th century introduced the monochromatic room with sleek surfaces and strong contrast with black, gray, silver, brown, beige, and white as favorite colors. The 20's preferred all-white interiors which gave way to delicate pastels with bright accents. Favorite colors were cocoa brown with hyacinth blue, mustard yellow with gray, and prune with turquoise. Light colors were preferred through the 50's, but soon American interest turned to Mexico and a shift to bright colors with bright contrast. Colors for the 90's are regal gold, blue, and red. The Southwestern look remains popular and the Victorian look is being revived. The Ivy League look is also popular with forest greens and cranberry reds as favorites.

Color Basics
COLOR A ray of light is the source of all color. Without light, color does not exist. Color is light broken into electromagnetic vibrations of varying wavelengths, which cause the viewer to see different colors. This can be demonstrated by shining a light through a glass prism. The light beam divides into the colors of the spectrum. The longest wavelength is perceived as red and the shortest as violet. You often see a variety of colors in a bright beam of light striking a soap bubble, the beveled edge of a mirror, or a rainbow. Pigments are substances that can be ground into fine powder and used for adding color to dyes and paints. Before people learned how to produce pigments through chemistry, they were derived from animal, mineral, and vegetable sources. Mayans in Central America extracted purple from shellfish. Robes of Roman emperors were dyed from shellfish found in the Mediterranean. People in the Near East extracted red dye from the dried bodies of scale insects. Color can alter the appearance of form and space, affect our performance abilities, and change our moods. Color is derived from reflected light. It is perceived in the brain through a response of the eyes to different wavelengths of light. THE COLOR WHEEL The color wheel is a basic tool we use when working with colors. It is based on the standard color theory known as Brewster/Prang. In addition to the traditional color wheel, there are two color systems that are useful when more detailed colors are required. 1. The Mussel system has five principal hues: red, yellow, green, blue, and purple, and five intermediate hues, yellow-red, green-yellow, blue-green, purple-blue, and red-purple. A numbering system helps designers identify the exact hue they need. 2. The Oswald system is made from three pairs of complementary colors: red and green, blue and orange, and black and white. The color circle has twenty-four hues. There are: 1. Primary hues: red, yellow, and blue 2. Secondary hues: green, violet, and orange (made by combining primary colors) 3. Tertiary hues: yellow-green, blue-green, blue-violet, red-violet, red-orange, and yellow-orange (made by combining secondary hues) Colors are created in different ways. 1. Analogous hues are near each other on the color wheel. 2. Complementary hues are opposite each other on the color wheel. In all of the following exercises that require you to create color charts, you may use acrylic paints - they would be easy to mix and give you the many shades and hues you will need, or you may use colored pencils that come in a wide variety of shades.

02.06 Drafts & Speech Delivery - English 10

teacher-scored 150 points possible 180 minutes

Share the dream: Martin Luther King Jr. - I Have A Dream Speech fotopediaShare the dream: Martin Luther King Jr. - I Have A Dream Speech fotopediaRevision Complete the draft of the speech from above to be handed in now. Follow the instructions below to understand the completion steps for this assignment.

Assignment Parts:

1. Submit your 1st draft of your speech.

2. Receive feedback from me and make the needed revisions.

3. Submit your 2nd draft of your speech.

4. Receive feedback from me and make the needed revisions.

5. Submit your 3rd draft of your speech.

6. Receive feedback from me and make the needed revisions.

7. Have a friend and listen to you deliver your speech and give you feedback.

8. Make the needed changes from your friend feedback.

9. Submit your friend's revision suggestions.

10. Make the needed revisions and prepare your final draft.

11. Submit your final draft

12. Post the written version of your speech on your blog.

13. Practice reading your speech at least ten times, then deliver it to yourself in the mirror and again to a friend. Get their feedback on your delivery, intonation, expression, etc. and make the needed changes and practice it again ten more times.

14. Call me on my Google voice mail to deliver your speech on a voice message. You will find my voice mail number in the "Teacher Contact" section at the top of the course content page.

15. Submit your written response of your feelings about this process/experience

16. Prepare assignment submissions by following the check list below.

Final Submission Inclusions: a. answers & notes - lesson 02.05 "Yes, a speech . . ." b. blog URL with speech posted in it c. final draft - This is the final document created from the steps above. d. speech delivered to my voice mail e. your feelings about the process documented f. submission steps, from above, are completed Grading Criteria:

1. Introduction - The first few lines of the speech command attention.

2. Content - The speech is focused on one or two major issues and it describes those issues clearly and thoroughly.

3. Delivery - The speaker spoke in a clear and expressive voice.

4. Conclusion - The end of the speech was exciting, lively, and summarizing.

5. Overall - The speech was exciting and informative with supportive evidence stated clearly.

*All of these parts must be included for full credit. SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.06 Evaluate Websites

You will now use your rubric to evaluate two websites. Find one website that you think is a “good” accurate website and one that is a “bad” website. Pick one of the following categories to find your two websites:

  • News source
  • Shopping

teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

You should have one good example website and one bad example website from the same category. 

Explore each website and fill out a separate rubric for each. Be sure to include the category you picked, the websites used, and which one was good and which one was bad in your opinion. Upload the two rubrics.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.06 Examine how the market revolution affected retail distribution of goods in the cities and in rural areas.(U.S. History)

Learning about growth of the American economy, as markets were created for American products from Industrialization and livestock shipments.

02.06 Group Portrait (DigitalPhoto1)

Take pictures of groups of four or more people. Try different backgrounds, angles and arrangements.

02.06 Group Portrait(DigitalPhoto1)

teacher-scored 100 points possible 60 minutes

5-Group Portrait
Submit three different images, of three different groups of people - your family, a birthday, or group of at least four people. These must be creative, well done images.

1.2.6 Group Portrait(DigitalPhoto1)1.2.6 Group Portrait(DigitalPhoto1)

02.06 How to reduce a file's size in Photoshop (Basic Photography)

Before you submit an assignment to be graded, you will need to reduce the file size in an image editing software like Photoshop. You can watch a "How to " video on that will show you how to reduce a file in PhotoShop before you submit the image for assessment.

Fantasy Valley, Vernal Utah: This is a good example of points of interest, and "Minimum Depth of field.
Only the rock closest to us is in focus the background is out of focus.
ISO 100, Shutter speed 1/400 second, F-stop4Fantasy Valley, Vernal Utah: This is a good example of points of interest, and "Minimum Depth of field.
Only the rock closest to us is in focus the background is out of focus.
ISO 100, Shutter speed 1/400 second, F-stop4

02.06 Improving Tone and Word Choice

teacher-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

Using the provided URLs, check out the resources there regarding tone and word choice. After reading through these, answer the following questions.

a. Explain why positive wording in a message is more effective than negative wording. Why should you be more concerned about the position of good news or bad news in your message?
b. What six factors of tone would you consider when conveying your message to your audience and which one, do you feel, is the most critical in composing your message? Why?

Please rewrite each of the following sentences/phrases improving tone and word choice, making them more precise and in some cases, more positive. For help with word choice, click on the links.

  1. Many people attended the demonstration.
  2. We regret to tell you that there will be a short delay in processing your forms.
  3. It was suggested that the deadline for returning damaged or defective merchandise be extended.
  4. The new manuals won't be available to each and every technician till the month of August.
  5. I know you’re the boss, but what’s your problem anyway?
  6. We demand payment this week.
  7. We are not open on Saturday.
  8. Your desk is always messy. I find that I feel extremely embarrassed when visitors enter our area and, immediately upon entering, see this mess. Clean it up today. I don’t want to have to tell you again.
  9. If you're having trouble setting up our product, just read the instruction manual.
  10. The process of how to put together all the pieces isn't difficult and shouldn't take more than a couple hours at most.
  11. Unfortunately, we can't send you your money back because we still haven't gotten the paperwork we told you to send last month.

02.06 Lesson 2F: "Destinos" Video 3 (Spanish I)

 

Lesson 2F
"Destinos" Video 3

[A copy of this lesson is available in a PDF file!! If you prefer to use this type of document, just click on the following link to complete this lesson: SpI_Lesson2F]

 

           I hope that you are enjoying this fun story!! I really like this segment of this series!! Raquel begins the first leg of her search by traveling to Seville, Spain. The scenery is so authentic and interesting!! The market place is so busy and chaotic. The buildings are old with a gate at the entrance. It is so common in Spanish countries to call through the gate to see if someone is home!! I don’t think you could get a better experience of seeing Spain than is presented in this video segment unless you actually traveled there yourself!!!

           Also, take advantage of your ability to repeat as much, as many times as you need in order to understand the material. If you think you might have heard a word but you aren’t sure, rewind the segment a bit and listen again!! Just click on the progress bar and drag it to the left.

           Click on the following link to begin viewing the next video in this wonderful video series!! (If you are asked to log in or provide any personal information in order to watch the videos ... please contact your teacher for a special username and password that we have created for our EHS students to use, if required!!)

           At the bottom of the screen is a group of photos, dividing the episodes of this novella into 5 different groups. Just go to the second division [“Episodes 3-11: España”] at the bottom of the screen and click on the blue box that says, “WATCH”!

           On the right side of this new screen, notice that the box with a “3”> in it should already be highlighted, so that the third episode is selected. Now just click on the arrow in the middle of the video segment to begin watching!! When the video begins playing, “CC”(for Closed Caption) appears in the bottom right corner of the little picture. Many students have enjoyed being able to see and read the words as they listen to the video!! (As you watch the text in "CC", you will see the letters "&nbsp" constantly appear. This is computer code for a "space" to be placed in text but due to a programming error, these letters are appearing instead of a blank space. Sorry about that ... just train your brain to ignore these letters and continue reading!)

           Print this page to use in recognizing some of the words from this unit as you watch the next video segment!! Below is a list of review words to listen for as you watch the video.

           Review and Helpful Vocabulary Words: I will include a list of helpful vocabulary (as listed below) with each video segment to help as you watch the video. As you’re watching the video, you can always click on the “video progress cursor” and drag it back (to the left) to rewind for extra help!)

           Lesson 2B: Basic Numbers:

           Other words to listen for:

           Summary of Video 3: Hopefully you have enjoyed the next video in this series and been able to “hear/distinguish” some of the Spanish words and phrases above. Remember, it’s OK that there was much of the Spanish dialogue that sounded like jibberish!! Go back and watch this video again. This time, you will “hear” more words that you recognize!!

02.06 Matrices and Systems of Equations (PreCalc)

One of the most useful things you can do with a matrix is use it to solve systems of equations. You can write the system of equations as a matrix, work with the matrix, and find the answer. When computer scientists program computers to solve systems of equations, they are actually programming the computer to use matrices to solve the system of equations. This lesson is all about solving systems of equations.



Download the attached file.



02.06 Natural Selection: Rat Island (Biology)

Cite evidence for changes in populations over time and use concepts of evolution to explain these changes.

TO DO

Read: Chapter 6 Natural Selection: Rat Island in the EHS Biology Quarter 2 - Ecology text book.

Complete: Once you have read the chapter complete the following activities:

  • 02.06.01 Natural Selection: Rat Island - Assignment 
  • 02.06.02 Natural Selection: Rat Island - Quiz 
  • 02.06.03 - Lesson Check

 

 

02.06 Part I B. Art Talks - Texture and Value (ArtFouii)

Value and Texture

Every surface has a texture and a value. In art, value refers to the dark and lights of an object. Texture is the way something looks if touched or would like if could be touched. In drawing to create the illusion of texture we should learn how to invented texture and value of an object. Because this unit deals with color, texture and values, we need to learn about how to create invented textures and various values of the animal subject that you will select to draw and complete with high-grade or medium-grade colored pencils.

Texture can engage our sense of touch as well as our vision, and it can enhance both the visual surface and the conceptual substance of any design. Two dimensional visual textures are illusions. These can be created using multiple marks or through a descriptive simulation of physical textures. Many different textures can be created through the use of a variety of pencil and pen techniques. The internet can be a good source of information on how to create a variety of invented. Because these sites change on a daily bases and are hard to keep up with.

Let say you want to learn "how to create the invented texture with a Prisma colored pencil of the feather of a bird". Do a Google video search of just what you want to see as I did and linked to and see what you can come up with. You animal might not have feathers so this might not apply to your final animal drawing. But see what you can find on the various video instructions.

Invented textures are created when you use patterns that can be created through repetition of lines or shapes on a small scale over the surface of an area. Visual texture is created whenever lines, dots, or other shapes are repeated. Variations in the size, density, and orientation of these marks can produce different spatial effects.

Rough and smooth textures: The roughness or smoothness of a texture can be recognized by the means of shadows that it shows. A rough surface reflects light unevenly. Rough textures show irregular patterns of light and shadows. A smooth texture reflects light evenly. Your eyes glide across these objects, uninterrupted by shadows, just as your fingers would glide across them, uninterrupted by bumps and dents.

Matte and shiny textures: A matte surface is a surface that reflects a soft, dull light. It absorbs some light and reflects the rest. A shiny surface is the opposite of a matte surface. A shiny surface reflects so much light so brightly that it seems to glow. Shiny surfaces also have highlights. Matte and shiny surfaces can be rough or smooth. Dirt is a matte rough, and the sky takes on the appearance of a matte smooth surface. An animals' eyeball looks shiny and smooth.

02.06 Printing Your Digital Photographs (Basic Photography)

Image editing and printing. • Image transferred downloading files to a computer. • Image management organizing files, photo selection and managing folders. • Size resolution for printing image to a color printer or photo lab.

Worm's eye view or low angle.: ISO 160, Shutter speed 1/680 second, F-stop (or aperature) F-2.8.Worm's eye view or low angle.: ISO 160, Shutter speed 1/680 second, F-stop (or aperature) F-2.8.
Albums, framed prints and scrapbooks

You can print out pictures on your inkjet printer or at a photo store or use on online service to make great gifts and capture a moment in time. You can make photo albums and arrange them in chronological order, such as adding new babies when they come. You can make albums with themes such as Scout trips, camping, family outings, pets, special events, weddings, high school sports, dances, road trips and birthdays. Locations such as home town hot spots, and National Parks, also make nice albums.

Personalized Greeting Cards of you or your family members give that special touch that will be remembered. Scapbooking has become a multi million dollar industry wih templates, books and local clubs to help you keep all memories together.

02.06 Section 3.5: Limits at Infinity (Calculus)

02.06 Story Writing Assignments (English 9-1)

02.06 Types of Investments (Financial Literacy)

Identify and explain types of investment vehicles.

Crowd gathering on Wall Street after the stock market crash of October 25, 1929: By Freelancer Journalist (CC0), via Wikimedia CommonsCrowd gathering on Wall Street after the stock market crash of October 25, 1929: By Freelancer Journalist (CC0), via Wikimedia Commons

BACKGROUND

Next, we consider several common types of investments. Examples of investments include stocks, bonds, mutual funds, collectibles, real estate and more. These investments are more risky than regular bank savings, CD's, and Money Market accounts, BUT they have potentially higher earnings--especially over long periods (many years).

Investments are not insured like bank and credit union savings. That is part of the reason investment money should NOT be needed for emergencies or everyday expenses since the money can be lost. You should have more liquid funds for emergencies in such places as savings or Bank Money Market Accounts.

Stocks, bonds, and certain other investments are often referred to as “securities.” A person must be licensed and meet certain standards to sell securities. This helps reduce risk but you still have to be careful since “securities fraud” happens all the time.

As an introduction, visit and read the link in the URLs. Make sure you click on the side links entitled "What is the Stock Market," that discusses Stocks, Mutual Funds, Bonds, and Collectibles. Then take the quiz.

02.06 Types of Investments Links (Financial Literacy)

02.06 Types of Investments Quiz (Financial literacy)

computer-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

Take the 2.6.1 quiz. You must score 8 or higher on this quiz to continue. If your score is lower, simply re-take the quiz as many times as you need after reviewing the material.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.06 Unit 02 Review Quiz (Math Level 1)

both teacher- and computer-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

Unit 2 Review Quiz

You are allowed three attempts at the quiz

The quiz is worth 20 points and you must score 16 or higher to meet the minimum requirements.

  1. Work all problems.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 9 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.06 Using the Phone (FrenchII)

The link in the URL's will take you to this lesson.

02.06 Using the Phone links (FrenchII)

02.06 Water Quality (Earth Systems)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 60 minutes

Assignment:

PART ONE:

* Go to What’s Up with Our Nation's Waters? (See URL's) Click on “DOWNLOAD PRINTABLE VERION OF DOCUMENT." Then click on "What's Up with Our Nation's Waters?" and then "What Do Scientists Measure?"

* Use COMPLETE SENTENCES to answer the following questions.

1. How do scientists measure the quality of our waters?

2. Give two reasons why scientists measure water’s temperature.

3. What is D.O.?

4. Why is D.O. important in measuring water quality?

5. What affects the D.O. of a stream?

6. What is the pH range of “healthy” water?

7. Why is the pH of a stream important?

8. Identify four things that can happen if there are too many nutrients in the water.

9. Identify three toxic substances that scientists test for.

10. What is turbidity?

11. Why do scientists test water’s turbidity?

12. Why are scientists concerned about the presence of fecal coli forms in a stream or lake?

13. How does a visual survey help a scientist determine water quality?

14. What is biological sampling?

15. How does biological sampling help a scientist to determine water quality? * Click on “Three Big Pollutants”

16. Write a paragraph describing each of the three big pollutants. Explain why each is a pollution problem. * Click on “Where Are These Pollutants Coming From?”

17. Where are the majority of our pollutants coming from?

18. How does pavement increase water pollution problems?

19. How do straightened streams and cement-lined canals increase water pollution problems?

PART TWO:

The first part of this assignment was a simple “read-and-write” exercise. The answers to the questions were all found in the reading material. The next part of this assignment requires you to think and analyze. Use the information you learned above to answer the following questions.

Be sure to use COMPLETE SENTENCES to answer the questions.

1. Water released from a dam comes from the bottom of the reservoir, which means that it is VERY cold. Why would colder-than-normal water be considered a water pollution problem?

2. To build a housing development, engineers changed the path of a local stream. As a result the stream flowed more slowly than usual, so the sun had more time to warm the stream waters. As a consequence the water temperature in the stream increased ten degrees Celsius. Why would warm water be considered a water pollution problem?

3. You test the D.O. in a local stream and find that it is much lower than normal. What conclusions can you draw from this data?

4. You test the pH of a local stream and find that it is 5.5. What does this data tell you?

5. You want your lawn to be extra green for an upcoming party so you double the recommended amount of fertilizer you apply to your lawn. What water pollution problem could occur as a result of your action? [Fertilizer is a plant nutrient. Think what would happen to local streams, rivers, and lakes if extra plant nutrients were added.]

6. Lead is found in your water supply. Why is this a problem?

7. A lake you love to visit is usually very clear. Road construction upstream has caused the lake to be very turbid. Give two reasons why this is a water pollution problem.

8. Cattle are grazed on the mountain side. Give two reasons why this might be a water pollution problem for the streams in the area.

9. You love to fish and have found that, by turning over rocks in the streams where you fish, you can find “rock rollers” (little worm-like insect larvae) that work well as bait. This year, when you go to fish, you find that, where there once were hundreds of “rock rollers”, now there are very few. Why does this indicate a water pollution problem?

10. How are water temperature and D.O. related? Good job! Send me the answers to ALL these questions, both parts one and two. If you have read and thought well and have used complete sentences to answer the questions, you will receive a good grade.

GOOD LUCK AND HAVE FUN!

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.06 Writing Poetry (English 11)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

Poetry Practice

  Write one poem in the form of a sonnet on a topic of your choice. A true sonnet uses iambic pentameter (see the link below).  If you find that too difficult, aim for each line to have about 6-8 words.

Illustration to Shakespeare&#39;s Sonnet 144: Isac Friedlander, c. 1931, Copyleft Free Art license via Wikimedia CommonsIllustration to Shakespeare's Sonnet 144: Isac Friedlander, c. 1931, Copyleft Free Art license via Wikimedia Commons

Examples: Sonnet 18 and Sonnet 130, from the previous assignment

Shakespearean Sonnet Rhyme Scheme: abab, cdcd, efef, gg

14 Lines, 3 quatrains (poetry “paragraphs”) 

Scoring Rubric

4 Points= 14 lines of mostly iambic pentameter (3 points for 14 lines of about 6-8 words each)

4 Points= correct rhyme scheme is used

3 Points= poem is creative and original

10 Points total

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.06. Examine how the market revolution affected retail distribution of goods in the cities and in rural areas. (U.S. History)

Goods Distribution These two links to information regarding the cattle business of this period are supplemental to what we have already covered on goods distribution. The boom of the railroads in America is what significantly affected how products were distributed throughout the nation. Review the links in this folder to study how the railroads changed the distribution of goods within the country. Cattle roundup, southeastern Colorado, circa 1898: Wikimedia Commons, Library of Congress, public domainCattle roundup, southeastern Colorado, circa 1898: Wikimedia Commons, Library of Congress, public domain Texas longhorns During the 1800's there was an increased demand for beef. The longhorn breed of cattle was one answer to this growing demand. Chisholm Trail The Chisholm Trail also began to answer the call for the increased demand for beef after the Civil War. Look at this site for a map and information about this cattle trail.

02.06.00 - LITERATURE CONNECTION - SETTING

On your reading guide, you answered some questions about setting.  Here I'd like you to write 3 paragraphs discussing setting in more detail.    For this submission, I'd like you to write 3 paragraphs following the instructions below. 

Paragraph 1 - explain the impact the physical setting (the place) has on the main character

Paragraph 2 - explain some of the events that were happening at this time in history and discuss how these events affected the main character's life.

Paragraph 3 - discuss what impact family relationships, family history, and family stories have on this character.

Remember to copy your response to your reading guide as well.

02.06.00 - WHERE IN THE WORLD . . . ?

Before we leave this unit, we have one last activity. You have looked at a lot of biographical, autobiographical, and historical detail in this unit. And it might be interesting to put some of this into a geographic context.

If you don’t have Google Earth as an icon already, download it using the link given.

02.06.01

teacher-scored 16 points possible 40 minutes

Assessment Rubric:

Content   All three paragraphs address topics given.   /4  
Support   Detail is thorough and gives sufficient support for topic questions.   /4  
Research   Shows evidence of research and analysis.   /4  
Clarity   The ideas are clear and focused.   /4  

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.06.01 Circuits (PreCalc)

One of the places where matrices are particularly useful for solving systems of equations is in circuits. In a circuit you have batteries and wires and resistors (a resistor is something that uses the electricity, such as a lightbulb or a toaster oven or a curling iron). When you wire your house, or your Christmas tree lights, you do not want to attach all the resistors in a single line, because then if one appliance wasn't on, or one light bulb burned out, then none of the appliances would work. You have seen this with Christmas lights. You may have even lived in an old house where you discovered that the plug in the dining room wouldn't work unless the light in the kitchen was on. Yup, the Christmas lights are wired cheaply, and your house was wired wrong.

So, you want each resistor to more or less have its own loop in a circuit. You don't want to have to connect a battery to every single loop, so you do want the loops connected to each other so that you only need one battery, or row of batteries, or charging cord. (Can you imagine needing to open a dozen different places on the back of your game system to place a separate battery for each circuit loop? Or needed a dozen different phone chargers, one for each loop? etc.)

A very simple problem involving circuits is the two loop system. You have one battery, two loops and three resistors, arranged as shown here.




The battery is the thing with the long and short lines, labeled V in the image. The resistors are the zig-zagged lines, labeled R1, R2, and R3 in the image. The current travels through all the wires in the directions shown in the image, labeled I1, I2, and I3.

Since you built the circuit: You know what the voltage of your battery is. You know the resistances of each resistor. You need to find the value of the currents. If a current is too high, then the wires will melt, which is bad. If the current is too low, the appliance (resistor) will not work, which is also bad. Therefore, it is important to find the currents, I1, I2, and I3.

Still with me? There are two rules that determine how the current in a circuit will flow.

The first is basically the law that energy is conserved. Since the resistors use energy when a current flows through them, and the current flows through a loop, the sum of the voltages through a loop is equal to 0. The sign of the voltage depends on the direction of the current. It you are going with the current, a battery adds voltage. If you are going with the current, a resistor loses voltage. The voltage drop through a resistor is equal to the current through the resistor times the resistance of the resistor.

The second is basically the law of conservation of charge. You cannot create or destroy electrons. Electrons carry the current. So, the sum of the current going into a junction must be equal to the sum of the current going out of the junction.

We have three unknown currents in the circuit, therefore, we need three equations to solve this problem. (Hopefully you remember that from your previous algebra classes?)

Sum the voltages through the inner loop on the left. Go around the loop clockwise. You gain voltage through the battery, then you lose voltage through resistor 2 and lose voltage though resistor 1. The voltage lost is equal to the current times the resistance, or I R. So, in this case, I1 R1 and I2 R2. This gives us the first equation:

V – I1 R1 – I2 R2 = 0 (eq. 1)



Now sum the voltages through the inner loop on the right. Go around the loop clockwise. You lose voltage through resistor 3 and gain voltage though resistor 2 (because you are going against the current). The voltage lost is equal to the current times the resistance, or I R. So, in this case, I2 R2 and I3 R3. This gives us the second equation:

I2 R2 – I3 R3 = 0 (eq. 2)



We need one more equation. Consider the function at the bottom. You have the currents I3 and I2 going into the junction, and I1 coming out of it. This gives us our last equation:

I2 + I3 = I1 (eq. 3)



Alright, we have three equations, and three unknowns. We can solve the problem. In your previous math career, you may have had the opportunity to solve systems of equations such as this one. You may have followed a process such as: Solve the third equation for I1. Substitute that equation into the first equation. Solve the first equation for I2. Substitute that into the second equation. Solve that equation for I3. Substitute that solution back into the first equation for I2. Finally, substitute both I2 and I3 into equation three and find I1.

That method works. It is hard to keep track of all the equations and you can imagine that as the system of equations gets more and more complicated, this problem becomes increasingly messy. In a real circuit that an engineer may need to solve, she can expect to have at least 10 different currents. Usually more.

Electrical engineers use matrices almost exclusively to solve circuit problems. By using matrices, the data is organized, the work is clear, the process is straight forward. In addition, there are algorithms that can be used to solve a system of equations organized as a matrix. So, once the engineer learns to solve small matrices by hand, he can program the computer to solve large matrices for him. Using matrices is a great tool for an electrical engineer.



02.06.01 Destinos-Video 3 "El comienzo - The Beginning" (Spanish I)

teacher-scored 15 points possible 30 minutes

           **Assignment 02.06.01: Destinos-Video 3 "El comienzo - The Beginning"**: You know the drill, find the button: and click on it!

           DO NOT try to do this assignment until you have watched and reviewed "Destinos" Episode #3 in Lesson 2F!! You will need to write a brief summary (at least 6 sentences) about this episode, including at least TWO sentences in Spanish!!

IMPORTANT: To begin this assignment, you MUST copy and paste the paragraph above into the beginning of the textbox, before writing your summary. You will NOT receive full credit without it!

02.06.01 Natural Selection: Rat Island (Biology)

teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

Summary

After many years of studying nature and observing animals and their traits, Charles Darwin came up with his theory of evolution. In 1838, the idea came to him that organisms with favorable variations would be better able to survive and to reproduce than organisms with unfavorable variations. He called this process Natural Selection, because nature "selects" the survivors. The results of natural selection would be evolution.  Darwin published a book in 1859, On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection. Darwin's book was supported by many examples. The six main points of his theory are as follows:

  • Overproduction - Most species produce more offspring than needed to maintain a population, but only a small fraction of those offspring live.
  • Competition - Offspring must compete against one another for food and shelter, so only a small fraction will survive long enough to reproduce.
  • Variation - Some characteristics of species are different (variation). These characteristics are vital in the survival of the individual. Some may affect the ability to get food, run faster, escape enemies or find a mate.
  • Adaptations - Because of variations, some individuals may be better adapted to reproduce and survive than others. An adaptation is an inherited trait that improves the organism's chances of survival and reproduction.
  • Natural Selection - The environment selects plants and animals to be the parents of the upcoming generations. They must have favorable traits in order to survive. Those offspring better adapted to survive in their environment will pass those traits on to their offspring.
  • Speciation - Over many generations, favorable traits accumulate in species and form new species. The formation of a new species is called speciation.

RAT ISLANDS: An Exploration in Speciation - Adapted from Access Excellence activity by Leslie Tong

***************************************************************
ASSIGNMENT 02.06.01 - REVISION DATE: 7/21/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

This Assignment has three parts. Knowing what you do now about evolution and Darwin's theory of natural selection, you job is to create a rat for each of the island descriptions below. Think about the build and anatomy of a normal rat, and then give your rat the necessary variations and adaptions to survive the environment of each island.

PART 1

Make up a story for each of the four rats. They can be as elaborate as you want to explain how the rats ended up on each of their islands (A, B, C or D) and how long they have been on the island in order to change so much.

PART 2

Draw each of the islands and each of the rats with its adaptations.

TIP:  To submit this part of the assignment I suggest that you draw the picture on regular paper. Scan or take a picture of it, and upload the .jpeg as your assignment.
 

PART 3

Explain how each adaption allows the rat to survive.

***************************************************************

Examples:

ISLAND A The island is fairly flat, with an occasional hill. The ground is soft dirt, and several species of shrubs grow toward the center of the island. There is no animal life on land; but the water is teaming with fish. The island is surrounded by a coral reef which keeps the predators out. The shore is sandy with no algal growth. Fresh water is available.

ISLAND B The island has a rocky shoreline. Numerous tide pools dot the island along the shore where the wave action is somewhat sheltered by rock outcrops. The tide pools host barnacles, chitons, abalone, sea urchins and crabs. Algae grows all around the island; however, it is quite sparse in the tide pools where the various animals feed. The current is quite strong along the rocky outcrops where the algae grows best. Fresh water is available.

ISLAND C The island is somewhat barren. A few species of cactus thrive on the bare rocks. A large cactus-eating tortoise inhabits the island. A species of very large bird nest on the island annually. They build their nests on the rocks and protect their eggs from the sun by standing over the nests with outspread wings. The nests are always found on the windy side of the island which is cooled somewhat by offshore breezes.

ISLAND D The island is an extinct volcano. Vegetation on the island changes with the altitude moving up the volcano. Grasses grow at the base. Farther up the slope, the grasses give way to low shrubs. Halfway up, the island becomes quite lush; tropical plants and trees dominate the landscape. At this altitude, the island experiences frequent rain showers. There are two species of birds that inhabit the island. One is a raptor which preys upon the smaller birds. The other fishes the waters approximately one mile offshore. Both nest in trees.

 

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.06.01 Paint a color wheel(IntDes1)

02.06.01 Pet Portrait (Basic Photography)

Create a several pet portraits using art elements and principles.

Pet portrait.Pet portrait. Take at several pictures of your (or someone else's, if you don't have one) pet: cat, dog, horse, snake, domestic alligator, or Liger. Capture the personality of the animal, using different angles and backgrounds. Print out the images you will submit. Review of steps to take: 1-Open the image in Photoshop Elements 2- Look at the top menu options for "Enhance", click on "Enhance" go to the pull down menu for "Quick Fix". 3- Make adjustments to brightness (if needed) 4- Make adjustments to color correction (if needed) 5- Make adjustments to focus (if needed) 6- Make adjustments to rotation (if needed) 7- Click on the menu options "Image" then click to the pulldown "Resize" option and make the image at least 3x5 inches at 300 dpi. Submit the 1 picture of that animal in the next module assignment. 

teacher-scored 15 points possible 60 minutes

Example of Pet Portrait.: The compostion is using the &quot;Rule of Thirds&quot;. The background is plain, no cluttered distractions. The cat is eye level. The image is in focus, and properly exposed. The student earned an &quot;A&quot; on this assignment.Example of Pet Portrait.: The compostion is using the "Rule of Thirds". The background is plain, no cluttered distractions. The cat is eye level. The image is in focus, and properly exposed. The student earned an "A" on this assignment.  1.2.5 Pet Portrait(DigitalPhoto1)1.2.5 Pet Portrait(DigitalPhoto1)

02.06.01 Unit 2 Review (FrenchII)

teacher-scored 20 points possible 50 minutes

The link in the URL's will take you to this assignment.

02.06.01 Unit 2 Review links (FrenchII)

02.06.02

teacher-scored 8 points possible 20 minutes

For this assignment I’d like you to find and set placemarks (the yellow push-pin at the top left in the toolbar) in at least three sites. You can choose any sites that are significant to what you have done in this unit.

Consider:

• Setting for the historical novel you read.
• Other places mentioned in, or significant to, the novel.
• Places where your ancestors lived.
• Place where your interview subject (bio-phase essay) lived/worked.
• Places you mentioned in the “when you were born” presentation.
• Setting for the historical fiction story you wrote.

Once you have set your placemarks in Google Earth, click on the email icon at the top of the page, select "current view," and email it to me.

Then, in this submission box, give me a list of the places you placemarked and the significance of them.

Assessment Rubric:

Content All five sites identified. /4
Support Explanation of significance of each placemark included /4

02.06.02 Natural Selection: Rat Island (Biology)

computer-scored 5 points possible 20 minutes

You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


02.06.02 Writing a System of Equations as a Matrix Equation (PreCalc)

The first step is to reorganize the system of equations so that we can enter them in to a matrix. To do this, start by reordering each equation in standard form. If you recall, a multivariable equation in standard form looks like

a x + b y + c z = d (eq. 4)



For our system of equations, the variables are I1, I2, and I3. Therefore, we want to reorder each equation so that the term including I1 is first, the term including I2 is the second, the term including I3 is third, and everything else is on the other side.

Recall the three equations are:

V – I1 R1 – I2 R2 = 0 (eq. 1)

I2 R2 – I3 R3 = 0 (eq. 2)

I2 + I3 = I1 (eq. 3)



For the first equation, add I1 R1 and I2 R2 to both sides, then reorder the equation so that V is on the right,

I1 R1 + I2 R2 = V (eq. 5)



For the second equation, the terms are already in order. Therefore, we do not need to do anything else to it at this time,

I2 R2 – I3 R3 = 0 (eq. 2)



Finally, the third equation. If we subtract I1 and I2 from both sides, then reverse the order, we will have the equation we want,

I1 – I2 – I3 = 0 (eq. 6)



Now that the equations are organized, let's put them together, lining up the terms that are the same, as follows:

I1 R1 + I2 R2 = V (eq. 5)

I2 R2 – I3 R3 = 0 (eq. 2)

I1 – I2 – I3 = 0 (eq. 6)



Do you see where the matrix is going to come from? The matrix equation will have three matrices, one with the coefficients, one with the variables, and one with the answers. To start, place the coefficients of each term into a 3×3 matrix. Remember, the coefficient of the I3 term in the first equation is 0. Also, make sure that you include any negative signs. Call this matrix A.

(eq. 7)



The variables go into a 3×1 column matrix, and the answers go into another 3×1 column matrix. Call these X and B, respectively. These are the standard names for the terms in a matrix equation such as this one.

(eq. 8)


(eq. 9)



We can now rewrite equations 5, 2 and 6 as the single matrix equation below,

(eq. 10)



If you multiply matrices A and X you will get the matrix equation

(eq. 10a)



I assume you can see that this is the same as equations 5, 2, and 6, but written as a matrix?



02.06.03 Solving the Matrix Equation – Method 1: Row Reduction (PreCalc)

Row reduction is a technique used to solve matrix equations. There is an algorithm for this, but it is really only used to program computers to solve matrix equations using row reduction. Most people solve systems of equations intelligently, meaning, you make decisions based on how “nice” the results will be. Therefore, I am not going to teach you the algorithm. I will teach you the process. If you really want to learn the algorithm, you can read more in the links associated with this lesson.

The goal of row reduction is to convert the matrix you have to an identity matrix. You do this by adding rows together, multiplying rows by scalars, and by swapping rows.

To begin, you create an “augmented matrix.” This means that you stick the answer matrix next to the coefficient matrix. The point of doing this is that it keeps you organized. We did something similar when finding the determinant of a 3×3 matrix. The augmented matrix for our circuit problem is shown below,

(mat. 1)



At this point, as I said before, we will work intelligently. Therefore, our choices will depend on the numbers we have. Therefore, we need numbers. A standard battery size is 12 volt. Therefore, let V = 12. Resistors have a full range of magnitudes. To keep it simple, let's let R1 = 5 ohms, R2 = 4 ohms, and R3 = 3 ohms. Make these substitutions in our augmented matrix,

(mat. 2)


Recall, the 3×3 identity matrix looks like

(eq. 11)



Therefore, the first thing we want to do is get a 1 in the top left corner of matrix 2. There is a 5 there now. We could divide that row by 5 (multiply by ). There is also a 1 in the left-most position of row three, we could swap rows one and three. I am going to do the later, as I would prefer to be further along in the process before I have to start working with fractions.


Step 1: Swap rows one and three.

(mat. 3)



Next, we want 0's in the left-most positions of rows 2 and three. There is already a 0 in the left-most position of row two. If I multiply row one by -5, and add that row to row three, there will be a 0 in the left-most position of row three. Therefore:


Step 2: Multiply row 1 by -5 and add to row three. Replace row three with that result.

This gives us

(eq. 12)



Place that in row three,

(mat. 4)



There are a couple directions we could go next: We could work on getting a 1 in the middle position of the second row. We could work on getting a 0 in the middle position of the first row. We could work on getting a 0 in the middle position of the third row. I see that there is a -1 currently in the middle position of the first row. I know that a 4 in the denominator makes a nicer fraction than a 9 in the denominator. I realize that if I add 1 and -1 I will get 0. Therefore, I decide to work on the second row first.

To get a 1 in the middle position of the second row, I need to multiply that row by . I will write my results as decimals.


Step 3: Multiply row two by .

(mat. 5)



Now, if I add rows one and two I will get a 0 in the middle position of row one.


Step 4: Add row two to row one. Replace row one with that result.

(mat. 6)



Here again, I have more than one choice for what to do next. I definitely need to work on the middle position of the bottom row; it needs to be 0. However, I could either multiply row two by -9 and add that to row three, or I could multiply row three by and add that to row two. Since I already mentioned I don't care for fractions with 9 in the denominator, I will choose the first option.


Step 5: Multiply row two by -9. Add that to row three. Replace row three with the result.

This gives us

(eq. 13)



Place that result in row three.

(mat. 7)



The next step is to divide row three by 11.75 (multiply by ). There really is no other choice at this point.


Step 6: Multiply row three by .

(mat. 8)





Next, we will work back up the matrix, such that we have 0's in the right position of rows one and two. Can you see what the steps need to be? To get a 0 in the right position of row one we need to add row one to 1.75 times row three. Place that result in row one. To get a 0 in the right position of row two, we need to add row two to 0.75 times row three. Place that result in row two.


Step 7: Multiply row three by 1.75 and add to row one. Place the result in row one.

(mat. 9)





Step 8: Multiply row three by 0.75 and add to row two. Place the result in row two.

(mat. 10)



And that is it! We have the identity matrix on the left, we have the answers on the right. All we need to do is read off the answers. Recall, the order is I1, I2, and I3. Therefore the answer 84/47 corresponds to I1, 36/47 goes with I2, and 48/47 corresponds to I3.

(eq. 14)


(eq. 15)


(eq. 16)



Tuh duh!

That wasn't that bad was it?



02.06.04 Row Reduction: Another Example (PreCalc)

We should work through this again. Consider the following system of equations:

5 x – 3 y + 9 z = 40 (eq. 17)

2 x + 6 z = 22 (eq. 18)

5 x – 6 y + 5 z = 37 (eq. 19)



Solve this system of equations using matrix row-reduction.

Before, the first thing we did was write these as matrix equations, then we placed them into an augmented matrix. We could probably skip the matrix equation and go straight to the augmented matrix. Go ahead and take a second to do this. You should get something like the following:

(mat. 11)



Again, I am going to take a second and look at what I have before doing anything.

There is a 2 in the left position of the second row, and both 6 and 22 can be divided by 2. Plus there is a zero in the middle position. I probably want that row to be my first row.

I could subtract the first row from the third row to get a zero in the first position of either of those rows. However, if I subtract the third row from the first row the right-hand side of my augmented matrix will be positive. I would like that.

Alright, I can't really plan any further than that, so let's start.


Step 1: Multiply row two by and swap rows one and two.

(mat. 12)



Step 2: Multiply row three by -1, and add that to row two. Replace row two with that result.

If I do this I get

(eq. 20)



Place that result in row two.

(mat. 13)



Okay, we want to get a 0 in the left position of row three. One option is to multiply row one by -5 and add that to row three. A similar option is to multiply row one by 5, row three by -1, and add those together. In the short run this will keep the value on the right hand side of the equation positive, but I don't think it will not help in the long run. Therefore, I think we will go with the first choice.


Step 3: Multiply row one by -5, and add that to row three. Replace row three with that result.

When I do this I get

(eq. 21)



Place that result in row three.

(mat. 14)



Now, if we multiply row three by and add that result to row two, we will get a 0 in the middle position of the bottom row. That seems like a reasonable next step.


Step 4: Multiply row three by , and add that to row two. Replace row three with that result.

When I do this I get

(eq. 22)



Place that result in row three.

<

(mat. 15)



At this point, we could multiply the second row byor we could multiply the third row by -1. I think the second choice will be better.


Step 5: Multiply row three by -1.

(mat. 16)



Now we can work back up the matrix. If we multiply row three by -4 and add that to row two we will get a 0 in the right position on the second row.


Step 6: Multiply row three by -4, and add that to row two. Replace row two with that result.

(mat. 17)



Now would be a good time to multiply row two by .


Step 7: Multiply row two by .

(mat. 18)



Finally, if we multiply row three by -3 and add that to row one we will be done.


Step 8: Multiply row three by -3, and add that to row one. Replace row one with that result.

(mat. 19)



The matrix is now in the format we need. We can read off the answers from here.

x = -7 (eq. 23)

y = -7 (eq. 24)

z = 6 (eq. 25)



Ready to try this on your own?



02.06.05 Solving the Matrix Equation – Method 2: Inverses (PreCalc)

The second method is that of solving a matrix equation using inverses. Again, recall how we were able to write the system of equations

I1 R1 + I2 R2 = V (eq. 5)

I2 R2 – I3 R3 = 0 (eq. 2)

I1 – I2 – I3 = 0 (eq. 6)



as the single matrix equation

(eq. 10)



Also, recall that we named these matrices

(eq. 7)

(eq. 8)



and

(eq. 9)



Hopefully, you still remember the “golden rule of algebra?” Do unto the right side of the equation what you do unto the left side of the equation. This rule applies to matrix equations also. Therefore, if I knew the inverse matrix to matrix A, A-1, we could perform the following matrix operations:

We already know that

A X = B (eq. 10b)



Now multiply both sides of this equation by A-1, on the left,

A-1 A X = A-1 B (eq. 26)



We already know that A-1 A is equal to the identity. This is how we defined A-1 in the first place. Therefore equation 26 simplifies to,

I X = A-1 B (eq. 26a)



We also know that the identity times its corresponding matrix is equal to the original matrix. In particular, I X = X. Therefore,

X = A-1 B (eq. 26b)



From equation 26b, we can read off the solutions to the system of equations. Cool?

Now, we have the following problem, we do not know how to find A-1. True, but we do know how to find the inverse matrix for a 2×2 matrix. Therefore, we could solve a two-variable system of equations with this technique.

Now, you might be thinking: Why? It is not that hard to solve a two-variable system of equations. Why would I bother using this technique? The answer is, to learn the technique. Later we will learn how to find the inverse of a 3×3 matrix, or a 4×4 matrix, or whatever, and you will be able to apply this technique. You should learn the technique with a system of equations where you can find the inverse, so you can apply it later to more complicated problems.

Alright, so let's use this technique to actually solve a 2×2 system of equations.

Given the following system of equations

-7 x – 1 y = -50 (eq. 27)

3 x + 10 y = -36 (eq. 28)



Solve this system of equations using inverse matrices.

The first step is to write this as a matrix equation. We will name the matrices A, X and B.

(eq. 29)



where

(eq. 30)

(eq. 31)



and

(eq. 32)



The next step is to find A-1. You have worked through this problem enough that you should be able to find A-1 on your own. Take a second and do that.

Did you find

(eq. 33)



Now, multiply equation 29 on the left by A-1,

(eq. 34)



Multiply out the first two factors on the right, we get

(eq. 34a)



Multiply out the remaining factors on the right gives us,

(eq. 34b)



Now, the hard part, we need to multiply the factors on the left-hand side. I will go through some of the steps for this,

(eq. 34c)

(eq. 34d)

(eq. 34e)



From here we can read off the solutions,

x = 8 (eq. 35)

y = -6 (eq. 36)



Easy enough?



02.06.06 Solving the Matrix Equation – Method 3: Cramer's Rule (PreCalc)

The final method is that of solving a system of equations with Cramer's Rule. Cramer's rule is named for Gabriel Cramer, who apparently was the first person to describe the process in general, although specific examples had been known prior to this.

Cramer's rule is an algorithm that can be used to solve an arbitrarily large system of equations by creating special matrices and taking the determinant of those matrices. I will work through the algorithm first.

Given the following system of equations,

x + 8 y + z = 29 (eq. 37)

5 x – 7 y – 3 z = -66 (eq. 38)

-8 x – 5 y – 9 z = 66 (eq. 39)



Solve these equations using Cramer's Rule.

The first step is to write these equations as one matrix equation,

A X = B (eq. 40)



where

(eq. 41)


(eq. 42)



and

(eq. 43)



Our first step is to find the determinant of matrix A. Again, we have done this many times, so I will not go through the steps, but make sure you can find the answer below.

|A| = 519 (eq. 44)



Now, we are going to create three additional matrices, Ax, Ay, and Az. Ax is found by replacing the first column of matrix A with matrix B. Ay is found by replacing the second column of matrix A with matrix B. Can you guess how we find Az? Yup, replace the third column of matrix A with matrix B. When we do this we get the following three matrices,

(eq. 45)


(eq. 46)


(eq. 47)



The next step is to find the determinant of matrices Ax, Ay, and Az. Again, you should be able to find a determinant yourself, so make sure you can find the following results,

|Ax| = -4152 (eq.48 )


|Ay| = 2595 (eq. 49)


|Az| = 1557 (eq. 50)



Alright, final step. The variables are found from the following equations:

(eq. 51)


(eq. 52)


(eq. 53)



Therefore, for our problem

(eq. 54)

x = -8 (eq. 54a)


(eq. 55)

y = 5 (eq. 55a)


(eq. 56)

z = 3 (eq. 56a)


Tuhduh! not bad huh?

Alright, while this is not really a proof, I do want to discuss a geometric explanation. Recall I mentioned that the determinant is like the magnitude of a matrix. For a 2×2 matrix, the determinant does describe the area of a parallelogram. By replacing the “x-column” with the answers, the determinant of the new matrix has the same area as the previous parallelogram, but scaled by x. By replacing the “y-column” with the answers, the determinant of the new matrix has the same area as the previous parallelogram, but scaled by y. This can be scaled up from the area of a parallelogram to the volume of a parallelepiped for a 3×3 matrix, or the 4-D equivalent of volume for the 4-D equivalent of a parallelepiped, etc.

Hopefully this is everything you need to know about solving systems of equations. Ready to solve some problems on your own?



02.06.07 Matrices and Systems of Equations - Links (PreCalc)

Use these links for supplemental instruction and additional practice.



02.06.08 Matrices - Assignment 10 (PreCalc)

computer-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

Complete

Unit 02 -- Matrices -- Assignment 10
Systems of Equations
Writing Equations in Matrix Form

Work on this quiz/assignment at the link below this lesson. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do the assignment and provides immediate feedback.

Complete this assignment after reading Lesson 6.



02.06.09 Matrices -- Assignment 11 (PreCalc)

teacher-scored 70 points possible 90 minutes

Complete

Unit 02 -- Matrices -- Assignment 11
Solving Systems of Equations Using Matrices

Print out the attached assignment and complete the assignment in the space provided. You may use additional paper if needed. Once you have completed the assignment, scan it into the computer and convert it to an image file such as .pdf or .jpg. You may need to practice scanning pencil drawings so that you produce a clear, easily readable image. Finally, upload the image using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

This assignment is worth 70 points.

Complete this assignment after reading Lesson 6.



02.41 Study Skills, some optional resouces for further investigation

03.05.00 Chapter 3 Test (C++)

both teacher- and computer-scored 150 points possible 60 minutes

Return to the front page of this class to take the chapter 3 test under Topic 3.

03.05.02 Unit Three Review (Sociology)

teacher-scored 25 points possible 30 minutes

Unit Three Review (Sociology)

This unit's test is one on which you can do really well if you are familiar with the terminology. Complete the review to make sure you are.

Complete the terms that go with the following definitions

1. The most commonly given answer ______________________

2. The variable which causes change _________________

3. The mathematical average of a series of numbers __________________

4. Repeating a study to prove results _______________________

5. A representation of the total population to be studied ________________

6. The predicted results of research ____________________

7. The number of subjects responding ___________

8. Two variables which occur together are said to have _____________________

9. Data which can be measured numerically is __Q__________________

10. The score in the middle of an array is the __________________

11. Questioning method good for collecting qualitative data ________________

12. Method of observation where you are an outsider __________________

13. The study of a group’s written materials ___________________

14. The group which experiences the independent variable ______________

15. The group which experiences no change __________________

16. The total group being studied is the __________________

17. Method of observation where you are a part of the group ____________________

18. A representation of the total group being studied ___________________

19. The fact that people's behavior tends to change when they know that they are being observed is the___________________ Effect.

20. The preferred method for gathering data in an experiment _____________________

03.05.06 The Sequences and Series Project (PreCalc)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 120 minutes

Complete

Sequences and Series Project

_________________________________

To submit this assignment, click [Browse] and [Upload this file] to submit files.

Assignment:

Select a real-life situation which can be represented by a sequence. Find the sequence, the corresponding series, and determine if the infinite series exists.

  1. Select a real-life situation which can be represented by a sequence. This can be an arithmetic, geometric, or other sequence.

  2. Describe the situation.

  3. Determine the type of sequence. If it has a name (arithmetic, geometric, Fibonacci, triangle, etc.) label it with the correct name. Otherwise label it "other."

  4. List the first 5 terms of the sequence.

  5. Determine the formula for the nth term, n.

  6. Find an arbitrarily large term (such as the 30th term or the 51st term).

  7. Find the corresponding series.

  8. Find the partial sum for the first 5 terms of the series.

  9. Write this partial sum in sigma notation.

  10. Write the equation for the nth partial sum, Sn. (If your series is not an arithmetic nor a geometric series you will have to do more research to determine this equation.)

  11. Find an arbitrarily large sum (such as the 30th sum or the 51st sum).

  12. Write the equation for the infinite series in sigma notation. Specify if this exists.

  13. If the infinite series exists, find the equation for that sum, then find the sum. (If your series is not an arithmetic nor a geometric series you will have to do more research to determine if the series converges and the sum of the series.)

  14. If the infinite series does not exist, explain why. (If your series is not an arithmetic nor a geometric series you will have to do more research to determine if the series diverges.)




03.06

We have reviewed some of the literary elements commonly found in poetry--but, of course, there are more.  For this assignment, I'd like you to review more of those elements as well as practice your skill at analyzing those elements in poetry.

Now try it yourself.  Read  "Nothing Gold Can Stay," by Robert Frost and respond to the questions below.

Nothing Gold Can Stay
by Robert Frost

Nature's first green is gold,
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf's a flower;
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf.
So Eden sank to grief,
So dawn goes down to day.
Nothing gold can stay.

***************************************

A)   find and explain:

  1. a) theme
  2. a) a symbol or metaphor
  3. c) irony or paradox
  4. d) allusion

B.  Describe the tone

C  What are the images in the poem that are strongest for you?  What words were used by the poet to create those images?

D)  Look at the list of other literary elements at one of the links below.  Explain two others you see in this poem.

***************************************

03.06 Listening Activities for Occupations

What do all these people and their families do for a living?

03.06 Wormology (Earth Systems)

Wormology

03.06 earthworm03.06 earthworm
Introduction:

The atmosphere surrounds us all and, consequently, affects all of us. Atmospheric conditions affect you, your family, your friends, and the maniac down the street. They also affect all the plants and animals in the area. As part of this assignment, you will design and conduct an experiment that investigates the effects of a specific atmospheric condition on worms.

For a more detailed explanation of how to design your own experiment, click on the EXPERIMENT GUIDELINES attachment.

03.06 You are what you eat (Biology)

TO DO

Read: Chapter 6 You are what you eat  in the EHS Biology Quarter 3 - INSIDE A CELL text book.

Explore:  The URLs found under the heading 03.06  You are what you eat (Biology).  

Complete: Once you have read the chapter and explored the URLs complete the following activities:

  • 03.06.01 You are what you eat - Assignment
  • 03.06.02 You are what you eat - Quiz 
  • 03.06.03 You are what you eat - Lesson Check

 

 

03.06 Assess the growth and development of labor unions and their key leaders. (US History)

Objectives:

Trace the development of national labor unions.
Determine the impact of collective bargaining.
Analyze the development of socialism in the United States.

Lesson Notes

As you go through this section, think about why people join unions. Think about the options of workers during this period, and the difficulties they faced in getting fair and safe working conditions. In mines, factories and slaughter houses, it was common for workers (including young children) to work six days a week and ten or more hours a day under dangerous conditions. Did unions reach their goals, and is there still a need for unions today?

Child labor:  little boys operating machines at a textile factory, 1912: Wikimedia Commons, Lawrence textile strike, public domainChild labor: little boys operating machines at a textile factory, 1912: Wikimedia Commons, Lawrence textile strike, public domain

Working Conditions
In the full swing of the industrial revolution the main goal was money. The owners of the factories went to extreme lengths to get money. The work hours were long, the wages were low, and the factories were unsafe. There was a slight difference in the way people were treated in the North v. the South, for instance wages were higher in the North. Across the board working conditions were bad; in many steel mills they had seven day work, many workers in other factories worked 12 hour days and 6 days a week, and they didn't get vacations, sick pay, workers compensation, or any kind of pay for injuries. In many cases if you were hurt there were lines of people waiting for a job and as soon as you left they would take the next person in line.

There were many justifications for the way workers were treated, one such idea was Social Darwinism. Social Darwinism was adapted from Charles Darwin's theory of evolution. It was also justification for 'laissez faire' economic policies. What all of this basically means is that big business wanted to be left alone, they didn't want any government regulation. The funny thing is that this theory appealed to many because of the idea that you get what you work for, and that riches were a sign of God's favor and that if you were poor you must be lazy.

Forming Labor Unions

    The first labor unions were organized in the late 1700s they were small and didn't rally much support. However in 1866, right after the Civil War, the first big labor union, the National Labor Union, was formed. In response to their refusal to allow African Americans spurred the creation of Colored National Labor Union. The numbers grew and within a couple of years they successfully lobbied congress to legalize the eight hour work day. Once that big step was out of the way they began to link with other unions to grow their membership.
  • The Noble Order of the Knights of Labor:
    • Formed in 1869, by Uriah Stephens. The Knights of Labor was open to everyone, literally everyone. They also only used strikes and the refusal to work as a last resort, they advocated arbitration.
  • The American Federation of Labor:
    • Led by Samuel Grompers, who took the Cigar Makers' Union to join with other craft unions, and form one large union. The AFL focused on bargaining and negotiation but they did use strikes as the main tactic, they were able to make gains in wages and shorter work weeks.
  • American Railway Union:
    • The brain child of Eugene V. Debs. Debs felt unions should include both skilled and unskilled laborers. Union members included both groups as well as engineers and firemen. After a successful strike in 1894 the union's membership reached 150,000 (this was much larger than the other railroad unions.) But like the AFL they fizzled after a failed strike.
  • Industrial Workers of the World (IWW):
    • Woblies as they were a radical socialist union. The group, led by William "Big Bill" Haywood, included miners, lumbers, and cannery and dock workers, they also welcomed African Americans. This union was the first group to turn to socialism as an answer to their working problems. Socialism is an economic and political idea based on the idea that there should be an equal distribution of property and wealth. Most people are more familiar with the extreme form of it, communism. The author of communism in theory is Karl Marx and he predicted that communism would overthrow the capitalist system. It wasn't a very successful union and it only had one successful strike.
  • Migrant Workers:
    • Japanese and Mexican workers organized in California and in Wyoming, they were looking for the same wages and treatment as other unions.

    Violence

  • The Great Strike of 1877
    • In July of 1877 workers for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad went on strike to protest a second payroll cut in two months. The strike spread to other railroad lines causing freight and passenger traffic to stop for over a week. Federal troops ended the strike after President Hayes stepped in.
  • The Haymarket Affair
    • With the success of the Great Strike of 1877, more labor unions pushed for change. After a striker at the McCormick Harvester plant had been killed and others were wounded a group gathered Haymarket Square in Chicago to protest the brutality that led to the death and injuries of the strikers. Because of rain the protesters had begun to leave when police showed, this is when the violence began. An unknown protestor threw a bomb into the line of police officers; officers responded by shooting into the crowd, seven police officers and several workers were killed in the violence. As a result of the riot that ensued eight people involved in the protest, including the three speakers and five other radicals were charged with inciting a riot, all were convicted. Instead of getting the change they were hoping for the affair caused people to be wary of unions and the public began to turn on the labor movement.
  • The Homestead Strike
    • Although public support for strikes was low the unions themselves weren't done. Conditions at the Carnegie Steel Company's Homestead plan were dismal and in June 1892 after the an announced plan to cut wages, the steelworkers went on strike. In an unwise decision Henry Frick hired guards from the Pinkerton Detective Agency to protect the plant so that he could hire scabs. Three detectives and nine workers died, the steelworkers forced the Pinkertons out and closed the plant until the National Gurad and broke it up on July 12. The strike actually continued until November and the workers gave in to the company.
  • The Pullman Strike
    • During the panic of 1893 the Pullman company laid off almost 52% of its staff and cut wages by 25 to 50 percent for the workers who were kept on. They also didn't lower housing costs and after they paid rent their take home was less than $6 per week. So they called the strike in the spring of 1894. They tried for arbitration but Pullman wouldn't negotiate. When strikebreakers were hired the strike became violent and President Grover Cleveland was forced to send in troops. Pullman ended up firing most of the striker, many of whom were blacklisted in the railroad industry.
  • Women's Union Movements
    • Most unions didn't allow women to join, that did not stop them from working to improve working conditions and push for the end of child labor. A prominent figure in the women's labor movement was Mary Harris Jones. She supported big strikes and organized for the United Mine Workers of America. One of her greatest moves was to lead 80 million children with horrible injuries resulting from work injuries, to the home of President Roosevelt. A reporter who followed her career said, "She fights their battles with a Mother's Love." She endured many things including death threats and jail time, her efforts earned her the name Mother Jones. She fought for them until her death, she was 100 years old.
      Pauline Newman another woman organizer; organized the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, at the age of 16.
    • Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire
        In March of 1911 a fire spread through the machines at the garment factory. The machines were covered in oil and the factory contained piles of cloth. The fire covered the 8-10th floors. As they attempted to flee from the fire workers found locked doors and no way to escape. One unlocked door was blocked by fire and the only fire escape collapsed. 146 women died. Public outrage worsened after the owners were acquitted of manslaughter. New York was forced to take a look into working conditions.

        Despite the attempts of business owners to stop all unions, union member ship continued to grow. The growth was slow at first, but by the end of WWI membership in the AFL had grown to over 2 million.

    03.06 Assess the growth and development of labor unions and their key leaders. Quiz 2 (US History)

    teacher-scored 15 points possible 40 minutes

    Coal miner, 1946: Wikimedia Commons, NARA, public domainCoal miner, 1946: Wikimedia Commons, NARA, public domain
    After you have reviewed the course materials covering unions and socialism and reviewed the terms in the vocabulary folder, you are ready to take the quiz for this section.

    You must complete the quiz once you have started. You must score 80 percent on the test, and you will have 40 minutes to complete it. If you score below 80 percent, you will need to wait 24 hours before you can take the test again.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


    03.06 Checking Account Intro (Financial Literacy)

    Bank building: image from Wikimedia Commons, Nyttend, public domainBank building: image from Wikimedia Commons, Nyttend, public domain

    BACKGROUND

    Checks and DEBIT cards are convenient for buying gas, groceries, and other items that cost more than the amount of cash you want to carry. Review the following information and websites before answering the assignment 3.6 questions:


    • Always make sure you have enough money in the bank to “cover” any checks and DEBIT card withdrawals.
    • Make sure you and the bank agree on how much money you have left. This is called balancing your checkbook, or reconciling your accounts, or balancing your bank statement.
    • Protect your accounts against improper use by others (fraud, identity theft, etc.) by protecting your passwords, statements, and use of your accounts.

    Later, we will consider the use of credit cards and loans.

    Checks and DEBIT cards are similar. They allow you to spend money that you already have in the bank or credit union without having to carry cash. They usually draw money from the same financial account at your bank or credit union.

    Note: Much of this assignment focuses on Banks and Credit Unions. Other institutions are also available such as “savings and loans” agencies, investment agencies, investment brokers, etc. In all your financial activities, you should consider interest rates, fees, fund safety, convenience, service and support, and Internet or web-based services, etc. Credit Unions are usually member-owned institutions that are created and operated by its members. Profits are usually shared amongst the owners. As a result, they often have better rates and lower fees because they are non-profit institutions owned by the shareholders.

    Visit URL #1 to read the initial “banking” page and the “Choosing a Bank” link at the bottom of the page. (Be sure to read “How To Shop For A Bank.” Then exit the web page and proceed to the next URL.

    Visit URL #2 to read the article on banking. Be sure to read all the links located on the first page of the article under "Types of checking accounts," and then continue reading the article following the arrows at the bottom of each page until you reach the "stop" sign. Then exit the web page and proceed to the next URL.

    Visit URL #3 to examine several types of checking accounts. Note: This is a real bank but it is only used as an example. In real life, you would want to compare checking accounts options at several banks of your choice. (Note: you can use this site to answer Question #4 or you may use any other bank site of your choice to answer the question)

    Visit URL #4 to learn differences between "debit" and "credit" cards (read pages 1 and 2).

    03.06 Checking Account Intro (Financial Literacy)

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

    ****************************************

    ASSIGNMENT 03.06 (13E) (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

    1) Q: After studying the difference between a Debit card and Credit card, answer the following:
    a) Why does a DEBIT card prevent you from going in debt? > ANSWER:
    b) If you pay off ALL charges in full before payment is due on a CREDIT card each month, it is like a free loan. How much would you pay in interest (answer not on website)? > ANSWER:
    2) Q: Why should you always know the balance of available funds on your DEBIT card? > ANSWER:
    3) Q: After reading the web page, why should you NOT use a “debit card” to purchase items online? > ANSWER:
    4) Pick one of the checking accounts in URL #3 OR pick a different bank or credit union YOU choose to answer the following questions:
    a) Q: Which did you pick? > ANSWER:
    b) Q: What did you LIKE about this account. > ANSWER:
    c) Q: What did NOT like about this account? > ANSWER:
    5) Q: (3.6): Write your first and last name and today's date.> ANSWER:

    ****************************************

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


    03.06 Checking Account Intro links (Financial Literacy)

    03.06 Computer Basics Test--CBT (Computer Technology)

    computer-scored 35 points possible 20 minutes

    Computer Basics Post-test (CBT)

    After completing all the activities for this unit, go to the test (CBT) to take this post-test. This test will cover the terminology and concepts from the Computer Basics Unit. You can use your notes, assignments and handouts. There is a one hour time limit.

    03.06 Critical Movie Review (English 11)

    teacher-scored 13 points possible 40 minutes

    Critical Viewing Movie Review

    Choose a movie (or live play or musical) that fits with the quarter theme (love and relationships) and write a one page response to that viewing.  

    Suggested movies for this quarter: Ever After, Tangled, Twilight, Love Story, Westside Story, The Great Gatsby, Jane Eyre, Pride and Prejudice, Romeo and Juliet, Much Ado About Nothing

    *Note: You are not restricted to any of these titles. Any movie that fits within the theme of the quarter will work.

    If you are not sure if a movie fits with the theme, just send me a message. Honestly, I don't watch many movies, so I am not really sure what is out there--use your best judgement.

    You will then present your response in one of two ways: use Google Voice (see my message phone number in the Teacher Contact Information) to record your response, or make a short video of your response. It is best to have your response written out and practice it before making the phone call or final video.

    Respond to the following questions in your review: 

    1895 illustration for Pride and Prejudice: C. E. Brock, public domain via Wikimedia Commons1895 illustration for Pride and Prejudice: C. E. Brock, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

    1. How does this movie tie into the quarter theme of Love and Relationships?

    2. What is the message or theme of the movie?

    3. What obstacles did the protagonist have to overcome?

    4. What rating (out of five stars) would you give this movie? Why? 

     If you use Google Voice, you can leave up to a three-minute message. Use the questions to guide your response and write out your review in detail before completing the assignment. In the assignment submission box, simply make a note of the day and time you recorded your message.

    If you make a video, you can upload it there as well. The video does not have to be anything super elaborate; it can be just you talking to the camera and answering the questions about the movie.

    Scoring Rubric

    8 Points - Student responds to each question clearly and adequately.

    5 Points - Student is well-spoken during the presentation; it is clear that he or she has practiced.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


    03.06 Food Freezing (FoodSci)

    Unit 3.6: Food Freezing

    Freezing food has been around since the 1920s when Clarence Birds eye produced the first frozen food, a fish. Since then this industry has grown and expanded and the introduction of convenience foods has changed society.

    Freezing foods preserves them by slowing the action of enzymes which cause foods to spoil. The enzymes are slowed down rather than destroyed. Some foods, especially vegetables have to be blanched first before freezing to denature the enzymes, which helps the food retain a fresher flavor. The freezing processes slow the microbes, but once thawing occurs, the microbes will become active again if they are present. Careful handling is very important. It is recommended that frozen foods such as meats be thawed in the refrigerator to minimize microbe activity.

    (Resource: Cooking with Understanding, Nichols, H.L. Jr., North Castle Books, 1971.)

    Foods that are high in water do not freeze well without destroying the basic structure of the food. The water changes to ice which is a physical change and this impacts the food structure. Quick freezing usually does less damage to the flavor and texture of properly prepared and packaged food than any other method of preservation.

    Fast freezing creates many fine crystals; slower freezing produces fewer but larger ones. Small crystal formation gives a better texture, is less likely to rupture cell membranes of food, and it damages the food less. Care should be taken to freeze food quickly.

    ICE FORMATION
    When water freezes, its molecules arrange themselves in crystals. As the crystals form, they seed, or draw other molecules of water, separating them from other substances that are in combination with the water. As the water molecules separate and freeze, the water is drawn from the cells of the food, and as the water molecule leaves the cell, it punctures or tears the cell wall, damaging it by pulling the water molecule through it. Quick freezing makes smaller crystals that do less damage. Quick freezing also is more likely to freeze the molecules in place and give less time for them to separate and move through cell walls.

    RULES TO ENSURE QUICK FREEZING
    1. Place food in a freezer that maintains the
    temperature of 0’ F during the freezing period.

    2. Do not put packages to be frozen in the door compartment of an upright freezer, as they are usually several degrees warmer than the interior.

    3. Packages larger than a quart are not advisable. Small packages freeze faster than large ones.

    4. Wrapping in foil slows freezing somewhat.

    5. If placing several unfrozen packages in the freezer at the same time, put them in different areas of the freezing compartment.

    6. Refer to the freezer instructions book for the pounds of fresh material it can freeze in one batch. If information is not listed, assume you can freeze twice as many pounds as the freezer's rated capacity in cubic feet.

    7. Follow quick freezing rules with meat. It will decrease the amount of runoff that occurs when the meat thaws out.

    FREEZING FOODS
    1. Always use quality foods.

    2. Don't overestimate your needs.

    3. A rapid turnover is important! Use a STORAGE CHART to keep a record of what you put in your freezer, when you put it in, and the date by which the food should be removed.

    4. Preserve quality by:
    a. Proper handling before freezing
    b. Good packaging
    c. Storage at temperature no higher than 0’ F
    d. Proper handling and cooking after removing from freezer

    RULES FOR PACKAGING FREEZER FOODS
    Packages for freezing must give adequate protection against moisture and vapor losses or color, flavor, and texture will deteriorate.

    1. Choose the size of container that will hold enough food for its use.

    2. Select containers or wrappings based on how you will handle the food when it is thawed for serving (e.g., meat loaves in casserole dishes, bread to be reheated in aluminum foil, etc.)

    3. When filling containers, keep in mind that liquids expand when frozen. Always allow 1/2" head space at the top of the cartons.

    4. Never use scotch tape or common gummed paper tapes to seal freezer packages. These tapes loosen at low temperatures. Use freezer tape for sealing and labeling.

    5. To keep foods at the peak of freshness, they must be completely sealed to keep out air. When the food surface is exposed to air, evaporations form of freezer burn-takes place.

    FREEZER BURN
    Freezer burn occurs when foods are not
    package properly for freezing. It causes a damaging effect causing foods to have a tough texture and off-flavor. The actual cause is from moisture loss from the food when the food has been exposed to air. It can also be caused when freezing and thawing happens in the freezer. With each refreezing, the ice crystals in the food get larger and cause the freezer burn.

    HOW TO PREVENT FREEZER BURN
    1. Use a cover that fits tightly. When in doubt, seal the edges with freezer tape.

    2. When using aluminum foil, shape it around the food.

    3. When ice cream has been left in a container, smooth off the surface and place a sheet of foil directly over the ice cream.

    4. When using cellophane or plastic freezer bags, force out the air and use a twister around the bag to keep out the air.

    WRAPPING MATERIALS
    Good wrapping materials are moisture-vapor proof or resistant and will help minimize freezer burn. For most solid foods such as meat, cake, pie, and bread, use freezer weight paper such as aluminum foil, cellophane, pliofilm, or other transparent film. Polyethylene bags may be used for baked goods such as bread and cookies. To give form to shapeless plastic bags, put them in paper cartons, then fill and freeze.

    Liquid-packed foods may be packaged in heavily waxed cartons, glass freezer jars, and plastic or aluminum containers. Choose a size that holds enough for one meal-quart containers hold 4-6 servings; pints, 2-3. Use only containers with wide top openings so the food does not have to be thawed completely to remove it from the container. Some prepared foods like meat pies and casserole dishes may be frozen in the containers in which they were prepared, ready for reheating at time of use.

    Seal frozen food containers or packages with freezer locker tape, not general utility tape. Freezer locker tape may also be used as a label on hard-to-mark wrapping materials.

    Label jars, cartons, and packages with china marking pencil or soft crayon, available at stationery stores. Be sure to DATE the package and IDENTIFY the contents.

    HOW TO WRAP FOR FREEZING
    Packaging with Freezer Sheet Material

    1. Place food in the center of the wrapping. Have enough length to overlap. Bring edges together evenly above food.

    2. Fold edges over and over until fold is flat against the food. Press out air.

    3. Fold side edges; seal with freezer locker tape. Label plainly with contents and date.

    Packaging in Rigid Container
    Place food in container. Seal rigid food containers by adjusting the lids as required for the type of package used. Casseroles made of ovenproof material can be covered and then sealed with freezer tape. Label with contents and date.

    Packaging in a Polyethylene Bag
    Polyethylene bags are especially durable. Some are manufactured especially for freezing. They can be sealed by twisting the tops and securing with soft twine or rubber binders. If using bags with a zip-lock, be sure to expel as much air as possible before sealing. Label with contents and date.

    MEATS AND BAKED GOODS
    Meat can be frozen raw, cooked, or half-cooked because it has no problem of spoiling due to enzyme action. Baked goods can be frozen as is for the same reason.

    FRUITS
    Fruits have to be treated to help prevent oxidation
    which can change the color and the texture of the fruit.

    1. SUGAR - Sugar helps slow enzyme damage and is desirable and often essential to counteract acid flavors is some fruits.
    a. Dry method - 1/2 to 1 cup of sugar
    to a pound of fruit.
    b. Syrup - in general, thick or heavy syrups are used with high acid fruits. Medium and thin syrups are used with lower acid fruits.
    2. ASCORBIC ACID - is added to sugar in the proportion of about 1/4 teaspoon to the cup and mixed well before putting on the fruit. If it is added to the syrup, it is necessary to wait until the syrup is cool and ready to use.

    VEGETABLES
    Vegetables must be partially cooked (blanched or scalded) before freezing to destroy enzymes and prevent the deterioration they can cause.

    Most enzymes are destroyed by keeping food at 212 E F (boiling temperature) for a period varying from 50 seconds to 2 minutes depending on the vegetable. There are several ways to accomplish this:

    a. Water blanching
    b. Steam blanching
    c. Chilling
    d. Full cooking

    Freezer Jams and Jellies
    Why make jams and jellies? They add a extra special touch to meals and they provide a good way to use fruit not at its best for canning or freezing; i.e., extra large or small sized fruits and those that are irregularly shaped. Jam and Jelly making also provides a means for taking advantage of in- season fruits for the best tasting product at the lowest cost. Many people choose to make jams and jellies because they can make fruit combinations that are not commercially available. Often times people want to give a personalized gift that was hand-made.

    What are jams and jellies? Jams and jellies are fruit preserved using sugar and jellied to some extent and individual characteristics depend on the fruit used, how the fruit is prepared and the proportions of the ingredients. Jam is made from crushed or ground fruit that is left in the mixture. The consistency is thick but not as firm as jelly. Jam will hold its shape. Jelly is made from the juice of the fruit only. Jelly should be clear and firm enough to hold its shape when unmolded from its container.

    What is the importance of pectin? Pectin is a natural substance found in fruits that gives the fruit structure (shape). The amount of pectin used varies depending on the type of fruit (i.e., citrus fruits are high in pectin, apricots are low in pectin) and also on the ripeness of the fruit (i.e., ripe strawberries have less pectin than under-ripe strawberries). Adding commercial pectin ensures a sufficient amount of pectin so jams and jellies will set. Before commercial pectin was available, recipes called for a proportion of under-ripe fruit to have sufficient pectin to set. Flavor was not as good because the under-ripe fruits do not have a fully developed fruit flavor. Also, before commercial pectin was available, jams and jellies had to cook for extended periods of time to come to theme point. This extended cooking time resulted in a less desirable flavor, darker color, and a lower jam and jelly yield.

    What are some of the advantage of freezer jams and jellies?

    They have fresher taste and color. They use less sugar and fruit, so they are more economical. The containers do not have to be sterilized. Containers do not have to be glass; any container with a tight-fitting lid will work. The yield is generally comparable to cooked jams and jellies. They are much easier to prepare; not as many steps to follow. They are generally failure-proof.

    What causes freezer jams and jellies to not set? Stiff jams and jellies are usually the result of using under-ripe fruit, improper measuring, and under-measurement of fruit. Soft- set jams or jellies are usually the result of using overripe fruit, over-measuring fruit or fruit juice, not adding the required amount of sugar, and using fruits lacking in fruit acids (without the addition of lemon juice). Syrupy jelly is usually caused by of adding pectin at the wrong time and omitting the lemon juice if called for. Weeping jellies are usually caused by too much acidity (from fruit or lemon juice) and fluctuation of storage temperature.

    Tips on proper storage of freezer jams and jellies.
    Maintain the excellent qualities of freezer jams and jellies by following these simple guidelines:

    Make sure the lids of storage containers are extremely tight fitting and airtight.

    The freezer temperature should be 0 E F or lower. If the temperature in the freezer is higher than 0 E F do not keep jams and jellies for over three months.

    Freezer temperatures should not fluctuate, but should be kept constant at 0 E F as with all frozen foods. Fluctuations in temperature occur during the automatic defrost cycle, manual defrosting, and frequent opening and closing of the freezer door or freezer compartment doors.

    ADDITIONAL POINTS TO EMPHASIZE ON

    COOKED/FREEZER JAMS AND JELLIES

    When measuring fruit or fruit juice, if there is not enough to equal amount needed, add water up to 1 cup.

    Pre-measuring of dry ingredients is extremely important. Careless mistakes are more often made when one is hurrying to measure the ingredients at the last minute. Adding too much or too little sugar can drastically affect the recipe outcome.

    Powdered and liquid pectins cannot be used interchangeably. Powdered pectin is formulated to be dissolved in fruit or fruit juice; then the sugar is added. In recipes using liquid pectin, it is added to fruit and sugar mixtures; powdered pectin will not dissolve in fruit and sugar mixtures.

    Two different recipes may be combined. Halve the recipes, add the different halves together, and proceed with basic directions and preparations. Some excellent combinations can be made.

    It is not necessary to use fresh fruits to make jams and jellies. Canned, bottled, and frozen fruits and fruit juices work just as well and, in most cases, cut down preparation time.

    If using canned or frozen fruits processed without the addition of sugar, thaw fruit if necessary, and use just as you would fresh fruits. If canned or frozen fruit is packed with sugar or with sugar syrup, omit 3/4 cup sugar from freezer jam and jelly recipes. Make sure excess syrup is drained from fruit and NOT added to jams or jellies.

    As with all canned or preserved foods, be sure to label and date each container. Use containers with the oldest dates first.

    DIFFERENCE BETWEEN COOKED & UNCOOKED (FREEZER)

    JAMS AND JELLIES

    (Source: Jam & Jelly soft by MCP Pectin.)

    There are many differences between cooked and uncooked jams and jellies. These differences include the amount of ingredients called for, the method of preparation used, the color and taste of the jams and jellies, die containers used, and the storage of these two types of jams and jellies. Following is a discussion of these differences.

    The amount of ingredients called for is usually less in the uncooked jams and jellies. This is because none of the liquid is evaporated as it is in the cooked jams and jellies. For example: cooked strawberry jam uses 5-3/4 cups crushed berries, while uncooked strawberry jam uses only 3-1/4 cups crushed berries. The amount of sugar used is quite a bit less in uncooked jams and jellies. Using strawberry jam as the example again, cooked strawberry jam uses 8-1/2 cups of sugar while uncooked strawberry jam uses 4-1/2 cups of sugar. The yield is slightly greater in the cooked recipes. The uncooked recipes also use fight corn syrup (Karo) as an ingredient. This helps prevent sugar crystals from forming during storage.

    The differences in methods of preparation are quite obvious, as the names cooked and uncooked imply. The uncooked method involves stirring, mixing, and warming. The cooked method involves constant sniffing (to avoid boil over and/or scorching), boiling, mixing, and reboiling. Preparation is much easier in the uncooked method because you don't have to constantly watch and stir the jams and jellies. When the directions are followed exactly, the uncooked method is a virtual failure-proof procedure for making quality jams and jellies.

    The taste and color differences in cooked and uncooked jams and jellies are also quite noticeable. When large amount of sugar are used, the color is usually deepened. Also, cooking only fruit or fruit juice drives off some of the natural flavor. Therefore, uncooked jams and jellies usually have a lighter, more natural fruit color, and a fresher taste. The texture of the uncooked jams and jellies is usually more delicate because it hasn't been cooked.

    The containers that can be used in cooked jams and jellies must be glass so that the container may be properly sterilized and sealed. If the containers are not properly sealed, air may come in contact with the jam or jelly and turn it dark or allow mold to form. A two-piece metal lid or melted paraffin must be used to seal the containers for cooked jams and jellies so that the contents are air- tight during storage. If the containers have not been sterilized, the bacteria in the container will cause spoilage.

    Uncooked freezer jams may be stored in any type of container as long as the lids are tight fining. This is because the preservation method for these jams and jellies is the freezing process during storage. Bacteria and mold cannot thrive in freezing temperatures. Parafin is not to be used on uncooked jams and jellies, as it may crack during freezer storage.

    Both cooked and uncooked jams and jellies may be stored for up to one year. Cooked jams and jellies should be stored in a cool, dry place. If cooked jams and jellies are stored in a place that is too warm, or for too long a period of time, the jam or jelly may darken in color and lose flavor. Uncooked jams and jellies are stored in the freezer, unless they are to be used within three weeks (then they may be stored in the refrigerator). Any opened jam or jelly, regardless of the method of preparation, should be stored in the refrigerator until consumed.

    JAM AND JELLY INGREDIENTS AND THEIR FUNCTIONS
    (Source: Jam & jelly unit by MCP Pectin.)

    Jam and jelly making has often been considered a skill that tested the ability of even the most experienced cook. The MCP freezer (uncooked) method, using the right proportions of ingredients, gives the cook tender, flavorful fruit jams and jellies that require little time, culinary expertise, and no cooking!

    Basically jams and jellies are similar products; jellied fruit is preserved by sugar. The type of fruit, the preparation method, and the proportions of ingredients utilized give jams and jellies their unique characteristics. Jelly is made from the juice of fruits and should be clear and firm enough to hold its shape. Jam is made from crushed or ground fruit and is less firm than jelly. Conserves are jams made from a mixture of fruits, with citrus fruits, raisins, and nuts. Marmalade is basically jelly with citrus fruit pieces evenly distributed. Preserves are whole fruits or large pieces of fruit in a very heavy syrup which is sometimes slightly jellied.

    Freezer jams and jellies have a fresher, more natural fruit taste and brighter color. These types of jams and jellies may be stored in the freezer for up to one year or left in the refrigerator if they are to be used within three weeks.

    INGREDIENTS
    MCP freezer jams and jellies, like conventional jams and jellies, use the following basic ingredients pectin, Fruit or fruit juices, lemon juice, and sugar. One difference is that the MCP recipes call for an additional ingredient, light corn syrup (Karo) to prevent formation of sugar crystals in the freezer jams. The formation of crystals is also addressed in the unit on Crystallization (Candy). Each ingredient performs a specific function and is added in certain proportions to ensure excellent flavor, texture, and color of freezer jams and jellies. Their functions are described below.

    PECTIN
    Pectin is used to enable fruit or Fruit juice and sugar mixtures to gel in a very short period of time. Before added pectin was used, the cook boiled equal amounts of Fruit and sugar until this mixture sheeted off a spoon. The mixture had to be cooked over a very high heat and stirred constantly to prevent burning, scorching, or boiling over. This usually meant constant attention from the cook and a long cooking period. Pectin is a natural substance found in all fruits. Pectin is extracted from citrus rinds, chiefly lemons and oranges. Other principal sources of pectin are apples and citrus fruits. Pectin is a substance similar to gelatin, but gelatin is from animal sources. The amount of pectin present in fruits varies with the type of fruit and the degree of ripeness.

    FRUIT OR FRUIT JUICES
    Fruit or fruit juices give the jam or jelly its characteristic
    flavor and color and also provides part of the pectin and acid necessary for the mixture to gel. For full-flavored jams and jellies, be sure to use fully ripe fruits. Underripe fruits may produce a rubbery product with an underdeveloped flavor. Canned, frozen, and fresh fruits may be used in making jams and jellies.

    LEMON JUICE
    Lemon juice may be used with certain fruits if that particular fruit
    is especially low in fruit acids (i.e., pears, peaches, apricots).
    The addition of lemon juices in recipes using low acid fruits
    helps flavor development and gel formation.

    SUGAR
    Sugar is very important in jams and jellies for it helps the mixture to gel, acts as a preserving agent, and intensifies the flavor of the jam or jelly. It can also add extra firmness to fruits used in jams, thereby ensuring a pleasing texture in the resulting product. The composition of beet and cane sugar is identical, either type of sugar can be successfully used in making jams and jellies.

    LIGHT CORN SYRUP (KARO)
    Light corn syrup (Karo) is added to prevent sugar crystals from forming. The molecular action of corn syrup is such that it interferes with the molecular structure of the other sugars in the candy solution, thus preventing crystallization from taking place. The sugar in corn syrup (dextrose) is Dot as sweet as regular sugar (sucrose).

    PREPARATION OF FREEZER JAMS AND JELLIES
    (Source: Jam & Jelly unit by MCP Pectin.)
    The steps used to prepare perfect freezer jams and jellies are easy and simple to follow.

    The Utensils needed are basic pieces of equipment that can be found in most kitchens. These include:
    1. Paring knife or peeler (for jams)
    2. Fruit (or potato) masher or grinder (for jams)
    3. Shallow plate or bowls to crush fruit (for jams)
    4. Standard liquid measuring cups
    5. Standard dry measuring cups for sugar
    6. Bowl to remeasure sugar
    7. Rubber scraper for corn syrup
    8. 4-quart sauce pan or kettle
    9. Stirring spoon with long handle
    10. Thermometer
    11. Canning funnel (optional)

    Preparing Containers is extremely easy. Any type of container (jelly glasses, small canning jars, plastic storage con=m) may be used as long as it has a tight-fitting lid. Inspect all containers for chips, cracks, or defects and discard these containers as they may allow air to get into the product and affect flavor. Wash containers in soapy water; rinse thoroughly, sterilize, and drain.

    Accurate Pre-measuring of Ingredients is extremely important to assure perfect jam or jelly. All the ingredients called for should be pre-measured before combining ingredients. There are five basic steps used to preparing jams and jellies:

    STEP 1
    Prepare fruit or fruit juice and measure into a 4-quart saucepan or kettle.

    FOR JAMS: Wash and stem or pit fruit. For large pieces of fruit, slice and grind through fine food chopper or food processor. Smaller pieces of fruit may be crushed. All fruit pieces should be as uniform in size as possible for uniform consistency and flavor. After the fruit is thoroughly crushed, measure the amount of fruit called for. Fruits should not be measured before they are crushed or ground because of the air spaces around the fruit particles.

    FOR JELLIES: If using bottled juices, measure out the juice required in the recipe. If using frozen concentrated juices, dilute the cancan to juice strength. (Do not dilute to beverage strength, as this dilution is weak in flavor and color). If extracting juices from fruits, wash fruit thoroughly, and crush fruit completely one layer at a time. Rest colander in a bowl. Spread a cloth or jelly bag over the colander. Pour crushed fruit into the cloth or bag. Fold the cloth to form a bag. Twist the bag and press out the juice with a masher. Add lemon juice to fruit juice if the recipe calls for it. If short of juice, add water for the exact amount.

    STEP 2
    Slowly sprinkle in a package of pectin (MCP) while stirring
    fruit or fruit juice vigorously. Let mixture set for 30 minutes,
    stirring occasionally. This ensures complete dispersion and dissolution of pectin and is a vital step in making successful freezer jams and jellies.

    STEP 3
    Add one cup fight corn syrup (Karo). Mix well. As mentioned earlier, corn syrup will keep sugar crystals from forming by interfering with the molecular action of the sugar. While mixing, make sure to scrape the bottom of the saucepan often as the corn syrup will tend to settle to the bottom.

    STEP 4
    Add premeasured sugar all at owe. Stir thoroughly using a wide-backed spoon, strainer, or potato masher. As with the corn syrup, scrape the bottom and sides of the saucepan often so that lumps and particles of sugar are dissolved. To hasten die dissolution of the sugar, the jam or jelly may be warmed gradually while stirring the mixture. Warming to 100 F will help speed up sugar dissolution.

    STEP 5
    Once sugar is completely dissolved, pour into prepared containers. Fill to 1/2" of the top. This head space is used to allow room for expansion of the product when frozen. Cover the containers with tight fitting lids so that air does not come in contact with the jam or jelly during prolonged storage periods. Refrigerate in coldest part of the refrigerator if the product will be used in three weeks; otherwise store in the freezer.

    PREPARATION STEPS FOR FREEZER METHODS

    STRAWBERRY FREEZER JAM (as an example)
    1. Wash, stem, and crush berries one layer at a time.
    2. Measure fruit. Add lemon juice, if called for. Place in a 4-quart pan. Stir well.
    3. Slowly sprinkle in pectin (MCP), stirring vigorously. Let stand for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.
    4. Add light corn syrup (Karo). Mix well.
    5. Add premeasured sugar all at once. Stir thoroughly. Warm to 100 F to hasten sugar dissolution.
    6. Pour into containers with tight lids leaving head space of 1/2 inch. Cover and refrigerate.

    GRAPE JELLY (as an example)
    1. Measure juice, including lemon juice, into a 4-quart kettle or saucepan. Stir well.
    2. Slowly sprinkle in pectin (MCP), stirring vigorously. Let stand for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.
    3. Add light corn syrup (Karo). Mix well.
    4. Add premeasured sugar all at once. Stir thoroughly. Warm to 100 F to hasten sugar dissolution.
    5. Pour into containers with tight lids leaving a head space of 1/2 inch. Cover and refrigerate or freeze.

    CANNING RECIPES

    APRICOT-PINEAPPLE FREEZER JAM
    YIELD: 7 cups

    INGREDIENTS
    2 cups apricots, ground or mashed (about 1-1/2 lbs.)
    1-1/4 cups unsweetened pineapple, canned or crushed
    1/4 cup lemon juice
    1 pkg. pectin (MCP)
    1 cup light corn syrup (Karo)
    4-1/2 cups sugar

    TO PREPARE FRUIT

    Rinse, peel, and pit firm ripe apricots. Mash or grind through fine food chopper.

    TO MAKE JAM
    1. Measure sugar into a dry bowl to be added later.
    2. Measure ground apricots, crushed pineapple, and lemon juice into large bowl or kettle; stir well.
    3. Slowly sprinkle in pectin (MCP), stirring vigorously. Set aside 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.
    4. Add light corn syrup (Karo), stir well.
    5. Stir in premeasured sugar. Warm to 100 F to speed up sugar dissolving time, but not any hotter.
    6. When sugar has dissolved, the jam is ready. Ladle into jelly glasses or suitable freezer containers with tight lids, leaving a head space of 1/2 inch. Store in freezer. If jam is to be used immediately, it can be stored in the refrigerator up to three weeks.

    BLUEBERRY-PEACH FREEZER JAM
    YIELD: 7 cups

    INGREDIENTS
    1-1/2 cups blueberries, fully ripe, crushed
    1-1/4 cups peaches, fully ripe, crushed (6 medium)
    1/2 cup lemon juice
    1 pkg. pectin (MCP)
    1 cup light corn syrup (Karo)
    4-1/2 cups sugar

    TO PREPARE FRUIT
    Rinse and stem blueberries. Crush berries one layer at a time to let juices flow freely. Rinse, peel, pit, and crush peaches.

    TO MAKE JAM
    1. Measure sugar into a dry bowl to be added later.
    2. Measure crushed blueberries , peaches, and lemon juice into large bowl or kettle; stir well.
    3. Slowly sprinkle in pectin (MCP), stirring vigorously. Set aside 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.
    4. Add light corn syrup (Karo), stir well.
    5. Stir in premeasured sugar. Warm to 100 F to speed up sugar dissolving time, but not any hotter.
    6. When sugar has dissolved, the jam is ready. Ladle into jelly glasses or suitable freezer containers with tight lids, leaving a head space of 1/2 inch. Store in freezer. If jam is to be used immediately, it can be stored in the refrigerator up to three weeks.

    STRAWBERRY-PEACH-KIWI FREEZER JAM
    YIELD: 7 cups

    INGREDIENTS
    1 cup strawberries, fully ripe, crushed (about 1 pint)
    1 cup peaches, fully ripe, crushed (about 3 medium)
    1-1/4 cups kiwi, crushed (about 3 medium)
    1/4 cup lemon juice
    1 pkg. pectin (MCP)
    1 cup light corn syrup (Karo)
    4-1/2 cups sugar

    TO PREPARE FRUIT
    Rinse and stem strawberries. Crush berries one layer at a time to let juices flow freely. Rinse, peel, pit, and crush peaches. Stem, peel, slice, and crush kiwi.

    TO MAKE JAM
    1. Measure sugar into a dry bowl to be added later.
    2. Measure crushed strawberries, peaches, kiwi, and lemon juice into large bowl or kettle; stir well.
    3. Slowly sprinkle in pectin (MCP), stirring vigorously. Set aside 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.
    4. Add light corn syrup (Karo), stir well.
    5. Stir in premeasured sugar. Warm to 100 F to speed up sugar dissolving time, but not any hotter.
    6. When sugar has dissolved, the jam is ready. Ladle into jelly glasses or suitable freezer containers with tight lids, leaving a head space of 1/2 inch. Store in freezer. If jam is to be used immediately, it can be stored in the refrigerator up to three weeks.

    STRAWBERRY-RASPBERRY FREEZER JAM
    YIELD: 7 cups

    INGREDIENTS
    1-1/2 cups strawberries, crushed (about 1-1/4 pints)
    1-1/2 cups raspberries, crushed (about 2 cups)
    1/2 cup Rose wine (or lemon juice)
    1 Tbsp. orange rind, grated
    1 pkg. pectin (MCP)
    1 cup light corn syrup (Karo)
    4-1/2 cups sugar

    TO PREPARE FRUIT
    Rinse and stem berries. Crush berries one layer at a time to let juices flow freely.

    TO MAKE JAM
    1. Measure sugar into a dry bowl to be added later.
    2. Measure blueberries , wine (or lemon juice), and orange rind into large bowl or kettle; stir well.
    3. Slowly sprinkle in pectin (MCP), stirring vigorously. Set aside 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.
    4. Add light corn syrup (Karo), stir well.
    5. Stir in premeasured sugar. Warm to 100 F to speed up sugar dissolving time, but not any hotter.
    6. When sugar has dissolved, the jam is ready. Ladle into jelly glasses or suitable freezer containers with tight lids, leaving a head space of 1/2 inch. Store in freezer. If jam is to be used immediately, it can be stored in the refrigerator up to three weeks.

    APPLE FREEZER JELLY
    (Using Bottled Apple Juice)
    YIELD: 7 cups

    INGREDIENTS
    3-1/4 cups bottled apple juice or cider
    1/4 cup lemon juice
    1 pkg. pectin (MCP)
    1 cup light corn syrup (Karo)
    4-1/2 cups sugar

    METHOD
    1. Prepare containers according to manufacturer's instructions.
    2. Measure juice and lemon juice into a 4-quart kettle or saucepan. Stir well.
    3. Slowly sprinkle in pectin (MCP), stirring vigorously. Set aside 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.
    4. Add light corn syrup (Karo). Mix well.
    5. Add premeasured sugar all at once, and mix well. Warm to 100 F to hasten sugar dissolution.
    6. When sugar is dissolved, pour into containers with tight fitting lids, leaving a head space of 1/2 inch. Cover.
    7. Store in freezer, or if jelly is to be used within three weeks, store in refrigerator.

    Now that you have read the information, you are ready for Assignment 3.6.

    03.06 Functions and Function Notation

    If after completing this lesson you can state without hesitation that...

    Objectives:

    1. I can determine whether a relation is a function given a graph or table of values
    2. I understand function notation
    3. I can evaluate a function for different input values
    4. I can define the terms "domain" and "range"
    5. I can find the domain and range from a graph or table of values
    6. I can find the domain given an equation of a function

    …you are ready for the quiz. Otherwise, go back and review the material before moving on!

    Optional Readings:

    • Algebra Structure and Method, Book 1 (McDougal Littell) - Chapters 8, 12

    03.06 History of the English Language (English 9)

    English: Word Origins, 941
    To open this resource in SAS® Curriculum Pathways®:
    Go to: http://www.sascurriculumpathways.com/login
    Enter the student user name: farm9the
    In the Quick Launch (QL#) box, enter: 941
    Do "Prepare" and "Identify" (follow the on-screen directions to see all the pages and play the video).

    03.06 Introduction to Computers

    Use the website in the link below to explore the various terms listed in the vocabulary list. Go through each of the seven lessons by viewing the video in each section and reading the information for each section. Complete the various activities that are included within the lessons.

    teacher-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

    Assignment:(CB3)

    Complete the Intel Assignment worksheet. Please type your answers in bold. This worksheet can be used as you take the Computer Basics test. After completing the worksheet, upload the file the (CB3) assignment

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


    03.06 Introduction to Computers--Videos (CompTech07)

    Introduction to Computers (CB3)

    Use the website in section 03.06.1 to explore the various terms listed in the vocabulary list. Go through each of the 7 lessons by viewing the video in each section and reading the information for each section. Complete the various activities that are included within the lessons.

    Assignment: Complete the Intel Assignment worksheet. Please type your answers in bold. This worksheet can be used as you take the Computer Basics test. After completing the worksheet, attach it to the (CB3) assignment link.

    03.06 Lesson 3F: Simple Yes/No Questions (Spanish I)

     

    Lesson 3F
    Simple Yes/No Questions

    [A copy of this lesson is available in a PDF file!! If you prefer to use this type of document, just click on the following link to complete this lesson: SpI_Lesson3F]

     

               In the first two units, you were introduced to some of the most common words used to ask questions in Spanish. Do you remember these words: “¿Cómo? – How? and ¿Qué? – What?”(Lesson 1F), “¿Quién? – Who?”(Lesson 1J), “¿Cuándo? – When? and ¿Cuántos(as) – How many?”(Lesson 2E), and “¿Dónde? – Where?”(Lesson 2I)? If not, please review these lessons before continuing this lesson.

               (¡¡Ojo!! – I really like the way the Spanish language has the same rule for exclamation and question marks as they have for quotes and parenthesis … using a mark to begin the exclamation or question as well as at the end. It makes reading Spanish much easier, with fewer surprises!!)

               Yes or No questions: Most information questions are formed using question words, but there are times when asking a question is as simple as raising the pitch in your voice at the end of a sentence. The rising and falling of the pitch of your voice as you speak is called intonation. When a sentence, in either English or Spanish, is spoken with a rising intonation at the end of the sentence, it changes the sentence from a statement to a question. This simple question can only be answered with a “yes” or “no” response. Let’s look at a few examples:

               To make a question negative: Making a question negative follows the same form as making a statement negative, just put the word “no” before the verb!!

               Put the verb first: Switching the subject and verb is also an easy way to make a statement a question. You still will need to raise the pitch of your voice as you end the sentence to make sure it is understood to be a question, but putting the verb before the subject clearly makes it a question.

               A Great Web Site to Use: This is a great link to use in explaining a bit more about how these questions are formed in Spanish and their similarity to the English language.

               Confirmation or “Tag” questions: This is very common way to ask confirmation questions in Spanish speaking countries … just add one word at the end of a statement!! Once again, you must raise the pitch of your voice as you say this confirming word:

               Summary of Lesson: Hopefully, you have reviewed and reinforced your knowledge of different ways of asking questions in Spanish!! In order to have a conversation with your native Spanish friend, you first need to be able to ask questions about the information that you would like to know. Gradually, (and I promise that this will happen!!) little by little, you will be able to understand when he/she responds!! Just remember to use “más despacio, por favor – more slowly, please”!!

               Practice Exercises: Use the link below to review your knowledge of making simple yes/no questions!

    03.06 Proctored Final (Participation Skills and Techniques)

    03.06 Proctored Final (Participation Skills and Techniques)

    computer-scored 160 points possible 75 minutes

    Yes! - you are ready to take the proctored final test.

    This should be completed by WEEK 9 of this class

    *PE QUARTER 1 FINAL INSTRUCTIONS:

    • • You CANNOT have any "0's" on an assignment.
    • • The 1st quarter test has 40 questions that cover the entire quarter. You must score at least 60 percent on the proctored final to pass 1st quarter.
    • YOU HAVE TWO WEEKS TO TAKE THE PROCTORED FINAL BEFORE EHS WILL DROP YOU FROM MY COURSE
    • • When you COMPLETE your final--EMAIL ME: YOUR NAME, QUARTER, and Let me know you completed the FINAL.              THEN I WILL SUBMIT YOUR GRADE - you can EMAIL me at: kami.elison@ehs.uen.org

    ****YOUR GRADE:

    • • Your final grade is assigned after the proctor test.
    • • There is no provision to improve your grade so please do your best. THIS MEANS IF YOU WANT TO RETAKE ANY QUIZZES, REDO any of your Assignments for a better grade. YOU MUST DO SO BEFORE YOU TAKE THE PROCTORED EXAM.
    • • Your credit will be emailed to the school listed in YOUR PROFILE within a few days, it could take a couple of weeks.
    • • Check with your counselor to make sure it arrives.

    THIS IS ESSENTIAL TO YOUR SUCCESS: Please allow 24 hours from your teacher's approval before completing the following steps.

    Good luck on your final, you will need to perform the following steps in order to take the

    FINAL:

    • STEP ONE: Click on the link "EHS Certified Proctors List." This will bring up a list of proctors and you will be able to see those available in your area. (NOTE: Some schools have certified proctors whose names are not on the list. Your school counselor will know if your school has an unlisted certified proctor. Then proceed to step two.)
    • STEP TWO: Contact your preferred proctor to arrange the date and time for the test. It's best to contact the proctor in person to arrange a date and time. Note: based on local district policy, some proctors charge for their proctoring services. For best results, please schedule yourself a few days leeway before you take the proctored final test to allow time for the password to be sent to your proctor. Then proceed to step three.
    • STEP THREE: *You must wait 24 hours after your teacher has approved your Ready assignment to complete this step.* Once you have arranged a date and time with the proctor fill in the Proctor Manager Notification Form. Supply your EHS username on that form and your personal Proctor Manager Notification Form will appear.
    • When you have successfully passed the proctored final, I will award your credit once you have sent me an email of completion and our registrar will send the record of the credit to the school listed in your EHS account.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 9 of your enrollment date for this class.


    03.06 Related Rates (Calculus)

    03.06 Review Greatest Common Factor and Factor Polynomials with Four Terms (Math Level 2)

    Find the greatest common factor (GCF) of monomials, factor polynomials by factoring out the greatest common factor (GCF) and factor expressions with four terms by grouping.

    Factors are the building blocks of multiplication. They are the numbers that you can multiply together to produce another number: 2 and 10 are factors of 20, as are 4 and 5 and 1 and 20. To factor a number is to rewrite it as a product. 20 = 4 • 5.

    Likewise to factor a polynomial, you rewrite it as a product. Just as any integer can be written as the product of factors, so too can any monomial or polynomial be expressed as a product of factors. Factoring is very helpful in simplifying and solving equations using polynomials.

    A prime factor is similar to a prime number—it has only itself and 1 as factors. The process of breaking a number down into its prime factors is called prime factorization.

    A whole number, monomial, or polynomial can be expressed as a product of factors. You can use some of the same logic that you apply to factoring integers to factoring polynomials. To factor a polynomial, first identify the greatest common factor of the terms, and then apply the distributive property to rewrite the expression. Once a polynomial in ab + ac form has been rewritten as a(b + c), where a is the GCF, the polynomial is in factored form.

    When factoring a four-term polynomial using grouping, find the common factor of pairs of terms rather than the whole polynomial. Use the distributive property to rewrite the grouped terms as the common factor times a binomial. Finally, pull any common binomials out of the factored groups. The fully factored polynomial will be the product of two binomials.

    If after completing this topic you can state without hesitation that...

    • I can find the greatest common factor (GCF) of monomials.
    • I can factor polynomials by factoring out the greatest common factor (GCF).
    • I can factor expressions with four terms by grouping.

    …you are ready for the assignment! Otherwise, go back and review the material before moving on.

    Click the link below to begin viewing the lesson videos and to try the practice problems.

    Each topic is divided into sections that include the following:

    Warm Up - questions to answer to see if you are ready for the lesson.
    Presentation - high quality video with excellent illustrations that teaches the topic.
    Worked Examples - examples that are worked out step-by-step with narration.
    Practice - quiz problems on the topic covered.
    Review - practice test to check your knowledge before moving on.

    You are not required to complete every section. However, REMEMBER the goal is to MASTER the material!!

    03.06 Review Greatest Common Factor and Factor Polynomials with Four Terms – Assignment (Math Level 2)

    teacher-scored 72 points possible 40 minutes

    Activity for this lesson

    Complete the attached worksheet.

    1. Print the worksheet and complete the assignment in the space provided. You may use additional paper if needed. Work all the problems showing ALL your steps.
    2. Once you have completed the assignment, digitize (scan or take digital photo, up close and clear) and save it to the computer and convert it to an image file such as .pdf or .jpg.
    3. Finally, upload the image using the assignment submission window under the assignment link on your math home page for this assignment.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


    03.06 Roundabouts and Continuous Flow Intersections (DriverEd)

    Residential Roundabout: By Richard Drdul (Traffic Calming Flickr Photoset), CC-BY-SA-2.0, via Wikimedia CommonsResidential Roundabout: By Richard Drdul (Traffic Calming Flickr Photoset), CC-BY-SA-2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    ROUNDABOUTS
    Roundabouts were created in an effort to reduce the number of points where conflict can occur between two vehicles or a vehicle and a pedestrian. A roundabout has 12 potential points of conflict compared to 56 potential points of conflict at a regular “four-leg” intersection. A typical roundabout has a mountable curb around the outside of the center island to accommodate big trucks and semis as necessary.

    There are four points to remember when using a roundabout:

    1. Always yield to the traffic that is already in the roundabout
    2. Roundabouts run counter clockwise, always enter the roundabout to your right
    3. Always yield to pedestrians
    4. Always signal going in and out of a roundabout. The roundabout is a free-flowing traffic lane; therefore, it is not regulated by traffic lights. It is extremely important for the driver to be aware of pedestrians that might be crossing the traffic lanes of a roundabout.

    CONTINUOUS FLOW INTERSECTIONS (CFI)
    New to Utah is a Continuous-Flow Intersection (CFI). The first one is located at 3500 South and Bangerter Highway in West Valley City. CFI is a new approach to intersection design. Compared to a traditional intersection, it reduces the steps in the light cycle and places left turns along a safer path.


    Proceed as you normally would but watch for another light just past the intersection. It’s possible to encounter a red light here which allows left turning cars to cross in front of you.


    Be sure to yield to traffic, cyclists, and pedestrians. Make your turn, merge with traffic and keep going.


    Proceed just like a normal intersection, but watch for another light just past the intersection. You may see a red light here which allows left turning cars to cross in front of you.

    (Select the link "Continuous Flow Intersections" for more information.)

    03.06 Roundabouts and Continuous Flow Intersections (DriverEd)

    03.06 Slope-Intercept Form (Math Level 1)

    Use the slope and y-intercepts to graph and write functions.

    Something to Ponder

    How would you explain the parts of the Slope-Intercept form and how they relate to the graph of an equation?

    Mathematics Vocabulary

    Slope-intercept form: y = mx + b, where m is the slope and b is the y-intercept of the line

    Learning these concepts

    Click each mathematician image OR click the link below to launch the video to help you better understand this "mathematical language."

    Scroll down to the Guided Practice section and work through the examples before submitting the assignment.

    03.06 Slope-Intercept Form - Explanation Video Link (Math Level 1)

    03.06 Slope-Intercept Form - Explanation Videos (Math Level 1)

    See video


    03.06 Slope-Intercept Form - Extra Video (Math Level 1)

    I highly recommend that you click on the links above.

    NROC links: You can just watch the videos by clicking on PRESENTATION or work through each section.

    Guided Practice
    After watching the video try these problems. The worked solutions follow.

    Example 1:

    What are the slope (m) and y-intercept (b) of the following:

    a. y = 2x - 3

    b. y=-\frac{2}{3}x + 6

    c. 4x - 2y = -8

    Example 2:

    Write an equation in slope-intercept form with slope \frac{2}{5} and y-intercept 4.

    Example 3:

    Graph the following equations:

    a. y = \frac{1}{3}x - 2

    b. y = -2x + 1

    c. y=-\frac{3}{2}x

    Answers

    Example 1: What are the slope and y-intercept (b) of the following?

    a)  y={\color{Red} 2}x{\color{Blue} -3}

    {\color{Red} m = 2} and {\color{Blue} b = -3}

    b) y={\color{Red} \frac{2}{3}}x {\color{Blue} + 6}

    {\color{Red} m=\frac{2}{3}}

    {\color{Blue} b=6}

    c) 4x - 2y = -8

    Step 1: Write the equation in slope-intercept form.

    4x - 2y = -8

    Subtract 4x from both sides:

    -2y = -4x - 8

    Divide all three terms by -2:

    y={\color{Red}2 }x{\color{Blue}+4 }

    Step 2: Identify m and b.

    {\color{Red} m=2} and {\color{Blue} b=4}

    Example 2: Write an equation in slope-intercept form with slope {\color{Red} \frac{2}{5}} and y-intercept {\color{Blue} 4}.

    y={\color{Red} m}x {\color{Blue} + b}={\color{Red} \frac{2}{5}}x {\color{Blue} +6}

    Example 3: Graph the following equations:

    a) y={\color{Red} \frac{1}{3}}x {\color{Blue} -2}

    b) y=\color{Red}-2x {\color{Blue} +1}

    c) y=-{\color{Red} \frac{3}{2}}x

    03.06 Slope-Intercept Form - Worksheet (Math Level 1)

    teacher-scored 20 points possible 60 minutes

    Activity for this lesson

    1. Print the worksheet. Work all the problems showing ALL your steps.
    2. Digitize (scan or take digital photo) and upload your worksheet activity.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


    03.06 Speech Patterns

    Stewart examines speech patterns of Cache Valley, Utah

    By George Stewart, guest writer

    An article on Cache Valley Utah speech style by George Stewart, which first appeared in The Statesman.

    This article was prompted more by interest than expertise. I have always been interested in language and how particular sounds and symbols convey ideas, experiences, and feelings. The lists of words, phrases, and pronunciation keys that follow were first collected for my own children. The children were taught that English usage is not a moral issue, although we may murder the language at times! They learned that individuals were not "good, bad, or better" because of their command of language. Language usage is very much the product of opportunity and experience. To understand and be understood provides each of us with a wider range of experiences and an enriched enjoyment of our interactions with others. Our personal use of the language can restrict or provide opportunities for us. Another lesson that my children learned from this word and usage study was the value of a sense of humor. We all have struggled with the language at some time in our lives--I still do! English "mis-usage" can be funny! We should not, however, be devastated by our own grammatical stumbles, nor should we disparage others when they miss the mark. The challenge for all of us is to grow and to improve. Not all of the following entries are necessarily "Utah"; however, many are in common use.

    Pronunciations

    • n.ciation (pro.nun.ci.a.tion)
    • tore (tour)
    • edge.ju.cation (ed.u.ca.tion)
    • varly (barely)
    • stastics (statistics)
    • or.i.en.tate (or.i.ent)
    • pacific (specific)
    • door.ing (during)
    • li.berry (library)
    • nu.cu.lar (nu.cle.ar)
    • excetera (etcetera)
    • air.a.gation (irrigation)
    • exspecially (especially)
    • crick (creek)
    • pit.cher (pic.ture)
    • crell (corral)
    • pam.plit (pam.phlet)
    • am.ble.ance (ambulance)
    • "in" (ing)--fishin', eatin'
    • maa.nayze (may.o.naise)
    • 'post (suppose)
    • drownded (drown)
    • 'nother (another)
    • cold slaw (coleslaw)
    • pome (po.em)
    • pertnear (nearly)
    • for (far)
    • far (for)
    • ig.nernt (ig.no.rant)
    • play.sure (pleasure)
    • clean (clear)
    • diff.ernt (dif.fer-ent)
    • man'r (manure)
    • pardner (partner)
    • matore (mature)

    Weak or Missing Long Vowel Sounds

    • tell (ta-il, ta-le)
    • jell (ja-il)
    • dell, dill (de-al)
    • rilly (re-ally)
    • for sal (for sa-le, often spelled "for sell" in ads)
    • melk (milk)
    • bell (ba-il)
    • mel (me-al, ma-le, ma-il) ("mel" very useful; word refers to food, sex, and letters!)
    • hell (ha-il)

    Phrases and Words

    • we was (usually pronounced "wuz" meaning "we were")
    • I promise. (Used to mean "I am telling the truth!", rather than, "I will do something or will carry through.")
    • have came (have come)
    • me and ("me" used as subject instead of object)
    • has done good (has done well - good is an adjective, well is an adverb, good usually used to refer to a moral act, well often used to refer to a skill)
    • there is (frequently misused when speaking of more than one event, person, place, or thing where there are is appropriate usage)
    • bath the baby (ba-the the baby)
    • we won them (we beat them, we won the game, we won)
    • This is her/him. (This is he/she. Usually used when answering the telephone)
    • gonna, gotta, hav'ta (going to, have to)
    • Oh, for rude! (You are or that was rude.)
    • tend (babysitting - to tend a baby is not incorrect, but not too common outside of Utah)
    • elastic (not necessarily wrong, but not as commonly understood elsewhere as rubber band would be)
    • unthaw (thaw)
    • What do you times it by? (What do you multiply it by?)
    • boughten (purchased)
    • those, them (These words are often used interchangeably and with syntactical absurdity. "Them cars are neat" or "I would like one of those ones")
    • learn me (teach)
    • borrow me (loan me)
    • Can I go with? (May I go?)
    • take that for granite (take that for granted)
    • in head of (ahead of)
    • What was your name again? (What is your name?)
    • Do you got. . .? (Do you have. . .?)
    • irregardless (there is no such word and would be redundant anyway)
    • Double Negatives-Rather common grammatical error in Utah. (An example would be, "I don't want to hear no more noise.", "We don't have no..." is also too commonly heard.)

    Dominant Subcultural Pronunciations, Words, and Phrases

    • choice/special (What or who isn't choice or special in Utah?)
    • con.fernce (con.fer.ence)
    • gen.e.ol.ogy (gen.e.al.ogy)
    • hal.a.lu.le.ah (hall.e.lu.jah)
    • inactive/active (used as a personal noun to denote ones level of church attendance or dedication to precepts)

    03.06 Speech Patterns Assignment

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

    After reading the article, answer the following questions:

    1. What is meant by the fact that language is a matter of opportunity and experience?
    2. Because of the unique use of so many terms here in Utah and other places, we often sound unique. What phrases from the list above are used by people near/around you?
    3. Compare some of the “Phrases” in the list above and select two that would be pronounced differently in another city or state.
    4. What are two phrases NOT included in the article's list that you could add?

    03.06 The Metro (FrenchII)

    Le lien dans l'URL vous portera à la leçon.

    03.06 The Metro links (FrenchII)

    03.06 Wormology (Earth Systems)

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 120 minutes

    Assignment:

    You will design and conduct an experiment that answers the following question:

    How does a specific atmospheric condition affect worms (life)? In designing and conduction your experiment, please keep the following guidelines in mind:

    · Worms should not be harmed maliciously

    · Be careful when handling the acid rain solution, should you decide to use it.

    Materials, facilities, and resources:

    Materials can be added or subtracted as needed.

    The following are a few ideas of things you may or may not want to use. You will certainly not need to use all of them. You may want to use some items that are not listed. You should be able to borrow these materials from your local high school teacher or purchase them for a minimal amount at local stores.

    • Heat source (warm water, hot plate etc.)
    • Acid rain mixture (20 ml of 0.1 M HCl to 2 liters of water or 20 ml lemon juice to 2 liters water)
    • Basic glassware (graduated cylinders, beakers, canning jars)
    • Worms (Planarias, Earthworms, and/or Mealworms, available in a local pet store, local fishing store, or in your yard.)
    • Small paint brushes
    • Droppers (Available at a local pharmacy if you do not have a spare medicine dropper hanging around.)
    • Straws
    • String
    • Colored light sources
    • Thermometers
    • Dissecting trays or something similar (like a pie tin)
    • UV light source
    • Wind source (fan)
    • Ice
    • Scales
    • Alka Seltzer tablets (source of carbon dioxide)

    The experiment rubric (see the attachment) outlines what is expected in your experiment. It also shows how your experiment will be scored.

    Click on the "Experiment Rubric" link and review what is expected.

    1. Determine exactly which changed atmospheric condition you would like to simulate in your experiment. For example, you may want to test the effect of acid rain on worms or global warming or increased carbon dioxide levels, etc. Decide on the specific question that you would like to test and write it down.

    2. Predict what you think the outcome of your experiment will be. This is your HYPOTHESIS. Use the following format for writing your prediction: IF I ________________(write what you will do in your experiment), THEN___________(Fill in the blank with what you think will happen.) For example, IF I increase the temperature 10 degrees Celsius, THEN the worms will become sluggish and move more slowly.

    3. Write a set of procedures that will test your hypothesis. Be sure to include a timeline. Your experiment may last a little as 60 minutes or as long as a week. You do not need to plan an experiment that lasts longer than a week. Remember to include a control. Be very specific. Tell me exactly what you plan to do. Tell me how much of everything you plan on using. Tell me how long you plan on running the experiment, and how often you will check it. Tell me how you will measure and record your data. I want details!

    4. STOP! Submit your experimental design to me via email before going any further. Send me your question, hypothesis, and your procedures. I promise to give you feedback on your design within three days. If the design is scientifically sound, you may go ahead and conduct your experiment. If it has flaws, we will work together until you have designed a valid, reliable experiment---then you may go ahead and conduct your experiment. If you fail to submit your plan before you do your experiment you may not receive credit for the assignment.

    5. AFTER you have received my go-ahead, conduct your experiment. Be sure to keep detailed lab notes. Your lab notes should contain a record of everything you did as well as all the data you collected. Every entry on your lab notes should be dated (month/day/year)

    6. Follow the directions below to submit your assignment.

    ANALYSIS

    1. Re-send me your original question, your hypothesis, and your procedures.

    2. Send me your lab notes. I want to the observations that you recorded. Do not simply send me a summary of your results. I want to see a record of everything you did as well as the data you collected.

    3. Based on your observations, write a conclusion. What does your data tell you? What did you learn from your experimental results?

    4. What kind of relationships did you find between worms and your selected atmospheric condition?

    5. Do your findings support your hypothesis? Why or why not?

    6. If you were to do this again, what would you change? Why?

    7. What additional experiments could be performed?

    GOOD LUCK AND HAVE FUN!!!

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


    03.06 You are what you eat (Biology)

    03.06.00 - ALLUSION

    Authors often use allusions as well as symbols to convey connotative meaning. This exercise will focus on allusion.

    For this activity, you will read the poem “Demeter’s Prayer to Hades.”

    This poem has an allusion to a mythological story of Demeter and her daughter Persephone. For an allusion to be effective, you have to know the story, so If you are not familiar with it, read a short version given at one of the links below.

    03.06.01

    03.06.01 Lesson 3F: Simple Yes/No Questions (Spanish I)

    computer-scored 20 points possible 20 minutes

               **Assignment 03.06.01: Simple Yes/No Questions**: You know the drill, find the button: and click on it!

    03.06.01 Metro Trip to the Musee d'Orsay (FrenchII)

    teacher-scored 16 points possible 40 minutes

    The link in the URL's will take you to this assignment.

    03.06.01 Metro Trip to the Musee d'Orsay links (FrenchII)

    03.06.01 Quiz 30

    computer-scored 10 points possible 40 minutes

    If you are certain you have mastered the material, you are ready for the quiz. Click on the Quiz 30 link.

    03.06.01 Related rates exploration links (Calculus)

    It is an exploration on related rates using a balloon. You will need a balloon, a fabric measuring tape (one that's not metal) and your calculator.

    In the exploration, there is an example that will guide you through their work and steps. However, you'll need to show all your work in a seperate write up (either TI Interactive or by pencil) and email to the instructor.

    03.06.01 Unit 03 Review Quiz (English 11)

    computer-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

    Complete the review quiz on unit 3 after you have completed reading the novel.  You will need to understand and apply the literary terms as they relate to the book you read.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


    03.06.01 You are what you eat (Biology)

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 90 minutes

    Summary:

    Now that you've learned about cells, cell chemistry, properties of elements in cells and much more, let's put a little of that to use in our everyday world. Sure, you understand that you and other organisms are made up of cells and that cells have an important function in our bodies. You have researched the macromolecules (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids), and you have looked at some of the major elements that play a role in the makeup of the human beings and all other organisms. Don't forget that inorganic materials (those not containing Carbon - nonliving factors in our environment) are also present in our everyday lives.

    You've heard the phrase "you are what you eat." Let's take a little stroll to your kitchen and see what exactly it is that you take into your body daily, and what these items may do for your body.

    Instructional Procedures:

    This assignment contains two parts.  Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document. 

    ******************************************************

    ASSIGNMENT 03.06.01 - REVISION DATE: 8/28/14 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

    PART 1

    • Obtain the original label from any type of non-perishable food Item (get the can or the box). 
    • List all of the Ingredients. There should be at least 7 different ingredients. 
    • Research and explain each of the ingredients.  Make sure you include the purpose for the ingredient in the food and how it helps or hinders your body. (Note: Some items have no nutritive value. You should explain what their purpose is in the product. Why put them in?)
    • Give references for you information. 

    PART 2

    Being properly hydrated is important for you to stay healthy.  There are several ways to determine how much water you need to drink each day.  Use the following formula to calculate how much water you need to drink each day.  

    current weight/2 = how many ounces of water you need to drink each day

    1 cup = 8 ounces

    For example a person who weighs 130 pounds should drink 65 ounces of water each day.  That's equivalent to 8.125 cups of water each day.

    130/2 = 65 ounces  

    65 ounces ÷ 8 ounces = 8.125 cups  

    1. How many ounces of water do you need to drink each day?
    2. How many cups of water do you need to drink each day?

    ******************************************************

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


    03.06.02

    teacher-scored 12 points possible 30 minutes

    Once you have read the myth and the poem, answer these questions (make sure that you answer in complete sentences):

    1. How does knowing the story change the meaning of the word “prayer” and of the tone of the poem?
    2. What particular lines did you find most effective and why?

    Assessment Rubric:

    Content Shows the required response and understanding of the poem. /4
    Clarity Writing is clear, focused and well organized. /4
    Conventions No significant errors in grammar, usage, punctuation or spelling. /4

    teacher-scored 16 points possible 45 minutes

    Assessment Rubric:

    Content   Each question answered completely and in a way that shows knowledge and understanding of the selection.   /4  
    Support   Each answer includes the specific language from the poem to illustrate analysis.   /4  
    Clarity   Writing is clear, focused & well organized—didn’t give me any “huh?” moments.   /4  
    Conventions   No significant errors in grammar, usage, punctuation or spelling.   /4  

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


    03.06.02 Greek and Latin word parts (English 9)

    03.06.02 You are what you eat (Biology)

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

    You need to score at least 80% on this quiz before you can take the final.  You can take it as many times as you would like, in order to earn the score you desire.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


    03.06.04 Root word webs (English 9)

    03.08 Wie gehts? Dialog #3(German1)

    Click on the link and save the file down to your hard drive as an .exe file. Open it to study this subject. Be patient for download, it takes a few minutes. Memorize each part. Practice it until it is second nature.

    03.09 Dialogue #2,3 Comprehension Questions(German1)

    teacher-scored 20 points possible 60 minutes

    Go to the link below and take the online quiz. You may take it multiple times.

    03.10 Wie Geht es Ihnen Written Assgt(German1)

    teacher-scored 20 points possible 60 minutes

    Go to the link below and complete the online writing assignment.

    Here is a preview of this assignment:

    Wie geht es Ihnen?

    I. Was fehlt?
    Fill in the blanks from the dialogue:

    Guten _____, Herr Eckebrecht!
    Beate!
    Wie geht es _______?
    Mir geht es______ ________ ______. __________ geht es _____________ ?
    Ich _____________ einen Test in Englisch.
    Viel ___________ !
    Danke__________!
    Wiedersehen!

    II. Antworten Sie die Fragen mit Sätzen, bitte!
    Answer the questions in complete sentences, please!:

    1. Wie heisst das Mädchen?
    2. Wie heisst der Mann?
    3. Was hat Beate in heute in Englisch?
    4. Wie geht es dem Mann? Es geht ihm ...
    5. Wie geht es dem Mädchen? Es geht ihm ...

    III. Welche sind positive Ausdrücke und welche sind negative Ausdrücke?
    (which are positive responses to "Wie geht es Ihnen?" and which are negative? Put a + by the positives and a - by the negatives.

    04.02.06 - Dilations (Geometry)

    The final non-rigid motion we will consider is actually the most important one in terms of geometry. It is the dilation. In a dilation, the object is scaled in such a way that all the angles are preserved, and all lengths are scaled, so clearly, to define a dilation we need a scale factor. In addition, we need a center of the dilation.

    The image below shows a parallelogram dilated with a scale factor of about 1.5 about the points A, B and C. The light green parallelogram is the original figure. The dark green parallelogram is dilated about the point A. The turquoise parallelogram is dilated about the point B and the dark blue parallelogram is dilated about the point C.




    This image shows a trapezoid dilated with several scale factors about point D. The light red trapezoid is the original figure. The dark red trapezoid has been dilated with a scale factor of 1.5. The dark magenta trapezoid has been dilated with a scale factor of 1.25. The dark green trapezoid has been dilated with a scale factor of 0.75. Finally, the turquoise trapezoid has been dilated with a scale factor of 0.5.




    Notice that all the angles remain the same and that each line segment is scaled by the same factor.

    Now, here is a question. What happens to lines going through the center of dilation? Look at the turquoise parallelogram. What happened to the line segments that went through point B? Can you generalize this to a line?

    What happens to lines that do not go through the center of dilation? Look at all the other line segments. What happened to them? Can you generalize this to a line?

    Okay, let's do a few practice problems. The first image shows three triangles, each dilated with a scaling factor of 1.5 about different centers. The light cyan triangle is the original triangle. Using the answers to the previous question about lines that intersect the center of dilation, determine the center of dilation for each of the three dilated triangles.




    Second, using the answers to the previous questions, predict the resulting triangles if you were to dilate the light cyan triangle shown by a factor of two about each of its vertices. How do the resulting figures differ? How are they the same? Answers are on the next page.




    Answers:

    The centers of dilation are shown below. The dark blue triangle is dilated about point E. The turquoise triangle is dilated about point F, and the green triangle is dilated about point G. These points are determined by drawing lines that connect the vertices of the original light cyan triangle with the vertices of the darker colored dilated triangles. The points of intersection are the centers of dilation.




    The dilated triangles about the vertices are shown here. The dark red triangle is dilated about the bottom right vertex. The dark magenta triangle is dilated about the bottom left vertex. The dark green triangle is dilated about the top vertex. These clearly differ by their location in space. However, these triangles are all the same size, have the same orientation, and all share part of their sides with the original triangle.




    Did you get all of those?



    04.03.01 Chapter 4 Assignment 2 - Extra Credit Program (C++)

    teacher-scored 20 points possible 45 minutes

    Do this assignment and submit it under Topic 3.

    Miss Johnson, a math teacher, adds extra credit points to her students' total points if they score well on her final examination. Points are awarded as follows:

    score < 60 no extra credit
    score >= 60 and score <= 80 extra Credit = score * 2 / 11.0;
    score > 80 extra Credit = score * 3 / 11.0;

    Write a C++ program to allow the user to enter the final examination score. The program should then calculate and display the student's final score including any extra credit.

    Example:

    Miss Johnson's Extra Credit Program

    Enter the student's score on the final 85

    The Students final score is 108.182

    04.05 Unit 03-04 Review Quiz

    computer-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

    Assessment 04.05 Review Quiz 03-04

    Complete

    03-04 Review Quiz
    Ancient Middle East and Ancient India and China

    This assignment is found under Review Quiz 03-04 on the course website. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do and will provide immediate feedback.

    Complete this assignment after you finish reading lessons 3 and 4.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


    04.06 Space Text book (Earth Systems)

    Found in Space!

    Introduction:

    You started out fourth quarter describing energy that is “Lost in Space”. (Remember assignment 4.3?) Now, at the end of fourth quarter you’ll describe information that is “Found in Space”. Lost and found--Sounds like someplace you’d look for your missing yo-yo!
    04.06 yo-yo04.06 yo-yo
    Well, I know where my favorite yo-yo is, and hopefully you do too. But, do you know how scientists learned about the universe? Or how scientists believe the universe began? What about how stars are born and die? Or how Earth compares to other planets? You will find this, and other information, in the assignment that follows. Hang on and enjoy your intellectual journey to see you what you can find in (or about) space.

    To this point, we have studied Earth’s various sub-systems (I’m sure that by now you can recite them in your sleep; water system, geologic system, atmospheric system, biologic system). Now we will examine the Earth as a part of a larger system.

    Earth is a part of the solar system. The solar system is a component of the system we call the Milky Way Galaxy.
    04.06 galaxy04.06 galaxy
    Our galaxy is part of the universe as we know it, and who knows what part the universe plays in an even greater whole? As a member of these systems, the Earth both affects and is affected by its celestial neighbors. In fact, the Earth itself exists thanks to interactions that occurred millions of years ago in our “corner” of the universe. It is your job to document these interactions.

    04.06 Skimming

    Now, it's time to show what you can do using the skimming strategy.

    04.06 Skimming Assignment

    04.06 Space Text book (Earth Systems)

    Remember: Do NOT copy the text from these Internet sites word for word. I have read the information on the sites. I will recognize it if you cut and paste it into your text. You will FAIL the assignment if you cut and paste the information from the sites into your textbook. You MUST write it in your own words.

    04.06 Translating Functions (Math Level 1)

    Graph parent functions and transformations of exponential functions.

    Something to Ponder

    How would you explain the meaning of vertical shift and how it is used to graph exponential functions?

    Mathematics Vocabulary

    Parent Function: the most basic equation of a function, before any shifts or alterations

    Translation: a transformation that shifts a function horizontally, vertically or both

    Vertical Shift: a transformation up or down

    Learning these concepts

    Click each mathematician image OR click the link below to launch the video to help you better understand this "mathematical language."

    Scroll down to the Guided Practice section and work through the examples before submitting the assignment.

    04.06 Translating Functions - Explanation Video Link (Math Level 1)

    04.06 Translating Functions - Explanation Videos (Math Level 1)

    See video


    04.06 Age of Jackson

    04.06 Applying your Skills: Video 4 (Participation Skills and Techniques)

    teacher-scored 25 points possible 60 minutes

    This assignment should be completed by WEEK 3 of this class

    Standard Four Video INSTRUCTIONS: You will need to submit an instructional video demonstrating an exercise of your choice from the following list. If you are unable to make a video of YOURSELF, you can use powerpoint to create a presentation USING pictures of YOU demonstrating the basics skills for the exercise you have chosen. (As in Quarter 1.....there needs to be as many pictures as there are CRTICAL CUES for each exercise.) 

    ****Here is the list of acceptable activities you can choose from

    *** You must choose an activity from THIS LIST

    sit-ups, pull-ups, crunches, push-ups, biceps curl, shoulder press, squats, rows, leg curls, chest fly.

    SAFETY IS PARAMOUNT. Take all reasonable safety precautions for the chosen activity. You may not receive credit if your teacher finds that you have not taken safety into consideration. *You will need to demonstrate the correct way to do whatever exercise you choose. You must research the correct form and sequence for your activity (use books or the internet, or ask your coach if you have one for the activity).

    You will also need to discuss the importance of the FITT principal as it relates to your activity of choice.
     

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE VIDEO:. *Your video needs to be at least one minute long and NO longer than two minutes. If you would rather take pictures and use a video editor program to make a video/powerpoint to create your video, you can but you must have a minimum of 4-6 pictures.

    *You MUST be the star of your video, the video needs to be of YOU teaching and demonstrating how to perform the skill or exercise, so you might need to get a friend to do the filming. You will also be the narrator of the video.

    *Assume that you are making this video for another student who has never tried your particular activity/sport.                           

    *You CANNOT use the same video for another other PE Skills and Techniques, including both quarters. Example: If the activity you choose was tennis, you would need to show the basic skills of tennis, such as:

    How to grip the tennis racket. How to serve a tennis ball. What a backhand swing looks like and how to accomplish it. Etc.

     

    CRITIQUE QUESTIONS: After you have created your video, Answer the following questions. MAKE SURE YOUR ANSWERS ARE IN COMPLETE SENTENCES OR PARAGRAPHS. Please put all answers in bold or UPPER CASE.

    ****************************************

    When you have completed this process, Submit your video in the submission box by pasting your url in the text box. Make sure you include the following obervation questions:

    1. From the list of activities - sit-ups, pull-ups, crunches, push-ups, biceps curl, shoulder press, squats, rows, leg curls, chest fly, which activity did you choose to demonstrate and teach?

    2. What source(s) you used to research the correct technique.

    3. What you learned from watching yourself in the video about how you might improve your technique in your activity (ie, critique yourself).

    4. How can you implement the FITT principal in your activity to improve yourself in the activity of your choice?

    ****************************************

    INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR VIDEO: You will need a computer with a connection to the Internet and your digital video content (under two minutes, please). 

    You can choose between 

    "YouTube" - web based option

    "Photobucket" - image hosting and video hosting website

    "UPLOAD your video to your GOOGLE drive" to host your video assignments. 

    You will need to create an account for YouTube or Photobucket. Follow the instructions to upload and share your videos. "YouTube" will take a little longer to upload.

    WHICHEVER resource you decide to use to submit your video..... you need to Submit the LINK to your video with your Questions in the assignment Submission, so the questions and the Video are together to be graded. 

    ****DO NOT send the video to my EMAIL!!! *****

    In YouTube, you need to make your video "available to the world." When you go to the "My Videos" section of your YouTube account, play the video you want to submit. At this point you need to click on the "Share this Video" then copy the URL address in the URL and paste it in the Text Entry with your Questions or the comment box and submit it WITH YOUR ASSIGNMENT

    Photobucket is very similar. If you don't have a video camera, you can use still images in a slide show with narration that is converted to digital video.

    IF you decide to NOT use PHOTOBUCKET or YOUTUBE... You can upload your video or power point to your GOOGLE drive and share it and then copy the link, and paste it into the text entry submission page with your Questions and submit it.

    Please make sure your video is in one of the following formats or you will have to redo the video.

     

     

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


    04.06 Circuit training workout (Fitness for Life)

    Official Navy Page from United States of America MC3 Donald White Jr./U.S. Navy, Public domain, via Wikimedia CommonsOfficial Navy Page from United States of America MC3 Donald White Jr./U.S. Navy, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

    Circuit training is a method that combines muscular strength, muscular endurance, and aerobic conditioning. Once you perform this type of workout, you can decide how to incorporate circuit training into your overall workout program.

    04.06 Circuit training workout assignment (Fitness for Life)

    teacher-scored 50 points possible 60 minutes

    Introduction: The purpose of this assignment is to introduce you to circuit training.

    Task: Jog or walk for 5 to 10 minutes to warm up.

    Conduct the Circuit Training Workout. This workout asks you to complete a circuit training workout for 30 minutes. You may use the one found on pages 72 – 74 of the text, or... Go to the link below this assignment and complete the total body workout suggested there by “Sports Fitness Advisor”. Or… You may substitute for a different circuit training workout of your choice, but you MUST justify your alternative workout for full points. (You might want to pre-approve your alternative workout with your teacher.) • If you use the textbook workout, use the text for photos of the proper way to do activities. • If you use the on-line “Sports Fitness Advisor” workout, you will need some minor equipment. You may substitute household items where appropriate. Follow the directions given for proper technique. Describe which workout you chose, and list the exercises completed.

    Fill in the exercises you will perform BEFORE you begin the workout. That way you will only need to fill in the number of Reps performed. • Have a visible clock, with a second hand, that you can easily see WHILE you exercise. • Participate in each exercise for 1 minute and 50 seconds. Allow 10 seconds between exercises. • When you check heart rate, check for 10 seconds. Multiply by 6 AFTER the entire workout is completed. • Continue the workout, rotating through the exercises, for a total of at least 30 minutes.

    Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Print a copy to take with you to your workout. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Don't forget to highlight your answers. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

    ***************************************************************************

    Name:________________ Date:________________ Workout: _______________________

    Exercise Reps
    1._______________________ ____________
    2. ______________________ ____________
    3. ______________________ ____________
    4. ______________________ ____________
    5. ______________________ ____________

     

    Heart rate after 10 minutes ______________

     

    6. ______________________

    ____________
    7. ______________________ ____________
    8. ______________________ ____________
    9. ______________________ ____________
    10. _____________________ ____________

     

    Heart rate after 20 minutes ______________

    11. _____________________

    ____________
    12. _____________________ ____________
    13. _____________________ ____________
    14. _____________________ ____________
    15. _____________________ ____________

     

    Heart rate after 30 minutes ______________

    (30 pts. for completion.)

    Additional Questions: Provide adequate information for full credit DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS.

    9. (5 pts.) Did you enjoy alternating muscular endurance/strength activities with aerobic activities as is done in a circuit? • Why or why not?

    10. (5 pts.) Now that you have completed workouts to improve muscular endurance, muscular strength, and both (circuit training), which type of workout did you like the best and why?

    11. (10 pts.) Given your experience with this workout, create and describe a program that you would use to incorporate circuit training into your future workouts. list at least 5 different exercises and provide the number of repetitions or durations for each.

    • General Description: • Exercises:

    1. #reps:
    2. #reps:
    3. #reps:
    4. #reps:
    5. #reps:

    *****************************************************************************

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


    04.06 Domain, Range, Graphs and Transformations of Absolute Value Functions (Math Level 2)

    Identify the domain and range of absolute value functions and graph absolute value functions and the transformation of their parent functions.

    Recall that the absolute value is defined as the distance a number is from zero. Since it is a distance, the absolute value will always be postive, or zero. Absolute value is represented by two parallel vertical lines on either side of a term. For example, \left | 3 \right |.

    An absolute value function is a function whose rule contains an absolute value expression. The parent graph for absolute values is f(x)=|x| and it looks like this:

     

    The graph is a V shape. It has a vertex and is symmetrical about the vertical line running through the vertex.

    The general form of an absolute value function is y=a\left | x-h \right |+k. The absolute value function has many similarities with the quadratic function.

    • The vertex of the absolute value function is (h,k). Note that the value of h is the opposite of what is in the equation.
    • It is symmetric about the line x = h.
    • If a > 0, (a is positive), the graph opens up. If a < 0, (a is negative), the graph opens down.
    • If \left | a \right | < 1, the graph will be wider. If \left | a \right | > 1, the graph will be narrower.

    You will recall that the domain is the set of all possible inputs (all the x values) of a function which allow the function to work. The range is the set of all possible outputs (all the y values) of a function.

    Let’s apply this to absolute value functions.

    Look at the graph of f(x) = |x|:

    Absolute value function graphs always look like the letter V. All such functions will have a domain that includes all real numbers. The range will vary depending on the value of the vertex. Can you see that the range of this function is all real numbers ≥ 0?

    Now, let’s graph the function f(x) = |x + 2|:

    • How does (x+2) change the domain?
    • How does (x+2) change the range?

    The domain is still all real numbers and the range is still all real numbers ≥ 0. The (x+2) moved the vertex (0,0) to (-2,0).

    What about the graph of f(x) = |x| + 2?

    • How does +2 change the domain?
    • How does +2 change the range?

    The domain is still all real numbers and the range is all real numbers ≥ 2. The vertex is (0,2).

    Here is the graph of f(x) = |x – 2|.

    • How does (x – 2 change the domain?
    • How does (x – 2) change the range?

    The domain is still all real numbers and the range is all real numbers ≥ 0.

    Finally, look at the graph of f(x) = |x| – 2?

    • How does –2 change the domain?
    • How does –2 change the range?

    In what must be obvious to you by now, the domain is still all real numbers but the range is all real numbers ≥ –2. The vertex is (0, –2).

    Have you figured out a pattern?

    • f(x) = |x + a| translates the graph to the left and does not alter the domain nor the range.
    • f(x) = |xa| translates the graph to the right and does not alter the domain nor the range.
    • f(x) = |x| + a translates the graph up and does not alter the domain. However, the range is moved to ≥ k.
    • f(x) = |x| – a translates the graph down and does not alter the domain. However, the range is moved to ≥ – k.

    In this “family” of graphs, the original f(x) = |x| is called the parent function. The other graphs in the “family” are referred to as transformations of the parent function. Once you have graphed the parent function it is easy to graph the transformations.

    Let's make things a bit more interesting. Look at the graph of f(x) = 2|x|:

    The domain and range don’t change but the “V” is narrower.

    What about the graph of f(x) = –2|x|?

    Hmmm. The “V” is upside down! It is a reflection of f(x) = 2|x|.

    The domain doesn’t change but the range is now all real numbers ≤ 0.

    Of course, we can make things even more interesting.

    How about the graph of f(x) = –3|x + 2| + 1?

    Can you figure out the domain and range?

    The domain is still all real numbers but the range is all real numbers ≤ 1. The vertex is (–2,1).

    We can now add to our list from above:

    • f(x) = a|x| compresses the graph but does not alter the domain nor the range.
    • f(x) = –a|x| compresses the graph, then reflects it across the x-axis and does not alter the domain. However, the range is changed to all real numbers ≤ 0.
    • f(x) = a|x + h| + k translates the graph left or right depending on the value of h. It also translates the graph up or down depending on the value of k.
    • Finally, it compresses the graph depending on the value of a.

    Take time to practice with these types of graphs at the website listed below.

     

    I highly recommend that you click on the links below and watch the videos before continuing:

    If after completing this topic can you state without hesitation that...

    • I can identify the domain and range of absolute value functions.
    • I can graph absolute value functions and the transformation of their parent functions.

    …you are ready for the assignment! Otherwise, go back and review the material before moving on.

    04.06 Domain, Range, Graphs and Transformations of Absolute Value Functions – Assignment (Math Level 2)

    teacher-scored 76 points possible 40 minutes

    Activity for this lesson

    Complete the attached worksheet.

    1. Print the worksheet and complete the assignment in the space provided. You may use additional paper if needed. Work all the problems showing ALL your steps.
    2. Once you have completed the assignment, digitize (scan or take digital photo, up close and clear) and save it to the computer and convert it to an image file such as .pdf or .jpg.
    3. Finally, upload the image using the assignment submission window under the assignment link on your math home page for this assignment.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


    04.06 Following Instructions

    Open and complete the Drawing Pictures Activity.

    04.06 Lesson 4F “¿Cuál(es)? - Which? (Spanish I)

     

    Lesson 4F
    “¿Cuál(es)? - Which?

    [A copy of this lesson is available in a PDF file!! If you prefer to use this type of document, just click on the following link to complete this lesson: SpI_Lesson4F]

     

               In this lesson, we’re going to look at another important question word, “¿Cuál(es)? – Which?”. This question word is similar to the question word, “¿Quién(es)? – Who/Whom?” (Spanish I – Quarter 1: Lesson 1J). These question words change depending on whether the thing/person that is being asked about in the question is singular or plural. (¡¡Remember!! – In Spanish, they follow the same rule for exclamation and question marks as they have for quotes and parenthesis … using a mark to begin the exclamation or question as well as at the end. It makes reading Spanish much easier, with fewer surprises!!)

               Looking at the examples above – the Spanish word “¿cuál(es)?” is used just like the word “which?” in English … but “¿cuál(es)?” can also be used in Spanish, the same way that English speakers use the word, “what?”. This can cause many English speakers to confuse the two Spanish words: “¿Cuál(es)?” and “¿Qué?” … so it is important to understand the subtle difference!!

               “¿Qué?” – this Spanish question word is used when asking for an identification of an object, a definition, or an explanation.

               “¿Cuál(es)?” – this Spanish question word is used when asking for a choice from few or many (even billions) of possibilities.

               Now lets look at the following examples to see when to use each word:

               So the question word “¿Cuál(es)?” is the correct Spanish word to use when asking for specific information about a person or people. Once you learn this question word, you can ask Spanish speakers many basic questions about their lives using the list of words below. (The YouTube video clip below shows exactly how this is done!)

    See video

     

               Summary of Lesson: Hopefully, you have learned another important way of asking questions in Spanish!! In order to have a conversation with your native Spanish friend, you first need to be able to ask questions about the information that you would like to know. Gradually, (and we promise that this will happen!!) little by little, you will be able to understand when he/she responds!! Just remember to use “más despacio, por favor – more slowly, please”!!

               Practice Exercises: Make sure you completely understand the concepts taught in this lesson by reviewing the following article!!

    04.06 More Car Insurance (Financial Literacy)

    Identify more things to consider in purchasing car insurance and understand related terminology.

    This isn&#39;t the kind of car wash you need for your ride: Andrew Smith, CC-BY-SA-2.0, via Wikimedia CommonsThis isn't the kind of car wash you need for your ride: Andrew Smith, CC-BY-SA-2.0, via Wikimedia Commons BACKGROUND

    Now that you know a few more things about insurance, we will consider insurance rates and insurance requirements for cars in Utah. The government does not require that you be insured against all risks. They DO require car insurance. Car insurance is also required by those who loan the money to buy car because they want to minimize their risks. They want to make sure they get their money back. Lets consider a few things about auto insurance.

    Visit URL #1. Skip the “Compare Quotes Instantly” section and scroll down to “Utah Car Insurance Laws” to find out what car insurance is required in Utah. You may stop reading when you reach the section entitled “Where to get Utah auto insurance quotes.” Again, ignore the “sidebar” insurance advertisements and other price quote links. Then exit the web page and go to the next URL. Visit URL #2 to learn more about "no-fault" insurance and "minimum liabilty rates."  Visit URL #3 to learn how to lower car insurance rates. Read the suggestions for lowering a young driver's car insurance rates. 

    04.06 More Car Insurance (Financial Literacy)

    computer-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

    Take the Setting Priorities quiz. You must score 8 or higher on this quiz to continue. If your score is lower, simply re-take the quiz as many times as you need after reviewing the material.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


    04.06 More Car Insurance links (Financial Literacy)

    04.06 Narrative Writing

    Students will write a 600-800 word narrative on a topic related to "Love and Relationships"

    Steve Evans, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia CommonsSteve Evans, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic license via Wikimedia Commons

     

    The theme for English 11 Quarter 1 is “Love and Relationships.”

    Definition of narrative: a story or account of events, experiences or the like, whether true or fictitious.  A narrative is not a report or essay, but a story.

    Summary of the assignments for this section: (complete instructions will be with each assignment)  

    The first assignment for this section will be to brainstorm a list of 25 things that come to mind about “love and relationships.” Make a list of things you could write about, then narrow down your topic. (5 Points)

    Once you have decided on a topic, please write approximately two pages (600-800 words) in narrative form. (15 points for the submission)

    After the paper has been turned in, the teacher will give you a set of revision instructions that you must complete to receive the final grade for this paper. (Final paper: 40 points) Attached is the scoring rubric for the final paper.

    04.06 Numbers Oral Quiz(German1)

    04.06 Online Resources Test--ORT (Computer Technology)

    computer-scored 55 points possible 30 minutes

    Review
    Review all the reading materials and activities to study for the posttest.

    Take the Online Resources Posttest (ORT)
    This test covers the concepts from the activities, reading, and handouts for the Online Resources Unit. You can use your notes and handouts for this test. There is a one hour time limit.

    04.06 Prenatal Development(Childdev1)

    Lesson 4.6: Prenatal Development

    Open the file above, "Stages of Prenatal Development", in the format (Microsoft Word or WordPerfect) that you prefer and go through the materials presented.

    STAGES OF PRENATAL DEVELOPMENT

    TIMELINE OF PRENATAL DEVELOPMENT

    • Day 1 - conception takes place.
    • 7 days - tiny human implants in mother’s uterus.
    • 10 days - mother’s menses stop.
    • 18 days - heart begins to beat.
    • 21 days - pumps own blood through separate closed circulatory system with own blood type.
    • 28 days - eye, ear and respiratory system begin to form.
    • 42 days - brain waves recorded, skeleton complete, reflexes present.
    • 7 weeks - photo of thumbsucking.
    • 8 weeks - all body systems present.
    • 9 weeks - squints, swallows, moves tongue, makes fist.
    • 11 weeks - spontaneous breathing movements, has fingernails, all body systems working.
    • 12 weeks - weighs one ounce.
    • 16 weeks - genital organs clearly differentiated, grasps with hands, swims, kicks, turns, somersaults, (still not felt by the mother.)
    • 18 weeks - vocal cords work – can cry.
    • 20 weeks - has hair on head, weighs one pound, 12 inches long.
    • 23 weeks - 15% chance of viability outside of womb if birth premature.*
    • 24 weeks - 56% of babies survive premature birth.*
    • 25 weeks - 79% of babies survive premature birth.*
    • (*Source: M. Allen et. al., "The Limits of Viability." New England Journal of Medicine. 11/25/93: Vol. 329, No. 22, p. 1597.)

    Introduction/ Summary:

    The duration of pregnancy is divided into three equal segments called trimesters. The first trimester (months 1-3) is essential to the proper development of the infant and encompasses both the ovum and embryonic period of prenatal development. This is when all organs, nerve cells and brain cells develop. This is when most spontaneous abortions (miscarriages) occur. They generally are caused by abnormal development of the fetus and are nature’s way of eliminating a chromosomal abnormality. It is vital that all necessary nutrients be available to the fetus in order to develop properly.

    The second trimester (months 4-6) is often referred to as the “Golden trimester”. This is when the mother generally feels the best. Morning sickness and nausea have generally disappeared and the mother is quite comfortable.

    The third trimester comprises (months 7-9). These are important months for the baby as its organs and body systems mature and prepare to function on their own. The fat accumulated during this time will five the baby a “head start” on life.

    The prenatal development is sometimes separated into three development periods. The first period is referred to as the period of the zygote. This stage begins at conception and lasts until the zygote is implanted in the mother’s uterus. It lasts for about 10-14 days. The zygote grows to be about the size of a pinhead. Roots grow from the zygote into the wall of the uterus where they can receive nutrients from the mother’s blood

    The period of the embryo lasts from about 2 weeks to 8 weeks after conception. The embryo is attached to the mother by the umbilical cord (20 inches long) which reaches from the embryo’s stomach to the wall of the uterus. The umbilical cord contains arteries which carry the embryo’s waste products away from the embryo to the mother’s blood system to be purified. It also brings oxygenated and nutrient-rich blood back to the embryo to keep it alive. The umbilical cord is connected to the placenta. The placenta is an organ which serves as a medium for the exchange of nutrients and waste between the mother and the fetus. Throughout this period, the embryo is inside the amniotic sac (a bag filled with watery substance called amniotic fluid). The fluid will protect the developing baby against bumps, bruises and temperature changes. During this period all of the organs that will be present at birth are formed.

    The third development period is called the period of the fetus. This period extends from the end of the second month of pregnancy until birth. During this stage, the developing baby is referred to as a fetus. The body parts, organs and systems which were formed during the embryo period will become much more developed and begin to function. The fetus will begin will begin to resemble a human being and features will increase in clarity.

    During the fetal period the baby may increase in length as much as twelve inches.

    MONTHLY DEVELOPMENT

    Month 2
    The embryo increases in length to about 1 ½ inches. Bones and muscles begin to form. The head grows rapidly at first, accounting for about half of the embryo’s size. The face and neck begin to take on human form. The brain develops very rapidly. Leg and arm buds form and grow the eyes begin converging toward the center of the face. The mouth and nose form. Major organs of the digestive system become differentiated. The heart has been beating for about a month now.
    Month 3
    The fetus measures about 3 inches from head to buttocks and weighs about ½ ounce. The fetus has all of its major systems and they are functioning. However, it is still unable to survive independently. No new organs will need to be formed, but the ones that are present will need time to develop and mature. The digestive system is active. The liver and kidneys are functioning. The fetus practices swallowing amniotic fluid, breathing amniotic fluid and its vocal chords are developing. The roof of its mouth comes together and fuses. Taste buds appear, sex organs continue to develop, buds for all temporary teeth are formed and bone formation begins. During this month, arms, legs and fingers begin to make spontaneous movement. The eyelids close and are sealed shut at this time. They will reopen at about 6 months.
    Month 4
    The fetus grows to almost 6 inches in length and 4 ounces in weight. The skin is thin, loose and wrinkled and appears red because of underlying blood vessels. The face acquires a human appearance. The body outgrows the head at this time. Hands and feet become well formed and finger closure is possible. The fetal reflexes become more brisk as it begins to stir and move the arms and legs. In males, the testes are in position for later descent into the scrotum and in females, the uterus and vagina are recognizable.
    Month 5
    The fetus is now about 12 inches long and weighs about 8 ounces. During this month the mother will probably feel the baby’s movement, called quickening. It is suspended in a quart of amniotic fluid. The development seems so advanced that the skin and digestive organs are not prepared to exist on their own. Also, there is no provision for regulating body temperature. The fetus grows a fine dark body hair called lanugo and collects vernix, which is a waxy coating to cover and protect the skin. The nose and ears begin ossification, the skeleton hardens, and the heartbeat can now be heard. Fingernails and toenails begin to appear and the baby will wake and sleep. Sweat glands are formed and functioning.
    Month 6
    The fetus increases in weight and is now between 1 ½ - 2 pounds. The eyelids, which have been fused shut, are now open and completely formed. The eyes look up, down and sideways. Eyebrows and eyelashes are well defined and taste buds appear on the tongue and in the mouth.
    Month 7
    The fetus is now about 15 inches long and weighs between 2 ½ - 3 pounds. It can cry weakly and can suck its thumb. The fetus can make a variety of reflex movements: startle, grasp, and swim movements. The cerebral hemispheres cover almost the entire brain.
    Month 8
    The fetus will gain 2-3 pounds during this month, which it will need to stay warm following birth. The fingernails reach beyond the fingertips and much of the lanugo is shed. By the end of this month, the fetus will most likely settle into the head down position. However, the baby is capable of changing positions.
    Month 9
    The fetus reaches full growth. It measures 14-15 inches from head to buttocks and weighs 6-8 pounds. During this last month, the baby acquires antibodies from its mother which will give it temporary immunity against some diseases. The eyes are normally blue at birth because pigmentation is not normally formed until after a few weeks of exposure to light. Vernix is present over the entire body. The fetus will alternate between periods of activity and periods of quiet. The organs increase their activity, the fetal heart rate increases to rapid rate. Birth usually occurs approximately 280 days after the first day of the mother’s last menstrual period.

    TRIMESTERS

    FIRST TRIMESTER

    The Mother

    There are many signs and symptoms that help determine pregnancy.

    The first and most obvious change is missing a menstrual period. Usually with this symptom a woman will suspect pregnancy, although some women may miss two periods (if their cycle is not regular) before suspecting pregnancy.

    A simple urine test from the doctor will show whether or not a woman is pregnant. Home pregnancy tests are available for $10-$15 and are quite accurate, but are no substitute for a doctor’s test or visit. (Most doctors will give their own test anyway!)

    Other changes that take place in the woman are as follow:

    • Morning sickness/nausea: this probably occurs due to the change in hormones or a drop in blood level. Morning sickness does not just take place in the morning. Many women say it is associated with smells or foods they eat. Not much can be done to cure morning sickness. (Drugs or over-the-counter stomach remedies should not be taken.) Watching the diet can help relieve some of the symptoms. Your doctor may recommend eating several small meals through out the day and/or eating something before getting out of bed, such as crackers. Also, there is a vitamin B6 shot the doctor can give that seems to help many women.
    • Frequent urination: Because the uterus lies next to the bladder, the changes in the uterus cause crowding. Therefore, the need for urination is increased.
    • Cravings: Unusual food cravings are also common during pregnancy. Giving in to them once in a while is all right. If you crave non-food items, consult your doctor.
    • Breasts: Swollen, tender breasts are common in pregnancy. This may occur before the menstrual period is missed. The breasts will enlarge a lot during the first few months. Although nothing will prevent stretch marks, lotions can relieve the tightness and itching associated with pregnancy.
    • Fatigue and Dizziness: these are two common symptoms of early pregnancy. To alleviate dizzy spells, get up slowly. To help with fatigue, get plenty of rest and eliminate unnecessary physical exertion. However, maintaining a regular pre-pregnancy exercise program can be most beneficial as long as it is with your doctor’s approval.
    The Baby
    • During the first trimester many changes take place for the baby. At four weeks the embryo is approximately ¼ inch long and its heart has started to beat. By six weeks after fertilization the embryo is about 5/8 inch long and has developed most of its vital organs. Its bones are still soft but the skeleton is well-formed. The arms and legs are forming. At eight weeks the embryo officially becomes a fetus.
    • In two months the mother has missed two menstrual cycles and her body has created a completely new individual.
    • By the ninth week the fetus floats in the amniotic fluid and is nourished from the placenta through the umbilical cord.
    • At twelve weeks the fetus is 2 ¾ inches long. Most of its organs are working, including the kidneys. Its arms, legs, hand, fingers, etc. are fully developed. The nails on its fingers and toes are starting to develop.
    The Mother

    At the end of three months the baby is essentially complete. Form now on the mother’s uterus is busy helping the growth and perfecting of the baby.

    The doctor should be called immediately if any of these symptoms occur:

    1. Vaginal bleeding
    2. Sharp abdominal pain or cramping
    3. Loss of fluid from the vagina
    4. Severe or prolonged nausea or vomiting
    5. Frequent dizzy spells
    6. Painful urination
    7. High fever over 100*F
    8. Vaginal discharge that is irritating

    Some other things to consider:

    • Do not take any medication unless approved by your doctor. This includes over-the-counter drugs.
    • No drugs or alcohol. These have a tremendous effect on the baby.
    • No X-rays. Radiation can interfere with cell division and organ development.
    • No saunas and hot tubs. The high and prolonged temperatures can be harmful to the fetus.
    • Vaccinations. Because vaccinations are live viruses, these should not be taken during pregnancy. However, do vaccinate the children in your home to protect them against these deadly diseases.
    • Cats. A parasite found in cats, cattle, sheep, and pigs can cause a disease in humans called Toxoplasmosis. This can cause severe damage to an unborn child. Because of this risk, you should avoid undercooked meat and changing cat litter boxes.

    SECOND TRIMESTER

    The Mother

    The woman’s body has many changes taking place:

    Skin:
    Each woman’s body reacts differently to pregnancy. Skin may become oily, dry, scaly, etc. the skin must stretch over the growing uterus. Therefore, stretch marks appear often. Facial skin may darken. This is called Chloasma or the mask of pregnancy. Staying out of the sun can help but usually there is nothing that can be done to prevent it. It usually disappears after pregnancy. Another area that darkens is a line from the navel to the pubic hair. This is called Linea Nigra. This line disappears after pregnancy. Many women have this line – some darker than others.
    Emotions:
    Because of the hormonal changes within the woman’s body, she may experience mood swings, depression, and even bad dreams. She simply must adjust and realize that the moods will pass. She may need a few extra breaks or time to relax. She should not blame herself but realize that this is normal with all of the changes taking place in her life.
    The Baby

    By the fourth month the fetus is about two inches long. The first outlines of the face are showing. The muscles have developed and the baby is beginning to move. The baby weighs about ¾ of an ounce (the weight of an ordinary letter). The umbilical cord and placenta are now the source of nourishment from the mother. By the fifth month the fetus is six inches long and is completely formed. The baby’s movements are noticeable to the mother and she will feel them regularly. The skull bones are the most important bones being developed at this time. These will not complete development until after the baby is born. The sixth month is just past the half-way mark. The eyes are now fully developed. The ears are complete. There is a lot of evidence to show that the baby can hear the outside world. The sounds are probably muffled, maybe like sounds under water. It is also believed the baby can hear the mother’s voice and heart beat and, of course, the rumbling of her stomach. Fingerprints are formed.

    THIRD TRIMESTER

    The Mother

    The most obvious change that takes place in the third trimester is the woman’s body. The abdomen enlarges and fatigue is common.

    The baby moves a lot now. The mother should feel it move every couple of hours. If she does not, she should call her doctor. Generally expectant fathers take more interest during this last trimester. This is because they can feel the baby move and the reality of the impending birth makes them anxious and excited.

    A lot of women become more interested in how their bodies function during pregnancy, especially with a first pregnancy. They read everything they can to learn about this process.

    There are some common discomforts many women experience during the third trimester:

    1. Heartburn is caused by the large size of the baby and the stomach being pushed up. Usually cutting down on the size of meals will help with this problem. Eating several small meals is suggested. Another help is cutting out greasy ad spic foods. Again, the caution, do not take any over-the-counter medicines without your doctor’s approval.
    2. Shortness of breath is due to the size and activity of the baby. Taking deep breaths is a difficult task. Before delivery the baby “drops,” making breathing easier.
    3. Some women experience heart palpitations. The body volume has increased and sometimes the heart has to work overtime. However, the heart can stand the strain.
    4. Leg cramps are common, especially late in the pregnancy. These are often called “Charley Horses.” The woman must walk them off or relax until they subside. Providing the body with plenty of calcium is important. Sometimes taking extra calcium is helpful.
    5. Round ligament pains. Because of all the pressure on the ligaments in the lower abdomen, a mild to moderate pain sometimes occurs. There is a product called a SLING available at women’s personal departments. This helps support the abdomen and back, relieving pain and discomfort.
    The Baby

    The last trimester is mostly a time for the baby to grow and develop by developing a layer of fat. The organs develop and get ready for the baby to be born. The lungs develop in preparation for breathing and the baby is now head-down. It does not have room to roll around as in previous months. It still moves, but is not as active in the last few weeks because of limited space. By the end of the 38-40 weeks, the baby “drops” – giving the mother a little breathing space.

    DANGER SIGNALS

    As in the other trimesters, there are danger signals to watch for:

    • Vaginal bleeding
    • Sharp abdominal pain/cramping
    • Loss of fluid
    • Frequent dizzy spells
    • Visual disturbances
    • Nausea or vomiting
    • Sudden and excessive swelling of face, hands, and feet
    • Headache
    • Burning, painful urinationFever
    • Vaginal discharge
    • Call your doctor if any of these problems occur.

    The recommended weight gain for an average woman during pregnancy is 25 to 30 pounds. This weight is distributed as follows:

    • Baby – 7 ½ pounds
    • Placenta – 1 ½ pounds
    • Uterus – 2 pounds
    • Amniotic Fluid – 1 ½ pounds
    • Extra blood volume and water retention – 4 ½ pounds
    • Breast tissue – 3 pounds
    • Maternal stores of protein – 4 pounds

    ADD .doc HERE

    04.06 Radical Equations

    If after completing this lesson you can state without hesitation that...

    Objectives:

    1. I can solve radical equations
    2. I can use the Pythagorean Theorem and distance formula to solve problems
    3. I can solve radical equations
    4. I can isolate the radical on one side of the equation
    5. I understand the Pythagorean Theorem
    6. I can solve for the unknown length of a side of a triangle
    7. I understand the distance formula
    8. I can solve for the distance between two points on a graph

    …you are ready for the quiz. Otherwise, go back and review the material before moving on!

    Optional Readings:

    • Algebra Structure and Method, Book 1 (McDougal Littell) - Chapter 11

    04.06 Search Mechanisms

    Using Search Mechanisms

    As mentioned previously, internet searching is a critical skill to learn and master. Attached above is a helpful chart called "Search Mechanisims" to guide you on what search tool to use in various situations. Review the chart and become familiar with the information.

    There is an interesting search activity on the internet. It is called Googlewhacking. A Googlewhack is a type of contest for finding a Google search query consisting of exactly two words without quotation marks, that returns exactly one hit. A Googlewhack must consist of two actual words found in a dictionary. A Googlewhack is considered legitimate if both of the searched-for words appear in the result page. Published googlewhacks are short-lived, since when published to a website, the new number of hits will become at least two, one to the original hit found, and one to the publishing site. If you want to, go ahead and try it(not required). It's very difficult to come up with one. Double check with your parents before you try, Make sure your browser "safe search" is on. Do not follow any questionable links.

    Also attached above is document named "Search Engine Info Packet." Review the information on Search engines carefully. Also attached is the document "Internet Searches Worksheet." Use the information from the Search Engine Info packet to fill out the information on the worksheet completely. You will upload this worksheet as part of the assignment submission

    04.06 Search Mechanisms (CompTech2007)

    Using Search Mechanisms

    This is a helpful chart to guide you on what search tool to use in various situations.

    04.06 Search Mechanisms Activity

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 45 minutes

    Assignment (OR9)

    In the assignment section of the course you will UPLOAD the completed "Internet Searches Worksheet" that you filled out from the lesson materials above.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


    04.06 Section 4.3: Reimann Sums and Definite Integrals (Calculus)

    Section 4.3, Concept 1: Reimann Sums

    Read Concept 1, Example 1. Remember you are adding (summing) many rectangles' areas. The area of a rectangle is height times width. In Fig. 4.18, the height is f(c) (determined by the height of the curve) and the width is Δx. Your summation is simply summing height times width for every rectangle. If n = 3, you've got 3 rectangles; if n = 4, you sum up the area of 4 rectangles.

    But, if we have unequal rectangles, that width may not apply when i = 4. So, we need a general form for the distance or width of every rectangle. So, you subtract the ith interval from the (i-1)st interval. So, they substituted i-1 in for i in the formula for x sub i. Then simplified! Then, substituted that into the limit, with f(c) also substituted, and the limit is found. That limit is the area under that curve!

    Section 4.3, Concept 2: Definite Integrals
    Instead of writing limits, we are now going to use integral notation. And, we are going to specify limits of integration. These limits of integration are values a and b, that we want to find the area of a curve between.

    Read Example 2. What wrong with the answer? Is that the correct area? It isn't. So, simply computing the definite integral does not necessarily mean the area under the curve, because area below the x-axis is negative!

    Now complete problems 7, 9, 13-23 odd, 27, and 31.
    Assignment 6
    Section 4.3:
    7,9,13-23odd,27,31,41,43,45,46,47,51,53,69

    Section 4.3, Concept 3: Properties of Definite Integrals
    These properties are critical to your being able to manipulate integrals and solve them with ease. You may want to keep a note paper of them as you read about them so you have them handy to refer to!

    Complete TB Assignment 6.

    04.06 Section 4.3: Reimann Sums and Definite Integrals (Calculus)

    04.06 Skimming Assignment

    teacher-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

    Following Directions: Click on the URL for “A Message for Garcia”.

    a. Before reading the link, know that you will SKIM this text. In other words, do not read it word for word, simply skim it for the main ideas, key terms, read the first and last paragraph or the first sentence of each paragraph. Don’t hesitate to make notes on a separate sheet as you read.


    b. Then, in 80 words or less, tell me what this reading is about (based on your skimming) and how it can be used to support the idea of following directions.


    04.06 Space Text book (Earth Systems)

    teacher-scored 50 points possible 700 minutes

    Assignment:

    This is a BIG project. You are to write a textbook that documents many of the components of the space systems of which Earth is a part. Your textbook will contain four chapters, as outlined below.

    Your text must:

    · Be written in your own words (that means it should be easily understood by the typical high school freshman)

    · Cover ALL of the information required

    · Include illustrations and diagrams.

    · Be scientifically accurate

    · Be referenced. You MUST cite all information sources you use, including the addresses of all Internet sites.

    · Include THREE multiple-choice questions for each chapter. The multiple-choice questions must have answers with them. Each chapter is worth 10 points. The entire project is worth 50 points. (10 points for the information included in each of the four chapters and an additional 10 points for having illustrations and multiple choice questions.)

    Suggested Internet sites will be given for each chapter (see the URL's). You may use these sites, but you do not have to. You may use any sources of information available to you, provided that you reference them. Each chapter will probably be about three pages long.

    You should include enough information to adequately cover the subject but I certainly do not expect a major research paper on each topic.

    I STRONGLY suggest that you complete the first chapter and send it to me before working on the remaining three chapters. I will review your work and will tell you whether what you have done is satisfactory or if you need to invest more time and effort into your work. You may give your FOUR chapters any title of your choosing, but the contents of your chapters must be as follows:

    Chapter One: The History of Cosmology

    Cosmology is the scientific study of the large-scale properties of the Universe as a whole. Over the centuries, mankind’s ideas about the nature of the universe have changed significantly. In this chapter you will describe how the accepted ideas regarding the nature of the universe have changed in science throughout history.

    In your chapter, include explanations of the ideas of the following individuals:

    · The ancient Greeks · Ptolemy · Copernicus · Galileo · Kepler · Newton · Hubble · Einstein · ALSO, identify at least two examples of how technology has helped scientists investigate the universe. (HINT: The telescope is an example of technology.)

    Do NOT copy the text from your sources word for word. I have read the information on the sites. I will recognize it if you cut and paste it into your text. You will FAIL the assignment if you cut and paste the information from your sources into your textbook. You MUST write it in your own words.

    REMEMBER to include your three multiple-choice questions with answers. Your chapter should also have illustrations.

    STOP! Send me your first chapter for review before you continue.

    Chapter Two: Origin of the Universe

    · Describe the Big Bang Theory. 1. What does the theory state? 2. When did the Big Bang occur? 

    3. What happened during the Bang?

    4. What happened in the microseconds, seconds, minutes, and years after the Big Bang?

    · Describe at least three pieces of evidence that support the Big Bang Theory, including:

    1. Red shift evidence. What is a red shift? What does it tell us about the relative motion of a star or of the universe? Does the red shift indicate the universe is expanding or contracting?

    2. Cosmic microwave background energy. Where does it come from? How does its presence support the Big Bang Theory?

    3. The numbers and kinds of atoms found in the universe. There are many more hydrogen and helium atoms in the universe that any other kind of atoms. Where did they come from? How did they form? How does their relative abundance support the Big Bang Theory?

    REMEMBER to include your three multiple-choice questions as well as your references. Also, write the text in your own words and include illustrations or diagrams. 

    Chapter Three: Star Life Cycles

    · Describe the life cycle of a typical star.

    · Compare life cycle of the sun to the life cycle of other stars.

    · Hydrogen and helium (light elements) were formed during the Big Bang. Describe how the heavier elements were formed. (HINT: The answer has to do with the end of a star’s life!)

    · While you are at it, explain the origin of heavy elements on Earth. Where did most of the matter on Earth come from? (HINT: The answer is the same as the answer to the preceding question!)

    REMEMBER to include your three multiple-choice questions with answers. Also, document your sources and write the text in your own words. Have you included diagrams or illustrations?

    Chapter Four: Life on Earth

    · Describe the unique physical features of Earth’s environment that make life on Earth possible. Consider things like the atmosphere (including ozone layer and greenhouse gases), solar energy, and water.

    · Choose two planets in our solar system and compare them to Earth. 

    Consider their:

    1. average temperatures, low and high

    2. location in the solar system

    3. satellites

    4. atmosphere

    5. gravity

    6. common elements

    7. geology

    8. other interesting facts

    REMEMBER to include your three multiple-choice questions with answers. Also, write the text in your own words and identify your sources of information. Don’t forget your diagrams and/or illustrations!

    Send your completed text to me.

    GOOD LUCK AND HAVE FUN!!!!!!!!!

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


    04.06 Thesis My Thesis . . . - English 10

    teacher-scored 50 points possible 60 minutes

    What question are you answering?: Image: Michelle Meiklejohn / FreeDigitalPhotos.netWhat question are you answering?: Image: Michelle Meiklejohn / FreeDigitalPhotos.netTips For Writing A Thesis Statement Now that you have investigated and written about your topic, in depth, it is time to finalize your thesis statement. You have discovered what truly interests you about your subject through your research and writing. You now need to review your writing and your previous thesis statement to ensure that it states what you have presented in your paper. This statement serves as the main idea for your paper. It should express what you believe your research proves. An effective thesis statement tells readers specifically what you plan to tell them in your paper. It serves as a guide to keep your ideas on track as you present your research. Make sure your thesis does the following . . . -makes a statement of importance, takes a stand of some sort, or expresses a specific perspective or feature of the subject being researched. -briefly presents the most important point(s) of the paper in a effort to set a specific approach/direction and or purpose for your writing. The following formula and examples could be used to form your finalized thesis statement:

    A specific subject THE GREAT WALL OF CHINA + a particular stand, feeling, or feature WAS SPECIFICALLY BUILT AS A DEFENSE SYSTEM = an effective thesis statement of purpose Sample Thesis Statements: 1. What is the Great Wall of China and why was it built? OR 2. Certain political forces were at work when the Great Wall of China was being developed as a defense system.

    Refine your thesis statement according to the following checklist

    Thesis Checklist Make sure your thesis statement… _____ identifies a limited, specific subject _____ focuses on a particular stand, feature, or feeling about the subject _____ is stated in a clear, direct sentence (or sentences) _____ can be supported with the convincing facts and details you have researched and included in your drafts _____ meets the requirements of the assignments and explains what you are wanting to present or prove to your readers

    Write your finalized thesis statement.

    You can use your original thesis phraseology, if it seems to meet the stated requirements, but make sure you have included the main idea that you have formulated throughout the research process of your topic.

    Final Submission Inclusions: a. copy of the original thesis, labeled as thesis 1 b. copy of the new thesis, pasted below the old one and labeled as thesis 2 c. the body of the research paper needs to be attached below the two thesis statements Grading Criteria:

    Category Standards
    The student chooses a topic for research and formulates a thesis statement The student chooses a topic for research and makes modifications to the topic as information is gathered, then formulates a thesis statement that can be proven by the research. THESIS STATEMENT is clear, obvious, and outlines the (at least) three topics discussed in the BODY of the paper.

    SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


    04.06 Translating Functions - Extra Link (Math Level 1)

    I highly recommend that you click on the link above and work through the material before continuing.

    Guided Practice:
    After watching the video try these problems. The worked solutions follow.

    Example 1:

    Write the parent function and the vertical shift for each of the following functions:

    a) f(x)=3^{x}+2

    b) f(x)=(\frac{1}{2})^{x}-6

    Example 2:

    Write the parent function and the vertical shift for each of the following functions:

    a)

    b)

    Answers

    Example 1:

    Write the parent function and the vertical shift for each of the following functions:

    a) f(x) = 3x + 2

    Parent function: 3x

    Vertical shift: 2

    b) f(x)=(\frac{1}{2})^{x}-6

    Parent function: f(x)=(\frac{1}{2})^{x}

    Vertical shift: – 6

    Example 2:

    a)

    Parent function: 2x

    Vertical shift: 3 – 1 = 2 (see the blue line)

    b)

    Parent function: f(x)=(\frac{1}{2})^{x}

    Vertical shift: -1 – 1 = – 2

    04.06 Unit 4 Quiz(Psychology)

    computer-scored 32 points possible 40 minutes

    Be sure that you have completed all your assignments and have copies of them in front of you. Also have all your notes from the objectives handy. Review them once more before attempting this quiz. Remember, it's open note and book!!! You will need to score at least 80% on this quiz (that's 26 out of 32 points!) If you score BELOW this, then you will need to study your notes from the objectives and re-take the quiz. The test is taken from a pool of questions, so you never know exactly what questions will be asked.

    04.06 Window treatments(IntDes2)

    WINDOW TREATMENTS

    Overview: A window treatment is not considered the focal point of a room. However, the wall space or furniture surrounding the window may be considered a focal point. It is important to use appropriate treatments made of suitable materials to maximize the utility of the window. A window treatment should add to the beauty of the room in both color and style. Other considerations when making a selection are privacy, light control, durability of materials, and the ability of the material to conserve energy and block noise. Window treatments can be created to enhance or obscure an outside view. WINDOW TREATMENTS: BOTTOM UP SHADE A type of roller shade which pulls up instead of down CASEMENT FABRIC Fabric that is heavy enough to be drawn at night for privacy and serve as side draperies during the day CORNICE A rigid horizontal heading of wood or metal. CURTAIN Stationary treatment made of sheet or lightweight fabric DRPERY Heavier fabrics – may be stationary or drawn CASCADE Softly draped fabric hung at each side of swags JABOTS A ruffle or folded fabric placed vertically to separate swags LAMBREQUIN A cornice with a highly-curved bottom edge SEMI SHEERS Drapery usually used for privacy SHUTTERS made of wood or metal horizontal slats or of panels of fabric, which fit inside the window frame SIDE DRAPERIES Stationary or hanging draperies that may be left straight or tied back only at the sides of the window SOFT TREATMENT Window treatments such a draperies or curtains STRUCTURAL OR ARCHITECTURAL TREATMENTS Window treatments such a shutters, blinds, screens, panels, shades, wood valances SWAGS A valance made of fabric, which is pleated or draped across the top of a window TIE BACKS A cord or narrow strip of fabric to hold a drapery back VALANCE A fabric heading VENETIAN BLINDS Wooden, metal, or plastic strips controlled by turning a rod rather than by pulling a cord (may be vertical or horizontal, wide or narrow)

    04.06.00 Composition of Functions and Inverses (PreCalc)

    A composition is a function of a function. You can make interesting designs by making compositions.

    Spirographs



    Did you ever draw a spirograph? I loved doing this when I was a kid. Who doesn't! I always wanted to make my own designs, and tried to using cardboard. (They never worked very well, but I tired.)

    What do spirographs have to do with math? A spirograph is a pattern which gets repeated in a different pattern. It is a pattern within a pattern. A composition.

    Spirographs are not actually functions in the Cartesian coordinate system (later we will use polar systems, and spirogaphs are functions in that system). But you can imagine taking a function of a function. This will create a new function that has different properties from the original functions.


    You can download the attached files, or read the same content below.



    04.06.00 WRITING AN OUTLINE

    You should be finished with your reading assignment novel by this point.

    For this assignment, you will be required to draft an outline for your essay which includes the theme you’ve chosen to write about and specific examples from the book that illustrate that theme.

    Here is an example:

    Theme: In coming from innocence to maturity, one has to confront evil and inequality in the world.

    Support:

    a) The Symbol of the killing of a mockingbird represents those who would attempt to harm or destroy innocence. Miss Maudie’s explanation that it is a sin to kill mockingbird shows the moral imperative to stand up for those who would be harmed by evil forces in a society.

    b) Children begin to confront their fear of Boo Radley. He begins as a superstition and gradually Lee begins to 'flesh' him out and he becomes more human. The children begin to change their opinions of him.

    c) Scout is able to hold on to faith and move forward, but Jem is more damaged by the revelation of the evil that racism is in his community. Scout’s name foreshadows her ability for forge the path from childhood to maturity while maintaining faith in humanity.

    Before you begin your outline, view the video at the link below. Make sure that you understand the distinction between "topic," "theme," and "thesis." If that isn't clear, let me know.

    04.06.00- WRITING A FINAL DRAFT

    Once I have sent you comments on your rough draft, you are ready to revise it.  You had to wait a day or two for my response, so you should be able to look at your rough draft with "fresh eyes."

    To begin, read through this article, “Revision: from first to final draft.” Now, using these guidelines, begin to revise your essay. Work with it as much as you need.

    When you are confident in the content of your essay, head to the editing/proofreading stage. Read the article “Proofreading & Editing checklist" and make sure you have addressed each item on the list to polish your essay.   Keep in mind that these are the standards to which I will hold you when I grade the assignment.

    For this submission, please turn in both your rough draft and your final draft so I can see the evolution of your writing.

    Important:  Here you will also need to turn in your reading guide.

    04.06.01

    teacher-scored 8 points possible 30 minutes

    To help me evaluate your outline, make sure that you include the title of the novel.

    Assessment Rubric:

    Content Outline shows clear theme. /4
    Support Includes three supporting details or examples from novel /4

    04.06.01 Translating Functions - Worksheet (Math Level 1)

    teacher-scored 20 points possible 40 minutes

    Activity for this lesson

    1. Print the worksheet. Work all the problems showing ALL your steps.
    2. Digitize (scan or take digital photo) and upload your worksheet activity

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


    04.06.01 Activity log week 6 (Fitness for Life)

    teacher-scored 65 points possible 120 minutes

    Submit your activity log. To submit your work, scan or take a photo of your log and the form. Save as a .jpg, .pdf or .gif and go to Topic 3 on the main class page to upload the files. IMPORTANT: Please do not email logs, as this delays the grading process, since emails do not become submitted into the instructor's grade book. As a last resort, you may mail copies to your teacher's physical address.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


    04.06.01 Compositions (PreCalc)

    Taking the function of a function is called composition. You have actually done this before, you just probably didn't think of it like that. Consider

    h(x) = (3x2)5



    You solve a similar problem in an earlier problem set. To simplify this, you raise the terms in the
    parenthesis to the 5th power. So

    h(x) = (3x2)5 = (3)5(x2)5 = 243x10



    Easy enough. But if we look at that closely, we can break h(x) into 2 functions:

    ƒ(y) = y5

    g(x) = 3x2



    Then we can combine these to make h(x). This is an important “function” of functions, so it has its own name, composition, and it has a special notation

    h(x) = (ƒ ° g)(x)= ƒ (g(x))



    You read this as “h of x equals ƒ of g of x”.


    Is (ƒ°g)(x) the same as (g°ƒ)(x) ?


    Well, let's check our 2 functions.

    (ƒ °g)(x)=(3x2)5=243 x10

    (g° ƒ)(x)=3(x5)2=3 x10



    These are not equal. So

    (ƒ °g)(x)≠(g° ƒ)(x)



    Let's do another example. Consider



    This can be “decomposed” in several different ways. We could decompose it as

    g(x) = x3



    But ƒ(y) looks like that could also be decomposed into



    So



    and



    which means that



    So, you can take compositions of compositions. Cool.

    One last note about compositions. When you take a composition of 2 functions, the domain of the new function is limited by the domains of the original 2 functions. For example, consider the functions

    ƒ(x) = x2



    The function ƒ(x) = x2 has a domain from −∞ < x < ∞ , but the function g(x) = has the limited domain of -3 ≤ x ≤ 3.

    If we take the composition (ƒ °g)(x) we find




    Which has a limited range, but should have an infinite domain. But it doesn't really. Try graphing with your graphing calculator. Do you get the same thing as when you graph y= 32 - x2?

    You should get something like this.




    The limited domain of the original function continues to limit the domain of the new function.

    This will be important later.


    Your turn:


    1. Rewrite as a composition of 2 functions.




    04.06.01 Drawing Pictures Activity

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

    Upload a picture of the picture you drew during the Drawing Pictures Activity.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


    04.06.01 Lesson 4F: “¿Cuál(es)? - Which? (Spanish I)

    computer-scored 15 points possible 20 minutes

               **Assignment 04.06.01: “¿Cuál(es)? - Which?**: You got this, find the button: and click on it!

    04.06.01 Narrative Brainstorming

    teacher-scored 5 points possible 8 minutes

    The first assignment for this section is to brainstorm a list of 25 things that come to mind about “love and relationships.”

    Make a list of things you could write about and then narrow down your topic.

    Your brainstorm can be in any form--freewriting, mindwebs, lists, etc.

    Narrowing down a topic can be the hardest part of writing. The key to a good narrative is a good idea, and one that is manageable. Don't try to tell about your entire first date, relating every step of the day. Instead, try focusing on a single moment with all the details and showing your experience. Don't overwhelm the reader with too much 'fluff' -- focus on the details and be creative.

    Narrative Brainstorm Scoring Rubric
    4 points= includes a list of possible topics
    1 point= chosen topic is somehow highlighted in the "brainstorm"
    5 Points Total

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


    04.06.01 Quiz 36

    computer-scored 10 points possible 45 minutes

    If you are certain you have mastered the material, you are ready for the quiz. Click on the Quiz 36 link.

    04.06.01 Stages of Development(Childdev1)

    teacher-scored 40 points possible 60 minutes

    Assignment 4.6 - Stages of Development

    After going through the material for this lesson, describe the fetal development and the effects on the mother for each of the nine months of a pregnancy.

    You may want to copy and paste the information below into a word processor (i.e. Microsoft Word or WordPerfect) and complete your work. Then you MUST copy and paste the information into the submission area of the assignment that corresponds to this lesson which is found in Topic 3.

    You may use the following format to submit your work: (Copy and paste everything between the asterisks.)
    **********************************************************************

    First Month
    a. Fetal Development:
    b. Effects on Mother:
    Second Month
    a. Fetal Development:
    b. Effects on Mother:
    Third Month
    a. Fetal Development:
    b. Effects on Mother:
    Fourth Month
    a. Fetal Development:
    b. Effects on Mother:
    Fifth Month
    a. Fetal Development:
    b. Effects on Mother:
    Sixth Month
    a. Fetal Development:
    b. Effects on Mother:
    Seventh Month
    a. Fetal Development:
    b. Effects on Mother:
    Eighth Month
    a. Fetal Development:
    b. Effects on Mother:
    Ninth Month
    a. Fetal Development:
    b. Effects on Mother:

    **************************************************************

    04.06.02

    teacher-scored 44 points possible 60 minutes

    Assessment Rubric:

    Content   Interesting introduction; clear thesis statement; shows understanding of novel and the theme.   /4  
    Support   Supporting paragraphs include detail which is specific and directly supports your analysis.   /4  
    Clarity   Writing is clear, focused and well organized.   /4  
    Organization   Essay is organized so that the ideas follow logically from one to the next.   /4  
    Conventions   No significant errors in grammar, usage, punctuation or spelling.   /4  
    Extra Points   Rough Draft is included.   /4  
    Extra Points   Reading guide is complete and shows thought & effort.   /20  

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


    04.06.02 Drawing Pictures Comparison

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

    Take the directions to a friend or family member and ask them to complete the activity. (Do not show them your drawing until they are finished with theirs.) Compare your drawing with your friend/family member’s drawing. Talk about the differences in the two drawings and explain to each other why you drew it the way you did.

    Journal Entry

    Using complete sentences, answer the following:

    1. What differences did you notice in the two drawings?
    2. Why were there so many differences?
    3. What does following directions have to do with computers?

     

     

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


    04.06.02 Identity (PreCalc)

    Remember that an identity is something that doesn't change whatever you started with? So in numbers, we have 2 identities: the additive identity, 0, and the multiplicative identity, 1. Specifically:



    In matrices we also had an additive identity matrix, and a multiplicative identity matrix. The 2x2 additive and multiplicative identity matrices are shown below



    So given a matrix


    We have





    So, these are examples of some identities.

    Previously we stated that the function ƒ(x) = x is the identity function. This is because when we take a composition of any function, g(x), with the identity, or a composition of the identity with any function, g(x), the result is the original function, g(x).

    Consider the function g(x) and the identity function ƒ(y).

    g(x) = x2 + 4x


    ƒ(y) = y



    Now find (ƒ °g)(x) and (g°ƒ)(x) . To find (ƒ°g)(x) we insert the function g(x) every time there is a y in ƒ(y). Likewise, to find (g° ƒ)(x) we substitute y with ƒ(x) every time it appears in g(y). This gives us

    (ƒ °g)(x) = (x2 + 4x) = g(x)


    (g°ƒ)(x) = (x)2 + 4(x) = g(x)



    And that is how the identity function is defined.


    Your turn.

    3. Given ƒ(x) = x, g(y) = 7 y4, and h(z) = ,

    show that (ƒ °g)(x) = g(x) , (g° ƒ)(x) = g(x) , (ƒ °h)(x) = h(x) , and (h° ƒ)(x) = h(x).




    04.06.02 Unit 04 Review Quiz (Math Level 1)

    teacher-scored 53 points possible 45 minutes

    Unit Review Quiz

    1. Print the quiz. Work all the problems showing ALL your steps.
    2. Digitize (scan or take digital photo) and upload your quiz.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


    04.06.03 Inverses (PreCalc)

    An inverse will return the identity when the operation is performed.

    For example, consider the number . We need to find a number that when added to will give us the additive identity, 0. Perhaps you already know that - is that number. So - is the additive inverse of , and



    In a similar manner, the multiplicative inverse of can be found by looking for a number that will return 1 when it is multiplied by . You may realize that the multiplicative inverse of is 1, and



    In quarter 1, we found the multiplicative inverses of 2x2 matrices, and verified that these were inverses.
    
    To find the inverse function for an arbitrary function, g(x), we look for a function that will return the identity function when composed with g(x). We denote the inverse of g(x) as g-1(x). (This notation is similar to the inverse of matrices.) This means that

    (g°g−1)(x)=(g−1°g)(x) = x

    Also similar to matrices, not all functions have an inverse.

    For an inverse to exist, the original function must be one-to-one. This means that ƒ(x) = x3 has an inverse, but ƒ(x) = x2 does not. It is possible to find a partial inverse to a function that is not one-to-one by limiting the domain.

    Below are the steps of finding an inverse:

    1. Write the equation.
    2. Exchange the x and y variables. So initially you had y = ƒ(x), you should now have x = ƒ(y).
    3. Solve the equation for y.
    4. The result will be the inverse function of ƒ(x).



    Example:

    Consider the function

    g(x) = 2 x - 5


    1. write this as an equation
    2. y = 2 x -5


    3. exchange the x and y variables
    4. x = 2 y -5


    5. solve for y
    6. x +5 = 2 y - 5 +5



    7. this is the inverse of g(x)



    You should be able to follow these steps to find the inverse of any one-to-one function. So, let's do that.

    4. Given ƒ(x) = 3 x - 2, find ƒ-1(x).

    5. Show that (ƒ°ƒ−1)(x) = (ƒ−1°ƒ)(x) = x



    04.06.04 Inverses of Power Functions (PreCalc)

    It is fairly easy to find the inverse of the power functions. You remember that the roots are defined as the inverses of the powers. So the inverse of . In a similar manner, the inverse of .

    Since only one-to-one functions have inverses, only powers raised to fractions with both odd numerators and odd denominators have inverses. (This includes the integers, as an integer can be treated as a fraction with 1 as the denominator.) In general, the power inverses are found by the following: given



    where m and n are odd integers.

    So for example, let



    then



    Let's check this. Find (h°h−1)(x) and (h−1°h)(x) . To make it clearer, write h(x) and h-1(x) as radicals.



    Or we can use the rules of exponents to do this.



    This is a bit easier to do.

    Both compositions have a result of x. This means that is indeed the inverse of .

    We also can find the inverses of functions with even numbers in either the numerator or denominator by limiting the domain. Remember, ƒ(x) = x2 was not a one-to-one function, but was. Of course, g(x) is only defined for positive numbers. By limiting the domain of ƒ(x) to only the positive numbers, then we are able to find inverses for both ƒ(x) and g(x).

    This means that given

    ƒ(x) = x2

    ƒ-1(x) does not exist,



    but if we only allow , then

    ƒ(x) = x2;



    likewise given

    g-1(x) = x2; .



    You should be able to find the inverse of all power functions in the same way.

    Your turn.

    6.

    7. Show that ƒ-1(x), and g-1(x) are inverses of ƒ(x) and g(x).



    04.06.05 Graphing Inverses (PreCalc)

    The graph of any inverse is found by reflecting the function across the line y = x. If the function is not one-to-one, the resulting reflection will not actually be a function. Consider the following graphs.

    In the first image,

    ƒ(x) = x3



    and

    are clearly inverse functions.




    In the second image, while the graph of ƒ(x) = x2 is a function, the reflected graph is not.

    This means that the function ƒ(x) = x2 does not have an inverse.

    Of course, we can limit the domain of ƒ(x) = x2 to positive numbers. If we do this, the resulting function does have an inverse, as shown here.



    has the inverse





    This is valid for all the power functions.

    If there is an even number in either the numerator or denominator, the function does not have an inverse, except for over the limited domain of (or x > 0 if the exponent is negative).

    If the function has odd numbers in both the numerator and denominator, the function has an inverse over its entire domain, (−∞,∞) for positive powers and (−∞,0)∪(0,∞) for negative powers.

    Consider the following functions of negative powers.

    The function



    has an inverse of



    if you limit the domain to x > 0.




    Similarly, does not have an inverse, but would with a limited domain.

    On the other hand



    has





    as an inverse for its entire domain (which is limited, but it is the same domain), and vice-versa.

    Now it is your turn. Given the following graphs, find the graph of their inverse functions. Indicate if the inverse exists for the entire domain, or only for a limited domain.




    Answers:



    1. (ƒ°g)(x) = ƒ(g(x)) = 7x4 = g(x)

      (g° ƒ )(x) = g( ƒ (x)) = 7x4 = g(x)






    2. ƒ-1(x) exists for the full domain of ƒ(x).
    3. ƒ-1(x) has a domain of x > 0, therefore the inverse of ƒ(x) does not exist for the full domain of ƒ(x).
    4. ƒ-1(x) has a limited domain of x ≥ 0, which corresponds to the full domain of ƒ(x).




    04.06.06 Compositions of Functions and Inverses, Review (PreCalc)

    In this lesson we learned about compositions, identities, and inverses.

    Composition of a function:
    Given ƒ(y), g(x), then h(x) = (ƒ ° g)(x) = ƒ (g(x)) , read "ƒ of g of x", is found by replacing y with g(x) in ƒ(y). It is important to remember that ( ƒ ° g)(x) ≠ (g ° ƒ )(x) .


    Identity:
    The identity function is the function ƒ(x) = x. this function has the property that when a composition of the identity is taken with an arbitrary function g(x), or vice-versa, it returns the original function g(x). That is (ƒ ° g)(x) = (g ° ƒ)(x) = g(x) .


    Inverse:
    The inverse function, ƒ-1(x), is a function that when a composition of ƒ(x) is taken with its inverse, or vice-versa, the identity is returned. That is (ƒ ° ƒ−1)(x) = (ƒ−1 ° ƒ)(x) = x . Only one-to- one functions have inverses, although a partial inverse can be found by limiting the domain (either of the function or the inverse).



    To find the inverse of a function, follow these steps:

    1. Write the equation.
    2. Exchange the x and y variables. So initially you had y = ƒ(x), you should now have x = ƒ(y).
    3. Solve the equation for y.
    4. The result will be the inverse function of ƒ(x).
    Inverse of Power Functions:
    Given , then where m and n are odd integers. If m and/or n are even integers, then a partial inverse can be found by limiting the domain (either of the function of or the inverse).


    Graphing Inverse Functions:
    The graph of an inverse function is found by reflecting the function across the line y = x. The function ƒ(x) = x3 and its inverse, are shown.





    04.06.07 Compositions of Functions and Inverses - Links (PreCalc)



    Use these links for supplemental instruction or additional practice.



    04.06.08 Introduction to Functions -- Assignment 7 (PreCalc)

    teacher-scored 80 points possible 120 minutes

    Complete

    Unit 04 -- Introduction to Functions -- Assignment 7
    Composition of Functions and Inverses

    In this assignment you will need prove you can work with compositions and inverses.

    Print out the attached assignment and complete the assignment in the space provided and complete the graphs on graph paper or on the computer with an appropriate graphing program. You may use additional paper if needed. Once you have completed the assignment, scan it into the computer and convert it to an image file such as .pdf or .jpg. You may need to practice scanning pencil drawings so that you produce a clear, easily readable image. Finally, upload the image using the assignment submission window for this assignment. Alternately, you may wish to type the answers into a word processing document, convert this to an .rtf file, and upload this. If you do this, be sure to include the questions as well as the answers.

    This assignment is worth 80 points.

    Complete this assignment after reading Lesson 6.



    04.08 Quarter Review (Biology)

    This is a review for you to prepare for the final test.

    TO DO

    Complete: 

    • 04.08.01 Quarter Review

    Proctored Final:  Once you earn at least 60% on each assignment and 80% on each quiz module 4 will open.  Once Module 4 is open you will need to:

    • Complete the Ready Assignment.
    • Right under the Ready Assignment, there is a link with a list of proctors. The proctors are listed by county. Select a proctor from the list.
    • Contact the proctor (via e-mail or phone) and make arrangements to take the final.
    • When you show up to take the final the proctor will type in the password and you will be ready to go.
    • In order to earn 0.25 biology credit, you need to get at least 60% on the final.
    • To prepare for the final I recommend you understand the concepts from assignment 04.08.01 and the quizzes.

     

     

    04.08 Units 1 through 4 Online Test

    computer-scored 102 points possible 20 minutes

    Go to the link below and take the online test. You will only be allowed one attempt at this test and it has a 20 minute time limit.

    04.08.01 Quarter Review (Biology)

    teacher-scored 30 points possible 90 minutes

    Your answers must be VERY DETAILED. Copy all information below between the lines of asterisks, including the lesson number, revision date and all questions into a word document.

    ***************************************************************
    ASSIGNMENT 04.08.01 - REVISION DATE: 10/11/13 (Copy everything between the asterisks.)

    4th quarter Biology final study guide

    Make sure you understand all of your assignments and this study guide.

    1. Where in a mammal would mitosis take place?

    2. Where in a mammal would meiosis take place?

    3. Where in a plant would mitosis take place?

    4. Where in a plant would meiosis take place?

    5. Explain the difference between identical and fraternal twins related?

    6. Which nucleotide does guanine bond with?

    7. Which nucleotide does adenine bond with?

    8. What is genetic engineering?

    9. When diagramming a segment of DNA what does:

     

    • G stand for?
    • T stand for?
    • A stand for?
    • C stand for?
    • How do the nucleotides pair up?

    10. What is asexual reproduction? Give an example of an organism that reproduces asexually. How does asexual reproduction help the survival of a species?

    11. Draw and label the structural shape of DNA.

    12. Explain mRNA and how the different nucleotides combine.

    13. What is contained in the nucleus of a cell? Do all cells have a nucleus?

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


    05.01.05 Panama Canal Quiz (World Geography)

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

    Panama Canal-

    First, check out these two videos about the Panama Canal:

    http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1063460/through_panama_canal_in_75_seconds/

    and

    http://www.5min.com/Video/Discover-the-Panama-Canal-228514752

    Then, read about the canal at

    http:/http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panama_Canal

    Use the information you gain to answer the following questions:

    1. What limits the size of ships that can use the Panama Canal?
    2. Why is the Panama Canal important?
    3. Who operates the Panama Canal?
    4. What were the three major engineering jobs necessary to dig the canal?
    5. What was the greatest obstacle to building the canal?
    6. How did the Spanish-American War affect the canal?
    7. How long does it take a ship to pass through the Panama Canal?
    8. Summarize the history of the Panama Canal in a five-sentence paragraph.
    9. What did you find surprising or interesting about the Canal when
    you viewed the two videos? List three things here:

    a.

    b.

    c.

    ***70% or higher is required to pass any assignment***

    05.01.06 Rainforest Pop-up Book/ Interactive Power Point (World Geography)

    teacher-scored 100 points possible 120 minutes

    You will create a childrens lift-a-flap book illustrating the parts of a rainforest, animals that live in a rainforest, and the interaction of man with the rainforest. You may also use power point for this project, but make sure it is INTERACTIVE.

    TASKS: Create a story line that will teach a child about the rainforest.

    * These topics must be found in your story
    o structure of the rainforest
    o animals found in the forest
    o indigenous people of the forest
    o effects of deforestation

    * Create illustrations for your books and place windows in them. Mount the illustrations on top of a second sheet and place the text material behind the windows. MAKE SURE THAT COLOR IS ADDED TO THE BOOK!!!

    Refer to the web sites to help you investigate the rainforest. Cite the sources at the back of the book or power point.

    Search the web for at least two other sites on the rainforest for information and put those sites URL (address) on the last page of your book.

    The book can be sent in through surface mail, or digital pictures of the book can be taken and sent in electronically. If you choose to send the digital pictures, be sure to take pictures with your flaps both closed and open. The Power Point can be sent via the submissions in the assignment or via e-mail.

    The following criteria will be use to evaluate your book:
    1. Is the major idea clear and easily identified?
    2. Are the pages and illustration well organized and attractively displayed? What is the overall appearance of the book?
    3. Is the text information effective and tied into the main idea?
    4. Is the major idea backed up by the supporting information and is all information accurate?

    Here are some more links that give some information about the rainforest.

    -- http://www.rain-tree.com/facts.htm

    -- http://www.kidssavingtherainforest.org/factsheet.html

    -- http://savetherainforest.org/

    -- http://www.rainforestanimals.net/

    -- http://kids.mongabay.com/

    ***70% or higher is required to pass any assignment***

    05.02 Sentences, clauses, and phrases (Writing lab)

    When we write or talk, we use groups of words. For the sake of simplicity, we have names for different kinds of groups of words - so that we can talk or write about our talking or writing.

    The key unit of written communication is the sentence. A sentence begins with a capital letter and ends with a period, question mark or exclamation point. It is the smallest group of words that can stand alone (often it is said to "express a complete thought"). A sentence always has a subject and a predicate (though sometimes the subject may be understood rather than expressed, as in "Get out of here!", where the subject is understood to be "You").

    A clause is a group of words that has a subject and a predicate. A clause may be:
    an independent clause(in which case it may be a whole sentence by itself, or a part of a complex sentence), or
    a dependent clause, also called a subordinate clause (in which case it must be part of a complex or compound sentence). A dependent clause is not missing any parts - the thing that makes it dependent is an extra word (or words), usually a conjunction which is meant to link or relate it to an independent clause. For example:
    I stayed up late so that I could study.
    "I stayed up late" is an independent clause, which could stand alone as a sentence. "So that I could study" is a dependent clause which can't stand alone as a sentence, but ONLY because the words "so that" link it to the first clause. If you left out "so that", "I could study" could be a complete sentence on its own.

    A phrase is a group of words working together to function as a single part of speech. It may have a subject, or a predicate, but doesn't necessarily have either, and never has both. Here are some examples of phrases:
    going to Georgia
    caused various problems
    up the stairs
    the strongest man in the county

    A simple sentence has only one clause (though it may have many phrases).
    Examples of simple sentences:
    Marian slept.
    The cat and dog chased each other around the house.
    Tom ordered a milkshake.
    The house has a spiral staircase, two stained glass windows, and a balcony.
    We stopped for groceries, talked to friends, and drove home.
    Before starting chores, they changed clothes.

    A compound sentence has two independent clauses connected by a coordinating conjunction (commonly, and, or, but, & so).
    Examples of compound sentences:
    We won the first game, so we had to stay for the finals.
    I finished running errands, but I was late.
    Margaret can go to the carnival, or Jared can go to the movie.
    He was happy, and he was pleased with his son.

    Another, much less common kind of compound sentence has two independent clauses connected by a semicolon and a conjunctive adverb (such as: then, thus, however, also, nevertheless, similarly, for example, in addition).
    Examples:
    We won the first three rounds; however, we lost in the finals.
    She told her mother; furthermore, she left a note on the refrigerator.

    A complex sentence has one independent clause and one dependent clause. Either clause can come first, and the dependent (sometimes called subordinate) clause begins with a subordinating conjunction (such as: because, since, that, before, after, in spite of, although, if, while, until, when, where, unless), or a relative pronoun (which, who, that).
    Examples of complex sentences:
    After we started home, we quickly got lost.
    We got lost after we started home.
    Because she was wearing white, she didn't want to fall in the mud.
    Lois wouldn't have minded getting muddy if she had been wearing jeans.
    Unless George is going to drive, Tyler can't go.
    Desrie likes Robert in spite of the fact that he wears twelve earrings.
    We went to see Paul, who is my favorite brother. [who, which, that & what can act both as the subordinating conjunction and as the subject of the dependent clause]

    As you might guess, a compound-complex sentence has both two independent clauses, and at least one dependent clause, in any order.
    Examples of compound-complex sentences:
    Marty was hungry, so after they finished cleaning up, they bought a pizza.
    Before the test started, Jeremy got sick, and Brent passed out.

    More explanation & examples about simple, compound, and complex sentences:

    A simple sentence can be stripped down to its single subject & verb. Here is a long simple sentence:
    Hoping to meet her brother on the evening before their departure, she carefully planned a schedule to help with her preparations.
    Why is this a simple sentence? Because if you get rid of all the extra modifiers, it strips down to "she planned a schedule". It has only one clause. You might think of a clause as a basic subject/verb unit. If you think of it that way, you can see that this is still a single clause even though the subject & verb are compound: George and Terry stopped and waited. It is one unit of meaning.

    Compound sentences:
    On the other hand, if we say "George stopped, and Terry waited," now we have two clauses - two units of meaning. Each unit has its own subject doing a unique thing. We could also say "George stopped, but Terry waited," or "George stopped, so Terry waited." Any of those three are compound sentences because they consist of two independent clauses, connected by a coordinating conjunction (and, but, so, or).

    Complex sentences
    The other way of connecting clauses involves subordinating conjunctions, which suggest how one of the units of meaning depends on the other. If we say "Because George stopped, Terry waited," we have a complex sentence - one independent clause (terry waited) with at least one dependent, or subordinate, clause (because George stopped). In many cases we can reverse the order of the clauses ("Terry waited because George stopped.)" A complex sentence can have clauses nested inside of clauses: Because Terry was waiting ~ while George was stopped,~ the whole convoy came to a halt~ until the tow truck arrived~ so that George's car could be hauled back home~ where a mechanic was waiting to fix it ~so that he could continue on with everyone else. That has seven clauses! Only one (the whole convoy came to a halt) is independent.

    Compound/complex sentences
    More often, complicated sentences use both ways of connecting clauses, so they have two or more independent clauses AND one or more dependent (subordinate) clauses: George stopped ~ and Terry waited ~ while the rest of the group caught up. (Two independent clauses and one dependent clause)

    05.02.01 Chapter 5 Assignment 1 - Random Symbols (while) (C++)

    teacher-scored 20 points possible 60 minutes

    Do this assignment and submit it under Topic 3.

    Write a C++ program using a while loop to display 20 random symbols using the characters ! - @ associated with the code numbers 33 - 64.

    Example:

    Random Symbols
    #&(@!^9&$)-78_%$&!.*

    05.06 Cults and extreme movements (Sociology)

    teacher-scored 25 points possible 45 minutes

    Perhaps you have heard of situations in which powerful leaders influenced group members to take their own lives or perform other acts that seem hard for a rational person to believe. In this lesson you will examine some of these occurrences, and see what extreme movements have in common.

    To begin this lesson, write a one-page report on various cult suicides. Be sure to talk about Jonestown, as well as The People's Temple and Heavens Gate. Use the video clip and website in the URL's and the article below for information.

    __________________

    SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER
    (San Francisco, CA)
    Nov. 8, 1998, pp.

    Reprinted with permission from the San Francisco Examiner. (c) 1998 San Francisco Examiner. This article accessed from the SIRS database, available free to all Utah students through http://www.pioneer.uen.org.

    DAYS OF DARKNESS: NOVEMBER 1978
    Utopian Nightmare--Jonestown: What Did We Learn?
    by Larry D. Hatfield

    … James Warren Jones was born May 13, 1931, in a tattered town called Crete in Indiana. He was different from the beginning--a Holy Roller preacher as a child, selling spider monkeys on the streets of Indianapolis to buy food as a young student and modeling himself after Father Divine, whose Peace Mission drew a cult following at the time. In a credo that would refine and warp itself until the end, he developed a set of professed beliefs, sometimes called "apostolic socialism," that ignored God while deifying social justice and worshipping the slavific power of socialism.

    He became a student minister at an Indiana Methodist church in 1952. He left the Methodists because the church wouldn't desegregate, and in the 1950s founded the movement that would take various names as it evolved into Peoples Temple. In 1965, Jones and his wife, Marceline, brought the nascent temple and a handful of the faithful to California, the promised land for alternative religions.

    A CHURCH IN REDWOOD VALLEY

    The Joneses and their rainbow family of adopted children and about 70 followers set up in the sylvan Redwood Valley near Ukiah where relations between them and the laidback locals were uneasy but generally peaceful.

    Jones quickly relocated his church to the bigger and more lucrative markets of San Francisco and Los Angeles. He moved Peoples Temple into an abandoned synagogue in The City's Fillmore district.

    While attracting a growing congregation of urban blacks, he used his considerable intellectual and acting skills to bring onto his bandwagon many of San Francisco's leading politicians.

    Current Mayor Brown was one of Jones' biggest cheerleaders, hailing him as a blend of Martin Luther King, Einstein and Mao. Then-Lt. Gov. Mervyn Dymally was another. Mayor George Moscone was still another, naming Jones to head his Housing Commission and, some said, owing his razor-thin election to the few hundred illegal voters Jones allegedly and other seekers were hearing from Jones' pulpit.

    …But the politics of the day also fed the paranoia in Jones. He believed the government was conspiring to continue the war in Vietnam and spy on such groups as the Black Panthers. The government was not to be trusted.

    The government also was working covertly against Jones and the temple, seeking to short-circuit the drive for a better society. Jones believed all this and so, to an almost universal extent, did the Temple congregation.

    So Jones moved the temple and 1,000 or so followers to Guyana's outback, winning a 25-year lease on 3,852 acres in the Orinoco River basin near the disputed border with Venezuela.

    A small group of temple pioneers moved in 1974 to what was to become Jonestown, far from the hostile attacks of media, government and others. The lease from the Guyana government required the Peoples Temple Agricultural Project to "cultivate and beneficially occupy" at least one-fifth of the land by 1976.

    Temple members raised livestock and grew pineapple, cassava, eddoes and other tropical fruits and vegetables. Charles Garry, Peoples Temple's San Francisco lawyer, called it a paradise.

    TROUBLE IN PARADISE

    But there was trouble in paradise. The camp never became agriculturally self-sustaining and the swift tropical diseases of the jungle ran rampant. At the end, only a third of the residents were able-bodied. Worse, critics said, it was a prison camp--people were not allowed to leave. Abusive practices such as beatings and forced sex, long-rumored but little-reported at the San Francisco church, escalated. Jones' deteriorating mental stability made him increasingly erratic and he demanded utter, unquestioning loyalty.

    Agencies from the State Department and the CIA to the Internal Revenue Service and the Postal Service were investigating or taking legal action against Peoples Temple for mail fraud, wresting Social Security checks from members, arms and narcotics trafficking, and other crimes, real or imagined.

    Aiding and abetting the conspiracy in the eyes of Jones and his followers were the few temple defectors and families of members who were getting attention from the hostile North American media.

    Against this background, Jones, who was white, and his predominantly white inner circle had faithful followers practice mass suicide in a series of "white nights." Such a drastic end was the only possible response to the vast and growing outside threat, Jones preached. The people believed him.

    CONGRESSMAN'S VISIT

    The final act began to unfold when Ryan, a respected Democratic congressman from San Mateo County with a taste for headlines, lead a delegation of newsmen and a group of family members called the Concerned Relatives to Jonestown to investigate allegations of thought control, imprisonment, drug- and gun-running.

    Ryan was knifed--superficially--during the visit. When he was ready to leave, several Jonestown residents asked to leave with him, an action that apparently triggered the subsequent massacre of Ryan, Robinson and the others at Port Kaituma.

    The incredible scene of mass death quickly followed at Jonestown.

    "We died because you would not let us live," wrote temple insider Annie Moore in her suicide note.

    Among those who survived was Jim Jones' son, Stephan, who was away with the camp's basketball team. It was left to the younger Jones, who had broken with his father and since has denounced him repeatedly, to declare Jim Jones' most durable epitaph. In a recent ABC television visit to Jonestown, Stephan Jones said simply, "My father was a fraud."

    While no one denies that Jones was a madman, some feel the people of Jonestown have been unfairly characterized as mindless zombies.

    "The people who died in Jonestown were sweet, altruistic people. One the of the tragedies of Jonestown is that people haven't paid attention to that," says Timothy Stoen, whose son, John Victor, died at Jonestown. Stoen played a pivotal role in a custody battle with Jones that helped precipitate the murder-suicides. Among Ryan's reasons for going to Guyana was the custody fight.

    "No single theory could possibly explain the many complex and related issues that led the members of the Peoples Temple to leave family, friends and church communities and take residence in the jungle of Jonestown," says Archie Smith Jr., professor of pastoral psychology at the Pacific School of Religion and Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley. "Labeled by many as sick, dysfunctional or disadvantaged, (they) were seeking an alternative to the status quo, new and just ways of living and being in the world."

    "Amidst all the attention that was focused on Jim Jones, the people were accorded scarcely any respect as thinking, feeling, caring human beings....The dehumanizing of the victims of Jonestown by the journalistic community was tantamount to the withholding of permission to grieve."

    TRAGIC CHANGE IN DIRECTION

    Maaga says the lessons of Jonestown are to be learned by trying to figure out why the committed veered so tragically from their vision of a better world.

    "I think things went right earlier in the movement," Maaga says, pointing to the temple's successful social programs in San Francisco.

    "What we should be talking about is what went right and when did it go wrong," she said, suggesting the answers might prevent similar tragedies. "I don't think Peoples Temple was a singular example of a self-righteous religion gone horribly awry.

    "What was important about it was what they (the members) were--as people--not just how they died."

    Rebecca Moore, a University of North Dakota professor of religion and philosophy, lost her sisters Carolyn Layton and Annie Moore at Jonestown, as well as her nephew, Jim-Jon Prokes.

    She says some of the still-unexplored questions are whether people in San Francisco could have prevented the tragedy by reining in Jones before he was all-powerful and crazy; what responsibility Willie Brown and others had before and after the catastrophe; and the role of the black church.

    "At times I despair that we've learned nothing," Moore says. "By that I mean that people continue to demonize (Jones) and forget the others.

    "As a society we fail to take seriously the very strong and powerful desire, or hunger, for community, a community of people working for social change. The people in Jonestown were trying to create a Utopian society, racial justice and social equality. Granted, there were internal contradictions, but they were one of the few groups intentionally addressing the problem of racism and trying concretely to do something about it."

    The media, Moore says, almost always dwells on the dead bodies and on Jones himself; the government has swept under the rug all understanding of Jonestown and of its own role. No official inquiry was held in the United States and the Guyanan investigation was almost laughably superficial.

    Jonestown, Berkeley's Smith warns, "was not an anomaly. Rather, it was a product of the evolving ethos of our time, an ethos that tends to repress and trivialize the essentially religious impulse. The social and historical forces that gave rise to Jonestown 20 years ago operate today."

    A CENTRAL LESSON UNLEARNED

    "Perhaps the biggest heartache of all," Sawyer says, "is that our country and our churches still have not sought an answer to the question of why the people joined this movement, and so still have not discerned the central lesson of Jonestown. Why, indeed, were white idealists and black Christians drawn to a movement that promised them sanctuary from America's failure to honor her promises of equality and justice?

    "Churches, like the public, were so horrified they psychologically needed to distance themselves...to handle the reality of it. Most people know what Jonestown is but if you say Peoples Temple, people will have a blank look. They don't know there was a longstanding social change movement.

    "And they're no more informed today than they were 20 years ago. I hope this anniversary will not be just a replay of Jim Jones as a crazy man but that there is some conscientious effort to make America understand. It takes two or three decades before people start asking the right questions....There hasn't been that kind of soul-searching.

    "It's important to do this. We have to have sense of the wounds that are still there."

    "What should we be talking about?" asks Jackie Speier, who was elected to the California Assembly after the tragedy and on Tuesday was elected to the state Senate.

    "We should be talking about the fact that the menace of cults still lingers. Cults are still around. They're all around us. Many continue to operate under the guise of being religious, under the guise of religiosity and the First Amendment, violating state and federal laws (while) the government again looks the other way."

    Dr. Hardat Sukhdeo, a Guyana-born psychiatrist who treated Jonestown survivors, says the conditions that created Peoples Temple could create a similar movement.

    People joined the temple because "they needed to have this type of togetherness and leadership and somebody to tell them what to do and when to do it," said Sukhdeo, of Rutgers University.

    Sukhdeo sees the majority of temple members, mostly black, as largely alienated and at sea. The Peoples Temple was more of a place to improve their own lives than to achieve the societal do-goodism espoused by young whites who joined.

    "They wanted something like the cult to say, 'Yes, we know the truth. Yes, we have the answers.' They were lost, they were angry and they didn't feel they belonged to society."

    Nothing has changed, he says: Groups such as Branch Davidian and Heaven's Gate prove that the attraction to cults remains.

    A DISTRUST OF RELIGION

    The Rev. Robert Warren Cromey, rector of San Francisco's Trinity Episcopal Church, says that a "sad part of Jonestown is it has sent a message of distrust of religion, particularly the small sect religions....(There is) a sense of 'if you're religious, this is what might happen to you.'

    "But on the positive side, people are looking more critically before getting involved in religious programs, especially the more fringe type of things. Look at the kind of scrutiny now given to Hare Krishna, Scientology and the like. That's as it should be."

    Timothy Stoen also warns of the dangers of cults.

    "There are a lot of Jim Jones wannabes out there," said Stoen, who recently moved to Colorado Springs from Mendocino. "...You can't wish them away...(but) one hopefully can learn from (Peoples Temple) that these things can be lethal and there comes a point early on when you can do something about it."

    The psychological isolation that leads people to seek groups like Peoples Temple still exists, he says, urging families of cultists to ask questions, challenge the groups and otherwise get involved.

    "People just have to take an even-handed look that this is kind of a sign of our times--people need structure, community, etc. If mainline churches don't provide it, there'll be cults. Those cults will be there serving some sort of need."

    __________________

    What makes people follow extreme leaders and do such tragic and often uncharacteristic things?
    In my research I have found that many extreme movements have the following things in common:

    Strong, autocratic leader
    Members are taken away from their homes and familiar surroundings
    Members are encouraged to break ties with outside family and friends
    Material possessions are taken away
    People are often given new names
    The group fosters a feeling of “us” vs. “them”, paranoia
    Very structured way of life, strict rules
    Often required to dress the same

    Look back at your research. Add a paragraph to your paper describing the extent to which the factors I mentioned either do or do not apply.

    05.06 Cults and extreme movements links (Sociology)

    05.06 Effects of the Civil War

    05.06 Emergency Driving (DriverEd)

    Flooded Bridge: Sanpitch River Gunnison UT, Public domainFlooded Bridge: Sanpitch River Gunnison UT, Public domain

    FLOODING
    Flooding can occur when streams and rivers flow over their banks, when dams or levees break, when there is run-off from deep snow or any time there is heavy rainfall. Flood-waters can be found on roads, bridges, and low areas. Flash floods can come rapidly and unexpectedly. They can occur within a few minutes or hours of excessive rainfall.

    • Do not drive through flooded areas. If you see a flooded roadway ahead, turn around and find another route to get to your destination.
    • Be cautious, especially at night, when visibility is limited.
    • Remember, six (6) inches of water will reach the bottom of most passenger cars, causing loss of control or possible stalling.
    • Two feet of moving water can carry away most vehicles, including sport utility vehicles and pick-up trucks.
    • Even if the water appears shallow enough to cross, do not attempt to cross a flooded road. Water can hide dips, or worse, floodwaters can damage roadways by washing away the underlying road surface.
    • If there is no other route, proceed to higher ground and wait for the waters to subside.

    EMERGENCY MEASURES
    If you think about emergencies and plan for them before they happen, you will be less likely to panic and will know what to do if they do occur.

    NOTE: Motorists have been seriously injured or even killed when attending to vehicle malfunctions such as flat tires, out of gas and other equipment problems on and off of roadways.

    However, the majority of these incidents are preventable. In an effort to minimize death or injury the following simple rules for the road should be followed.

    • Please ensure that your vehicle is properly maintained, including the internal engine components.
    • Maintain adequate tire pressure and tread.
    • Be sure your vehicle has a sufficient amount of fuel.
    • If you do experience a vehicle malfunction, please pull off the road as far as possible or exit the freeway completely if possible. A shredded tire or bent rim is better than putting your life in danger.
    • If you are off to the side of the road and need help, please stay in your vehicle as much as possible and keep walking on the road to a minimum. Being out of the vehicle opens the door of opportunity for injury or even death.
    • Use your cell phone to call the local dispatch if you need assistance. If you do not have access to a cell phone, please leave the hood of your car up and your hazard lights on. This will advise the traveling public that you need assistance.
    • Inform family members or other persons when to expect you at your destination.
    • Have an emergency kit in the trunk of your vehicle with blankets, extra food and water, to sustain you and your family.

    Tire Blowout
    Do not slam on the brakes. Let your car coast so that you can steer more easily. Hold the wheel tightly and slowly apply your brakes. When you have slowed down enough, pull all the way off the road. Pick a level spot if possible, turn on your emergency flashers and change the tire.

    Brake Failure
    Try to get some brake pressure by pumping the brake pedal. Shift to a lower gear to help slow down the car. You can also use your paring brake to slow down and stop. If you still cannot stop and are going downhill, try to drive into heavy bushes, snow, or a sandbank.

    Skidding
    Most of us think of ice and sand when we think of skidding. Remember that skidding can also happen on roads that are wet. Your car may start to “hydroplane” at speeds over 35 mph. Hydroplaning occurs when your front tires start to ride on water instead of the road. As you go faster, the problem becomes worse and you will lose control of your steering. In Utah, we also have a special problem with “black ice.” Black ice is very difficult to see on the roadway and appears more like a wet spot than a patch of ice.

    Unfortunately, many crashes occur each year from skids caused by black ice.

    The best policy is to keep a skid from happening. Slow down to a speed at which you can control the car. If you do skid, slowly take your foot off the gas pedal. If your rear wheels skid to the right, turn your front wheels to the right. If the rear wheels skid to the left, turn left. This is called "turning into the skid." Do not turn the wheel too far though, as that will make the car skid in the other direction. Do not slam on your brakes. Once your car regains traction, straighten out your wheels.

    Car Stalling on the Highway
    Turn on your emergency flashers immediately and move your car off the road as soon as you can. If your car is near a traffic lane or where it is hard to be seen, get everyone out and away from the car. If you have them, use flares to warn other drivers. (It is a good idea to always have flares in your trunk.)

    Headlight Failure
    Slow down and get off the road. Use your flares or other emergency warning devices to warn other drivers. Check the terminals on the battery to see if they are loose. NEVER drive at night without lights.

    Gas Pedal Sticks
    Put your car into neutral or push in the clutch. Pull off the road and turn off the engine.

    Steering Wheel Locking Device
    It is dangerous to turn your vehicle’s ignition to the lock position while it is in motion. If this happens and you try to turn the steering wheel, it will lock and you will lose control of the vehicle.

    Car Coming Towards You in Your Lane
    Honk your horn or blink your lights. The other driver may be asleep. If this does not work, swerve to the RIGHT, if possible. Avoid swerving into the oncoming lane or traffic. If the other driver wakes up, he/she will probably over-correct by trying to move the car back into the original lane of travel. If you are in that lane because you swerved the wrong direction, you may end up in a head-on collision.

    Distracting Situations
    Sometimes while driving you may drop something, lose a contact lens, be stung by a bee, or be distracted in some other way. Some people panic when something like this happens. They become more concerned with the problem than about their driving and often run off the road or into the car in front of them. Don’t let this happen to you. If you have a problem or there is a distraction, pull over to the side of the road immediately and then take care of the problem.

    NOTE: A New law effective May 12, 2009, prohibits the use of a handheld wireless communication device for text messaging or electronic mail communication while operating a moving motor vehicle on a highway in this state.

    If You Need Help
    Pull to the side of the road, turn on your emergency flashers, raise your hood, and tie something white or orange on the antenna or left door handle.

    (Select the link "Skill Builder 18 - Driving in Hazardous Conditions")

    05.06 Emergency Driving (DriverEd)

    The links in this activity were developed by the state of California to help drivers develop proper driving habits. They are all "YouTube" videos, so if your school blocks access to Youtube.com, then you will have to watch the videos at another location. (library, home, GoogleTV, AppleTV, etc). They are short and contain very good information on the driving task.

    Please watch the videos carefully. It may be necessary to watch them a couple of times to understand the information before you start your behind-the-wheel driving experience. After watching the videos in this lesson, you will take a quiz on the content of the video in the next lesson.

    05.06 Emergency Driving Rules of Road Videos Quiz (DriverEd)

    computer-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

    After completing the readings and viewing activities for the lessons in this unit, please take the Unit 05 Rules of Road Videos Quiz.

    05.06 Here is how it is going to work! - English 10

    Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text. Analyze the structure of a text, including how specific portions of the text relate to each other and the whole. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. Use the reading of a text to help determine style and approach to narrative writing. Read narrative writing to determine an appropriate approach to the writing of narratives. Include stylistic elements, from the study of a narrative text, in narrative writing.

    Fitting it all together.: Wikimedia, Creative Commons, Jigsaw PuzzleFitting it all together.: Wikimedia, Creative Commons, Jigsaw Puzzle

    *All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

    The Plan

    You will now be working in tandem between your reading assignments and your narrative writing assignments. The reading will help you to find expressive writing techniques. Many writers practice by copying the text of some of their favorite authors as a way to develop their own style of written expression. The object of these next few assignments is to help you find your voice and write it for others to enjoy.

    Keep your reading assignments together in a separate document from your writing assignments. Everything you save in these files will be handed in and graded.

    SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

    *Parts of this unit have been used and adapted from the following site/course. neabigread.org/books/myantonia/readers02.php.
    There are many resources and much information found there that could help you with your study of this book (and possibly other books you may be reading). Feel free to browse it at your leisure.*

    05.06 Investigate the emerging civil rights movements for women and African-Americans in the early 20th century. (U.S. History)

    Investigate the emerging civil rights movements for women and African-Americans in the early 20th century.

    Lesson Notes:

    Women

    Ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920 giving women the right to vote in national elections was only the opening of a door dealing with women's rights. American women pursued new lifestyles and assumed new jobs and different roles in society during the 1920s. Workplace opportunities and trends in family life are still major issues for women today.

    By the 1920s, the experiences of World War I, the draw of cities and changing attitudes had opened up a new world for many young Americans. In the rebellious, pleasure-loving atmosphere of the Twenties, many women began to assert their independence, reject the values of their parents, and demand the same freedoms as men. During the 1920s, a new ideal emerged for some women: the flapper. She was an emancipated young woman who embraced the new fashions and urban attitudes of the day. Close-fitting felt hats, bright waistless dresses an inch above the knees, silk stockings and strings of beads replaced the dark and prim ankle-length dresses, corsets, and petticoats of the late-19th century Victorian days. Many young women cut their long hair into boyish bobs.

    Many young women became more assertive. In their bid for equal status with men, some began smoking cigarettes, drinking in public, and talking openly about sex--actions that would have ruined their reputations not too many years before. They danced to new, suggestive dances like the tango, Charleston, the fox trot and the shimmy. Along with these changes, the attitudes toward marriage changed as well. Many middle-class men and women began to view marriage as more of an equal partnership, although housework and child-rearing remained a woman's job.

    The fast-changing world of the "Roaring Twenties" produced new roles for women in the workplace and new trends in family life. The booming economy opened new work opportunities for women in offices, factories, stores, and professions. That same economy produced time-saving appliances and products also reshaped the roles of housewives and mothers.

    Although women had worked successfully during the war, afterwards employers turned to the returning soldiers to fill positions in industry. Children, who had been thrown in with adults in factory work, farm labor, and apprenticeships, spent most of their days at school and in organized activities with others their own age. Factory owners supported the education of children because an educated child became a more versatile and productive adult.

    African-American Voices

    During the 1920s, African Americans set new goals for themselves as they moved north to the nation's largest cities. Between 1910 and 1920, in a movement known as the Great Migration, hundreds of thousands of African Americans had uprooted themselves from their homes in the South and moved north and to California in search of jobs. Tensions between the races escalated in the years prior to 1920, culminating, in the summer of 1919, in some 25 urban race riots. Leading the way was James Weldon Johnson, executive secretary of the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People), an organization founded in 1909 to protest racial violence and fight for legislation to protect African-American rights. The NAACP made antilynching laws one of its main priorities.

    Another approach was taken by Marcus Garvey, an immigrant from Jamaica, who believed that African Americans should build a separate society. His more radical message of black pride aroused the hopes of many. Garvey lured followers with programs to promote African-American businesses. He also encouraged his followers to "return to Africa" and help build a mighty nation. Despite the appeal of Garvey's movement, support for it declined in the mid-1920s when he was convicted of mail fraud and jailed.

    But the most powerful and long-lasting movement of black pride is known as the Harlem Renaissance. It was a creative literary and musical movement that spoke for all African-Americans throughout America. Many Southern blacks who migrated north moved to Harlem, a neighborhood on the northern end of Manhattan Island. In the 1920s Harlem became the world's largest black urban community with residents from the South, the West Indies, Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Haiti.

    Conclusion

    The liberated women and Harlem Renaissance represented two parts of the great social and cultural changes that swept America in the 1920s. The period was characterized by economic prosperity, new ideas, changing values, and personal freedom. The Twenties also brought the nation important new developments in art, literature, and music. Most of these changes were lasting. The economic boom, however, was not.

    05.06 Lesson 5F: Stem Changing Verbs: O – UE (Poder/Dormir) (Spanish I)

     

    Lesson 5F
    Stem Changing Verbs: O – UE (Poder/Dormir)

    [A copy of this lesson is available in a PDF file!! If you prefer to use this type of document, just click on the following link to complete this lesson: SpI_Lesson5F]

     

               In lesson 4H, we learned about another type of irregular verbs, “stem changing verbs” and specifically, the verb stems that change from “e” to “ie” (Querer/Preferir). You may want to go back and review that lesson because this lesson follows the same format, but in this lesson, we’ll talk about verbs stems that change from “o” to “ue”. (Remember: a verb “stem” is the beginning part of a verb, that is in front of the verb endings of “-ar”, “-er”, or “ir”. These verbs are appropriately called “stem changing verbs” because they have all the “regular” verb endings, but it is the stem of the verb that changes!). As examples of this stem changing verb, we will be using two very common Spanish verbs “poder – to be able to/can” and “dormir – to sleep”.

               The stems for these verbs are “poder – pod...” (taking off the “-er” ending) and “dormir – dorm…” (taking off the “-ir” ending). The endings are the same as regular “-er” and “-ir” verbs but in the stems, “ue” replaces the “o”. The stems become “poder – pued...” and “dormir – duerm…” for all forms, except for in the nosotros(as) and vosotros(as) forms!! (¡¡Ojo!!: In the nosotros(as) and vosotros(as) forms, the verb uses the “unchanged” stems, “poder – pod…” and “dormir – dorm…” See the chart below:

               Other “o” to “ue” stem changing verbs: Learn these other verbs below as they are conjugated exactly as the verbs above:

               This is a fabulous presentation of this type of stem changing verbs (o to ue). Click on the following link, enter your name, and click on level A. On the left side, click on “Unidad 4”, “Lección 2”, “Gramática”, and then “Presentación: gramática 1”. A window will open with two cute animated marks (save this fun part for the end!!). Click on the tab “English Grammar Connection” and read the page, then click on the tab “Gramática” and read the page. Now click on the fun red and blue tab, “Pablo and Pili”, and click the arrow at the bottom of the page “>” to hear their fun lesson. When finished, click on the “x” in the upper right corner to close this window.
               On the left side of the screen, click on “Práctica: gramática 1”. Do the first page and when finished, click on the “Answer” button at the bottom of the page. Click on the blue “2” circle to bring up the next activity. After finishing these 5 activities, click on the “Level B” circle in the upper right of the screen. Now you will have 5 more activities to practice. Then go on to “Level C” for another 5 practice pages!! Wasn’t this a great site with lots of good practice??!!!

               Summary of Lesson: You should now know how to conjugate stem changing (o to ue) verbs in the present tense. Once again, Professor Jason has done a great video clip explaining “stem changing verbs”. These verbs can also be called “boot verbs” … do you see why??

    See video

     

               Practice Exercises: Remember ... Do as many of these exercises as YOU need, as many times as YOU need to do each one so that you can successfully complete the assignment for this lesson!!

    05.06 Letter Samples IMPORTANT

    Letter Samples IMPORTANT

    Use this handout to learn the difference between block and modified block style letters as well as additional letter information. PLEASE REFER TO THIS HANDOUT OFTEN AS YOU DO THE LETTER ASSIGNMENTS. THE LETTER ASSIGNMENTS WILL NEED TO BE FORMATTED CORRECTLY!

    NOTE: Remember to set the top margin to 2 inches before starting the letter!

    05.06 Nervous System Links (Human Biology)

    These sites have illustrations, images, charts, and research material about the human nervous system and its functions. Also includes interactive human body tours, quizzes, and games.

    05.06 Point of Interest Assignment (DigitalPhoto2)

    teacher-scored 100 points possible 20 minutes

    Point of interest.

    Submit three different images of three different scenes that demonstrate your understanding and ability to follow the rules of good composition. These images should show a point of interest in the photograph.
    Do not send any pictures of your car. A car parked in your driveway is boring.

    Take pictures that demonstrate good composition. These images should show a point of interest in the photograph. It could be a still life or something out of the ordinary that captures your attention. Perhaps your picture tells a story.
    01.2.6 Point of Interest(DigitalPhoto2)01.2.6 Point of Interest(DigitalPhoto2)

    05.06 Reports--WP5A-B (Computer Technology)

    teacher-scored 20 points possible 90 minutes

    Report Guidelines
    Study the attached MLA_Report_Instructions.pdf to learn how to type an MLA style report. Study the Formatting_Reports.pdf instructions to learn how to format a report in Word. Use these guides as you complete your Hero Report that you started in assignment OR1 in the Online Resources unit.

    Citing Sources in Reports Presentation
    View the attached Citing_Sources.pps presentation to learn rules about citing sources to avoid plagiarism.

    Works Cited Activity (WP5A)
    This activity will help you see how easy it is to use the Citation Machine to create a Works Cited page. Follow the instructions in Works Cited Activity (WP5A).doc. Send as attachment to WP5A assignment.

    MLA Report (WP5B)
    Study the Report Guidelines above before completing this assignment. Type your Hero Report using MLA format and include a Works Cited page. Be sure to use the Landmarks Citation Machine website or the EasyBib website in section 05.6.1 to format the sources correctly. Be sure to check your work using the Report Grading Sheet.doc before you send it as an attachment to WP5B.

    05.06 Section 6.4 (Calculus)

    05.06 Solve Quadratics with Complex Solutions (Math Level 2)

    Solve quadratic that have complex roots.

    Lesson material is from Beginning Algebra http://2012books.lardbucket.org that has a Creative Commons by-nc-sa 3.0 license.

    We complete our study of solutions to quadratic equations by including solutions involving imaginary roots

    Let's review a little bit before moving on. We know that \sqrt{-9} is not a real number.

    \sqrt{-9}={\color{Blue} ?}      or      \left ( {\color{Blue} ?} \right )^{2}=-9

    There is no real number that when squared results in a negative number. We begin to resolve this issue by defining the imaginary unit, i, as the square root of −1.

    i=\sqrt{-1}    and    i^{2}=-1

    To express a square root of a negative number in terms of the imaginary unit i, we use the following property where a represents any non-negative real number:

    \sqrt{-a}=\sqrt{-1\cdot a}=\sqrt{-1}\cdot \sqrt{a}=i\sqrt{a}

    With this we can write

    \sqrt{-9}=\sqrt{-1\cdot 9}=\sqrt{-1}\cdot \sqrt{9}=i\cdot 3=3i

    If \sqrt{-9}=3i, then we would expect that 3i squared will equal −9:

    (3i)^{2}=9i^{2}=9\cdot -1=-9

    In this way any square root of a negative real number can be written in terms of the imaginary unit. Such a number is often called an imaginary number.

    http://www.onemathematicalcat.org

    Example 1

    Rewrite in terms of the imaginary unit i.

    a. \sqrt{-7}

    b. \sqrt{-25}

    c. \sqrt{-72}

    Solution:

    a. \sqrt{-7}=\sqrt{-1\cdot 7}=\sqrt{-1}\cdot \sqrt{7}=i\sqrt{7}

    b. \sqrt{-25}=\sqrt{-1\cdot 25}=\sqrt{-1}\cdot \sqrt{25}=i\cdot 5=5i

    c. \sqrt{-72}=\sqrt{-1\cdot36\cdot 2}=\sqrt{-1}\cdot \sqrt{36}\cdot \sqrt{2}=i\cdot6\cdot \sqrt{2} =6i\sqrt{2}

    Notation Note: When an imaginary number involves a radical, we place i in front of the radical. Consider the following:

    6i\sqrt{2}=6\sqrt{2}i

    Since multiplication is commutative, these numbers are equivalent. However, in the form 6\sqrt{2}i the imaginary unit i is often misinterpreted to be part of the radicand. To avoid this confusion, it is a best practice to place i in front of the radical and use 6i\sqrt{2}.

    Now let's apply this to solving quadratic equations that involve including solutions involving imaginary roots

    Example 1: Solve using the quadratic formula: x2−2x + 5 = 0

    Solution: Begin by identifying a, b, and c: a = 1, b = -2, and c = 5

    Substitute these values into the quadratic formula and then simplify.

    x=\frac{-{\color{Red} b}\pm\sqrt{{\color{Red} b}^{2}-4{\color{Blue} a}{\color{Green} c}} }{2{\color{Blue} a}}

    x=\frac{-({\color{Red} -2})\pm\sqrt{({\color{Red} -2})^{2}-4({\color{Blue} 1})({\color{Green} 5})} }{2({\color{Blue} 1})}

    x=\frac{2\pm \sqrt{4-20}}{2}

    x=\frac{2\pm \sqrt{-16}}{2}

    x=\frac{2\pm 4i}{2}

    x=\frac{2}{3}\pm \frac{4i}{2}

    x=1\pm 2i

    Check these solutions by substituting them into the original equation.

    Answer: The solutions are 1−2i and 1 + 2i.

    The equation may not be given in standard form. The general steps for solving using the quadratic formula are outlined in the following example.

    Example 2: Solve: (2x + 1)(x − 3) = x − 8.

    Solution:

    Step 1: Write the quadratic equation in standard form:

    (2x+1)(x-3) = -8

    2x^{2}-6x+x-3 = x-8

    2x^{2}-5x-3 = x-8

    2x^{2}-6x+5=0

    Step 2: Identify a, b, and c for use in the quadratic formula: a = 2, b = - 6, c = 5

    Step 3: Substitute the appropriate values into the quadratic formula and then simplify.

    x=\frac{-{\color{Red} b}\pm\sqrt{{\color{Red} b}^{2}-4{\color{Blue} a}{\color{Green} c}} }{2{\color{Blue} a}}

    x=\frac{-{\color{Red} (-6)}\pm\sqrt{{\color{Red} (-6)}^{2}-4{\color{Blue} (2)}{\color{Green} (5)}} }{2{\color{Blue} (2)}}

    x=\frac{6\pm \sqrt{36-40}}{4}

    x=\frac{6\pm \sqrt{-4}}{4}

    x=\frac{6\pm 2i}{4}

    x=\frac{6}{4}\pm \frac{2i}{4}x=\frac{6}{4}\pm \frac{1}{2}i

    Answer: The solution is \frac{3}{2} \pm \frac{1}{2} i. The check is optional.

    Example 3: Solve: x(x + 2) = - 19

    x(x+2)=-19

    x^{2}+2x=-19

    x^{2}+2x+19 = 0

    Here a = 1, b = 2, and c = 19. Substitute these values into the quadratic formula:

    x=\frac{-{\color{Red} b}\pm\sqrt{{\color{Red} b}^{2}-4{\color{Blue} a}{\color{Green} c}} }{2{\color{Blue} a}}

    x=\frac{-{\color{Red} (-2)}\pm\sqrt{{\color{Red} 2}^{2}-4{\color{Blue} (1)}{\color{Green} (19)}} }{2{\color{Blue} (1)}}

    x=\frac{-2\pm \sqrt{4-76}}{2}

    x=\frac{-2\pm \sqrt{-72}}{2}

    x=\frac{-2\pm \sqrt{-1\cdot 36\cdot 2}}{2}

    x=\frac{-2\pm 6i\sqrt{ 2}}{2}

    x=\frac{-2}{2}\pm 6i\sqrt{2}

    x=-1\pm 3i\sqrt{2}

    Answer: The solutions are x=-1\pm 3i\sqrt{2}

    Notation Note

    Consider the following: -1+3i\sqrt{2}= -1+3\sqrt{2}i

    Both numbers are equivalent and -1+3\sqrt{2}i is in standard form, where the real part is -1 and the imaginary part is 3\sqrt{2}. However, this number is often expressed as -1+3i\sqrt{2} to avoid the possibility of misinterpreting the imaginary unit as part of the radicand.

    Try this! Solve: (2x+3)(x+5) = 5x+4.

    Answer: \frac{-4\pm i\sqrt{6}}{2} = -2\pm \frac{\sqrt{6}}{2}i

    Click on the link below for a video solution to this problem.

    05.06 Solve Quadratics with Complex Solutions - Video Solution (Math Level 2)

    I highly recommend that you click on the links below and watch the videos before continuing:

    05.06 Solve Quadratics with Complex Solutions - Videos (Math Level 2)

    If after completing this topic you can state without hesitation that...

    • I can solve quadratic that have complex roots.

    …you are ready for the assignment! Otherwise, go back and review the material before moving on.

    05.06 Solve Quadratics with Complex Solutions - Worksheet (Math Level 2)

    teacher-scored 80 points possible 40 minutes

    Activity for this lesson

    Complete the attached worksheet.

    1. Print the worksheet and complete the assignment in the space provided. You may use additional paper if needed. Work all the problems showing ALL your steps.
    2. Once you have completed the assignment, digitize (scan or take digital photo, up close and clear) and save it to the computer and convert it to an image file such as .pdf or .jpg.
    3. Finally, upload the image using the assignment submission window under the assignment link on your math home page for this assignment.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


    05.06 Spelling commonly misspelled words (English 9)

    Spell correctly.

    Why is English spelling so inconsistent and tricky?
    It ties back into the history of the English language.

    "In spelling, the [English] language was assimilating the consequences of having a civil service of French scribes, who paid little attention to the traditions of English spelling that had developed in Anglo-Saxon times. Not only did French qu arrive, replacing Old English cw (as in queen), but ch replaced c (in words such as church--Old English cirice), sh and sch replaced sc (as in ship--Old English scip), and much more. Vowels were written in a great number of ways. Much of the irregularity of modern English spelling derives from the forcing together of Old English and French systems of spelling in the Middle Ages. People struggled to find the best way of writing English throughout the period. ... Even Caxton didn't help, at times. Some of his typesetters were Dutch, and they introduced some of their own spelling conventions into their work. That is where the gh in such words as ghost comes from.

    "Any desire to standardize would also have been hindered by the ... Great English Vowel Shift, [which] took place in the early 1400s. Before the shift, a word like loud would have been pronounced 'lood'; name as 'nahm'; leaf as 'layf'; mice as 'mees'. ...

    "The renewed interest in classical languages and cultures, which formed part of the ethos of the Renaissance, had introduced a new perspective into spelling: etymology. Etymology is the study of the history of words, and there was a widespread view that words should show their history in the way they were spelled. These weren't classicists showing off. There was a genuine belief that it would help people if they could 'see' the original Latin in a Latin-derived English word. So someone added a b to the word typically spelled det, dett, or dette in Middle English, because the source in Latin was debitum, and it became debt, and caught on. Similarly, an o was added to peple, because it came from populum: we find both poeple and people, before the latter became the norm. An s was added to ile and iland, because of Latin insula, so we now have island. There are many more such cases. Some people nowadays find it hard to understand why there are so many 'silent letters' of this kind in English. It is because other people thought they were helping."

    David Crystal, The Fight for English: How language pundits ate, shot, and left, Oxford, 2006, pp. 26-9.

    SpellingEng9205 Loose Talk poster: NARA, ca. 1944, public domaineEng9205 Loose Talk poster: NARA, ca. 1944, public domaine
    Yes, spelling can be a nuisance, but yes, it is important. Here are some general guidelines to help you become a better speller:

    1) Learn some of the basic rules that work MOST of the time, for instance:

    i before e except after c, or when sounded as "ay" as in neighbor or weigh

    When you add a suffix to a word which ends with a single vowel followed by a single consonant, double the consonant (fit becomes fitted or fitting); when you add a suffix that begins with a vowel to a word that ends in a silent e, drop the e and add the suffix (fade becomed fading or faded; fate becomes fated, or fateful).

    For words that end in a consonant & y, change the y to i UNLESS the suffix begins with i (fry becomes frying or fries or fried).

    2) Use the spell-check on your computer, but

    3) Don't depend on ONLY the computer spell-check. Your computer doesn't know what word you meant to spell, only whether the words you used match a long list of possible words.

    4) Ask a friend or family member who is a good speller to check your work.

    5) Make a list of words you have trouble with, and work on learning one of them each day or week.

    Common Words that Cause Spelling Errors

    1) there refers to a place (here and there).
    they're is the contraction for "they are" (They're coming over later.)
    their is the possessive of they, which is why the e comes before the i. (Don't touch their fancy car.)

    2)Two is the number 2. (I want two cookies.)
    too may mean "also" (I want cake, too.) or may add emphasis (It was too hot.)
    to is a preposition or part of the infinitive (I want to go to the store.)

    3) Conscious means you know what is going on around you (you haven't been knocked out). (He was conscious of them all staring at him.)
    Conscience is the part of your mind that tells you something is morally right or wrong. (Her conscience was bothering her because she had lied to her best friend.)

    4)which is a pronoun referring to something.(I couldn't decide which one to buy.)
    witch is a woman with magical (often evil) powers. (The witch cast a spell to turn the prince into a frog.)

    5) were is the past tense of "are". (They were sad.)
    where refers to a place. (Where are we going?)

    6) loose is the opposite of tight. (The screw had worked loose and fallen off.)
    lose is the verb related to lost. (I didn't want to lose my earring.)

    7) all right is the only correct way to write this expression (there is no such word as "alright").

    8)desert is a dry place. (Cactus grow in the desert.)
    dessert is the treat you eat after dinner. (We're having apple pie for dessert.)
    Note that the above two words break the usual pronunciation rule that in two syllable words, vowels followed by a single consonant are long, and vowels followed by a double consonant are short.
    Desert (pronounced like "dessert" with a long E in the first syllable) can also be a verb meaning to leave (I can't imagine how a mother could desert her children.)

    9) everyday is always an adjective. (I wore my everyday clothes except to church.)
    If you mean something that happens day after day, you write every day. (I get up before noon every day.)

    10) definitely means certainly (I definitely want to graduate from high school.)
    defiantly means with defiance (The demonstrators shouted defiantly at the police.)

    11) Pay attention to the difference between into and in to especially if preceded by "turned":
    Correct - The sorceress turned them into frogs.
    Possibly confusing - I turned into a parking lot. (Did you turn so as to arrive in a parking lot, or were you transformed from a human into flat asphalt?)
    Correct - He turned them in to the police.
    Incorrect: He turned them into the police.
    Correct - I went in to see what was going on.
    Correct - I was accepted into the club.

    05.06 Spelling quiz (English 9)

    computer-scored 15 points possible 10 minutes

    Take the spelling quiz. Go to the class main page, and to Topic 3, to take this quiz. You may take it multiple times, but you must score at least 73%.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 2 of your enrollment date for this class.


    05.06 Unit 5 quiz (Java)

    teacher-scored 1 points possible 30 minutes

    Read This - Review Notes - Study these for exam. This exam is a compilation of questions from the previous quizzes. You should do very well on this quiz as you have seen all the questions before. I have also included a review of some key ideas for you. You should also read the sample quizzes and answers from CHAPTER 1 and CHAPTER 2 from the book .

    Here is some review information that may be covered on the quiz. But nevertheless, you should know this information very well. That is why this is basically a review quiz It also includes some information on the GUI and JoptionPane objects. Save it for referenece later. It contains some some information on additional functions. (methods) we will use.
    Review this information and then take the unit 5 quiz.

    IN NO PARTICULAR ORDER

    (the information on GUI and Swing will be covered later. There will no questions on this quiz.)

    * An application is a program that executes using the Java interpreter after it has been compiled to bytecode
    * Comments begin with //
    * Blank lines, spaces, carriage returns, and tab characters are known as white space and help in making your source code more readable.
    * The first line of the main method must be defined as follows
    public static void main(String args[])

    * A left brace is read as “begin” and right brace is read as “end”
    * Java is case sensitive, upper and lower case letters are considered differently
    * Method System.out.println displays or prints a line of information in the command window. When println is finished it finishes with a carriage return and places the cursor on the next line. System.out.print leaves the cursor on the same line… no carriage return
    * Every statement must end with a semicolon. Not every line, but every statement.
    * Identifiers must begin with a letter
    * Identifiers must only contain letters, digits, and the underscore _
    * Keywords are reserved words, reserved for Java
    * Keywords must all appear in lowercase letters.
    * Standard practice and good style states that all Java class names begin with a capital letter, if the class name contains more that one word, the first letter of each word should be capitalized. This is called camel case.
    * Keyword class introduces a class definition and immediately followed by a class name.
    * Methods are able to perform tasks and return information (if necessary) when they are finished.
    * Java applications all begin at method main
    * A static method is called by following its class name by a dot and the name of the method.
    * The System.exit (0) method terminates an application that uses a GUI. Not necessary in the console window.
    * A variable is a location in computer memory where data is stored. The book refers to this as a "box"
    * Variable names must be a valid identifier
    * Variables all have a NAME, a TYPE , and a VALUE
    * All variables have to be declared, it is helpful to read the declaration from right to left and substitute the words “of Type” for the space. The declaration String myname; is read “variable myname is of type string”

    * Declarations end with semi-colons;
    * There are 8 primitive data types -- int, short, byte, long, char, boolean, float, double.
    * int, short, byte, long are all integers (whole number)
    * float, double are real numbers, they contain a decimal, double have the greater precision.
    * char is any single character that could be typed from the keyboard.
    * Boolean is either true or false
    * import adds java packages (classes, methods, and commands) to your program, you “check them out” of the java class library.
    * The core java classes are called “java”
    * The extension java classes are called “javax”
    * import javax.swing.* means use ALL the swing methods and classes
    * swing is the java package for familiar windows GUI interface classes and methods
    * Source code is what you the human create
    * Object code is what the java compiler creates
    * Java has its own type of object code called BYTECODE
    * Syntax errors are errors that must be corrected before the compiler can finish creating the bytecode.
    * Semantic errors are errors in logic that can generate incorrect results.

    Class/Methods/Functions used so far:
    JOptionPane - a class to provide the user a simple GUI interface

    Integer.parseInt() - a method to convert a string to a number. “123” is convert to one hundred twenty three. The argument is any string. The value returned is an integer.

    System.out.println()

    System.out.print()

    System.exit(0)

    JOptionPane.showConfirmDialog() =Asks a confirming question, like yes/no/cancel.

    JOptionPane.showInputDialog() = Prompt for some input.

    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog() = Tell the user about something that’s happened.

    JOptionPane.showOptionDialog = The Grand Unification of the above three

    Key in the following program to see what each of these methods does:

    1. In jcreator start a new project, delete the template code, and key in the following. Compile it and run… Change some of the string values to see what they do.

    import javax.swing.JOptionPane;

    public class Example2 {

    public static void main( String[] args) {

    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Welcome to Java Programming");

    JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null,"enter a number");

    JOptionPane.showConfirmDialog(null,"Would you like to exit");

    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "alert", "alert", JOptionPane.ERROR_MESSAGE);

    System.exit( 0);

    }

    }

    05.06 Unit 5 Test (Financial Literacy)

    Review your assignments from Unit 5 to prepare for the Unit 5 Test.

    05.06 Unit 5 test (Financial Literacy)

    computer-scored 100 points possible 45 minutes

    Take the unit 5 test.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


    05.06 Word - What You Need to Know (CompTech07)

    teacher-scored 5 points possible 20 minutes

    Word--What You Need to Know (WP1C)

    Open up Word--What You Need to Know and fill in the worksheet by following the instructions given. (The tabs and ribbons will not be active when you open the worksheet. Print the worksheet. Go to a new Word document. Write in the answers as you go through the features and commands in Word. Type the answers into the worksheet.)

    Assignment: Go into Assignment (WP1C) and attach the file.

    05.06. Investigate the emerging civil rights movements for women and African-Americans in the early 20th century. (U.S. History)

    Labor activist Mother Jones, early 1900's: Wikimedia Commons, Library of Congress, public domainLabor activist Mother Jones, early 1900's: Wikimedia Commons, Library of Congress, public domainWomen Organize in Labor Unions

    Although women were barred from many unions, they united behind powerful leaders to demand better working conditions, equal pay for equal work and an end to child labor. The most prominent leader in the women's labor movement was Mother Jones. Please review the information that we have seen about her to find out what she was fighting for in this movement.

    Higher Education for Women
    Please go to this short report to find out why opportunities in higher education for women were increasing in the late 1800's. What did receiving more education mean for women?

    Women's Suffrage
    Find out about the movement that gained women the right to vote, or the women's suffrage movement. Why was voting important to these women, and who were their major leaders?

    NAWSA and Women's Suffrage
    Find out much more about the women's suffrage movement and their main organization, the NAWSA. How did the suffrage movement end--did they meet with success?

    NACW
    Find out about the women who started this organization and what their goals were for their sex and race.

    Booker T. Washington
    Find out about this prominent African American leader and the Tuskegee Institute. Also, read about his famous speech, the Atlanta Compromise. What did he use as a symbol of how Americans of different races could successfully work together?

    W.E.B. Du Bois
    W.E.B. Du Bois publicly fought for the rights of African Americans throughout his life. Find out what he believed and wanted for his people. Was it the same as Booker T. Washington's vision? Also, learn about the founding of the NAACP and what Du Bois called the "Talented Tenth."

    05.06.00 - THE HERO WITHIN

    Perhaps the archetype of the Hero's Journey has transcended time and place because it touches on the very essence of human experience. People everywhere throughout time have experienced crises and calls to adventure. To accept such calls is to embrace growth, change and transformation. An awareness of the Hero's Journey, consequently, provides us a map to understand and interpret our lives. As we learn to view life as a journey, we become better equipped to give life-enhancing meaning to our experiences.

    Not all of life's calls and challenges are of epic proportion. Indeed, virtually anything that requires us to move out of our comfort zone--a challenging class, a new job, even writing an essay--may serve as a catalyst for personal development.

    For this next activity, I'd like you to recreate a time in your life when you elected (or were perhaps compelled) to stretch and to grow. You have just completed step 1 of this essay in the previous activity. Now for step 2, write the rough draft.

    As part of your narrative, explain which elements of the Hero's Journey were present in your ordeal. (i.e., what kind of preparation did you have? Were there any helpers or mentor figures? How did the trial test you? Did you encounter disappointing setbacks or periods of self-doubt? How did you grow or develop as a result of the ordeal? With whom did you share your ultimate success with? How did they benefit as a result?)

    Now, I’d like you to practice step 3 in writing drafts, by sharpening the sentences and polishing just the introductory paragraph. For this assignment, turn in both steps: the rough draft and the revised introductory paragraph.

    05.06.00 Finding Solutions of Polynomials Using Numerical Methods (PreCalc)

    Most polynomial equations do not have rational solutions. Numerical methods can be used to find solutions to these polynomials.

    You can download the attached file or read the same content below.



    05.06.01

    teacher-scored 12 points possible 60 minutes

    Make sure you turn in both the rough draft and the revision of your introductory paragraph.

    Assessment Rubric:

    Content Includes completed rough draft, and revision of introduction shows a strong thesis statement as a part of an interesting introduction. /4
    Support Your rough draft shows a clear thesis and at least three body paragraphs with detail which is specific and directly supports the thesis. /4
    Clarity While not a polished draft, the ideas are clear. /4

    05.06.01 Bisection Method (PreCalc)

    The final way to find these illusive non-rational zeros of polynomials (and let's be honest, most polynomials are going to fall in this category) is by using a more sophisticated method of guess and check.

    Useful Fact

    If ƒ(x) is a polynomial function and and b are numbers such that ƒ() > 0 and ƒ(b) < 0, then the function ƒ(x) has at least one zero between and b. (This is also called the locator theorem.)



    So what? Well, we can use this information to find irrational zeros, to whatever precision you wish. (Precision basically means “how many decimal places.”) There are several techniques to narrow down these zeros, but since this is a pre-calculus class, we won't get too sophisticated.

    So any numerical method of solving a problem will start with a guess, calculate the value, then make another guess. You keep doing this, moving closer to the “real” answer, until you are as precise as you wish.

    It is simpler to show you how to do this then explain it. You should follow along on you calculator. Consider the polynomial

    ƒ(x) = 6 x4 – 3 x2 + 4 x – 1


    We already looked for rational roots of this polynomial, and determined there are none. We did this by trying all the possible rational roots. You may remember that:


    While none of these numbers are zero, some get closer than others. In particular, is close to zero. Notice that is positive. So 13 will be our a from the previous theorem. We need a number that is less than zero as well. Starting as close to zero as possible will help us find the “real” zero faster. So select for the negative term. 16 will be our b from the previous theorem. We know that the actual zero is between 13 and 16. So for our next guess, select the number halfway between these. In particular


    (I worked through this problem already, so I know the values of ƒ(x). Therefore, I label each new guess with an if ƒ(x) is positive, and b if ƒ(x) is negative. I think this will help make it more clear, but it also means the labels will appear somewhat random. When you do this yourself, you can label things however you want, but remember, you are always making your next guess between a positive ƒ(x) and a negative f(x').)

    Now, find ƒ(bi)


    This is not zero, but it is closer than . It is also negative. This means that the actual zero is between 13 and 14.

    So, we guess again. This time we want to guess the number that is halfway between 13 and 14 or


    This number is even closer to zero, and still negative. So our next guess will be halfway between 13 and 724

    This answer is positive, so we are now looking for a number between 516 and 724. Guess halfway between those or:


    As you can see, we are getting closer. We are at zero to one decimal point, and the number is also the same number to one decimal point. So, if that is all the closer you want to get, you could report that the zero is at x = 0.3. However, I am going to ask you to get even closer. Again, choose a number halfway between i and biii.


    Which is zero to 2 decimal points (the 6 rounds up), so let's keep going.


    And repeat. We now want to find a number between ii and biv.


    We are still only zero to 2 decimal places, so keep going. Notice that both ƒ(ii) and ƒ(iii) are positive, while ƒ(biv) is negative. So we are looking for a number between aiii and biv.


    And we are still only at 2 decimal places.

    Each time we repeat this process is an iteration. We will stop when we reach convergence. To reach convergence, first we decide (in advance) how close we want to get. Then we stop when we get there. We can base the convergence on many different criteria. For example, we could say that we want ƒ() to equal zero to 4 decimal places. Or we could say that we want a and b to equal each other to 3 decimal places. Or we could say that we want ƒ(b) to be within 10% of ƒ(). Etc.

    These are all valid “end point” criteria. Since we have already determined that there are no rational zeros, the zero will be an approximation anyway. You just need to figure out how close you want the answer. (Real problems are solved this way all the time.)

    Also, since this is such a repetitive process, it is an ideal computer problem. And people write programs all the time to solve problems like this. I have been doing this by using the “Entry” button on my calculator (this button will redisplay your previous entry, which you can then modify). You could also program a spreadsheet to do the iterations. In general, you do not want to do this by hand over and over.

    You should notice that we are not getting to zero very fast. This is a problem with all numerical methods. Your first few steps get you close to zero quickly. But each step after that is smaller and smaller. If you really wanted to find the complete irrational number that is the zero for this function, it would take you forever.

    So, with that in mind, I am going to stop when a equals b to 3 decimal places. We currently have

    iv = 0.30794...

    biv = 0.30729...


    Since that 9 rounds up but the 2 rounds down, I only have 2 decimal places. My next 2 iterations gets me

    v = 0.307617...

    ƒ(v) = 0.00010877... bv = 0.307454

    ƒ(bv) = -0.00015345...


    We now have ƒ(x) = 0 to 3 decimal places, and = b to 2 decimal places (that 6 rounds up, but the 4 rounds down). So keep going.

    vi = 0.3075358...

    ƒ(v) = 0.0000787... bv = 0.307495...

    ƒ(bv) = -0.0000373...


    Both of these values round to 0.3075, so they are the same number to 4 decimal places, and we have convergence. (Notice that we actually skipped our 3 decimal place convergence. That happens when the next digit is 5, it is okay.)

    Now, we can report that a zero for this function is

    x = 0.3075


    Are we done? Well, not really. This is an polynomial of even power with a positive coefficient. This means that the graph goes up at both the right end and the left end. So, if it crossed the x-axis once, it has to cross it again. (For the same reason, an odd function must have at least 1 zero.)

    At this point, I could use Descartes rule of signs to try and figure out how many more zeros I am looking for, and what their signs are. I am not going to ask you to use the rule, but you may want to familiarize yourself with it. It is only has limited usefulness, since it doesn't tell you how many zeros you have. But it does put some constraints on these zeros. Descartes rule of signs tells you to consider how many times the coefficients of ƒ(x) change signs. In our case

    ƒ(x) = 6 x4 – 3 x2 + 4 x – 1


    The signs of the coefficients are

    +– + –


    So they change signs 3 times. This means that there are either 3 or 1 positive zeros (3 – 2 = 1). We already found one positive zero. So we may need to look for 2 more, or we might have all the positive zeros of this function.

    The graph is increasing around this zero (remember ƒ(0.3074) is negative and ƒ(0.3075) is positive). So, it is possible that we have all the positive zeros.
    Next, Descartes rule of signs tells you to consider how many times the coefficients of ƒ(-x) change signs. In our case

    ƒ(-x) = 6 x4 – 3 x2 – 4 x – 1


    The signs of the coefficients are

    +– – –


    So they change signs once. This means there is exactly one negative zero. (The subtracting 2 thing doesn't apply here, since 1 – 2 = -1, and we can't have a negative number of zeros.) So we should look for that zero.



    05.06.01 Lesson 5F: Stem Changing Verbs: O – UE (Poder/Dormir) (Spanish I)

    computer-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

               **Assignment 05.06.01: Stem Changing Verbs: O – UE (Poder/Dormir)**: You know the drill, find the button: and click on it!

    05.06.01 Reports WP5 Links (Computer Technology)

    Landmarks Citation Machine or EasyBib
    These are great websites to help you create works cited. You type in the information for the specific type of resource, and it creates the citation for you. You can then copy and paste it into your document. I would definitely choose at least one of these websites to bookmark.

    05.06.01 Romeo and Juliet comparison essay (English 9)

    To listen to the introduction, use the link above and then click the microphone icon and the play button.

    05.06.01 STORY BREAK #5 - English 10

    STORY BREAK COURTESY OF "STORYCORPS"

    Listen to the following story . . .

    “Everybody would come to the house to see my mama...”

    Write down how you can and can't relate to these people. Save your response in its own document/file to be submitted separate from the rest of the assignments.

    *All of the above information/work should be saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference and grading.

    SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK FROM THIS QUARTER

    05.06.02 Graphing Calculators (PreCalc)

    So, I tell you to write a computer program, or program a spreadsheet, but act like you don't have a graphing calculator. Of course you do. (If you don't, you can download a graphing calculator simulator for your computer.)

    So we can graph this function. Each calculator is a bit different, so I will not be explaining how to use your graphing function. If you don't know how to do this, read the manual. If you lost your manual, you can find it online.

    Here is the graph at three different windows. In the last one, we can see that there are only 2 zeros, and that the graph does not come back down at larger values of x. This is a more useful way of determining the number of zeros than Descartes rule of signs.

    ƒ(x) = 6x4 – 3x2 + 4x – 1



    Now we can use the trace function on the calculator. This gives us a good starting point for the iterations. Using smallest window shown, on my calculator, the trace function gives the following values

    = -1.148936

    ƒ() = 0.89935285


    b = -1.106383

    ƒ(b) = -0.1075023


    So now, change the window again so that b and are the upper and lower limits of the domain, and f() and ƒ(b) are the upper and lower limits of the range. Again, use the trace function to find i and bi.

    i = -1.111363

    ƒ(i) = 0.00239895


    bi = -1.11091

    ƒ(bi) = -0.0076767


    And, rounding these numbers, we get our 3 decimal place convergence that we had determined previously. We can now report that the other zero for this function is found at

    x = -1.111


    And we are done in literally 2 steps. How much easier was that! Anyway, we can now report 2 zeros,

    x = 0.3075

    x = -1.111


    We know that there are 2 more zeros, either multiplicities of the 2 we have, or complex ones. In practice, we could actually divide by (x – 0.3075) and (x + 1.111) and then deal with that polynomial. However, we are interested in real solutions. So for our purposes, we will not do that. But you should know that you could do that.



    05.06.02 Reports Quiz--WPRQ (Computer Technology)

    computer-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

    Report Quiz (WPRQ)

    Take the Report Quiz. This quiz covers reports and proofreader marks.

    05.06.03 Velocity of a Race Car, part 2 (PreCalc)

    Finally, we can return to the problem of the maximum speed Joey Logano can achieve. At the end of the first part of this story we had found the equation

    ƒ(v) = Cv3 + Bv2 + AvP = 0.564 v3 + 0.00180v2 + 1450v – 559000 = 0


    Since this equation doesn't have integer or even fractional coefficients, there is really no point to even consider looking for rational coefficients. If there are no rational coefficients, then most of the methods we used to factor polynomials will not work. The only real choice is to do this numerically.

    Fortunately, because this is a third degree polynomial, we know we have at least one zero. We also can use Descartes rule of signs here. The signs of the coefficients for ƒ(v) are

    +++–


    We change sign once, so there is one positive zero. All we need is one positive zero. But let's consider negative zeros as well. The signs of the coefficients for ƒ(-v) are

    – +– –


    We change signs twice, so there could be 2 nega