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Unit 07

07.00 - Introduction to Motion(Physics2)

This quarter we will be focusing on the question, How do things move? This chapter looks at the language we use to describe motion and the methods we use to calculate it.



07.00 - Overview

This units covers data relating to human reproduction.

07.00 - OVERVIEW OF HUMAN REPRODUCTION - Introduction

Students will understand the human reproductive process, infertility, pregnancy, and steps that lead to a healthy lifestyle.

LESSON MATERIAL:.

I. HUMAN REPRODUCTIVE PROCESS

Objective: Students must explain the human reproductive process, infertility, pregnancy, and steps that lead to a healthy lifestyle.

A. A complete understanding of the male and female reproductive systems will enable you to act responsibly regarding your own personal health and safety.

07.00 - Triangle Similarity (Geometry)

This unit is about similar triangles. In geometry, similar figures have the same shape, but can have different sizes. We will learn how to construct similar triangles, prove that triangles are similar and solve problems using similar triangles.



07.00 Accessories(IntDes3)

Unit VII - Accessories

07.00 Argumentation (Writing lab)

07.00 Art at the Turn of the 19th and 20th Century (Art History and Art Criticism)

At the turn of the 19th Century, most of the western world had entered the machine age. This was a time when machines began to make work more productive and life more pleasant. These machines captured artist imagination and also made it possible for artists to spend more time creating art. You will be introduced to artists who are considered Impressionists, Cubists, Surrealists, Realists, African American Folk Artists, Native American Artists, American Regionalists, Modern Artists and others.

You will be asked to select an artist in each of the periods and report your what you have learned about that artist. There will be no tests in this unit, but you will need to know what these art periods and movements mean for the final quarter test, so don't skip any of the reading.

07.00 Asia (World Geography)

This is the beginning of third quarter of World Geography.

07.00 Australia(Geo4Life2)

Satellite photo of Antarctica and Australia: NASA image, public domainSatellite photo of Antarctica and Australia: NASA image, public domainAustralia, Oceania and Antarctica

07.00 Basic Food Science Principles (FoodSci)

This unit will discover the role of acids and bases and explain processes associated with milk protein and cheese.

07.00 Chapter 7 (Geometry)

07.00 Chemical Bonding(Chemistry2)

Chemical Bonding

The arrangement of the electrons in an atom determines how it will interact with other atoms. In this section we will look at the different ways atoms are attracted to each other.

07.00 Communication (TeenLiving)

07.00 Designing your own program (Fitness for Life)

Now that you have learned all about the various aspects of health-related fitness, it is time to put your knowledge to work and design a program that will work for YOU!!! This unit will help you accomplish that task.

Now that you have learned all about the various aspects of health-related fitness, it is time to put your knowledge to work and design a program that will work for YOU!!! This unit will help you accomplish that task. Begin by viewing/reading the unit presentation and lessons. Image from Wikimedia Commons, Tom Blomfield, CC Attribution Share-AlikeImage from Wikimedia Commons, Tom Blomfield, CC Attribution Share-Alike

Assignments related to this unit:

Read Chapters 5, 8 & 9 (if you have the textbook)

07.01 Your Physical Activity Preferences


07.02 Setting Fitness Goals

07.03 Unit 7 Review quiz

07.03 Activity log 10 - week 4

07.00 Ethics, Careers and Program Design (C++)

In this chapter, you will be researching computer ethics, careers and program design on the World Wide Web. There will be no reviews for this chapter. Some answers may be found at the web sites listed below.

07.00 Ethics, Careers and Program Design links (C++)

Refer to these links for assignments in this unit.

07.00 Exponential and Logarithmic Functions (PreCalc)

Exponential and Logarithmic functions can be used to model such problems as student loans, and learning curves. There are many other problems that are also solved by using exponential and logarithmic functions.



07.00 Fluid(PrinTech2)

During this unit you will learn about fluid work.

07.00 Food Preparation(F&N2Q2)

Unit 7: Food Preparation
Click on the words above Unit 7: Food Preparation and chose the lesson you wish to complete.

Lesson 7.1 Salad Preparation
Lesson 7.2 Soup Preparation
Lesson 7.3 Casserole Preparation
Lesson 7.4 Yeast Bread Preparation
Lesson 7.5 Meat Preparation
Lesson 7.6 Poultry Preparation
Lesson 7.7 Pastries Preparation

07.00 Functions (Math I)

We have discussed how many of the problems we have considered in this class are functions. We have mentioned that functions are something that takes an “input” and gives an “output.” In quarter 1, we considered how most lines are functions. In the previous unit we considered how sequences are functions. Before extending the concept of sequences to continuous curves, we need to step back, and take a closer look at functions.

We have discussed how many of the problems we have considered in this class are functions. We have mentioned that functions are something that takes an “input” and gives an “output.” In quarter 1, we considered how most lines are functions. In the previous unit we considered how sequences are functions. Before extending the concept of sequences to continuous curves, we need to step back, and take a closer look at functions.



07.00 Geometric Figures Overview (Math Level 1)

In previous grades, students were asked to draw triangles based on given measurements. They also have prior experi- ence with rigid motions: translations, reflections, and rotations and have used these to develop notions about what it means for two objects to be congruent. In this unit, students establish triangle congruence criteria, based on analyses of rigid motions and formal constructions. They solve problems about triangles, quadrilaterals, and other polygons. They apply reasoning to complete geometric constructions and explain why they work. By the end of the unit, students will be able to:

  • Define, name and model geometric figures including points, lines, rays, segments, angles and planes.
  • Find perimeter and area of geometric figures.
  • Write equations for solving problems involving angle relationships.
  • Find the lengths of segments using addition and midpoint properties.
  • Find the measures of angles using addition and bisector properties.
  • Explain and use the properties of triangles.
  • Explain and use the properties of quadrilaterals and polygons.
  • Find the measures of angles in circles and polygons.

07.00 Guidance Techniques(ChildDev2)

Lesson 7.1 - Discipline
Lesson 7.2 - Guidance
Lesson 7.3 - Stress
Lesson 7.4 - Abuse + Neglect

07.00 Health Problems and First Aid

When a horse is hurt or ill, it cannot call the vet to ask for help. You as a horseman have the responsibility to know what is normal for the horses under your care, and to recognize problems when they occur. Some health problems you can deal with yourself; for others you will need the help of a veterinarian. Anytime you are in doubt, ask the advice of your vet, or, if a vet is not available, call an experienced horseman.

A healthy horse has a good appetite, and is eager to eat. It has a shine to its coat, and a bright, alert eye, and interest in what is going on around it. It stands with weight on all four feet (though it is normal for a sleepy horse to cock one hind leg or the other) and moves easily and in a regular rhythm. By observing horses every day, you will learn to recognize even subtle signs that a horse is "off".

See also Basic Horse Care pp. 133-178 & 278-286

USPC Manual 1 pp. 209-211

USPC Manual 2 pp. 215-232

UC Davis Book of Horses pp. 377-402

07.00 Human Development and Healthy Relationships (Health II)

Standard 6: Students will demonstrate knowledge of human development, social skills, and
strategies that encourage healthy relationships and healthy growth throughout life.


Objective 1: Describe the physical, mental, social, and emotional changes that occur throughout
the life cycle.

a. Review the anatomy and physiology of the male and female reproductive systems.
b. Identify physical, mental, social, and emotional changes that occur from adolescence
through late adulthood.
c. Explain genetic influences on growth and development.
d. Describe fertilization, fetal development, the birth process, and personal choices that may
affect the fetus (e.g., nutrition, the use of alcohol, tobacco, other drugs).
e. Describe how the developing brain impacts choices and behaviors.

Objective 2: Describe the interrelationship of physical, mental, social, and emotional health.

a. Identify characteristics necessary for healthy relationships (e.g., communication,
empathy, confidence, trust, mutual respect).
b. Describe how personal relationships evolve over time, focusing on changes in
friendships, family, dating relationships, and marriage.
c. Develop and use effective communication skills including being able to discuss questions
on sexuality with parents and/or guardians.
d. Develop strategies for preventing sexual harassment.
e. Identify people, resources, and services that may help with personal or relationship issues.

Objective 3: Establish guidelines that promote healthy and positive dating relationships.

a. Analyze how personal values impact dating behaviors.
b. Identify skills for maintaining healthy relationships, and discuss unhealthy behaviors in
dating and other personal relationships (e.g., violence, coercion, selfishness, manipulation,
aggression, drug use).
c. Demonstrate refusal skills as they apply to situations involving pressure to be sexually
active, and identify alternative strategies that support the decision to abstain from sexual
behavior.
d. Evaluate messages about sexuality from society, including the media, and identify how
those messages affect attitudes and behaviors.
e. Explain how laws relate to relationships and sexual behavior.
f. Analyze how societal norms, cultural differences, personal beliefs, and media impact choices, behavior, and relationships.

Objective 4: Understand the importance of abstinence, the responsibilities related to sexual
development, and the challenges associated with teen and/or unintended pregnancies.

a. Describe how sexual abstinence before marriage and fidelity after marriage contribute to
overall wellness (e.g., physical, mental, social, emotional).
b. Analyze the responsibilities, joys, demands, and challenges of parenthood.
c. Identify means of prevention of early and/or unintended pregnancy and sexually
transmitted diseases (e.g., abstinence, disease prevention, contraception/condom use).
d. Identify adoption as an option for unintended pregnancy, and discuss the Newborn Safe
Haven Law.
e. Explain the importance of an annual physical examination as well as breast and testicular
self-examinations.

07.00 India China Introduction (WorldCiv1)

India and China take up most of southern Asia: Wikimedia Commons, CIA World Factbook, public domainIndia and China take up most of southern Asia: Wikimedia Commons, CIA World Factbook, public domain
Unit 7: The Heritage of India and China

Time Period: (1500 B.C. – 220 A.D.)

Geographic Areas: India and China

Unit 7 contains activities designed to increase your understanding of the heritage of
India and China. General assignment information is as follows:

1. Journal Entry: Students discuss personal thoughts and feelings on a topic that
connects the modern world with cultures and peoples of the past.

2. Reading Challenge: Students answer a series of questions based entirely on
information taken from articles that are required readings for the course. The
articles are provided through World Book Encyclopedia Online.

3. Summary: Students will write a short essay on a topic from the reading.

4. Enrichment Videos: The videos contain information of interest to students who
may wish to continue personal study of a topic discussed in the chapter. Points
are not given for watching the videos.

If you have any questions regarding the above information, or any other topic,
feel free to contact your instructor.

In India and China, religion and philosophy shaped the development of culture and significantly impacted the order of society.
Hinduism established a class-oriented society with castes.
Buddhism taught the necessity of eliminating worldly desires from one's life. Confucianism and Taoism emphasized withdrawal from the world.
Ideas from these religions provided a basis for the rule of an empire that lasted some 400 years.

Objectives:
Analyze the development of classical political systems.

Contrast Zhou feudalism, the Greek city-state, and the caste system of India.
Compare the development of the Roman and Han empires.

Investigate the purpose and influence of religions and philosophies on classical
civilizations of China and India.

Examine the essential elements of the belief systems of Confucianism, Buddhism, Hinduism and Islam.

Investigate the importance of the expansion of trade.

Identify routes of early colonization, e.g., Korean, Japanese.
Examine the technological improvements in transportation over time.
Assess the importance of the East Asian trade routes.

Evaluate the significance of classical sculpture, architecture, and performing arts.

Examine the importance and influence of Indian and Chinese art and architecture.
Investigate the importance and influence of the performing arts on classical civilizations.

Analyze the social organization of classical cultures.

Compare the role of the family in Imperial Rome and Confucian China.
Explain the caste system of India.
Compare the treatment of women in China, Athens, Sparta, India and Rome.

07.00 Integrated Project

Integrated Project Unit Objectives

(NOTE: You may choose to do this at the end of the course or whenever you have an assignment from another course that would fit this requirement, but you must first complete the Excel/PowerPoint unit if you choose to do a project from one of those units.)

* With the cooperation of a teacher in a different content area, you will create and implement an integrated project.

07.00 Integrated Project (CompTech 2007)

Integrated Project Unit Objectives

(NOTE: I put this unit here, but you may choose to do it at the end of the course or whenever you have an assignment from another course that would fit this requirement.)

* With the cooperation of a teacher in a different content area, you will create and implement an integrated project.

* You will use any or all of the following in a pre-approved project to be presented for grading to the Computer Technology teacher and a cross-curricular teacher: word processing, spreadsheet, and electronic presentation.

Integrated Project Grading Sheet

Use the grading sheet above for the Integrated Project Unit. This unit is completed in conjunction with another class assignment.

In this Computer Technology course you will learn about a variety of ways to use the computer in everyday life. To reinforce these concepts you will be expected to create and implement an integrated project with the cooperation of a teacher in a different content area. Doesn't this sound great! You can get a grade in two different classes for the same project.

NOTE: If you are taking this course in the summer or this is the only course you are taking, you can use one of the "Summer Integrated Project Ideas" in the link above.

Integrated Project Proposal (IP1)

Step 1: Integrated Project Proposal--5 points. Choose another class in your school schedule for which you will create a project using your computer technology skills. Choose one type of project from the three possibilities below and follow the guidelines given:

1. REPORT
Create an MLA report with a Works Cited page in Microsoft Word. The report must be at least 1 1/2 pages plus the Works Cited page. Consider page layout, line spacing, grammar, spelling, indentation, font changes, and automatic features such as headers for page numbering. Click on the MLA Report Instructions link above to see a sample of how a MLA style report is formatted.

2. SPREADSHEET WITH CHART
Create a spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel that uses text, numbers, and formulas. Format it in ways that improve the presentation, including font changes, borders, shading, number category, and alignment. Create a chart from the data. Format the chart to enhance its presentation.

3. PRESENTATION
Create an electronic presentation in Microsoft PowerPoint that is at least 8 slides. Use the following elements: variety of slide layouts; graphics; transitions; animations; font, color, and theme to support good design; proofreading for grammar; and correct spelling. If appropriate, use auto-advance with suitable timing as well as hyperlinks and action buttons. Remember to include a Works Cited page at the end of the presentation if you are using information that is not your own.

Complete the comment to me explaining the project that will be used (report, presentation or spreadsheet with chart), topic, due date for other course, and other relevant information. Get written approval from me to use this project to meet the integrated project requirements for this course. NOTE: You must have written approval before you start the project and this project should be completed after you complete the unit for the computer skills you will be using in this project.

Integrated Project (IP2)

Step 2: Create the Project--45 points. After completing this project for your other course, submit the final graded project to your Computer Technology instructor to receive a grade for this course. NOTE: You must have earned a B or better from your other instructor and/or you can make any changes recommended by your other instructor to improve this project before you submit it to me. Please indicate the grade you earned from your other instructor. Please attach your original graded project or your corrected copy.

07.00 Integrated Project (CompTech)

Integrated Project Unit Objectives

(NOTE: I put this unit here, but you may choose to do it at the end of the course or whenever you have an assignment from another course that would fit this requirement.)

* With the cooperation of a teacher in a different content area, you will create and implement an integrated project.

* You will use any or all of the following in a pre-approved project to be presented for grading to the Computer Technology teacher and a cross-curricular teacher: word processing, spreadsheet, and electronic presentation.

Integrated Project Grading Sheet

Use this grading sheet for the Integrated Project Unit. This unit is completed in conjunction with another class assignment.

In this Computer Technology course you will learn about a variety of ways to use the computer in everyday life. To reinforce these concepts you will be expected to create and implement an integrated project with the cooperation of a teacher in a different content area. Doesn't this sound great! You can get a grade in two different classes for the same project.

NOTE: If you are taking this course in the summer or this is the only course you are taking, you can use one of the "Summer Integrated Project Ideas."

Integrated Project Proposal (IP1)

Step 1: Integrated Project Proposal--5 points. Choose another class in your school schedule for which you will create a project using your computer technology skills. Choose one type of project from the three possibilities below and follow the guidelines given:

1. REPORT
Create an MLA report with a Works Cited page in Microsoft Word. The report must be at least 1 1/2 pages plus the Works Cited page. Consider page layout, line spacing, grammar, spelling, indentation, font changes, and automatic features such as headers for page numbering. Click on the MLA Report Instructions link above to see a sample of how a MLA style report is formatted.

2. SPREADSHEET WITH CHART
Create a spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel that uses text, numbers, and formulas. Format it in ways that improve the presentation, including font changes, borders, shading, number category, and alignment. Create a chart from the data. Format the chart to enhance its presentation.

3. PRESENTATION
Create an electronic presentation in Microsoft PowerPoint that is at least 8 slides. Use the following elements: variety of slide layouts; graphics; transitions; animations; font, color, and theme to support good design; proofreading for grammar; and correct spelling. If appropriate, use auto-advance with suitable timing as well as hyperlinks and action buttons. Remember to include a Works Cited page at the end of the presentation if you are using information that is not your own.

Complete the comment to me explaining the project that will be used (report, presentation or spreadsheet with chart), topic, due date for other course, and other relevant information. Get written approval from me to use this project to meet the integrated project requirements for this course. NOTE: You must have written approval before you start the project and this project should be completed after you complete the units for the computer skills you will be using in this project.

Integrated Project (IP2)

Step 2: Create the Project--45 points. After completing this project for your other course, submit the final graded project to your Computer Technology instructor to receive a grade for this course. NOTE: You must have earned a B or better from your other instructor and/or you can make any changes recommended by your other instructor to improve this project before you submit it to me. Please indicate the grade you earned from your other instructor. Please attach your original graded project or your corrected copy.

07.00 International Environment for Promo and IMC (Advertising)

07.00 Internet Personal Safety(Web Page Design)

In this unit, you will understand personal safety issues of Internet use.

07.00 Money, Cost, Ordering Food (FrenchI)

 

Unit 7:
 

Unit Content
 

Numbers 90-100

The French Monetary System

Describing Cost & Ordering Food

07.00 Moons, Asteroids, Comets, Dwarf Planets, and the Kuiper Belt(Astronomy1)

Week 7: Moons, Asteroids, Comets, Dwarf Planets and the Kuiper Belt

07.00 My Acquaintances and their Freetime

07.00 Photography and Cartoons (Journalism)

All good journalistic writing contains visual material to help "show" more about the written information. Photographs, charts, maps, and drawings are all critical elements of newspaper layout, and news broadcasts.

07.00 Put your knowledge where your pen is - English 10

The Power Of A Strong Argument

News media has the power to argue, inform, and expose the truth in a persuasive manner through the use of ethical investigation and reporting techniques.

By coupling ethical Journalism and argumentation techniques, reporters are able to inform and educate the public. You will now have the opportunity to implement ethical argumentation skills through ethical journalistic writing.

07.00 Searching

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • Describe the linear search algorithm.
  • Describe the binary search algorithm.
  • Explain conditions under which each search might be appropriate.
  • Define sorted and unsorted lists.
  • Describe various sorting algorithms.
  • Compare various sorting algorithms.
  • Solve a minimal spanning tree.
  • Draw a graph to solve a problem.

07.00 Similarity and Right Triangles (Math Level 2)

The goal of all math classes is for students to become mathematically proficient. In particular, students need to be able to:

  • Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
  • Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
  • Model with mathematics.
  • Use appropriate tools strategically.
  • Attend to precision.
  • Look for and make use of structure.
  • Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

As you work through this unit, keep these proficiencies in mind!

This unit focuses on the geometric concept of similarity and on the geometry of right triangles.

At the conclusion of this unit you must be able to state without hesitation that:

  • I can solve problems concerning dilations.
  • I can answer questions about similar polygons.
  • I can identify equilateral, isosceles, scalene, acute, right, and obtuse triangles.
  • I can identify whether triangles are similar, congruent, or neither.
  • I can identify corresponding sides of congruent and similar triangles.
  • I can find the missing measurements in a pair of similar triangles.
  • I can solve application problems involving similar triangles.
  • I can use my knowledge of similar triangles to solve problems.
  • I can solve problems using Angle-Angle similarity.
  • I can prove the midsegment of a triangle is parallel to the third side.
  • I can prove the medians of a triangle meet at a point.
  • I can prove the Pythagorean Theorem.

07.00 Special Subject and Interests for Drivers - including DUI - Handbook Chapter 7 (DriverEd)

This unit is designed to give you a basic understanding special subjects and interests for drivers. The handbook will outline what you should and are legally responsible to do in each situation. You can download this section of the Driver License Handbook from the link above.

At completion of this unit the student:

  • Will understand the physical health problems and driving safety restrictions pertaining to driving.
  • Will understand the mental and emotional conditions and how they pertain to driving.
  • Will understand the effects of driving and using alcohol or drugs while driving.
  • Will understand how boating while under the influence pertains to driving.
  • Will understand what voluntary contributions you may make as a Utah resident.
  • Will understand the implications of fraud and identity theft and what is being done to protect you.

07.00 Standard 7: Ethics and Leadership

Students will apply basic social communication skills in personal and professional situations by demonstrating competence, ethics, leadership, and interpersonal skills.

Objective 1: Demonstrate proper respect for authority.
Objective 2: Practice and consider the process(es) for conflict resolution by demonstrating correct responses to passive, assertive, and aggressive behaviors.
Objective 3: Explore positive leadership skills, techniques, and styles including conducting a meeting and preparing an agenda.
Objective 4: Explain the importance of following chains of command (upward, downward, and horizontal).
Objective 5: Incorporate standards of personal ethics into effective communication.

07.00 Textures (Navajo)

On the right hand side of the class you will find the PowerPoint slides for Unit 7

07.00 The Executive Branch (NavajoGovt)

07.00 This unit will cover parts 1, 2,3,4, and 5

07.00 Two-Step Equations (PreAlgebra)

07.00 Unit 1: Persuasion (English 9)

Most of the assignments in this unit will focus on advertising, logic, and persuasive writing or speaking. Other topics include commonly misspelled words and verbal phrases.

07.00 Unit 7 (ArtHistory1)

The beginnings of Western Art : - Prehistoric, Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Greek & Roman

07.00 Unit 7 (Business Law)

07.00 Unit 7 (English 10)

07.00 Unit 7 (FrenchII)

Unit 7:

1. Past-Tense of "-IR" verbs

2. Directions

3. Review: The City

4. Review: "a" + "le/la/les"

5. Street Vendors

07.00 Unit 7 (Spanish I)

Welcome to Unit 7! In this unit, we will continue to add to what you have already learned. You have learned some consonants, but now we are going to emphasize some additional consonants. You will also learn some more vocabulary, having to do with school. You will begin to learn about commands, and how a teacher would use commands in the classroom. You will continue to learn about verbs, but now you will learn how to say things in the past tense, when it has only been present tense usages up to this point. Although there is more than one past tense in Spanish, you will start with the PRETERITE past tense in this unit. We will begin with the preterite of regular -ar verbs. You will also learn the preterite endings of regular -er and -ir verbs. Remember the verbs ser and estar? How do you use them? Can they be used interchangeably? NO! You will compare ser and estar in this unit. What is the personal "a," and when do you use it? These are just some of the many things that you will learn in this unit. You will review how to use the question words. The Destinos video series will continue to be a part of this unit. Let's get started! Buena suerte.

Attention New EHS Spanish Students: The following assignment in Unit 07 checks to make sure that you can type Spanish accents and special characters. This is important for all assignments in this course. We presented some very important materials in Module 2 - "Start Here". There is a lesson "0C" that specifically explains how to set up your computer with a Spanish keyboard, and the Ascii codes for typing Spanish accents and special characters. We assume that you have read through all of the introductory materials in Module 2 before beginning Module 3!

07.00 Unit 7 - Psychological Disorders and Therapy: What goes wrong and how we fix it! (Psychology)

Objectives for Unit 7 Mental Disorders and Therapy
1. Describe what DSM-IV stands for and what it is.

2. Define Psychological Disorder.

3. Understanding Depression and therapy to treat it:
......What is depression?
......How prevalent is depression? (how much depression is there in our society?)
......What causes depression?
...... How does it affect men and women differently?
......Treatments for depression
......What is Psychotherapy?
......Know the difference between behavioral psychotherapy, cognitive psychotherapy and psychodynamic psychotherapy.
......What is Psychopharmatherapy? (You don’t need to know the specific medications except for ‘antidepressant’ and ‘lithium’!)
......What is Electroconvulsive (ECT) therapy and when is it used?
......How do you help yourself or loved ones who may be depressed?
......Know the differences between the three types of depressive disorders:
......Major depression
......Dysthymia
......Bi-polar disorder

4. Understanding Anxiety Disorders and their Treatment:
......What is an Anxiety Disorder?
......What are the different types, and how are they different from each other?
............Panic Disorder (be able to describe a panic attack)
............Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
............Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
............Social Anxiety Disorder
............Phobias
............Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
.......What treatments are used for these disorders?
.......Cognitive Behavioral Therapy…what is it?
........Know how and why Exposure is used
........Know how deep breathing is used
........Psychopharmatherapy (Medications used for treatment)
........What are some coexisting conditions to anxiety disorders?
........What are some things that can aggravate the symptoms of an anxiety disorder?

5. Understanding Schizophrenia and it’s treatment:
......What is it? What are the symptoms?
......What causes it?
......What is the expected recovery rate?
......What is the suicide rate?
......What treatment is used for schizophrenia?
............Antipsychotic drugs
............Rehabilitation
.............Individual psychotherapy
.............Family education
.............Self help groups
......How do schizophrenics approach therapy?
......How can you help someone with schizophrenia?
.......Know these vocabulary words:
.............Psychosis
.............Schizoaffective disorder

6. Understanding Personality Disorders:
......What is a personality disorder?
.......Be able to define the following personality disorders:
.............Avoidance Personality Disorder
.............Histrionic Personality Disorder
.............Narcissistic Personality Disorder
.............Borderline Personality Disorder
.............Anti-Social Personality Disorder

7. Be able to describe Therapy:
......Describe a brief history
.......Psychosurgery
.......lobotomy
.......Psychopharmatherapy
.......Psychotherapy (talk therapy)
.......Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
.......Systematic Desensitization
.......Psychoanalysis
.......Client Centered Therapy
.......Electroconvulsive therapy

07.00 Unit 7 - World War II (US History)

WWII in Europe: Battle of the Bulge, Belgium, January 1945: Wikimedia Commons, US Army photo, public domainWWII in Europe: Battle of the Bulge, Belgium, January 1945: Wikimedia Commons, US Army photo, public domain
Determine how America shifted from isolationism to intervention.

Examine the impact World War II had on the American home front.

Evaluate how the rules and weapons of war changed during World War II.
WWII in Africa: Second Battle of Alamein, 1942: Wikimedia Commons, UK government image, public domainWWII in Africa: Second Battle of Alamein, 1942: Wikimedia Commons, UK government image, public domainWWII in the Pacific: Japanese bomber attacks US carrier, 1942: Wikimedia Commons, US Navy image, public domainWWII in the Pacific: Japanese bomber attacks US carrier, 1942: Wikimedia Commons, US Navy image, public domain

07.00 Unit 7 Narrative (English 9)

Scheherezade telling a story in the Arabian Nights: Virginia Frances Sterret, Wikimedia Commons, public domainScheherezade telling a story in the Arabian Nights: Virginia Frances Sterret, Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Basically, the purpose of narrative is to tell a story. A narrative may tell a true (nonfiction) story, or an invented (fiction) story, but the focus is on what happens. As far as we know, story-telling is a uniquely human pursuit. No other animals seem to have enough language to tell stories, but we all do it. When you talk to a friend, you tell them what you've been doing, or what has happened in your life since the last time you talked to them. That's an example of narrative. Novels, biographies, autobiographies, memoirs, and some essays and poetry are narrative. Most plays, movies and TV shows are narrative in structure, also.

In unit seven, you will read Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (one of the older narratives written in English), To Kill a Mockingbird, and some shorter pieces. The major writing assignments include one argument essay and one scene from a story.

You should expect the lessons, readings, and assignments in this unit to take you about 12-14 hours of concentrated work.

Again, remember our 'big idea': Writers choose details, events and characters' words and actions to develop main ideas or themes; readers use details, examples and evidence to infer main ideas or themes.

07.00 Unit 7: Charting Your Path (English 12)

For many teenagers, one of the hardest questions to answer is, "What do you want to be when you grow up?" People may seem to be asking you this question all the time. They are asking you to pick your major in college, decide where you want to go to school, decide what you want to do with your life... The question you might have is, "How the heck should I know???"

While some people seem to know from early on exactly what career they want to pursue, you should keep in mind that many successful adults went through a crazy and totally unplanned path to get to their current position in life. So, in choosing your own career and in picking your major, what should you do?

One approach would be to simply relax, find something you like doing now, major in it in college and get a job. Then be on the lookout for new opportunities and take them when they arise. That would be a completely valid approach. Another approach would be to do some research on different career possibilities so that you can see what's out there. There are thousands of jobs that you have never even heard of before, and one of them might be perfect for you.

The latter approach will be the focus of this unit. The Internet has many excellent career resources--and you'll have the opportunity to utilize some of them to research a career that has some current appeal to you. As a result of your research, you may either find that elusive "perfect fit," or, perhaps, you'll rule out at least one possibility. Either way, hopefully, your efforts will prove worthwhile.

About this class:

We live in a world filled with static. Whether born of ignorance, insincerity, or insensitivity, static chokes the channels of communication and prevents people from connecting in meaningful ways. This class focuses on the use of language as a tool to make connections: between our self and others, between our self and our world, between our self and history, and between our self and our future. By making these connections, I believe students will be better prepared to become productive and thoughtful citizens in the Information Age.

The class will be writing intensive, interdisciplinary, and, hopefully, enjoyable. We will devote considerable time and energy to examining the strategies and processes of writers and writing. Writing is, afterall, about learning how to think clearly. A good writer observes phenomena, formulates an idea, attempts to adequately support that idea with evidence, and then revises and refines the idea as he seeks to explain it to others. In other words, writing is just another form of the Scientific Method, or, stated another, way, writing is thinking.

Given this relationship between writing and thinking, this class requires that (1) you write a lot (both informally and formally) and practice the various steps in the writing process; (2) you read and respond to others' writing in order to discuss various ideas and develop an awareness of what readers need and want from a text; and (3) you read, examine, and respond to various published texts to examine how experienced writers use words to construct meaning.

07.00 Unit 7: Nervous System (MAP)

07.00 Unit 7: Good Writing Techniques (LA 9)

Author Christopher Paul Curtis, 2014: Jeffrey Beall, WC, CC-BY-3.0Author Christopher Paul Curtis, 2014: Jeffrey Beall, WC, CC-BY-3.0

 

Unit 1: Getting Started

In this introductory unit you will work primarily on language skills, as outlined in the Utah State Core Curriculum for ninth grade English/Language Arts. You will review or familiarize yourself with rubrics, the six-trait model of evaluating writing, and the writing process. Topics in this unit include techniques that will help you improve your writing, sentence structure, clauses and phrases.  There will be several short assignments and quizzes. You should expect this unit to take you anywhere from about three to twelve hours, depending on how much you already know, and how much you need to review.

The "big idea" behind most of the assignments in this class:  Writers choose details, events and characters' words and actions to develop main ideas or themes; readers use details, examples and evidence to understand and infer main ideas or themes.

Class plagiarism policy:

Plagiarism is copying someone else's writing, either copying the exact words or copying the general organization, and paraphrasing some of the ideas. Copying someone else's sentences, phrases or ideas, and failing to give credit to the original author, is plagiarism.

In some papers it is appropriate to quote someone else's exact words, but when you do, that section needs to be set off in quotation marks or otherwise set apart, and the author identified either in a sentence, or in a parenthetical note.  Then you need to supply a "works cited" list of sources at the bottom of your paper. This also applies when you use facts that are not common knowledge.  

If you have not already done so, please review the information about plagiarism on the Start Here page and its links. Plagiarism is unlawful and unethical, and against the EHS Honor Code. If you turn in a plagiarized assignment, you will receive ONE warning. If the problem recurs, you may be dropped from the class with no credit.

07.00 Unit 7: Novel (English 11)

The novel for this quarter is The Secret Life of Bees, by Sue Monk Kidd.

07.00 Vocabulary and Grammar (English 11)

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language from the Utah Core:

US Navy image, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsUS Navy image, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

• To be college and career-ready in language, students must have firm control over the conventions of standard English.

• Students must also have extensive vocabularies, built through reading and study, enabling them to comprehend complex texts and engage in purposeful writing about and conversations around content.

• Students need to become skilled in determining or clarifying the meaning of words and phrases they encounter, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies to aid them.

• Students must learn to see an individual word as part of a network of other words—words, for example, that have similar denotations but different connotations.

• The inclusion of Language standards in students' own strand should not be taken as an indication that skills related to conventions, effective language use, and vocabulary are unimportant to reading, writing, speaking, and listening; indeed, they are inseparable from such contexts.

07.00 Welcome to 2nd Quarter!!

You can listen to the welcome here --> http://goo.gl/4yEPU

Welcome to Java 2nd quarter. I look forward to working with you as we explore object oriented programming in the Java language. The first quarter was focused around the mechanics of the main method, using different data types, keyboard input and decision making. This quarter is focused on object oriented programming. It's exciting. Hopefully, at the end of this quarter you will have written a simple (very simple) computer game, or at least have some idea of the process. I will introduce you to Greenfoot and the power of Java with objects.

Unit 7 is meant to be a review. You should know and understand:

  • how to write a java program,
  • how to create a program in JCreator (or some other IDE)
  • how to use the scanner class,
  • how to use If ELSE statements
  • the basics of variables and declarations
  • basic syntax rules for Java
  • basic compiling and error fixes

    It is expected that you have the Java JDK installed . Remember it has to be a version greater than 1.5 You can find version 1.6 here:
    http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/index.html

    It is expected that you have Jcreator installed. I will also ask you to install Greenfoot in unit 8

    Wecome again. Make sure you read the assignments and listen to the lectures. I know the reading can be difficult, but it set a good basis for the lectures and understanding the details that can not be covered in brief lecture.

  • 07.00 What's your name? (Wie heißen Sie?) (German1)

    Objective 7: What is your name? (Introducing Yourself)

    07.00.00 - UNIT 7: YOUR FUTURE; WHAT IS AHEAD?

    As a culture, we love to speculate about the future of our civilization. In the next couple of activities, you will read the predictions of different writers, scientists and theorists, and we’ll make a jump back into fiction as well as non-fiction text.

    07.00.00 Geometry (Sec Dev Math)

    You use geometric terms in everyday language, often without thinking about it. For example, any time you say “walk along this line” or “watch out, this road quickly angles to the left” you are using geometric terms to make sense of the environment around you. You use these terms flexibly, and people generally know what you are talking about.

    In the world of mathematics, each of these geometric terms has a specific definition. It is important to know these definitions —- as well as how different figures are constructed—to become familiar with the language of geometry. Let’s start with a basic geometric figure: the plane.




    In this unit, you will gain a deeper understanding of basic geometric concepts and figures. You will also work with perimeter, circumference, and area. Finally, you will identify geometric solids and find their volume.

    IF you feel confident you have mastered these skills, skip the lessons but take the quizzes and unit test. Otherwise, work through the lessons that follow.



    07.00.01 Class policies quiz (English9)

    computer-scored 14 points possible 10 minutes

    Go to the class main page, and to Topic 3, to take this quiz. While you're there, also click the About Me link and introduce yourself to me.

    07.00.01 Glossary (World Geography)

    Refer to these terms as you work on your assignments.

    Abdicate To relinquish power or responsibility formally; to surrender one's office, throne, or authority.
    Aborigine An original inhabitant; one of the original inhabitants of Australia.
    Absolute Location The exact position on the earth in which a place can be found.
    Acculturation The process of accepting, borrowing and exchanging traits and ideas between cultures.
    Acid Deposition wet or dry airborne acids that fall to the earth.
    Acid Rain precipitation carrying large amounts of dissolved acids, especially sulfuric acid and nitric acid, which damages buildings, forests, and crops and kills wildlife.
    Alluvian Plain A broad expanse of land along riverbanks, consisting of rich, fertile soil left by floods.
    Amendment In U.S. government, official changes made to the Constitution.
    Anarchy Political disorder and violence; lawlessness.
    Ancestor Worship The belief that respecting and honoring one's ancestors will cause them to live in the spirit world after death.
    Animism The religious belief that such things as the sky, rivers, and trees contain a spirit, or soul.
    Apartheid The policy of strict separation of races adopted in South Africa.
    Aquaculture farming of plants and fish under water.
    Aqueduct A large pipe or channel designed to transport water from a remote location over a long distance.
    Aquifer Underground water-bearing layers of porous rock, sand, or gravel.
    Arable Land land suitable for growing crops.
    Archipelago A chain of islands.
    Artesian Water underground water supply that is under enough pressure to rise into wells without being pumped.
    Atmosphere The air that surrounds the earth.
    Atoll A ring-shaped coral island sorrounding a lagoon.
    Authoritarian Descriptive of a system of government in which one person, a dictator, holds all political power.
    Avalanche mass of ice, snow, or rock that slides down a mountainside.
    Axis Refering to the earth, an imaginary line that runs through the center between the North Pole and the South Pole.

    Barbarian A person without manners or civilized customs.
    Barter The exchange of goods for goods, or services without the use of money.
    Basin An area drained by a river and its tributaries.
    Batik method of dyeing cloth to produce beautiful patterns, developed in Indonesia and Malaysia.
    Bayou A marshy inlet or outlet of a lake or river.
    Bazaar An open-air market; a street lined with shops and stalls.
    Bedouin Member of a nomadic desert peoples of North Africa and Southwest Aisa.
    Bedrock Solid rock underlying all soil, gravel, clay, sand, and loose material on the earth's surface.
    Bilingual The ability to speak two or more languages.
    Biologist scientist who studies plant and animal life.
    Biosphere The part of the earth where life--people, plants, and animal life--exists.
    Birthrate The number of live births each year per 1,000 people.
    Black Market Any illegal market where scarce or illegal goods are sold, usually at high prices.
    Blizzard a heavy snowstorm with winds of more than 35 miles per hour.
    Boycott To refuse to purchase, sell, or use a product or service as an expression of disapproval.
    Buffer State A country that separates two or more hostile countries.

    Calligraphy The art of beautiful and decorative handwritting.
    Canopy top layer of a rain forest, where the tops of tall trees come together.
    Capital Wealth in the form of money or property owned or used in business; used to produce more wealth.
    Capitalist Descriptive of an economic system in which the means of production are controlled by individuals, or corporations.
    Cardinal Direction One of the four points of the compass: north, south, east, and west.
    Cartogrpher A person who makes maps or charts.
    Cash Crop A farm crop that is grown for sale and profit.
    Caste System A social hierarchy in which a person posesses a distinct rank in society that is determined by birth.
    Cataract A large waterfall; any strong flood or down-pour of water.
    Cay A small, low island or coral reef.
    Census The systematic counting of a population.
    Chaparral type of vegetation made up of dense forests of shrubs and short trees, common in Mediterranean climates.
    Chinook Seasonal warm wind that blows down the Rocky Mountains in late winter and early spring.
    Chlorofluorocarbon Chemical substance, found mainly in liquid coolants, that damages the earth's protective ozone layer.
    City-State In Ancient Greece, independant community consisting of a city and the surrounding lands.
    Climate The term used for the typical weather pattern in an region over a long period of time.
    Cold War Refers to the power struggle between the Soviet Union and the United States.
    Collective Farm A state-owned farm in the former Soviet Union managed by the workers who shared the profits.
    Command Economy An economic system in which the government dictates what goods will be manufactured.
    Commune in China, a collective farming community whose members were supposed to share work and products.
    Communism A system of government in which the government controls the means of production, determines what goods will be produced, and how much items will cost.
    Compass Rose The directional marker on a map, indicating north, south, east and west.
    Confederation A system of government in which the individual political units keep their sovereignty but give limited power to a central government.
    Consumer Goods Household goods, shoes, and clothing that an individual buys.
    Continent Any one of the seven large land masses on the earth's surface: Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, South America, Australia, Antartica.
    Continental Divide a line or ridge that separates rivers flowing toward opposite sides of a continent.
    Continental Drift The idea that the continents are continually moving their positions due to the movement to the tectonic plates on which they ride.
    Continental Shelf shallow ocean area near the coast of a continent.
    Contour Lines On a map, lines that connect points of land at the same elevation.
    Coral tiny marine animals and the rock-like structures (islands, reefs) formed by the skeletons of coral colonies.
    Cordillera a related set of separate mountain ranges.
    Cottage Industry A small-scale manufacturing operation in which people produce goods in their own home.
    Coup d'etat The sudden overthrow of a ruler or governement, often by violence or the threat of violent force.
    Crop Rotation Farming method in which different crops are alternated in the same field, perserving soil nutrients.
    Crusades A series of religious wars(1100-1300) in which European Christians tried to retake control of Palestine from Muslim rule.
    Culture The way of life that distinguishes a group of people from other groups of people.
    Culture region division of the earth based on a variety of factors, including government, social groups, economic systems, language, or religion.
    Cuneiform Sumerian writing system using wedge-shaped symbols pressed into clay tablets.
    Current cold or warm "river" of seawater that flows in the oceans, generally in a circular pattern.
    Czar An Emperor of Russia: Russian for Caesar.

    Death Rate The number of deaths each year per 1,000 people.
    Decentralization To transfer governmental power to smaller regions.
    Deforestation the loss or destruction of forests, due mainly to trees being cleared for logging or farming.
    Delta Triangular section of land built up by silt deposited at the mouth of a river.
    Demilitarized Zone A strip of land where there are no troops or weapons allowed.
    Democracy A system of government where the people choose their leaders and elected representatives, and determine government policy based on the will of the majority of the population.
    Demography The study of human populations, including their size, growth, density, distribution, and rates of births, marriages, and deaths.
    Developing Country A country with a relatively low industrial production rate, often lacking modern technology.
    Dharma in Hinduism, a person's moral duty, based on class distinctions, which guides his or her life.
    Dialect A variation of a spoken language that has its own distinct pronunciation or vocabulary and is unique to a region or area.
    Dictatorship A system of government in which one person holds absolute power.
    Diffusion The process of spreading cultural traits from one person or society to another.
    Directional Arrow The arrow on a map that always points to the north.
    Doldrums A frequently windless area near the Equator.
    Dry Farming A farming method used in dry regions in which the land is plowed and planted deeply to hold water in the soil.
    Dynasty A ruling house or continuing family of rulers.

    Economic system the way in which the people of a country produce and distribute goods and services.
    Embargo A severe restriction of trade with other countries.
    Emigrant A person who leaves their home country to live else-where.
    Enclave A country completely surronded by another country.
    Environment The physical conditions of the natural surroundings.
    Environmental interactions Interaction between humans and the environment, or between the environment and humans. How each adapts to the other.
    Equator An imaginary line that circles the earth at its widest point dividing the earth into two halfs called hemispheres; used as a starting point from which north and south latitude lines are measured in degrees.
    Equinox Either of the two times each year(spring and fall) when day and night are of nearly equal in length.
    Erosion wearing away of the earth's surface, by wind, flowing water, or glaciers.
    Ethnic Minority A cultural subgroup, not of the dominant culture.
    Ethnocracy A system of government in which one ethnic group rules others.
    Evaporation the changing of liquid water into water vapor, a gas.
    Exports resources or goods sent from one country to another.
    Farm cooperative organization in which farmers share in growing and selling farm products.
    Fault A fracture in the earth's crust.
    Fauna The animal life of a region.
    Fertile Able to produce abundantly, rich in resources.
    Feudalism in medieval Europe and Japan, system of government in which powerful lords gave land to nobles in return for pledges of loyalty.
    Five Themes of Geography
    1)Location: Exact/Relative,
    2)Place,
    3)Interaction Between People and Their Environment,
    4)Movement, and
    5)Regions.
    Fjord long, steep-sided glacial valley now filled with sea water, example: coast of Norway.
    Flora The plant life of a region.
    Foehn warm dry wind that blows from the leeward side of mountains, sometimes melting snow and causing an avalanche; used mainly in Europe.
    Fold A bend or buckle in the earth's crust.
    Foothills Low hills at the base of a mountain range.
    Formal Regions Places that have similar attributes; example, political regions.
    Fossil Fuel A nonrenewable mineral resource: coal, oil, natural, gas that is formed from the remains of ancient plants and animals and is used for fuel.
    Free Enterprise An economic system based on capitalism that allows private individuals to own, operate, and benefit from their own business.

    General purpose map map showing a wide range of general physical and/or political information about an area.
    Genocide The intentional destruction of a people.
    Geography the study of the earth and the ways people live and work on it.
    Geology The study of the earth's physical surface and history.
    Geothermal Energy An energy source derived from the intense interior heat, which transforms underground water into steam that can be used to create electricity.
    Glacier large bodies of ice that move across the surface of the earth.
    Glasnost Russian term for a "new opening," part of Gorbachev's reform plans.
    Global warming gradual warming of the earth and its atmosphere that may be caused in part by pollution and an increase in the greenhouse effect.
    Great circle shortest distance between any two places on the earth's surface.
    Grid system pattern formed as the lines of latitude and longitude cross one another.
    Gross National Product (GNP) The total value of goods and services produced by a country in a year.
    Groundwater water that lies beneath the surface of the earth, supplied mainly by rain filtering through the soil.
    Growing Season In farming, the average number of days between the last frost of spring and the first frost of fall.
    Gulf Arm of an ocean or sea that is partly enclosed by land, usually larger than a bay.

    Habitat Area with conditions suitable for certain plants or animals to live.
    Hajj In Islam, a pilgrimage or religious journey to the holy city of Mecca, birthplace of Muhammad.
    Headwaters the sources of river waters
    Heavy Industry The production of goods such as steel and machinery used by other industries.
    Hemisphere A half of the earth; the equator divides the world into the Northern and the Southern hemispheres. The Prime Meridian divides the world into the Eastern and Western hemispheres.
    Hierarchy Rank according to function; a group of persons or things arranged in order of rank, grade, or class.
    Hieroglyphics an Egyptian writing system using pictures and symbols to represent words and sounds.
    Holocaust The execution of 6 million Jews in Nazi Concentration camps during World War II.
    Homogeneous Having a similar nature; uniform in structure or quality; identical. Hurricane A large, powerful windstorm that forms over warm ocean waters.
    Hydroelectric Power Electricity that is generated by moving water.
    Hydrosphere the watery areas of the earth, including oceans, lakes, rivers, and other bodies of water.
    Hypothesis One step in the scientific method, suggesting a scientific explanation for observed events.

    Ice Shelf A massive extention of a glacial ice over the sea, often protruding hundreds of miles.
    Ideogram A pictorial character or symbol that has a specific meaning or stands for something.
    Immigant A person who has left their home country and settled permanently in another country.
    Imports resources or goods brought into one country from another.
    Impressionism artistic style that developed in Europe in the late 1800's and tried to show the natural appearance of objects with dabs or strokes of color.
    Indigenous Native to or living naturally in an area or environment.
    Indigo a plant that yields a blue dye; a dark blue dye obtained from this plant or an artificially made dye of the same color.
    Inflation A sharp, widespread rise in prices.
    Infrastructure An underlying foundation; the basic support facilities of a country, such as roads, power plants, and bridges.
    Inhabitable An area that is able to support permanent settlement.
    Interaction Between People and Their Environment Throughout history, people have adapted to and altered different environments. How do humans affect the environment and how does the environment affect humans?
    Interdependent Relying on one another for goods, services, and ideas.
    Irrigation The artificial watering of farmland, often by means of canals that draw water from reservoirs or rivers.
    Island Land area that is surrounded by water.
    Isthmus A narrow strip of land with water on each side that is joining two larger bodies of land.

    Jati in traditional Hindu society, a social group that defines a family's occupation and social standing.
    Joint Family System The custom of housing all memebers of an extended family together.
    Jute plant fiber used to make string and cloth.
    K Karma The Hinud belief, that the sum of good and bad actions in one's present and past lives, leads to rewards and punishments.
    Karst A landform made of soft limestone that is easily dissolved by wind and water.
    Key part of a map that explains the symbols used. A legend.
    Kums regional term for the sandy deserts in the Turan Lowland, as in Kara Kum.

    Labor Intensive Effort requiring a large human work force.
    Lagoon shallow pool of water at the center of an atoll.
    Land Redistribution A policy by which land is expropriated from those who own large amounts and given to those who have little or no land.
    Language family group of related languages that have all developed from one earlier language.
    Latitude One of the series of imaginary lines that circle the earth parallel to the equator; used to measure in degrees distance north and south from the equator.
    Leach to wash nutrients out of the soil.
    Leeward Situated on the side facing away from the direction the wind is blowing.
    Light Industry The production of small consumer goods such as clothes aand appliances.
    Literacy The ability to read and write.
    Lithosphere surface land areas of the earth's crust (about 30 percent), including continents and ocean basins.
    Llanos fertile plains along the Caribbean coast of South America, in Colombia and Venezuela.
    Location Where is it located. Can be described with either relative location or absolute (exact) location.
    Loess Fine, yellowish-brown soil made up of small silt and clay particles, usually carried by the wind.
    Longitude One of the series of imaginary lines that run north and south from one pole to the other; used to measure in degrees the distance east and west from the Prime Meridian.

    Malnutrition Disease caused by the lack of proper food; inadequate nutrition resulting from an unbalanced diet or insufficient food.
    Mantle A thick layer of mostly solid rock beneath the earth's crust that surrounds the earth's core.
    Mantra In Hinduism, a sacred word or pharse repeated in prayers and chants.
    Manufacturing The process of turning raw materials into finished products.
    Map Projection The way of drawing a map showing the rounded earth on a flat surface.
    Maritime Bordering on or near the sea; relating to navigation or shipping.
    Martial Law The law administration during a period of strict military control.
    Mass culture popular culture spread by media such as radio and television.
    Megalopolis a "super-city" that is made up of several large cities and the smaller cities near them, such as the area between Boston and Washington, D.C., or around Tokyo-Yokohama, Japan.
    Meltwater water formed by melting snow and ice.
    Mesa flat-topped, elevated landform.
    Mestizo A person of mixed European and Native American heritage.
    Metropolitan area region that includes a central city and its surrounding suburbs.
    Middle Passage The name given to the route of slave ships that traveled between Africa and the Americas.
    Militarism The glorification of the military and a readiness for war.
    Minaret A tall, slender tower attached to a mosque.
    Mistral strong northerly wind from the Alps that can bring cold air to southern France.
    Mixed farming raising several kinds of crops and livestock on th same farm.
    Mixed forest forestland with both evergreen and deciduous trees.
    Monarchy A system of authoritarian government headed by a monarch---a king, queen, shah, or sultan--- whose position is inherited.
    Monotheism The belief in one God.
    Monsoon A seasonal shift in the prevailing winds that influences large climate regions.
    Mosaic A picture or design made up of small pieces of colored glass, stone, or tile.
    Mosque An Islamic house of worship.
    Mouth of a river The place where a river or stream empties into a large body of water.
    Movement The movement of people, goods, information, and ideas around the globe.
    Mulato A person of mixed ancestory.
    Multicultural having elements that come from more than one culture.
    Muslim A follower of Islam.

    Nationalism Devotion to the interests or culture of a nation; the desire for national independence to promote a common culture.
    Nationalities large, distinct ethnic groups within a country, used especially in Russia and the Eurasian republics.
    Natural Resources A material that humans take from the environment to survive and to satisfy their needs.
    Natural vegetation plant life that grows in a certain area if people have not changed the natural environment.
    Nirvana In Buddhism, the ultimate state of peace and insight toward which people are striving to reach.
    Nomadic Describing a way of life in which a group of people travel from place to place in search of food, instead of establishing a permanent settlement.
    Nonrenewable Resource A natural resource that cannot be replaced once it is used.
    Nonviolent Resistance The policy of opposing an enemy or oppressor by means other than violence.

    Oasis A place where a supply of fresh water makes it possible to support life in a dry region.
    Oral History Stories or legends passed on by word of mouth from generation to generation.
    Ore A rocky material containing a valuable mineral.
    Organic farming the use of natural substances to enrich the soil and grow crops rather than chemical fertilizers and pesticides.

    Paddy Irrigated or flooded land on which rice is grown.
    Pampas grassy, treeless plains of southern South America, used for growing grain and grazing animals.
    Pastoralism The raising and grazing of livestock.
    Peat vegetable matter, mainly mosses, usually found in swamps; sometimes cut and burned as fuel in parts of western Europe.
    Peninsula A strip of land that juts out into a large body of water.
    Per Capita Income The total income of a country divided by thr number of people; income per person.
    Percipitation The moisture that falls to the earth in the form of rain, sleet, hail, or snow.
    Perestroika A Russian word meaning "a turning about"; in the former Soviet Union, a policy of economic restructuring.
    Permafrost A layer of soil just below the earth's surface that stays permanently frozen.
    Pesticide chemical used to kill insects, rodents, and other pests.
    Pharaoh A ruler of ancient Egypt.
    Pidgin English A dialect mixing English and local languages.
    Place Described in terms of both physical and human characteristics. What's it like there. Should be described with both human and physical characteristics.
    Plate Tectonics The theory that the earth's outer shell is composed of a number of large, unanchored plates, or slabs of rock, whose constant movement explains earthquakes and volcanic activity.
    Plateau A flat landmass that is higher then the surrounding land, with at least one side being very steep, or a cliff.
    Polder low-lying area of the Netherlands from which seawater has been drained to create new farmland.
    Polluted contaminated by harmful or impure substances.
    Pollution the existence of impure, unclean, or poisonous substances in the air, water, and land environment.
    Population Density The average number of people living in a given area.
    Population Distribution The pattern of population-where people live-in a country, continent, or the world.
    Prairie an inland grassland area.
    Precipitation moisture that falls to the earth as rain, sleet, hail, or snow.
    Prevailing wind wind in a region that blows in a fairly constant directional pattern, such as the trade winds that blow toward the Equator in low latitudes.
    Prime Meridian An imaginary line that runs from the North Pole to the South Pole through Greenwich, England; it is used as a reference point from which east and west lines of longitude are measured.
    Prophet A person whose teachings are believed to be inspired by God.
    Provisional Temporary; pending permanent arrangements.
    Purdah The practice among Hindu and Muslim women to cover their faces when in public.

    Quota A fixed quantity; the number of immigrants allowed to enter a country in a given time period.
    R
    Rain shadow dry area found on the leeward side of a mountain range.
    Realism artistic style portraying everyday life that developed in Europe during the mid-1800s.
    Recession An extended decline in general business activity.
    Reforestation replanting young trees or seeds on lands where trees have been cut or destroyed.
    Reformation The religious movement that began in Germany in the 1400's, that lead to the establishment of Protestant churches.
    Refugee A person who flees his or her country to escape invasion, oppression, or persecution.
    Region A region is an area of the world that has similar, unifying characteristics. Example: Bible Belt names a region of the Southern United States that have similar religious beliefs. The United States is a region of areas that belong to the same country and have similar ideas, languages, etc. Smaller regions can be in larger regions. Regions within regions and worlds within worlds.
    Reincarnation The belief that the soul of a human being or animal goes through a series of births, deaths, and rebirths.
    Relative Location The position of a place in relation to another place.
    Relief The difference in elevation, or height, of the landforms in any particular area.
    Renaissance The revival of art, literature, and learning that took place in Europe during the 14th, 15th, and 16th centuries.
    Renewable Resource A natural resource that the environment continues to supply or replace after it has been used.
    Reparations Money paid for war damages.
    Republic A form of government in which the people elect their political officials.
    Revolution in astronomy, the earth's yearly trip around the sun, taking 365 1/4 days.
    Rift Valley A large split along the crest of an underwater mountain system where small earthquakes and volcanic eruptions frequently occur.
    Ring of Fire A ring of volcanic mountains surrounding the rim of the Pacific Ocean.
    Romanticism artistic style emphasizing individual emotions that developed in Europe in the late 1700s and early 1800s as a reaction to industrialization.
    Rural Of, or characteristc of, the country side.
    Russification in 19th-century Russia, a government program that required everyone in the empire to speak Russian and to become a Christian.

    Savanna A tropical grassland with scattered trees, located in the warm lands nearest the equator.
    Scale on a map, the relationship of measures on the map to actual measurements in feet, miles, meters, or kilometers on the earth's surface.
    Secede To withdraw formally from membership in a political or religious organization.
    Sediment Small particles of soil, sand, and gravel carried and deposited by water.
    Segregation The act of imposing social separation of races.
    Seismic Descriptive of earthquakes or earth vibrations.
    Seismograph an instrument that detects and records motions of the ground, as in earthquakes.
    Self-Determination The right to decide one's political future.
    Serf A laborer owned by a noble and must remain on the land in which he or she works.
    Service industry business that provides a service- such as banking, insurance, or transport- instead of making goods.
    Shah The ruler of Iran.
    Shifting farming method in which farmers move every few years to find better soil.
    Shinto the traditional religion of the Japanese, marked by worship of nature, spirits and ancestors.
    Sirocco hot desert wind that can blow air and dust from North Africa to western Europe's Mediterranean coast.
    Slash-and-burn farming traditional farming method in which all trees and plants in an area are cut and burned to add nutrients to the soil.
    Smog irritating haze caused by the interaction of ultraviolet solar radiation with chemical fumes from automobile exhausts and other pollution sources.
    Socialism A system in which the government owns, manages, or controls the production, distribution, and exchange of goods.
    Solstice one of the two times a year (about June 21 and December 22) when the sun appears directly overhead at noon to observers at the Tropic of Cancer, 23 1/2 degrees N., and the Tropic of Capricorn, 23 1/2 degrees S.
    Source of a river The place where a river begins.
    Sovereighty A country's freedom and power to decide on policies and actions.
    Soviet In the former Soviet Union, any one of the various governing councils that made decisions at various levels.
    Special purpose map map emphasizing a special subject matter, such as resources or population.
    Sphere of Influence An area or country that is political and economically dominated by another country.
    Standard of Living A measure of people's quality of life, based on access to material goods such as income, food, and housing.
    State farm under communism, a state-owned farm managed by government officals; also called sovkhoz.
    Steppe A temperate grassland, often lightly wooded, found in Europe and Asia, also semi-arid climate regions elsewhere.
    Strait Narrow channel that connects two larger bodies of water.
    Subcontinent A large landmass; a major subdivision of a continent.
    Subsistence Farming Farming that provides only enough for the needs of a family or a village.
    Suburbs outlying communities around a central city.
    Sunbelt southern part of the United States, so named because of its mild climate.

    Taiga a Russian term for the vast subarctic forest, mainly evergreens, that begins where the tundra ends; also used for subarctic climate regions in general.
    Taoism Ancient religion or tradition of China.
    Tariff A duty or tax imposed by a government on imported goods.
    Temperature a measure of how hot or cold something is, generally measured in degrees on a set scale, such as Fahrenheit or Celsius.
    Terrace In farming, a flat, narrow ledge of land, supported by walls of stone and mud parallel to the natural slope of the land, used to increase the amount of ararble land.
    Terra Firma Latin for solid or firm ground.
    Timberline The elevation above where it is too cold for trees to grow.
    Topography The physical features of the earth's surface.
    Tornado a violent windstorm with rotating winds and a funnel-shaped cloud.
    Totalitarianism A system of government in which a central authority controls all aspects of society, subordinating individual freedom to state interests.
    Trading partner a country that buys from or sells to another country.
    Tributary A river or stream that flows into a main river.
    Tropical Storm A storm with winds of at least 39 miles per hour.
    Tsunami A huge wave caused by a disturbance beneath the ocean, such as an earthquake or volcanic eruption.
    Tundra A vast region of treeless plains in the cold northern climates, characterized by permafrost and small plants such as shrubs and mosses.
    Typhoon A destructive tropical storm occuring in the western Pacific Ocean; similar to a hurricane.
    U

    Universal suffrage equal voting rights for all adult residents of a nation.
    Urbanization The growth of city populations; the change from a rural society to one that is urban, or city-like in character.

    Valley Land that lies between hills or mountains.
    Velvet Revolution A revolution without bloodshed.
    W

    Wadi in the desert, a streambed that is dry except during a heavy rain.
    Warlord A local leader with a military following.
    Water Cycle The regular movement of water from ocean to air to ground and back to the ocean.
    Watershed A dividing ridge between two basins.
    Weather The condition of the atmosphere at any given point in time and place; for example: a "cold, windy, wet day".
    Weathering The chemical or mechanical process by which rock is gradually broken down and eventually becomes soil.
    Welfare state a nation, such as Great Britain, Norway, or Sweden, in which the government assumes major responsibility for people's welfare in areas such as health and education.
    Windward facing toward the direction from which the wind is blowing.
    World Bank An agency of the United Nations that provides loans to countries for development projects.

    Yurt A round tent made of wooden framework and covered with felt or skins.

    Zen a Japanese and Chinese form of Buddhism teaching that enlightenment can be reached through meditation and intuition rather than through religious scriptures.
    Ziggurat A large step-like temple built in ancient Mesopotamia.
    Zionist A member of a movement known as Zionism, founded to promote the establishment of an independent Jewish state.

    07.00.01 Spanish Accents and Special Characters! (Spanish I)

    both teacher- and computer-scored 15 points possible 30 minutes

               **Assignment 07.00.01 Spanish Accents and Special Characters**: You should have set up your computer with a Spanish keyboard, practiced typing accents along with special characters, and feel ready to demonstrate that in this assignment! Once again, look down in the bottom, right hand corner of your screen and find this button: Click on this button to go to the next assignment!

               Once again, after completing the assignment, find that dependable button and click on it to go to the next lesson in the course! So far, so good!!

    07.01 Getting started (LA 9)

    Wikimedia Commons, Tulane Public Relations, CC Attribution 2.0 GenericWikimedia Commons, Tulane Public Relations, CC Attribution 2.0 GenericTo get started on this class, complete the "About Me" assignment. Then read through the "Start Here" information, and take the quiz on class policies.

    07.01 Introduction to Argument (Writing lab)

    "Argument?" you say. "I'm good at that - just ask my parents!"

    In current usage, 'argument' means a discussion (often angry) between two or more people who disagree on something. However, that is not the way we will be using 'argument' in this class.

    The classical meaning of 'argument' (remember that 'classical' refers to the Greek and Roman period, about 2000+ years ago) had to do with persuasion. The words 'rhetoric' and 'discourse' have related meanings. Many of our ideas about rhetoric are based on the work of the Greek philosophers/teachers/writers Plato and Aristotle. Aristotle classified the techniques of rhetoric into three categories. Their Greek names are ethos, pathos and logos.

    Ethos has to do with the speaker/writer himself (or herself). Do you trust the speaker? Do you like him/her? Does s/he have a reputation for being honest and accurate? If you answer 'yes' to those questions, you are more likely to be persuaded to agree with the speaker. An attractive, charismatic speaker who seems to have a strong belief in his/her message will persuade or motivate more listeners.

    Pathos has to do with emotional reactions. Appealing to listeners' concerns or hopes, the speaker tries to arouse fear, anger, shame, sorrow, happiness or sympathy, often using "loaded language" - words calculated to "push your buttons". (If you're thinking of political speeches or commercial advertising, you're on the right track.) References to patriotism or loyalty to one's group; examples of wounded veterans, dying children, abused animals, or unemployed people losing their homes; or images of sexy models, happy families, beautiful scenery, or the trappings of wealth are all often used to manipulate viewers' and listeners' emotions. It is human nature to be easily swayed by emotion.

    Logos has to do with logic, knowledge and facts. The use of statistics, scientific studies, cause-and-effect relationships, and parallels from history are all examples of logos. Note, however, that logos can be used to mislead as well as to impart accurate information. A speaker who is working from false premises will arrive at false conclusions, even using logic. Logos should be the most important basis for persuasion, but generally, people are more easily persuaded by personal appeal and emotion. Why do you believe the things you do? Probably, in most cases, because your family members or friends believe those things.

    In this class, we will use 'argumentation' to mean logos - the use of logic and evidence in communication.

    Just as a poet or fiction writer uses carefully-chosen specific details to shape and clarify a poem or story, a writer of argument uses facts, examples and evidence to shape and clarify the meaning.

    How is argument different from persuasion?

    The purpose of persuasion is to convince others of something.
    The purpose of argument is to determine the truth about something.
    That said, argument may sometimes be used as part of persuasion.

    How is an argument different from an opinion?

    All of us have opinions. We may like school, or we may not like school. We may oppose abortion, or war, or higher taxes, or discrimination. We may think fried chicken is better than pizza or vice versa. Those are our views, or opinions.

    Sometimes your opinion may differ from someone else's opinion, and the two of you disagree. That is still not an argument.

    When we begin using logical reasons or evidence to determine whether a certain view is correct, then we are using argument.

    For example:

    From the Declaration of Independence:

    We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. That to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed. That whenever any form of government becomes destructive to these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shown that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such government, and to provide new guards for their future security.

    OK, let's analyze:

    Does it contain examples of the use of 'ethos'? Not that we can see here. It doesn't mention anyone by name, and it wasn't delivered as a speech, so we can't pin it to any particular person's reputation or charisma.

    Does it contain examples of the use of 'pathos'? It does use some 'loaded' language (suffer, evils, abuses, usurpations, despotism). However, it doesn't contain any specific, graphic images, so it doesn't elicit strong emotions... The appeals to pathos are minimal.

    Does it contain examples of the use of 'logos'? Yes, for sure. It is constructed in a very logical manner. It starts with premises (the list of the unalienable rights, the purpose of government, and the rights of people to change their government); it proceeds to explain how human nature tends to put up with problems rather than make major changes; and it ends with the claim that people have a right and duty to change a government that does not respect their rights.

    07.01 Psychological Disorders and Therapy (Psychology)

    Introduction to Mental Disorders and Therapy

    This Unit will require a lot of reading. The first two units were relatively easy and Unit 8 will also be quite easy. So consider this the HARD Unit!

    In all likelihood, you know someone or care about someone who has had a psychological disorder. Each year, there are nearly 2.1 million inpatient admissions to U.S. mental hospitals and psychiatric units. Another 2.4 million seek help as outpatients. Many more NEED help, but don t get it (estimated 1 in 5 Americans!). As you read through the descriptions of the psychological disorders in this Unit, you may find that you have experienced or are experiencing the symptoms outlined. Don t jump to conclusions though! Many of us may feel anxious, depressed, suspicious or antisocial. In order to have a diagnosable psychological disorder though, it needs to be intense enough to interfere with normal functioning and go on for an extended period of time. It is actually sometimes difficult to know exactly where to draw that line between 'normality' and 'abnormality'. There is actually a set of 'standards' that have been created to determine this 'line'. It is written in a book called the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual on mental Disorders 4th edition, normally called DSM-IV. This manual defines the different psychological disorders by outlining the specific symptoms and criteria for diagnosis. Perhaps we should take a moment and define Psychological Disorder. This is a harmful dysfunction in which behavior is judged to be atypical, disturbing, maladaptive and unjustifiable. The keys here are harmful and dysfunction .

    We're going to go to an Internet site of an organization that specializes in the research of psychological disorders. This is NIMH, the National Institute of Mental Health. Ever heard of them? You probably have, if you ve seen the animated movie, The Rats of NIMH . You will be reading about 10 specific psychological disorders, falling into 3 general categories. There are 17 general categories in the DSM-IV manual, so we're obviously not learning about ALL of them! Be sure to print out your objectives for this Unit and take notes as you read along on the website. You'll also get introduced to some therapies as well.

    Select the following links located at the end of the lesson for more information regarding specific disorders. Be sure to READ the entire booklet for each of the disorders and categories because MOST of the information you need to know are contained in them. These pamphlets of information will also give you the information you need to do your assignments

    • "Mood Disorders (Depression)"
    • "Anxiety Disorders"
    • "Schizophrenia"
    • "National Institute of Mental Health-NIMH"

    Another category of Psychological disorders not listed on this site is Personality Disorders. These are psychological disorders characterized by inflexible and enduring behavior patterns that impair social functioning. Some disorders in this category include:

    • Avoidance Personality Disorder a fearful sensitivity to rejection that causes a person to withdraw from social interaction.
    • Histrionic Personality Disorder one who displays shallow, attention getting emotions and goes to great lengths to gain others praise and reassurance.
    • Narcissistic Personality Disorder One who exaggerates their own importance and has success fantasies.
    • Borderline Personality Disorder One who has an unstable identity, unstable relationships, and unstable emotions.
    • Anti-social Personality Disorder (formerly called sociopath or psychopath) a person (usually a man) who has a lack of conscience for wrongdoing, even toward friends or family. Often, they have an aggressive, ruthless or clever con-artist tendency.


    Therapy

    As you did your reading about Psychological Disorders, you came across a few therapeutic techniques: Pscyhopharmaherapy (Taking medication), Psychotherapy ( talk therapy), two of the most common, and then Electroconvulsive Therapy (shock therapy).

    We ve come a long way from where we started in therapy. In ancient times up to the1600 s, people with mental illnesses were though to have demons . The treatment was to exorcize the demon, make the person an outcast, or lock them up. In the 1600 s, a hospital in London called St. Marys of Bethlem (commonly called Bedlam) housed mental patients. Visitors could come and tour the facility and see the inpatients, kind of like a zoo. Treatments included restraint, bleeding , cutting holes in the head or literally, beating the devil out of the patient. I'm sad to say that things only improved a little with the help of people like Dorothea Dix (from Unit 1) and others.

    Here in Utah, in the 1950's, things had not improved that much from Bedlam. We had state run Mental illness hospitals where the most severe cases were institutionalized and treated. A common practice was the Lobotomy. This is a surgical technique developed by Egas Moniz, who actually received a Nobel Prize for this technique. First, the patient was shocked into a coma, then a neurosurgeon would hammer an ice pick like instrument through each eye socket into the brain. He would then wiggle it to sever connections running up to the frontal lobes. The whole procedure was cheap and only took about 10 minutes. It produced a permanently lethargic, immature, impulsive personality. This procedure was even used on a 16 year old who had depression! This surgery did make people more manageable in these institutions, but then it s easy to just sit around and stay out of trouble when you are a vegetable. They also used shock therapy, hydrotherapy and insulin therapy as well as the same cut a hole in the brain treatment! Eventually, the pharmacy companies came out with some drugs like Thorazine, which helped calm patients without the long-term effects of a lobotomy. Then, if I remember right, the State run Mental Hospitals were closed down in the 1980's. As a young college student, I remember delivering drugs to the Hospital in American Fork. It was like a zoo with zoo-keepers. Some patients were actually in cages, slightly larger than a crib. There were awful moans and noises and it was very disturbing to see the treatment of some of the patients. I hope and believe we are treating individuals with mental illnesses more effectively and more humanely.

    Treatment is varied depending on the viewpoint and training of the therapist. If you or a loved one requires treatment, I recommend doing some research and then visiting 2 or 3 different therapists before actually beginning therapy. Sometimes your insurance will limit who you can or can t see.

    There are 250 or more types of psychotherapy ( Talk therapy). You were briefly introduced to 2 in your reading: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Systematic Desensitization (this is where the phobic patient is exposed to what they fear gradually until they no longer fear the object. It was never titled , but only described in your reading). There are two more psychotherapies you need to be familiar with. One is Psychoanalysis, developed by Sigmund Freud. This is a more complex form of talk therapy designed to bring forward repressed impulses and conflicts. The patient is made comfortable on a couch and the therapist works with different techniques to bring these repressed feelings into conscious awareness where the patient can then deal with them. There is a lot to this therapy and you ll have to read more on you own if you are interested. Another is Client-Centered Therapy developed by Carl Rogers. This therapy is less active for the therapist. Their role is to have unconditional positive regard for the therapist and to actively listen to the client. In this environment of emotional safety, the client talks, while the therapist merely mirrors their feelings and thoughts.

    In addition to psychotherapy, you ve already read enough about medications and Electro-convulsive therapy in treatment. Now it s time to do the assignments!

    07.01 Review Porfolio and Critique (Basic Photograpy)

    Evaluate your own photography based on forming techniques, effective use of art elements and principles, fulfillment of functions, impact of content, expressive qualities, and aesthetic significance. File size and resolution.

    Learn how to critique and formally analyze and edit your own work. Look over the images that you have photographed in the last three months while you have been enrolled in this course.
    When formally evaluating photography you might ask yourself some of these questions.

    1-Why did the photographer take the picture?
    2-Does the image tell a story?
    3-What is the purpose of the photograph?
    4-What compositional technique did the photographer use?
    5-Is the photograph technically correct, in focus properly exposed and show good composition?
    6-Is the photograph interesting to look at, do I want to look at it longer?
    7-Why do I want to look at it longer?
    8-Was the photographer's successful in conveying his or her message?
    9-What are the expressive qualities or the aesthetic significance of the subject matter or subject placement in the image?
    10-What type of emotions or interpretations do the image evoked from the viewer?
    11-Which of the following art elements are most strongly represented in the image you are formally analyzing? Is it line, geometric shapes, contrast, texture, color, tone?
    12-Where is your eye drawn first?

    File Size
    When submitting a portfolio or sending files to friends it is important to understand file size and resolution. The higher the resolution the bigger the file because it contains more data. High-res files are large files. Low-res files are small files, which load faster on the Internet. Sometimes it's necessary to adjust, and/or change your file size or file type.
    In order to change the size of a file you will have to make an adjustment on your digital camera, and/or reduce the file size on your computer in an image editing software program like Photoshop, Photoshop elements, Picasa, or Gimp.

    File size has a direct relationship to image quality when you print it out or put it on the web. You can always decrease or grow smaller with your images but you cannot always increase the size of your image once it has been reduced. Once the image has been reduced in size actual data is deleted from the file. This is okay if it's small but when you enlarge about the data is missing and the quality is lost. That's why it is so important to archive your images in large file format and then reduce the file when sending them into be graded online.

    Interpolation
    a digital process of increasing file size. Software doubles the pixels, care must be taken as quality of final image may be compromised.

    Resolution
    Resolution is the sharpness and clarity of a digital image that can refer to the number of dots per inch dots in inch. The term is most often used to describe monitors, printers, and bit-mapped graphic images. In the case of dot-matrix and laser printers, the resolution indicates the number of dots per inch. For example, a 300-dpi (dots per inch) printer is one that is capable of printing 300 distinct dots in a line 1 inch long. This means it can print 90,000 dots per square inch.

    07.01 - Female Reproductive System - Lesson 1

    Both sexes have reproductive organs called GENITALS or GENITALIA, designed for the purpose of intercourse and conception. Only the female has organs for pregnancy and childbirth.

    1. OVARIES: two solid egg-shaped structures about the size of a peach pit. They are attached to the uterus by ligaments. They are the counterpart of the male testicles. They have two main functions:
      1-produce female sex hormones ESTROGEN and PROGESTERONE.
      2-stores and releases the ova or female egg cell.
    2. ESTROGEN: is responsible for the secondary sex characteristics and the sex drive in females. It spurs the onset of puberty and is responsible for OVULATION.
    3. PROGESTERONE: builds up the lining of the uterus called the endometrium in preparation for the fertilized ovum.
    4. OVA: The female baby is born with all the ova she will ever have (about 200,000 in each ovary). Some of the ova disappear; others are dormant until each is ripened and released after puberty. Nature is very generous since only about 50,000 ova survive at adolescence and about 400 will never ripen to become available for fertilization. After menopause the remaining ova no longer ripen or develop.
    5. OVULATION: The time when the egg is released from the ovary. At the age of puberty, the pituitary glad located in the head begins monthly cycles of releasing a tiny dose of FSH (follicle stimulating hormone)to the surface of the ovary in a bubble. It then waits on the surface for LH luteinizing hormone which causes the bubble (follicle) to burst, allowing the ovum to fall into the opening of fallopian tube. When the follicle bursts, a crater is left on the ovary. The crater begins to produce progesterone.
    6. FALLOPIAN TUBES: two tubes shaped like arched and twisting bridges, high on either side of the uterus. They are about four inches long and 3/16 inch in diameter (the size of cooked spaghetti). These oviducts carry egg cells toward the uterus and sperm cells toward the egg cell. They are the location for fertilization. Fertilization takes place in the outer third of the oviduct. The oviducts are funnel- shaped and near the ovary. They have finger-like projections that reach out and encircle the ovum after ovulation takes place. Each oviduct is lined with many hair like fibers called cilia. The cilia beat a flowing motion toward the uterus. This motion carries the egg cell toward the uterus.
    7. UTERUS: the uterus is a hollow, muscular organ shaped somewhat like an upside-down pear, about three inches long and two inches wide. The uterus is lined with endometrium. The uterus has one main function--to protect and nourish a fetus until it is ready to live outside the mother's body. The walls of the uterus stretch much like a balloon that is blown up. After childbirth the uterus shrinks back to the original shape in 6-8 weeks.
    8. CERVIX: the neck or opening of the uterus. A normal healthy cervix is the strongest muscle in the body. It dips down about half an inch into the vagina. It is normally plugged by mucus. It stays tightly closed during pregnancy, but thins and opens for the delivery of the baby.
    9. VAGINA: female organ of intercourse, it is actually an empty passageway leading from the vaginal opening to the uterus. It is only 3-4 inches long and shaped like a flattened funnel. The vaginal walls are made of many small folds of membrane that stretch greatly to accommodate a baby during birth. The vagina has three main functions:
      1-channel for the menstrual flow.
      2-receptacle for the male penis during intercourse.
      3-birth canal.
    10. URETHRA: below the clitoris, the opening to the bladder.
    11. CLITORIS: the center of sexual sensation and stimulation in the female. It is composed of erectile tissues and many sensitive nerve endings. It is found where the folds of the labia minora meet in the front.
    12. FERTILIZATION: A sperm entering an ovum The sperm enter the vagina goes up through the cervix, uterus and into both fallopian tubes. If an ovum is present in the fallopian tube, the sperm surround it. One sperm penetrates the ovum; the other sperm move on.
    13. THE MENSTRUAL CYCLE:
      The start of the menstrual cycle will occur after the beginning of puberty, approximately ages 8-13. During the menstrual cycle, one ovary produces a mature egg cell, the lining of the uterus prepares for a fertilized egg, and the lining breaks down if an egg is not fertilized. The first menstrual cycle is called MENARCHE.

      The menstrual cycle does not start in the sex organ, but in the brain. During the first phase of the cycle the pituitary gland secretes FSH (Follicle Stimulating Hormone). FSH stimulates the follicle or egg nest in the ovary to produce estrogen. Estrogen stimulates the uterus to prepare for the egg. The follicle also produces a maturing egg cell. As the egg cell matures it moves to the surface of the ovary and is released. This process is called OVULATION. The mature egg moves through the fallopian tube to the uterus. After ovulation the part of the follicle left in the ovary changes and forms a temporary endocrine gland called the corpus luteum. The second phase of the menstrual cycle is after ovulation.

      LSH (Lutein Stimulating Hormone) stimulates the corpus luteum to produce the hormone progesterone. This hormone stimulates the lining of the uterus (endometrium) to build up or thicken. The uterus is now ready to support a fertilized egg. If fertilization takes place the corpus luteum continues to produce progesterone during pregnancy.

      If fertilization does not take place, the corpus luteum breaks down and progesterone production ceases. Cells in the endometrium die, the lining is shed and the dead tissue and the unfertilized egg passes out of the body through the vagina. The release of this tissue and blood is called the menstrual flow or MENSTRUATION. Menstruation occurs each month about two weeks after ovulation and usually lasts three to seven days. During this time, about two ounces of blood may be lost. Every female's cycle is different as to the length of time between menstruation and how long the menstrual flow will last.

      The menstrual cycle normally continues until a woman is in her 40s or 50s. As the function of the ovaries decrease with age, menstrual cycles become irregular and eventually cease. This is called MENOPAUSE.

      • Day 1 – Menstruation begins (bleeding)
      • Day 5 – Menstruation is usually ended
      • Day 14 – Ovum has matured and bursts out of the ovary
      • Day 15 – After 24 hours the egg is done
      • Day 26 – In the absence of fertilization, estrogen/progesterone levels drop and the endometrium lining breaks down
      • Day 28 – Menstruation begins again.

      OTHER RELATED CONCERNS

    14. D&C: Dilation and curettage, a common minor operation on women. The canal of the uterus is dilated and the lining of the uterus is scraped with a spoon-shaped instrument called a curet.
    15. ENDOMETRIOSIS: presence in abnormal locations of fragments of the membrane which lines the uterus (endometrium). The displaced tissue menstruates where it should not and tends to form cysts. No one knows for sure why some women have endometriosis. Some experts think it is caused by retrograde menstruation which means the menstrual fluid backs up through the fallopian tubes and spills out onto the pelvic organs. Others think that stray endometrial cells are in the pelvic cavity from birth. For more information, contact your hospital education department.
    16. ORGASM: Orgasm is characterized by the massive release of muscle tension which has built up during excitement. It is a series of rhythmic contractions in the vagina and uterus. This release is accompanied by very pleasurable sensations.
    17. HYSTERECTOMY: surgical removal of the uterus, either through an abdominal incision, or through the vagina, which leaves no abdominal scar.
    18. TUBAL LIGATION: an operation for sterilization of women. The surgeon makes a small incision in the abdomen and cuts and ties the oviducts. This prevents the meeting of the sperm and egg and makes conception impossible. Tubal ligation does not interfere with menstruation or sexual capacity; the ovaries continue to produce hormones. The operation should not be undertaken unless permanent sterility is desired.
    19. PMS (PREMENSTRUAL SYNDROME): a syndrome whose symptoms may become incapacitating: emotions get out of control, headaches, water retention, irritability, and painful uteral cramps. For possible solutions between ovulation and menstruation, try exercising vigorously, increasing protein in the diet, taking a Vitamin B6 (50-100 mg.) supplement 1-2 times daily.
    20. TOXIC SHOCK SYNDROME: caused by bacteria that live in the vagina, which multiply and cause infection. Toxic Shock if often fatal; symptoms are diarrhea, high fever, and low blood pressure. Methods of prevention: do not wear tampons all night (use a pad instead), change tampons often, do not use super-absorbent tampons. A man can get toxic shock from the heavy packing of a wound or sore (after a severe nosebleed or major injury) if the packing is not changed often enough. Careful cleaning and proper care of a wound is vital.
    21. MENOPAUSE: around the age of 45-55, the menstrual cycle stops. A woman is no longer capable of getting pregnant. The associated hormonal changes will cause come transient physical and emotional changes.

    (Assignment #194)

    07.01 - Language of Motion -- Velocity (Physics)

    In order to adequately describe the motion of an object, we need to use the right words.

    Fine, you say, but why do we want to describe how something moves?

    Well, consider the baseball. I bet everyone has spent some part of their summers in a makeshift ball park, playing the game until it got dark, the mosquitoes started to bite and the folks called you in. We played under the apple tree in my grandparents' backyard (the apple tree was the pitcher's mound), and in the cul-de-sac behind my house (the asphalt was murder on your knees). At first, everyone sucked. But the more you played, the better you got. The key to the whole game was knowing how the ball would move.

    To quote from the movie "Bull Durham": "Baseball is a simple game. You throw the ball. You hit the ball. You catch the ball."

    You play baseball by throwing the ball, hitting the ball and catching the ball. You have to know how the baseball will move through the air in order to throw it into the strike zone. You have to know where and when the baseball will enter the strike zone in order to hit the ball. You have to figure out what direction, what angle, and how hard the ball was hit in order to catch that ball. Those are a lot of calculations for a simple game.

    So, here is the question, How do you know how to throw the ball such that it will sail through the strike zone? How do you know where in the strike zone the ball will be? How do you know when it will get there? How do you know where to place you glove so that the ball will land in it? Practice? Trial and Error? You just do? These are all good answers. Remember I told you last quarter that you are an expert in forces. You are also an expert in motion. Things fall, fly and land the way you expect them to, because you have a lifetime of observing them, and you have it figured out.

    So, do you think you can put this knowledge to use? Can you give a quantitative answer to these questions?

    We need to identify and define the words we will use to answer these questions.



    07.01 - Similar Triangles and Dilations (Geometry)

    This lesson explores how similar triangles arise from dilations, a non-rigid transformation that scales lengths and preserves angles.

    The content of the lesson follows, or you can read the attached pdf file.



    07.01 Accessories(IntDes3)

    ACCESSORIES

    Accessories are the added things that you put in your home after the basic elements of design are in place. There is a group of common accessories below.
    07.1 Accessories(IntDes3)07.1 Accessories(IntDes3)07.1 Accessories(IntDes3)07.1 Accessories(IntDes3)

    07.01 Aegean Art(ArtHistory1)

    6.1 Aegean Art
    Except for a volcano, the course of Western Art might have been much different -
    See attached Powerpoint presentation.

    Minoan Art

    07.1 Aegean Art(ArtHistory1)07.1 Aegean Art(ArtHistory1)

    The Queen's Hall with dolphin frieze from Palace of Knossos, Late Minoan.
    Minoans are named after the mythical king Minos, after the discovery of the ruins on Crete. No one knows what the Minoans called themselves at this time.
    Recent discoveries have revealed that the bulls in Minoan art were represenative of Posieden, god of the Oceans, and also "Earth Shaker", meaning god of earthquakes. Minoans were incredibly rich and advanced from being the center of trade in the Mediteranean, which was the center of the western world of the time.

    This position was, in fact, particularly favourable, both for the Minoan domination of the sea, and for the growth and development of their wonderful civilization. It was the crossroads linking three continents, and the racial elements and cultural strands of Asia, Africa and Europe met and mingled here to produce a new way of life, a new philosophy of the world and an exceptionally fine art that still strikes one today with its freshness, charm, variety, and mobility. -from Dilos.com, Minoan Civilization

    When the island nearest Crete literally blew up, it sent a tidal wave which destroyed Minoan ships and harbors. It was such a huge explosion that it changed the global climate. All the ash and debris it pushed into the atmosphere caused rain and lowered temperatures, leading to crop failures around the world for several years.

    Within 3 generations the Minoans had died from invasions, starvation, and silicosis, the results of breathing so much ash from the volcano.
    Some archeologists think either Crete or the island which blew up was the fabled Atlantis.

    The Octopus Jar and the vase underneath it have marine themes. Notice the shape of the bottom - in the absence of tables or flat surfaces, you could use a metal stand, wooden racks, or stand a pot like this up in a hole in the ground.

    Click on the link "Minoan Art" to view a presentation on the subject.

    Mycenaean Art
    Watch the PowerPoint presentation on Mycenaean Art & Architecture.

    While the Minoans were traders by way of their use of a very fortunate site (some would say very unfortunate, after the volcano exploded), the MyCenaeans were slowly developing in the same area, but on the Greek mainland. They were warriors, rather than traders, as evidenced by the colossal stone walls and gates at Mycenae, such as this Lion Gate at Mycenae, as well as burial artifacts.

    The CITY of Mycenae (just as the city of NEW YORK is also the name of the state) was the capital of the Mycenae empire. They built fortifications that were so massive that they were once thought to be created by Cyclops, a mythological race of giants with one eye. The lion gate was the main gate to the huge fortifications.

    The Mycenaean art focused on armor, jewelry, pottery and frescoes.

    Compare the Funeral mask with the crystal Duck vase.
    Anything look out of place here? The crystal vase is obviously a product of Minoan society - natural, beautiful, and fragile.

    Though this culture was protected and fortified, it still managed to collapse around 1100 A.D., and most of the artifacts were discovered in graves by excavations in the late 1800's.

    Click on the link "Mycenaean Art" to view a presentation on the subject.

    07.01 American Post-Impressionism (Art History and Art Criticism)

    By the late 1880's, many artists felt that Impressionism, while beautiful, also had its limits. They wanted to get away from what they considered to be the mere recording of what one could see at a particular instant. As a result, many different styles developed in the late nineteenth century. The term Post-impressionism, which you should know for the 2nd quarter final test, refers to a movement that placed new emphasis on the importance of subject and the formal ways in which a subject was represented. Two American Post Impressionist artists were Mary Cassatt and Winslow Homer. Select one of these artists and complete the the reporter-guided questionaire.

    07.01 Australia, Oceania, and Antarctica(Geo4Life2)

    Australia, Oceania and Antarctica
    Beach in Queensland, Australia: Wikimedia Commons, Damien Dempsey, CC Attribution 2.0 GenericBeach in Queensland, Australia: Wikimedia Commons, Damien Dempsey, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic
    You will be visiting Australia and Antarctica in particular in this section. You will map some exciting places you want to visit in Australia, learn about 'Dreamtime' and write your own Dreamtime story. Then you will visit a website that will give you an idea of what it is like to be a scientist studying in Antarctica. Don't forget to take notes on important items as you read! There is a short quiz at the end of this section.

    Australia and Oceania are grouped together because they all are islands of the Pacific ocean and are close to one another. Australia probably brings to mind images of Crocodile Dundee in the great outback or the delightful accent that accompanies the Aussie's version of the English language. Oceania is made up of hundreds of islands. Some names you may recognize are the Marshall islands, Solomon Islands, Tahiti, Tonga, Fiji, or cities such as Bora Bora. Bora Bora, in Oceania: Wikimedia Commons, PHG image, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedBora Bora, in Oceania: Wikimedia Commons, PHG image, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

    Australia is actually considered a continent rather than an island because of its size. It is this size that lends it such diversity. There is a marked contrast between the ancient land steeped in Aboriginal lore and the New World culture built upon it, giving Australia much of its character and mystery.

    Australia's original inhabitants, known as Australian Aborigines, have the longest continuous cultural history in the world, dating back to the last Ice age. It is generally accepted that the first humans traveled across the sea from Indonesia about 70,000 years ago. The first visitors, called "Robust" by archaeologists because of their heavy-boned physique, were followed 20,000 years later by the more slender 'Gracile' people, the ancestors of Australian Aborigines.
    Europeans began to expand by exploring Australia in the 16th century. Portuguese navigators were followed by Dutch explorers and the enterprising English pirate William Dampier. Famous Captain James Cook sailed the entire length of the eastern coast in 1770, stopping at Botany Bay on the way. After rounding Cape York, he claimed the continent for the British and named it New South Wales.

    In 1779, Joseph Banks (a naturalist on Cook's voyage) suggested that Britain could solve overcrowding problems in its prisons by transporting convicts to New South Wales. In 1787, the First Fleet set sail for Botany Bay under the command of Captain Arthur Philip, who was to become the colony's first governor. The fleet comprised 11 ships, 750 male and female convicts, four companies of marines and supplies for two years. New South Wales was a harsh and horrible place, and the threat of starvation hung over the colony for at least 16 years.

    Free settlers began to be attracted to Australia, but it was the discovery of gold in the 1850s that changed the face of the colony. (Sounds a bit like California, doesn't it?) The large numbers of migrants and several large finds boosted the economy and changed the colonial social structures. Aborigines were ruthlessly pushed off their tribal lands as new settlers took up land for farming or mining. The Industrial Revolution in England required plenty of raw materials, and Australia's agricultural and mineral resources expanded to meet the demand. Today, only 10% of Australia's land is arable (farmable), but because of the wise use of resources, Australia is one of the leading producers of wheat, cattle and sheep. Australia also leads the world in production of lead and bauxite. Take a look at the incredible environment that makes up Australia.
    The dry interior of Australia (the "outback"): Wikimedia Commons, Gabriele Delhey, Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedThe dry interior of Australia (the "outback"): Wikimedia Commons, Gabriele Delhey, Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported
    Australia's population is sparse in the dry interior, and heavily concentrated along the southeast portion of the continent. Australia has become a multicultural society. Until World War II, Australians were predominantly of British descent, but that has changed dramatically since then with an increase of immigrants from Asia and other places. Sport is the Australian religion and Aussies are world beaters in cricket, rugby, swimming and cycling. Other popular sports are basketball, yachting, soccer and Aussie Rules--a unique Australian sport, similar to Gaelic football. The vigor and originality of the arts in Australia--films, opera, music, painting, theater, dance and crafts--are achieving international recognition.

    07.01 China (World Geography)

    teacher-scored 50 points possible 45 minutes

    Study the vocabulary words listed below and then take them and post the words in a crossword puzzle.

    Aquaculture, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Shinto, Pictogram, Dynasty, Martial Law, Ring of Fire, Theocrat, Ideogram, Acupunture, Typhoon,
    Militarism, Homogeneous, Paddy, Heterogeneity

    Glossary is found in the Start Here section of the class.

    Use the following guidelines to help you create your crossword.

    # 1. Make a master list of terms to be defined and the definitions.
    # 2. Lay the words out in a connected grid pattern on a piece of graph paper.
    # 3. Prepare a sheet of clues emphasizing the definitions. (but not the exact definition)
    # 4. Add color or graphic features for emphasis.
    # 5. Make a key for the answers to your puzzle.

    Try going to the web site listed below to help you create your crossword.

    Puzzle Maker

    After creating your crossword, send a copy of both the crossword and the answer key to your instructor.

    1.Is the major idea of each definition clear and easily identified?
    2.Is the spelling of the term and its definition accurate?
    3.Do the emphasis features and color lend to the major concepts?

    ***70% or higher is required to pass any assignment***

    07.01 Discipline(ChildDev2)

    Discipline is a necessary part of parenting. Disciplining effectively and with a positive outcome should always be the goal. Through this lesson, you will learn about discipline, punishment and be introduced to guidance of children.

    PUNISHMENT:

    • The act of punishing or act of being punished.
    • A penalty inflicted for a crime or offense.
    • Severe treatment (hurt, hit, spank, death sentence, prison).
    • Punishment may restrain a child temporarily, but it does not teach self-discipline. At best, it will only teach an obedience to authority, not self-control that enhances self-respect.

    DISCIPLINE:

    • Instruction designed to train proper conduct or action.
    • Punishment inflicted by way of correction and training.
    • The training effect of experience, adversity, etc.
    • Behavior in accordance with rules of conduct.
    • To train by instruction and exercise.
    • To bring to order and obedience by training and control (rule, consequences, grounding, control, training).
    • This word actually comes from the word disciple or follower. It is a long-term process that gradually leads to a child becoming responsible for his/her own behavior.

    GUIDANCE:

    • The act or function of guiding.
    • Advice or counseling service (help, teach, show, counsel).

    Our goal is to incorporate positive discipline and guidance. This will help the child to gain inner control and become independent and self-reliant.

    Family discipline can be broken down into three categories. They vary by the attitude of the adult about how much control he/she feels is necessary to guide the children.

    • One type is called PERMISSIVE discipline. Here the child is in control and is allowed to do whatever he/she wants to do. The child follows his/her own moods and desires causing over aggressiveness and confusion for the child. These children often wonder if anyone cares about them.
    • Another type of family discipline is AUTHORITARIAN or adult control. The adult completely controls the child, causing loss of independence, submission, or rebellion. This is similar to a dictatorship style of government.
    • The third type of family discipline is DEMOCRATIC. It is based on a belief in the worth, dignity, and creative capacity of every individual. The child is given opportunities to think for himself/herself and learn to be aware of the rights of others. It is concerned with individual freedom. Limits are set, but the child is allowed to act for himself/herself within those limits. These children tend to feel that they are responsible for their decisions and actions.

    CONSEQUENCES
    A consequence is the effect or result of an earlier occurrence. In many instances, consequences that are appropriate to the situation can be utilized by parents or caregivers to guide behavior.

    A natural consequence is a direct result of a specific behavior. This type of consequence occurs naturally if no one interferes. For example, a child who oversleeps will miss the bus and have to walk to school.

    Natural consequences are the best teachers that a child can have. If a child does something that results in unpleasant consequences, he/she will not want to repeat the act. If the child does something that results in pleasant consequences, then he/she will want to repeat the act.

    For example, if a child forgets to take his/her lunch to school, he/she will have to go without lunch and will probably be very hungry at the end of the day. This will cause the child to remember the lunch in the future. When he/she remembers the lunch, he/she will be able to eat it and will feel better at the end of the day. These pleasant consequences will cause the child to continue that behavior.

    Some natural consequences are too severe for the child to experience, and a parent or caregiver must intervene. For example, a child who runs out into the street would be hit by a car. This consequence is too severe. In this instance, the caregiver could utilize a logical consequence.

    A logical consequence is an imposed consequence that is directly related to the behavior. Besides being used when a natural consequence would be too harmful or dangerous, it is also used when rules of the home or classroom are broken.

    There are four rules to remember when applying logical consequences:

    1. The consequence must logically follow the act. It must be related to the undesired behavior. For example: You have just found Johnny playing outside. He is covered from head to foot in mud. The logical consequence would be to make him wash off in the house, clean up in the bathroom, and stay in the house for a while.
    2. The consequence cannot be imposed in anger. This also is interpreted as punishment. Even a good consequence can be made negative depending on how it is administered. If Sarah is hitting Caleb and screaming at him, it will not work well for you to yell at her and spank her. Simply remove her from the situation and get her involved in a quiet activity.
    3. The consequence must make the child feel as though it is an unpleasant result of behavior. The consequence should be given, and then let the child feel its effects without further comment from the adult. Reminding the child of what is happening will only cause resentment. Wayne made cookies as a surprise for his family. He forgot that he needed to clean up the kitchen after he was finished baking. When his mother got home, she complimented Wayne of the delicious cookies he had made, then made him come in from playing basketball to clean up the mess. Mother went about her business and Wayne went about his business. No argument or harsh words were spoken.
    4. The consequence should be short enough in duration and specific enough to have an impact on the child. A brief restriction is more successful than a longer one. If a child takes a toy from another child, she should return the toy to the other child and have a short (1-5 minute) time-out. Restricting her play for the rest of the day is inappropriate.
    (Go go to the links "Time Out" and "Discipline" below and read the information presented on Time Out.)

    Once you have read all of the information presented, go to the assignment area of the class and complete the assignment that corresponds to this lesson.

    07.01 Ethics in Journalism - English 10

    Gain a thorough understanding of the ethics involved in argumentative writing. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization. Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

    *All of the activities from this lesson need to be completed and saved in a folder on your hard drive for future use, reference, and grading.

    Ethics in Journalism

    It may seem like journalists can write whatever they please about a particular topic, and some do, based on our American "freedom of speech." That is an easy assumption to make but it is not entirely true. Ethics in journalism is a code of conduct that keeps reporters moving in an honest direction with their reporting and careers. A quality journalistic piece of writing employs the ethics that surround the profession to help ensure that news, ideas, events, thoughts, and opinions are substantiated by facts and truths.

    The following readings and assignment will teach you some of the commonly accepted ethics rules that directly affect the work of a journalist.

    Review the information, in the below listed URLs, to better understand the ethics meant to govern Journalism

    1. Introductory article

    2. The New York Times Ethics Code (scroll below the beginning list)

    3. The New York Times Ethics Code; A Summary

    07.01 Evolution of the Executive Branch (NavajoGovt)

    The executive branch of government in the Navajo Nation has evolved from the Naataanii, with their disperse leadership roles to that of the President of the Navajo Nation. This assignment deals with the Executive Branch of government and the powers delegated to it by the Navajo Nation Council.

    Use the web resources below and/or your own research to gain an understanding of the role of the executive branch of government. When you feel you have sufficient knowledge about this branch, take the test.

    07.01 Evolution of the Executive Branch links (NavajoGovt)

    07.01 Fluid Work(PrinTech2)

    Fluid Work Lesson 2.2
    Have you ever wondered about the drafts in your house?
    Winds are created because of high and low pressures. When the valley gets heated up, the winds blow from the canyon down into the valley and when the valley cools down, the winds blow towards the canyon. The wind blows from the cold to the hot or from the high side to the low side. In all pressure systems the force goes from the high to the low. In these systems there are two kinds of systems and they are open systems and closed systems.

    Open systems are systems that something goes in one side and exits out the other side. Some examples of these are, a fire truck pumping water, the gas system in a car, and your sewer system in your house.
    Closed systems are systems are those systems that are enclosed and reuse the fluid or gas over and over again. Some examples are: brake system on a car, hydraulic jack, cooling system in a car, and an air conditioner.

    Hydraulic systems are used widely in industry to do different things. The way that a hydraulic system works is there is a reservoir of hydraulic fluid and a motor to pump the fluid through the system. There is also a valve that governs the flow of the fluid either going in to do the work or letting the fluid out. The ram is the part that does the work with the fluid pushing on it.

    Work Done by a Fluid System
    Work is done when something moves and this is expressed by the force that moves the object times the distance that it is moved.

    In pressure systems these are the formulas that are used:

    This formula is used when you have a change in pressure.

    This formula is used when you have a change in volume.

    Now that you have covered the information in this lesson, go to assignments and complete the assignment corresponding to this unit.

    After completing the assignment, go to course materials and click on the next lesson there.

    07.01 Geometry Basics (Math Level 1)

    Define, name and model geometric figures including points, lines, rays, segments, angles and planes.

    Something to Ponder

    How would you describe the similarities and differences between lines, rays and segments?

    Mathematics Vocabulary

    Point: a location in space. Example:

    Line: a series of points extending infinitely in two opposite directions. Example: \overline{AC\E}

    Ray: a series of points having one terminal end and extending infinitely in one direction. Example: \overrightarrow{BA}}

    Segment: a portion of a line, having two terminal ends. Example: \overline{BE}

    Angle: two rays sharing a terminal end. Example: \angle ABC}

    Plane: a two dimensional surface that has no thickness and extends infinitely. Example: \square }ABC or \square ABCD (either is correct for the top of the cube above)

    Parallel lines: lines on a single plane that do not intersect. Example: \overline{AD} || \overline{BC}

    Skew lines: lines on separate planes that do not intersect. Example: \overline{AB} and \overline{FG}

    Parallel planes: two or more planes that do not intersect. Example: \square }ABC and \square }EFG

    Intersection: the location where two or more “things” meet (planes intersect in a line, lines intersect at a point)

    Learning these concepts

    Click the image or the link below to launch the video to help you better understand this "mathematical language."

    Scroll down to the Guided Practice section and work through the examples before submitting the assignment.

    07.01 Geometry Basics - Explanation Video Link (Math Level 1)

    07.01 Geometry Basics - Explanation Videos (Math Level 1)

    See video


    07.01 Geometry Basics - Extra links (Math Level 1)

    I highly recommend that you click on the links above and watch the videos or work through the material before continuing.

    Guided Practice
    After watching the video try these problems. The worked solutions follow.

    Example 1:

    Name each of the points, lines, rays, segments and angles in the figure in two ways using correct mathematical notation:

    Example 2:

    Using the box-like figure:

    a. Name all labeled segments that are parallel to BF
    b. Name all labeled segments that are skew to BF
    c. Name all the planes
    d. Name all the pairs of parallel planes
    e. Name the intersection of segments DH and DA; segments CG and GF.
    f. Name the intersection of the top and right planes; The back and bottom planes.

    Example 3:

    Draw and label the following:

    a. Point B

    d. line MN

    b. segment XY

    c. ray CK

    e. angle GHI

    f. plane QRST

    Answers

    Example 1:

    Points A B C D E        
    Lines1 \overline{BC} \overline{CE} \overline{BE}            
    Rays \overrightarrow{BC} \overrightarrow{CB} \overrightarrow{CE} \overrightarrow{EC} \overrightarrow{BE} \overrightarrow{EA} \overrightarrow{EB} \overrightarrow{BA} \overrightarrow{DC}
    Segments \overline{BC} \overline{AB} \overline{CE} \overline{BE} \overline{ED} \overline{EC}      
    Angles \angle BCE \angle CBE \angle ECB \angle CBA          

    1The line above each of these should have arrows on both ends.

    Example 2:

    a) Parallel to \overline{BF}: \overline{CG} and \overline{EA}

    b) Skew to \overline{BF}: \overline{AD}, {\overline{CD}} and {\overline{GH}} (must be in the same plane as {\overline{BF}}

    c) Planes: \square ABC, \square EFG, \square BFG, \square ADH, \square ABF, \square CDH (top, bottom, left right, back, front)

    d) Pairs of parallel planes: \square ABC and \square EFG (top and bottom), \square ADG and \square EFG (left and right, \square ABF and \square DCG (back and front)

    e) Intersection of \overline{DH} and \overline{DA}: Point d; intersection of \overline{CG} and \overline{GF}: Point G

    f) Intersection of \square ABC (top) and \square BFG (right): \overline{BC}; intersection of \square ABF (back) and \square EFG (bottom: \overline{EF}

    Example 3:

    Point B
    Segment XY
    Ray C
    Line MN
    Angle GHI
    Plane QRST

     

    07.01 Geometry Basics - Worksheet (Math Level 1)

    teacher-scored 42 points possible 30 minutes

    Activity for this lesson

    1. Print the worksheet. Work all the problems showing ALL your steps.
    2. Digitize (scan or take digital photo) and upload your worksheet activity.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 6 of your enrollment date for this class.


    07.01 Heritage of India China Journal Assignment(WorldCiv1)

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

    Women in tribal village, Umaria district, India: Wikimedia Commons, Yann, Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedWomen in tribal village, Umaria district, India: Wikimedia Commons, Yann, Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported "If you would understand anything, observe its beginning and its development." (Aristotle) "Seattle Pacific University History Department: Home." Seattle Pacific University History Department: Home. SPU History Department, 2012. Web. 24 Dec. 2012.

    Assignment Instructions: 7.1: Journal Entry: If you were in charge of a group of people that had to complete a job by a certain date, what would you do to make sure that a quality job was done on time?

     
    5- Accomplished
    3- Satisfactory
    2-Developing
    1-Beginning
    Context Contains fresh, original ideas. Solid content is backed up with examples, illustrations and a variety of support for ideas. All questions are answered. Good ideas and content backed up with generalized examples. Accurate wording is apparent. Support for ideas is all of the same type. Some of the questions are answered but not well backed up. Stale ideas. Worn-out. Content is not well supported. The writer is beginning to define the topic, even through development is still basic or general. No real ideas. Content is murky or unsupported. No awareness of audience is apparent. As yet, the journal entry has no clear purpose or central theme. Not all the questions are answered. To extract meaning from the text, the reader must make inferences based on sketchy or missing details.
    Conventions The writer demonstrates a strong grasp of conventions by using punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage and paragraphing in a way that enhances the message of the paper. There are no spelling or punctuation errors. The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions: spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing. Writer uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Less than three spelling or punctuation errors present. Writer shows a reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. Three to six spelling or punctuation errors present. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. Sixteen or more spelling or punctuation errors present.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


    07.01 Hiragana and Katakana Lesson (Japanese I)

    Hiragana and Katakana are the basic alphabets that all in Japan learn. They are purely phonetically, meaning the actual symbols only represent sounds. If you know all of the hiragana and katakana symbols, you can write anything in Japanese and a native speaker will be able to read what you have written! Kanji is the third and perhaps most famous alphabet-we will be barely touching on some of the kanji-there are over 40,000!

    Each hiragana symbol represents a sound and when you string a number of symbols together, you can form words and sentences. For example, if you put the three symbols ni, ho, and n together they form nihon which means the country of Japan in English. If you put a, ka, and i together you will form akai, which means red in Japanese.

    Katakana is for importing foreign words only. They are the same sounds, but, different symbols. You would use katakana for importing foreign names and other foreign words. For example, my name Boyce would use the katakana symbols bo, i and su to make my name Boisu in Japanese. America in Japanese would string the symbols a, me, ri, and ka together to make amerika. Remember to use katakana symbols and not hiragana symbols!

    First go to the link below and visit this website. Under the Learn Japanese with songs; listen to the Hiragana and Katakana songs.

    After that scroll down to the games section and play all of the Hiragana and Katakana games.

    Print off the free hiragana sheets and fill them out. You will not be turning these in so I must trust that you actually print them off and practice them. Make sure you do that for the practice!

    **You may purchase any of the resources on the website, but this is not required for the class. Purchasing any of those will be your own choice and again is not required.

    07.01 Influences on human development (Health II)

    Read this introduction, and then read at least the required links below.

    When a baby is conceived, it inherits roughly half its genetic material from its mother, and half from its father. Those inherited genes will determine certain characteristics (gender and eye color, for instance) and will strongly influence the person that baby becomes. Your genes play a role in determining your height, weight, personality, and susceptibility to certain diseases. However, many other factors also play important roles. Both your physical environment and your 'social environment' (family, culture, friends, etc), as well as your own choices and preferences, shape you all through your life.

    Genetic influences on human development

    A quick review of basic genetics: All the cells in the human body (EXCEPT eggs or sperm) contain PAIRS of chromosomes, which carry the genes. During the production of eggs and sperm, the pairs separate, so that each egg or sperm contains one member of each pair. Then, when an egg is fertilized by a sperm, the single chromosomes pair up with their partners, so that the resulting baby ends up with the normal pairs. (On rare occasions, a mistake occurs in this process, so that the baby has one missing or one extra chromosome. This often causes problems. Down's syndrome is caused by an extra chromosome; Turner's syndrome is caused by a missing chromosome.)

    There are a few genetic diseases/disorders (such as color-blindness, sickle-cell anemia, and cystic fibrosis) that are genetically determined: If you have the genes (usually, a matched pair of recessive genes), you will have the disease. Many other diseases (such as diabetes or schizophrenia) are genetically influenced: If you have the gene(s), you will be more likely to get the disease--but you might not. Much current research is looking at why some people with a certain gene develop problems, but other people with the same gene don't.

    Physical environmental influence

    When a baby is first conceived, the baby's environment is the mother's uterus. Anything the mother breathes, eats, drinks, or absorbs through her skin becomes part of the baby's environment. Notice that this would include second-hand smoke, prescription medications, and any chemicals, fumes or contamination the mother encounters. Unfortunately, the first few weeks of pregnancy, when the mother probably doesn't even know she is pregnant, are the most critical for the baby's healthy development. If you are a woman, what does this mean for you? It means that if there is ANY chance you are pregnant (ie, if you have had sex even one time since your last regular period), you should behave as if you are pregnant: no drinking, no drugs, no smoking, just good, healthy food and exercise. If you are a man? It means that if there is ANY chance your wife/girlfriend is pregnant ((ie, if you have had sex even one time), you should treat her as if she is pregnant--don't offer her alcohol, drugs or cigarettes.

    The physical environment (before and after birth) can have both positive and negative influences on the developing child. Some of this is common sense--with good nutrition, a child will be better able to reach his/her potential. A child who has a serious injury or illness, a child who is exposed to radiation or meth lab chemicals, or a child who is frequently hungry, cold, or thirsty, will be less likely to reach his/her potential. Some things are more complex and not so obvious--for instance, if you were somehow able to raise a child in a totally clean, sterile environment, that child's immune system would not develop normally. Two hundred years ago, children were often permanently damaged by too much hard physical labor when they were too young. Today, children are damaged by not having enough exercise.

    Social environment influence

    If genetics and the physical environment seem complex, the social environment is even more so! From the time a baby is born, it will begin learning about its environment through its senses--touch, taste, smell, hearing and vision. How often is it picked up and held? What happens when it cries? Is the world loud and busy, or quiet and still? First the young child is mostly with family or daycare. How much do people around the child talk? What kind of vocabulary do they use, talking to each other or to the child? How do people dress? How do they treat each other and the child? What are the norms and expectations of the culture, the everyday sights and sounds of the city, town, or area they live in? As the child grows up, makes friends, goes to school, church, parents' workplaces, sports, music lessons, etc, the social environment just gets more complicated.

    Moreover, everyone reacts differently. Most children who are told they can't become, say, a doctor, an artist, or a jockey when they grow up will give up on it, but a few will just become more determined to do what they were told they couldn't. If you know you have a difficult test tomorrow, are you going to study hard tonight and then get a good night's sleep? Blow it off and pretend you don't care? Tell your parents you have a stomach ache in the morning and can't go to school? stay up till midnight cramming and then lay awake worrying about it? Completely space it off till you walk into the room tomorrow? Gripe to your friends about how the class is too hard, and it isn't fair to expect you to learn all that stuff by tomorrow?

    What we spend our time doing ends up having a major impact on who we become. When you were very young, your parents had the major control over how you spent your time. Now that you are older, you can make more choices about what to practice doing, based on who you want to become. If you recognize the influences your social environment has on you, you can make better decisions about how to respond.

    07.01 Influences on human development assignment (Health II)

    teacher-scored 30 points possible 30 minutes

    Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word-processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment. *************************************************************************** Using personal experience and the INFORMATION PROVIDED IN THE UNIT 07.1 LESSON and links, answer the following questions in paragraph form: Part I: Genetic influences

    1. Explain at least three genetic influences on you. 2. Explain how a genetic influence has had a positive or negative impact on someone else you know.

    Part II: Physical environment influences

    1. Explain at least three influences your physical environment (before or after birth) has had on you. 2. Explain at least three responsibilities of a parent in managing the physical environment (before and after birth) for their children.

    Part III: Social environment: Gender stereotypes

    1. Do cultural and societal norms regarding gender roles impact you personally?

    A. If yes, how? B. If no, why do you think that is the case?

    2. Which do you believe has the greatest impact on gender roles: societal norms, cultural beliefs, or media representation? Support your answer.

    3. How might gender-specific messages impact your education, career choices, job, and relationships?

    4. The article on gender stereotyping was written as part of a study about why there are not more women in science and engineering schools/jobs, so it focused on the problems that affect women. In what ways can gender stereotypes cause difficulties for men?

    *********************************************************************** (Up to three points possible per question, with three more bonus points for particularly well-thought-out, in-depth answers.)

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


    07.01 Integrated Project (CompTech)

    * You will use any or all of the following in a pre-approved project to be presented for grading to the Computer Technology teacher and a cross-curricular teacher: word processing, spreadsheet and/or electronic presentation.

    Integrated Project Grading Sheet

    Use the grading sheet above for the Integrated Project Unit. This unit is completed in conjunction with another class assignment.

    In this Computer Technology course you will learn about a variety of ways to use the computer in everyday life. To reinforce these concepts you will be expected to create and implement an integrated project with the cooperation of a teacher in a different content area. Doesn't this sound great? You can get a grade in two different classes for the same project.  Pick an assignment that one of your OTHER teachers has assigned you this semester.  Edit it to fit the requirements for this class for the integrated project.

    NOTE: If you are taking this course in the summer or this is the only course you are taking, you can use one of the "Summer Integrated Project Ideas" in the link above (link only available in the summer months).

    07.01 Introductory Information (TeenLiving)

    Introductory Information

    TEENAGE TRANSITIONS

    Relationships and Communication:
    Communication occurs when two or more people understand a message in about the same way. Students communicate with others on a regular basis, but many times the outcome is not positive.

    CHILD, PARENT, ADULT COMMUNICATION STYLES

    Child: This style of communication is the easiest and most natural to use. It is also very immature and the least effective method of communication when you are an adult. It is characterized by self-centered motives:

    Giving orders
    Name Calling
    Yelling
    Verbal Abuse
    Not listening
    Interrupting
    Topping: "You got a B+? Well, I got an A+"
    Throwing Tantrums
    Acting out of control: hitting biting, scratching, kicking

    To communicate in this form, you do not need to be a child. Many teens and adults revert back to these childish communication habits when they are frustrated or upset.

    Parent: This style of communication has nothing to do with age or being the mother or father. In fact, two-year-olds are very good at this. It is the mode of communication that directs others behaviors. It is effective in that you usually get someone to comply or act a certain way, but it is a one-way or dictatorial communication. It is characterized by:

    Giving instructions
    Directing
    Punishing
    Demanding
    Ordering

    Examples of a child using the parent form of communication might be: "Mom, get me a cookie." A teenager would use it like: "Go get my book out of my locker."
    This style of communication gets the point across and affects the behavior of others. It is commonly used to deal with someone who is communicating as a child.

    Teens want to be treated as adults, but when they resort to child-like communication techniques (e.g., whining, temper outbursts, etc.), others around them resort to using parent techniques.

    Adult: This style of communication is the highest level and is the most desirable and effective. It is characterized by:

    The desire for open, two-way communication
    Taking responsibility for comments and actions
    Remaining calm
    Showing respect for others feelings and opinions
    Wanting to resolve problems with a win-win attitude
    Having trust in others
    Controlling emotions while discussing

    07.01 Lesson 7.1: Web Site Validity(Web Page Design)

    Lesson 7.1: Web Site Validity
    Thinking Critically about World Wide Web Resources by Esther Grassian, UCLA College Library The World Wide Web has a lot to offer, but not all sources are equally valuable or reliable. Here are some points to consider. For additional points regarding Web sites for subject disciplines, see below Thinking Critically about Discipline-Based World Wide Web Resources.

    Content & Evaluation
    • Who is the audience?
    • What is the purpose of the Web Page & what does it contain?
    • How complete and accurate are the information and the links provided? • What is the relative value of the Web site in comparison to the range of information resources available on this topic? (Note: Be sure to check with a librarian.)
    o What other resources (print & non-print) are available in this area?
    o What are the date(s) of coverage of the site and site-specific documents?
    o How comprehensive is this site?

     What are the link selection criteria if any?
     Are the links relevant and appropriate for the site?
     Is the site inward-focused, pointing outward, or both?
     Is there an appropriate balance between inward-pointing links ("inlinks" i.e., within the same site)& outward-pointing links ("outlinks" i.e., to other sites)?
     Are the links comprehensive or do they just provide a sampler?
     What do the links offer that is not easily available in other sources?
     Are the links evaluated in any way?
     Is there an appropriate range of Internet resources -- e.g., links to gophers?
     Is multimedia appropriately incorporated?
    • How valuable is the information provided in the Web Page (intrinsic value)?

    Source & Date
    • Who is the author or producer?
    • What is the authority or expertise of the individual or group that created this site?
    o How knowledgeable is the individual or group on the subject matter of the site?
    o Is the site sponsored or co-sponsored by an individual or group that has created other Web sites?
    • Is any sort of bias evident?
    • When was the Web item produced?
    • When was the Web item mounted?
    • When was the Web item last revised?
    • How up to date are the links?
    • How reliable are the links; are there blind links, or references to sites which have moved?
    • Is contact information for the author or producer included in the document?

    Structure
    • Does the document follow good graphic design principles?
    • Do the graphics and art serve a function or are they decorative?
    • Do the icons clearly represent what is intended?
    • Does the text follow basic rules of grammar, spelling and literary composition?
    • Is there an element of creativity, and does it add to or detract from the document itself?
    • Can the text stand alone for use in line-mode (text only) Web browsers as well as multimedia browsers, or is there an option for line-mode browsers?
    • Is attention paid to the needs of the disabled -- e.g., large print and graphics options; audio; alternative text for graphics?
    • Are links provided to Web "subject trees" or directories -- lists of subject-arranged Web sources?
    • How usable is the site? Can visitors get the information they need within a reasonable number of links (preferably 3 or fewer clicks)?

    Other
    • Is appropriate interactivity available?
    • When it is necessary to send confidential information out over the Internet, is encryption (i.e., a secure coding system) available? How secure is it?
    • Are there links to search engines or is a search engine attached to (embedded in) the Web site?

    Thinking Critically about Discipline-Based World Wide Web Resources by Esther Grassian, UCLA College Library
    The World Wide Web has a lot to offer, but not all sources are equally valuable or reliable. Thinking Critically About World Wide Web Resources offers some basic points to consider. Here are additional points to consider regarding Web sites for subject disciplines.

    Content & Evaluation
    • Does the site claim to represent a group, an organization, an institution, a corporation or a governmental body?
    • Does the site offer a selected list of resources in a particular discipline or field or does it claim to offer a complete list? (Note: Be sure to check with a librarian on the range of information resources in a particular discipline.)
    o Does the site refer to print and other non-Internet resources or just Internet resources?
    o If a selected list is offered, are criteria provided describing how the list of resources was chosen?
    o Is an explanation provided for use of particular criteria?
    • Does the site claim to describe or provide the results of research or scholarly effort?
    o Are sufficient references provided to other works, to document hypotheses, claims or assertions? o Are references cited fully?
    o Can the results be refuted or verified through other means--e.g., by use of library-related research tools?
    • Is any sort of third-party financial or other support or sponsorship evident?
    • Is advertising included at the site, and if so, has it had an impact on the content?
    • Does the site combine educational, research & scholarly information with commercial or non-commercial product or service marketing?

    Source & Date
    • Who designed the criteria used in selecting items for this site (if any), and who selected the items listed?
    • Is the site officially or unofficially sponsored or supported by particular groups, organizations, institutions, corporations or governmental bodies?
    • Can the researchers, scholars, groups, organizations, institutions, corporations or governmental bodies listed as authors, sponsors or supporters, be verified as such, and what are their qualifications?
    • How up to date is the study or the site? Structure
    • Are results of research studies reported in the style expected for that discipline?
    • Are references provided in the style normally used for documentation in that discipline?

    Other
    • Is there a fee for use of access to any of the information provided at this site, or is all information at this site freely available?
    • Are there options for text only, non-frames and non-tables views of this Web site?
    • Is alternative text provided for images, to guide the visually-impaired? When looking at the evaluation criteria you need to look at five things that make up a good site and they are:

    Accuracy Authority Objectivity Currency Coverage
    This web site below will help you understand what a good site is and the things that are good to look for. Click on the link called Website Evaluation 1 and read about the five items listed above.

    07.01 Lesson 7A: Consonant Sounds #4 (Spanish I)

     

    Lesson 7A
    Consonant Sounds #4

    [A copy of this lesson is available in a PDF file!! If you prefer to use this type of document, just click on the following link to complete this lesson: SpI_Lesson7A]

     

               We began this Spanish I course by introducing you to the Spanish alphabet. In second quarter, lesson 3A*, we focused specifically on the Spanish vowels – vocales. Then, in lesson 4A*, we looked at the consonants whose pronunciation sounds most like English’s pronunciation of “s” or “k”. These Spanish consonants were the letters “s”, “z”, “c”, “k”, and “q”. We also looked at the letters “b” and “v”. In lesson 5A*, we discussed some other basic consonants that are pronounced almost like their English equivalents: “f”, “m”, “p”, “t”, “w”, “y”, and “ch”. In lesson 6A*, we began to tackle some of the more difficult consonants that are distinctly different in Spanish, like “d”, “g”, “h”, “j”, and “l”. In this lesson, we will finish up our study of Spanish consonants with the letters “ll”, “n”, “ñ”, “r”, “rr”, and “x”. (In our first Spanish alphabet lesson - lesson 1A* – we learned that no longer is “ll” recognized as a unique letter in the new Spanish alphabet, but it does have a unique sound in Spanish so we will include it as part of our lesson!! The traditional Spanish alphabet also included the letter “ch”, which we discussed in lesson 5A*!) [*We realize that you’ve just seen this … BUT AS A REMINDER … to review lessons from quarters 1-3, links to PDF files are located in module 2 – Start Here!]

               We will be following the same format throughout this quarter that was used in the other three quarters … remember, words that are in “bold” letters are in español (Spanish), and words that are in “bold and italic” letters are English words/translations. Also, the Spanish language uses accents, along with some other special characters!! You were instructed on setting up your computer to type accents and special characters during the introduction to this class. If you haven’t already done this, please do it now!! You will need this information in order to complete the first activity for this quarter, Activity 7A.

               In this lesson, we will be looking at the Spanish consonants “ll”, “n”, “ñ”, “r”, “rr” and “x”. Remember that these are consonants that are more difficult for a native English speaker to learn because they are used differently than their English counterparts.

               Here are the consonants in this lesson:

               These are each great sites that will allow you to hear the Spanish sounds for these consonants!! Click on each link below and then after reviewing each site, return to our lesson by closing the window (Click the red "X" in the upper, right hand corner of the screen!!).

     

              These are each great sites that will allow you to hear the Spanish sounds for these consonants!! Click on each link below and then after reviewing each site, return to our lesson by closing the window (Click the red "X" in the upper, right hand corner of the screen!!).

     

               **Help pronouncing the “R” and “RR” in Spanish: Neither of the Spanish “r” sounds is very similar to the English “r” sound, so we will take some extra time and examples to learn these letters. The following links help specifically with pronouncing both the “r” and “rr” sounds. To return to the lesson, just close the window by clicking on the red "X" in the upper, right hand corner of the screen!!

     

               Here are a couple of video clips so that you can hear and practice “rolling your r’s”!! Some people can do this easily, but for some of us, it takes time and lots of silly sounds to finally get the hang of it. Keep trying, listening, and practicing ... for most of us, it will finally click and you’ll wonder why it ever seemed so hard!! The first video clip is a classroom Spanish teacher helping a couple of students say the word “arroz – rice”. Listen specifically to what the teacher is saying and the correct “rolling rr” sound that he demonstrates. (Just click on the picture below to start the video clip! You can close any ads that appear at the bottom of the video by clicking on the “x” in the upper, right corner of the ad. When finished watching the video clip, click on the “Back (<-)” button in the top, left corner of your internet browser to return to this page!)

    See video

     

               This second video is done by a student who is trying to learn to roll his "r’s". It is obvious that he has done a lot of research on physically how this can be done, using correct terminology, and has been practicing different methods of making the trilling r sound. Hopefully, this will give you some other ideas if you are struggling!! (Click on the picture below to start the video clip! When finished watching the video clip, click on the “Back (<-)” button in the top, left corner of your internet browser to return to this page!)

    See video

     

               Completing “Online” Lessons: As we discussed in the Start Here, there are many advantages of an “online” course! You are not in a classroom full of students with a teacher who is trying to present the material ONCE … with only time to answer a few questions before assigning homework. One of the most important advantages of “online” learning is the ability to take as much time as you [INDIVIDUALLY] need to understand each lesson … with a teacher waiting to answer any of your personal questions or concerns. Read through each lesson carefully and watch each of the video clips 2 or 3 times! You will understand a little bit more each time through and if you are still confused … ASK! Keep asking and working until you get it … and you CAN learn it! You are in control of your own education so take advantage of it … rather than skipping parts of the lesson and sliding through as quickly as possible … but it is up to YOU to be successful! IT’S YOUR CHOICE!!

               Summary of Lesson: You should now know how important pronunciation is when speaking another language. You could read a complete, correct Spanish sentence and not have anyone understand you without the proper pronunciation … so practice, practice … and listen carefully in each lesson to the correct pronunciation. Remember, you can always go back and listen again, as many times as you want!! The better you are at pronouncing the Spanish consonants you are learning, the easier your Spanish will be to understand!!

    07.01 Literary terms review (English 9)

    Literary terms: vocabulary and concepts used to discuss fiction: [These are words you need to understand and use to write about fiction.]

    Setting

    The setting of a story is where and when it happens.

    In some stories, the setting doesn't seem very important. Twilight is set in a small town in Washington state, but the author could have chosen a different town or a different state.

    If you wanted to write a story about an American teenager growing up, focusing on relationships between the teen and family and friends, you could choose from thousands of places in the United States to set your story. However, if part of the plot depended on the teenager having a cell phone, you would have to set the story at a TIME after the late 1990's.

    In other stories, the setting is key. For instance, the setting of "The White Seal" is in the northern Atlantic ocean. Kipling set the story in a place where the characters (seals) could live. Obviously, the events in the story couldn't have taken place in New York City or in the desert. The adventures in "The Song of Hiawatha", The Lord of the Rings or The Perfect Storm are inextricably wound up in their settings.

    Plot

    The plot of a story is what happens - the events and actions. In a 'plot-driven' story, the action is the main focus.

    The conflict is the problem or difficulty in the story. You may be familiar with classifying conflicts as one of these four types: the character against another person, the character against nature, the character against him/herself, or the character against fate (or God).

    The climax is often the most exciting part, the turning point, and is usually near the end, when the main conflict is settled. Rising action is the part of the story between the beginning and the climax, and the events and complications leading up to the climax, where the 'the plot thickens.' Usually, in the process of trying to solve his or her problems, the main character gets into progressively worse situations as the story goes on.

    The resolution is how the problem or conflict is solved (resolved). Falling action is the part of the story between the climax and the end--the winding down.

    There may be one or more subplots - smaller or less important stories connected to the main story. Some (usually longer) stories contain parallel plots A story with parallel plots has two (or sometimes even more) main characters, and what is happening with both (all) main characters is equally (or almost equally) important. For example, a mystery might follow a serial killer, a detective working on the case, and the killer's next chosen victim in alternating chapters.

    Suspense is the reader's doubt about what will happen or when it will happen. Usually the reader doesn't know how the story will turn out, and that is what creates suspense. If the writer tells us at the beginning of a story that a character is going to die, the suspense comes from wondering how or when.

    A flashback is a way for a writer to show events that happened before the beginning of the story. For example, when Odysseus remembers leaving his wife and baby son, or when Katniss in The Hunger Games remembers how her sister got the cat, that is a brief flashback.

    Foreshadowing is a hint about something that is going to happen later in the story. If a gun is mentioned early in the story, probably that is foreshadowing an event later that will involve someone shooting (or getting shot by) the gun. A discussion of death or funerals may foreshadow the death of one of the important characters. In some stories, there is a prophecy, or a character has a premonition that is an obvious example of foreshadowing, but often it is more subtle, and you might not notice it unless you read the story twice. Francis Kirkman, WIkimedia Commons, public domainFrancis Kirkman, WIkimedia Commons, public domain

    Character

    The characters are the "actors" in the story. Most often the characters are people, but they may be animals, aliens, toys, robots or whatever.

    The protagonist is the main character, sometimes called the hero, though he or she may not behave heroically.

    In many stories there is an antagonist - the "villain", the character who opposes the protagonist. The antagonist is often evil, but not necessarily so.

    Round characters are characters who have detailed, complex personalities, and seem like real people. Flat characters are characters who are often stereotypical, and lack the complexity to make them seem real. Characters can also be classified as dynamic or static.

    Dynamic characters change in the course of the story. Static characters stay the same.

    A sympathetic character is one that you like, and probably identify with at least to some extent. Generally, the protagonist is a sympathetic character - otherwise, it would be hard for you to care what happens to him or her. In 'character-driven' stories, the characters and how they interact, change and develop are the main focus; the plot arises mainly out of choices made by the characters.

    Point of View

    Point of view in fiction has to do with who seems to be telling (narrating) the story.

    If the story is told by "me" - as if a main character is telling the story - When I woke up that morning... - it is said to be in first person. King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" is in first person.

    If the story is told as if by an observer - When he woke up that morning... - it is in third person. The Odyssey, "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" and most fiction are in third person.

    • If the person telling the story - the narrator - seems to only know what a single person could really know, we say the point of view is third person, limited.
    • If the person telling the story seems to be able to see into the minds of multiple characters, or be observing many places at once, we say the point of view is third person, omniscient.

    Narrator

    In most stories, most of the time, we as readers trust that the narrator is telling us the truth about the story. An unreliable narrator is one whose version of the story is not accurate. Depending on the circumstances, the narrator may be unreliable because s/he is deliberately sharing an inaccurate version of an event, or because s/he really doesn't know it isn't correct. One common instance of an unreliable narrator occurs when the narrator (or main character, in third person, limited point of view) is seriously ill, injured, mentally ill, or under the influence of drugs, alcohol, poison, or magic.

    Other instances may not be so obvious. Probably you can think of a time when you heard someone say that so-and-so is ugly, disgusting, stuck-up, or rude--but you could see for yourself this was not the case. The person making the accusations may have believed what s/he said, but was 'blinded' by a dislike of so-and-so. In the same way, a character in a story may be presenting the 'truth' as s/he sees it, but be passing on his or her misconceptions or prejudices.

    In general usage, when we say "unreliable", we are making a negative judgement about a person's character.  That's NOT necessarily what is meant when we talk about an "unreliable narrator" in literature.

      An unreliable narrator is one who either can't  (or, more rarely, won't) explain the whole situation. For example, imagine this situation as a scene in a book:

      Jonathan and Kari have been  happily married for ten years and have a six-year-old daughter, Isabella.  Jonathan has become addicted to prescription pain pills after being injured in an accident, but has managed to completely hide his addiction from his wife and daughter.  He owes a lot of money to the drug dealer, who hires a mentally ill homeless man to go to the house one evening and hold Kari and Isabella at gun-point demanding money.  A neighbor calls the police, who arrive and interrogate all four people, separately.  If each of the four people got to tell this in their own chapter of the book, who will be a reliable narrator?

      The homeless man doesn't know why Jonathan owes money to the dealer, and, more importantly, is delusional and believes Jonathan's mind is being controlled by an alien government that wants to take over more and more people's bodies.  He (the homeless man) is an unreliable narrator because his "reality" is so far removed from the actual situation.

      Kari is totally shocked and doesn't know what is going on.  To her, this is a random act of attempted robbery committed against her family by a stranger. She thinks it must be a case of mistaken identity.  She doesn't know enough about the situation to tell us the whole story, so she would not be a reliable narrator.

      Isabella only understands that a strange man came into the house with a gun and started yelling at her parents until they were rescued by the police.  She is an unreliable narrator even though she would be totally honest; she simply doesn't understand most of the situation.

      Jonathan is the person in the story most likely to be a reliable narrator.  He understands what happened and why it happened.  If we see/hear the story from his point of view, we will probably get a pretty complete picture of what happened.

    Dialogue

    Dialogue is what the characters in the story say to each other. (In a play or movie, the dialogue is the actors' lines). In stories, it is the actual words spoken, and is put inside quotation marks to set it off from the narration. Most modern, realistic fiction contains lots of dialogue, and as a reader, you can find out quite a bit about a character from what s/he says, or what is said about her/him by other characters. Although in real life we engage in conversation all the time, it can be tricky to write dialogue that sounds natural, like what real people would say.

    Theme

    The theme of a work (refer back to our longer lesson on theme in the reading unit) is a main general idea, belief or truth about life, and is usually not stated explicitly, but must be inferred by observing what happens in the story. For instance, you might say that the theme of the Star Wars movies is 'good is more powerful than evil.' A work may have more than one theme. The moral of a fable is a simple sort of theme. Sometimes you can figure out the theme of a story by asking yourself "What would the author want me to learn about life from this story?"

    A theme is more than just a single word ("love", "courage" or "equality").  The theme must express a message.  For example, "love can overcome hate", "it takes courage to stand up for what you believe in", or "all people should be treated equally under the law" could be themes.

    07.01 Literary terms review (English 9)

    07.01 Moons, Asteroids, Comets, Dwarf Planets, and the Kuiper Belt Links (Astronomy1)

    07.01 Novel: The Secret Life of Bees (English 11)

    teacher-scored 100 points possible 300 minutes

    Read the New York Times best seller, The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd and then do the following activities.

    Book Review (15 Points)

    Write a paragraph long book review for this story. Include your rating out of five stars and discuss why you liked (or didn't like) this book. Include who you may recommend it to and why.

    Questions (5 points each=35 points)

    1. Were you surprised to learn that T. Ray used to be different, that he once truly loved Deborah? How do you think Deborah's leaving affected him? Did it shed any light on why T. Ray was so cruel and abusive to Lily?

    2. Had you ever heard of "kneeling on grits"? What qualities did Lily have that allowed her to survive, endure, and eventually thrive, despite T. Ray?

    3. Who is the queen bee in this story?

    4. Lily's relationship to her dead mother was complex, ranging from guilt to idealization, to hatred to acceptance. What happens to a daughter when she discovers her mother once abandoned her? Is Lily right-- generally, would people rather die than forgive? Was it harder for Lily to forgive her mother or herself?

    5. What compelled Rosaleen to spit on the three men's shoes? What does it take for a person to stand up with conviction against brutalizing injustice? What did you like best about Rosaleen?

    6. How would you describe Lily and Zach's relationship? What drew them together? Did you root for them to be together?

    7. Project into the future. Does Lily every see her father again? Does she become a beekeeper? A writer? What happens to Rosaleen? What happens to Lily and Zach? Who would Zach be today?

    Character Journal (20 Points)

    Choose one character and make 4 journal entries for that person as the story progresses. Each journal entry should be at least one paragraph in length and is worth 5 points.

    Significant Passages (30 Points)

    Choose three passages in the book are significant to the story. Discuss the passage in a complete paragraph-- noting its significance. Please include the passage and page number (if the passage is lengthy, include the first five words and the last five words so I know which one you are discussing.)

    07.01 Numbers 90-100 (FrenchI)

    The link in the URL's will take you to this lesson.

    07.01 Numbers 90-100 links (FrenchI)

    07.01 Object of choice report(Astronomy1)

    teacher-scored 100 points possible 50 minutes

    In addition to the 8 planets, our solar system has other important objects that, together with the planets and the sun, comprise our Solar System. All of the planets except Mercury and Venus have moons. Many of these moons are fascinating worlds of their own. We also have comets, asteroids, meteoroids and the still-mysterious Kuiper Belt. From the list of choices on the link, select any object other than one of the 8 planets and write a report. Go to the assignment under Topic 3 to submit your report. This is a high school credit course and I expect a minimum of one (1) page of research written in your own words. Any evidence of plagiarism or violation of copyright laws will warrant dismissal from this course.

    07.01 Past tense of -ir verbs (FrenchII)

    Le lien dans l'URL vous portera à la leçon.
    (The link in the URL's will take you to this lesson.)

    07.01 Past tense of -ir verbs links (FrenchII)

    07.01 pH - Acids and Bases (FoodSci)

    Unit 7.1: pH-Acids and Bases

    The pH scale is a numerical scale between 0 to 14 in which acidity is expressed and is determined by the concentration of hydrogen ions in a solution. The word acid comes from the the Latin term which means sour. What do you think of when you hear lemon, pickles, or vinegar? These are all acids. Acids can change the color of some foods or flowers. When eaten, bases taste bitter or salty. Some cleaning agents are bases such as a bar of soap and another example is table salt. Physically, a base is slippery.

    A strong acid has many hydrogen ions present. To make the acid weaker, hydroxide ions are added. As the number hydroxid ions and hydrogen ions equalize neutralization occurs in which the acid has reacted to the hydroxide ions from the base and water is produced. This is a neutral situation. If something has a value of 7.0 on the pH scale, this indicates it is a neutral solution like water.

    The pH of a soluction can be measured in different ways. There are special meters used and also dip papers which are dipped into the solution and thenwhen the paper dries, the color is compared to a scale to determine the pH value. The papers aren't as exact as meters.

    Scientist measure the concentration, the amount of a substance in a specific amount of volume, using moles. This is the easiest means for expressing the concentration of a solution. The amount of molarity or number of moles of solute per liter of solution is often used by scientist or chemists to state the concentration of a solution. Molarity is determined by the number of moles of solute divided by the volume of a solution.

    Titration is often used to determine the concentration of an acid or base in a solution. To accomplish this, an indicator is added to the solution to determine the pH. A measured amount of a basic solution of a predetermined concentration is added. The indicator will change colors when the two solutions mix and neutralize each other. By determining the point at which neutrilzation occurs, scientists and chemists can calculate the acidic concentration of the solution.

    (Select the link "pH in Foods")

    Facts about pH

    1. Pure water is a poor conductor of electricity which proves it has few ions (free electrons). An ion is an atom or a group of atoms that carries a positive or a negative charge as a result of having lost or gained one or more electrons. A free electron or other subatomic-charged particle is also referred to as an ion.
    2. Pure water can be used to measure the ions or pH of a substance dissolved in the water. Please note that some substances do not dissolve completely, others do.
    3. An acid can be defined as any water-soluble and sour compound capable of reacting with a base to form salts that are hydrogen-containing molecules that will give up a proton to the base and accept an unshared pair of electrons from that base.
    4. A base is fundamentals foundation or a main ingredient. It is the starting place and acts upon the acid. A base is the compound that reacts with the acid to form a salt because the molecules (ions) are able to take a proton from the acid and share a pair of electrons with the acid. (A salt consists of positive ions from a base and negative ions from an acid.)
    5. The pH scale can be used to measure acidity or basicity of any water solution by measuring the ion concentration which is expressed as the concentration of H3O+ (hydronium ions) in powers of 10, from 10-14 to 10. (Hydronium is a hydrated hydrogen ion. A regular hydrogen ion in water is expressed as 1420.)
    6. For example, a substance can measure 10-9, which is expressed as -9. By eliminating the because the scale is logarithmic, we say the pH of the substance is 9.
    7. The pH scale is shown graphically as:

    acid ------- neutral ------ base
    0 ----------- 7 --------- 14

    8. Pure water has a pH of 7. It is neutral.
    9. As the hydronium ion increases as a neutral solution, it is more acidic. The pH goes from 7 toward 0.
    10. If the pH solution falls between 7 and 14, the solution is basic.
    11. A small strip of pH paper (litmus paper) dipped in a solution will test (through the visible change of color) the pH of most substances.
    NOTE: In foods, acids and bases give distinctive tastes. Acids are sour (lemon juice, vinegar). Bases are salt (sodium chloride or table salt).

    Now that you have read the information, you are ready for Unit 7-Assignment 1.

    07.01 pH - Acids and Bases links (FoodSci)

    07.01 Physical Health Problems and Driving Safety Restrictions (DriverEd)

    In 1979, the Utah State Legislature made provisions for increasing highway safety and at the same time allowing many people with health concerns to drive within appropriate safety limits.

    The law states that individuals are personally responsible to be sure they are in reasonably good health when they drive. If a person has a health condition which may affect their ability to safely operate a vehicle, they are responsible to report it to the Driver License Division and are expected to seek competent medical evaluation and advice. Their physicians are responsible to advise them about their health as it relates to driving safety. A physician does not have authority to restrict anyone’s driving, but is responsible to report accurately about a patient’s health status. This report may permit an unlimited license, one with restrictions or, in some cases, a denial of a license for safety reasons.

    The Legislature also set up a Driver License Medical Advisory Board to advise physicians and the Driver License Division. The Board emphasizes functional ability to operate a vehicle safely, rather than stressing impairments. It developed a form, “Functional Ability Evaluation Medical Report,” to help physicians advise their patients and simplify reporting.

    The “Guidelines” include possible health concerns in the following twelve categories:

    • A - Diabetes and Metabolic Condition
    • B - Cardiovascular (Heart)
    • C - Pulmonary (Lung)
    • D - Neurological (Nervous System)
    • E - Epilepsy (Episodic Conditions)
    • F - Learning Memory
    • G - Psychiatric or Emotional Condition
    • H - Alcohol and Other Drugs
    • I - Vision
    • J - Musculoskeletal/Chronic Debility
    • K - Alertness or Sleep Disorders
    • L - Hearing and Balance

    Interstate 15 approaching the Spaghetti Bowl in Salt Lake City, Utah: By Ken Lund, CC-BY-SA-2.0, via Wikimedia CommonsInterstate 15 approaching the Spaghetti Bowl in Salt Lake City, Utah: By Ken Lund, CC-BY-SA-2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    The “Guidelines” are designed to be the least restrictive possible while at the same time maintaining safety on our highways.
    Applicants for a driver license will be asked to answer health-related questions. If there is a health concern, they will be given a Functional Ability Evaluation form to take to their health care provider, who will complete a Functional Ability Profile.

    The form is then returned to the Driver License Division and, if appropriate, a license to drive will be issued based upon previously determined levels of driving risk. For example, if there is a vision problem and the person cannot read highway signs at a distance, the individual may be considered safe to drive, but at reduced speeds, and a restricted license could then be issued.

    If you have a health problem, you should ask your physician about how it might affect your driving. Many medications may cause drowsiness or other difficulties; therefore, a physician may advise against driving until a suitable dosage schedule has been worked out that will not impair driving. Abuse or excessive use of prescription drugs has caused many serious accidents and should be avoided. Individual drivers have the final responsibility for knowing their abilities and for driving safely.

    The “Guidelines” require higher standards of fitness for drivers of commercial motor vehicles than for private vehicles, but the principles are the same.

    07.01 Political Cartoons links (Journalism)

    07.01 Post-Impressionism - assignment(Art History and Art Criticism)

    teacher-scored 25 points possible 40 minutes

    Objective: Select one of the artists of American Post Impressionist Art. Complete the questionnaire in statement form and in correct sentence structure with correct facts. Remember that people speak differently than they write--make the answers sound like what the artist might say, not like an encyclopedia entry. Do NOT copy and paste information from your research sources (that would be plagiarism). Re-write the information from the artist's point of view (in his/her words, as you imagine them speaking). Have the artist speak at more length about their work rather than the minimum, basic answers to the questions. Give reasons, examples or explanations in order to fully demonstrate your knowledge about the artist.

    Submit your questions and answers. You may copy and paste the questions below into a word document, but do not copy your artist statement from the internet or other booka. Re-word the artist’s statement. However, if you feel the artist has a quote that you need to share, make sure to give credit to the book or website after the artist statement. Make sure to include your full name on the assignment and the name of the artist that you are doing your report on. Also include an image of one of the artist's paintings/works that you like and why (or the url for the image).

    Imagine you are a reporter and could ask these questions of the artist:

    1. Reporter: When were you born, where did you live, what were some other key events in your life that might have influenced you?
    Artist possible statement: (For example, you might start out with My name is . . . and I was born. . .)

    2. Reporter: How did you get started in the field of art? What things discouraged or encouraged you?
    Artist possible statement:

    3. Reporter: What do you feel were your most important contributions to the visual arts? (A piece of art, a style, or possibly a technique)
    Artist possible statement:

    4. Reporter: What would your advice be to someone entering the field of the arts?
    Artist possible statement:

    5. Reporter: During your lifetime, what success or recognition did you receive? Why do you think that was?
    Artist possible statement:

    6. Reporter: This is one of your works that I like:
    (Paste in image, or list url of website where image can be seen.)

    07.01 Power Point Slides (Advertising)

    View the slides for this unit.

    07.01 Proctored Final (Participation Skills and Techniques)

    teacher-scored 120 points possible 75 minutes

    Go to the next section, and there you will see instructions on how to arrange your proctored final test. Follow the instructions there to take the test. Good luck! This assignment should be completed by WEEK 9 of this class

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 9 of your enrollment date for this class.


    07.01 Pscychological Disorders Assignment

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 240 minutes

    This assignment will demonstrate some of the knowledge you have gained while reading the content material.

    You will select ONLY ONE of the 3 assignments! There are 3 different assignments to choose from. Remember to use the grading rubric to score yourself on your assignment. Put the score you believe you have earned for the assignment at the top of your assignment. The instructions for all of the assignments are written in Lesson 07.01. When you are ready to submit your assignment, click on the assignment number link, copy and paste your paper into the text box or upload your file and hit submit.

    Grading Rubric:

    10 – Quality of work reveals student has a thorough understanding of the four categories of Psychological Disorders and the therapies related to these disorders. Work includes all elements required and is well developed, masterful and meaningful. Extra research, creativity and thought are shown in the assignment beyond what is in the course materials. Extra effort is obvious in its production.

    9 -- Work reveals student as good understanding of the four categories of Psychological Disorders and the therapies related to these disorders. Work includes all elements required. Work is well developed and meaningful. Extra research, creativity or throught are shown in the work.

    8 -- Work reveals a basic understanding of the four categories of Psychological Disorders and the therapies related to these disorders and include all elements required. Work is adequate in presenting information.

    7 -- Work reveals a basic understanding of the four categories of Psychological Disorders and the therapies related to these disorders. Work includes most elements required. Work is adequate in presenting information.

    1 – Work doesn’t portray an understanding of the four categories of Psychological Disorders and the therapies related to these disorders, nor does it include enough required information. Work must be re-done!

    Choice 1: Creatively Writing about it
    This choice involves writing a sample “Journal” entry for 4 different people who have different psychological disorders. The different disorders will need to be from one of each of the 4 different categories (mood disorder, personality disorder, anxiety disorder and Schizophrenia). Write at least 2 paragraphs for each person:

    · The first paragraph will describe activities and feelings you had as an individual with a mental illness. Remember, you are writing from the point of view of the person with a psychological disorder. It’s important to include some things that happened to them (you) that show some characteristic symptoms of the disorder.

    · The second paragraph will include some therapeutic information or experience that person has experienced in the last week. This could be a visit to the therapist and what was talked about or done. It could include medication and how that’s going. It could be a therapy “homework” assignment or some self-help activities. You may need to do some extra research to find out what therapies are used for that disorder.

    So for this assignment, you will have a total of 8 paragraphs written: 2 paragraphs as the journal entries for 4 imaginary people with psychological disorders. I’ve included a sample of one journal entry for “Jodi” who has a phobia of pencils and pens. (This would be two of the eight paragraphs assignment!).

    SAMPLE: 8 August 1963
    My name is Jodi. I’m 26 years old and I haven’t been able to hold a job for very long for the last seven years. Even though I’m trained to work on diesel engines, it seems that at some time or another, someone expects me to write down a message for a phone call or write up an estimate. I don’t understand why they just can’t let me work on engines! I’m good at it! But NO, there’s always something to write! They don’t seem to understand I can’t touch a pen or pencil! They think I’m sick or stupid or something. It makes me SO mad! I get fired and it’s so unfair. They just don’t get it.

    I finally went to a doctor because it’s really causing a problem for me to keep losing my job. The doctor sent me to a therapist and this week I met with him for the sixth time. It’s actually been pretty amazing. The doc says we’re doing something called ‘Systematic Desensitization’. At first, he would just sit in the room with me with a pen on the desk. After awhile, I relaxed and it was Okay. It was exciting this last time because I actually held the pen in my hand for a short while and didn’t feel like sweating or nervous or sick to my stomach at all! He said in the next few sessions, we’ll work on writing and then using a pen in different settings. I can’t believe how much progress I’m making!

    Choice 2: Brochure Art

    This is a good assignment for the artistic person! You will create a brochure that will have at least 4 pages. Each page will be an illness from one of the 4 different categories of mental illness. For instance, one page would be devoted to a mood disorder, specifically depression. Another page would be about a personality disorder and you chose to do avoidance personality disorder, etc. On the page you will draw a picture or make a collage that describes the disorder and label the disorder and category. Include a brief statement about the disorder and the therapies for that disorder.

    You will need to put effort, time, creativity and some skill into this activity. If you aren’t someone who likes to do artwork, then don’t do this assignment. You can make a digital photo of your artwork and e-mail it to me or send me the original. IF YOU WOULD like your artwork returned, PEASE send a self-addressed stamped envelope with your art so I can return it to you. Remember that your ark needs to reflect some knowledge of the psychological disorder. You will also need to give me some ‘tips’ on interpreting the art on the back. If you want a higher score, you will need to be extra creative and detailed!

    Choice 3: Diagram (Mind Map)
    This assignment choice is to create a diagram or flow chart that will show the following:

    1. The 4 different categories of psychological disorders.
    2. The specific disorders that fall under that category, with a list of a few of the symptoms for each.
    3. How prevalent the disorder is (percentage of the population with this disorder)
    4. Therapeutic treatments for each disorder that is used
    5. Your experience with this disorder. Have you known someone with this disorder? How did you feel about it? What was it like to you?

    07.01 Respect for Authority

    The word "respect" came from roots that meant something like 'to look at again'. The way we use it now is related to the ideas of courtesy, deference, obedience, and thoughtfulness for the feelings of others. When we respect others, we treat them as they would like to be treated. Everyone deserves this kind of respect (well, OK, there are probably some exceptions, but for the most part, this is true).

    People have formalized respect in various circumstances, and this is done differently in different cultures. For example, one might kneel to show respect for God, or bow one's head to pray. In the military, soldiers salute to show respect, and stand at attention when a higher-ranked officer enters the room. In some countries, it may be customary to bow when meeting someone new, or as a sign of respect for a king or head of state. In Japan, where art is held in high regard, people who are just walking down the street and recognize a famous artist may bow to the artist. In some cultures, women are expected to walk behind men as a sign of respect. Addressing heads of state as 'Your Highness' or 'Your Excellency' (or, when a child, addressing adults as Mr. or Mrs.) is a tradition of formal respect.

    In the United States, most of these formal shows of respect have been toned down. Partly, this was a deliberate decision by some of our Founding Fathers because they were rebelling against the traditional authority of the English king. George Washington, our first president, refused to be called "Your Majesty" or any such thing. He insisted that people address him as "Mr. President", and that became tradition. Likewise, these early Americans decided against bowing to our leaders or kneeling before them (for some people, this was a religious issue-- they didn't feel it was appropriate to show that much respect to anyone but God).

    In the years since the founding of the United States, we have become less and less formal (although there are some areas in the South where children may still be brought up to say "yes, sir" or "yes, ma'am" to adults). The counter-culture of the 1960's glorified the idea of rebelling against authority, and Americans tend to pride themselves on their independence. However, don't extend that philosophy into your workplace!

    Most businesses are organized as a hierarchy. At the top is a company president or board of directors or CEO: the 'big boss'. Under him or her are mid-level managers, and then maybe office or project managers, and then the 'workers'. (One of the main objects of Communism was to try to get rid of this hierarchy, but that didn't work out so well) When you get your first job (and probably your second, third and fourth jobs), you can expect to be at the bottom of this 'pecking order'. Both for the sake of getting things done efficiently, and for the sake of keeping your job, you need to show respect for the people who have authority over you.

    Respect for authority generally includes cheerful obedience to whatever your boss tells you to do. Now, in the ideal world, all your bosses would be intelligent, kind, hard-working, nice, and always right. In the real world, you probably won't be so lucky. You will likely find that you sometimes have to work with or for people who are not particularly good at their jobs and/or at getting along with other people. Get over it. If you can afford to quit your job and look for another one, that's fine. If you are going to stay on the job, show respect for others even if you feel they aren't respecting you. You will be better off, and those around you will, too.

    (NOTE: Of course, if you are asked to do something dangerous or unethical, you should NOT do it. Leave the situation as soon as possible, and think carefully about who you can ask for help so that it won't happen again.)

    07.01 Rigid Motion in a Plane (Geometry)

    teacher-scored 29 points possible 40 minutes

    Read Section 7.1

    Vocabulary
    1. image
    2. preimage
    3. transformation
    4. isometry

    pgs. 399- 402 (2 - 38 even, 43)

    Journal Entry
    Can a point or a line segment be its own preimage? Explain and illustrate your answer.

    07.01 Salad Prep (F&N2Q2)

    07.01 Salad Prep(F&N2Q2)

    Lesson 7.1: Salad Preparation

    Unit 7 is going to be an hands-on unit in which you will be having lots of cooking experiences. Part of the Utah State core curriculum for the Food & Nutrition II class requires that students have specific cooking experiences involving different kinds of salads, soups, casseroles, yeast breads, meats, and pastries. So- wash your hands and be ready to get cooking because all of the assignments for this unit are going to involve hands-on cooking experiences. Feel free to look ahead and if there are multiple things you can make for one eating experience, that would be fine. We'll start with salads first.

    There are four main types of salads:
    1. Appetizer - For a starter to stimulate the appetite, and it is served at the beginning of the meal. Make it with crisp greens, fruit or raw vegetables, and keep the servings small.
    2. Accompaniment - Served with main the course of the meal either on dinner or salad plate. This salad should contrast pleasantly with the rest of the meal in color, flavor, and texture. Use crisp greens, fruits, or vegetables whether raw or cooked.
    3. Main Dish - Must be substantial and satisfying. Make it with meat, fish, eggs, poultry, vegetables, fruit or a combination of fruit and cheese. This is served in meal-sized portions and often served hot.
    4. Dessert - This may be a sweetened, molded or frozen salad made of fruit gelatin or fruit mixture. Whipped cream is usually added to the dressing. This salad furnishes the meal with a color, flavor and texture treat. Nutrients in a Salad Luscious looking salads are fun to create and a delight to eat.

    Watch your meals take on a new sparkle when you serve salads. They are always so colorful looking. You can use raw foods, simple foods and even leftovers to make them. Minerals and vitamins come made to order in the fresh fruits and vegetables found in salads. Salads provide plenty of bulk or roughage (fiber) to aid good digestion and elimination. This regularity will help you grow stronger and more healthy and beautiful. The main course salads of eggs, fish, meat, poultry and cheese serve as body builders and provide protein for the body. Pasta and potatoes provide carbohydrates.

    Principles of Salad Making
    1. Place on a chilled plate or dish at least 5 hours before serving.
    2. Prepare salad dressing 2 to 3 hours and chill.
    3. Make just before eating.
    4. Choose fresh and good quality produce.
    5. Salads should look neat, but not labored over.
    6. Handle greens as little as possible.
    7. Avoid too much dressing.
    8. Do not put the dressing on or salt salad until just before serving.
    9. Break or tear into bite-size pieces.
    10. Use no more than 3 -4 ingredients.
    11. Ingredients should be well-drained.
    12. Combine crisp with soft ingredients for contrast in texture.
    13. Toss with a fork to give the tossed rather than smashed appearance.
    14. Serve immediately.

    CARE FOR SALAD GREENS IN THE FOLLOWING WAY
    1. Crisp up greens by placing in ice water for a few hours before serving.
    2. Drain thoroughly before serving.
    3. Greens may be broken or shredded according to the purpose.
    4. Do not overhandle or greens become bruised and wilted.
    5. Store in a plastic. Do not wash until your ready to use it as the greens might rust.
    6. Never freeze. SALAD GREENS Lettuce is the most popular salad plant grown in the Nation.

    Four types are generally sold: Iceberg, Butterhead, Romaine, and Leaf.
    Iceberg - lettuce is by far the major type. Heads are large, round and solid, with outer leaves medium-green. Inner leaves are a lighter green.
    Butterhead - lettuce, including the Big Boston and Bibb varieties is a smaller head than Iceberg. It is slightly flat on top and has a soft, tender, pale inner leaves that feel oily or buttery.
    Romaine - lettuce plants are tall and cylindrical with crisp, folded, darkgreen leaves. It is famous for it use in Caesar Salad.
    Leaf - lettuce has broad, tender succulent, fairly smooth leaves that vary in color depending on variety.

    It is the most common, home garden variety. Grown mainly in greenhouses or on track farms for local sale, leaf lettuce is very delicate and usually not suitable for long distance shipping. The leaves of Iceberg lettuce and Romaine should be crisp. Other types of lettuce have a softer texture, but the leaves should not be wilted. Look for good, bright color the shade of green varies with variety. Heads of Iceberg lettuce that are very hard and lack green color are overmature. They may have a less attractive flavor. Heads of irregular shape or with hard lumps on the top may have overgrown central stems, causing excessive waste and a slightly bitter flavor. Check the lettuce for tan or brown areas on the edge of the leaves. Slight discoloration of the outer or wrapper leaves usually will not hurt the lettuce quality. All salad greens should look fresh and crisp.

    Other greens used in salad-making:
    Endive - narrower, crinkly leaves with notched edges.
    Chinese cabbage - is an elongated plant resembling celery.

    Some of the varieties develop a firm stalk, while others have an open, leafy form.

    Watercress - is a small, round-leaved plant that grows naturally along the banks of a freshwater streak or ponds. It spicy flavor make it a favorite for use as a garnish or in mixed green salads.
    Spinach - is often used in salad raw.

    (Select the link "Salads") and read the information. For more information about individual fruits and vegetables, (Select the link "Fruits/Vegetable Dictionary") and research individual fruits or vegetables there. After covering all of the information for this lesson, go to the assignment area and complete the corresponding assignment.

    07.01 Setting in narrative (English 9)

    Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

    T. Imai image, Wikimedia Commons, public domain (copyright expired)T. Imai image, Wikimedia Commons, public domain (copyright expired)

    Any story or event happens someWHERE and someTIME. The where and when of narrative are called the setting. Many folk or fairy tales begin with some variation of "Once upon a time, in a land far away..." This helps set up the expectation that what happens in the story may be quite different from real life in the present day. On the other hand, if a story begins with Nathan's mother driving him to school in the morning, the reader will expect story events to be the sorts of things that might really happen.

    In a few cases, an author may choose to start a book or chapter with a heading like "Moscow, March 14th, 09:40," but in most cases, the exact time and place will not be explicitly stated. In much fiction, the place is at least partially invented, anyway. The exact place and time may not be that important to the story. However, what the author shows (or chooses not to show) about the setting can have a big impact on the tone of a narrative, and may contribute to either suspense or surprise--sort of like the soundtrack of a movie may prepare you for something frightening, or lull you into thinking everything is safe.


    Darkness, bad weather, isolation, old buildings, and rugged terrain (especially in combination) can all contribute to an ominous tone. Light, pleasant weather, beautiful scenery, and familiar or well-kept buildings or landscapes tend to contribute to a peaceful, safe tone. On the other hand, with just a couple of word choices (such as "seemed"), an author can reverse our expectations. Many accounts of the events of September 11th, 2001 include a description of how that day started out as a sunny, beautiful morning in New York.

    In stories of outdoor adventures or survival, the setting may be almost like a character in the narrative, as the protagonist must struggle against the forces of nature, a mountain, or the ocean. In narratives set in a different culture or time period, details of the setting help us imagine a life we haven't experienced. Most of us, though, don't want to read through long descriptions, so a skillful writer slips details of the setting into the action and dialogue, and selects which details are important enough to include. As readers, we can often infer important information from characters' interactions with elements of the setting. As you read, use details of the setting to help you imagine what it looks like, and what the characters see, hear, smell, taste or feel. As you read "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight," notice how the setting contributes to the sense of supernatural threat and mystery.

    07.01 Similarity and Dilations (Math Level 2)

    Solve problems concerning dilations. Answer questions about similar polygons.

    The material for this lesson is taken from:

    ©CK-12 Foundation Licensed under Terms of UseAttribution

    A transformation is an operation that moves, flips, or changes a figure to create a new figure. Transformations that preserve size are rigid and ones that do not are non-rigid. A dilation makes a figure larger or smaller, but has the same shape as the original. In other words, the dilation is similar to the original. All dilations have a center and a scale factor. The center is the point of reference for the dilation like the vanishing point in a perspective drawing and scale factor tells us how much the figure stretches or shrinks. A scale factor is typically labeled k and is always greater than zero. Also, if the original figure is labeled A, for example, the dilation would be A'. The ‘ indicates that it is a copy. This tic mark is said “prime,” so A’ is read “A prime.” A second dilation would be A’’, read “A double-prime.”

    If the dilated image is smaller than the original, then the scale factor is 0 < k < 1.

    If the dilated image is larger than the original, then the scale factor is k > 1.

    Example A

    The center of dilation is P and the scale factor is 3. Find Q’.

    If the scale factor is 3 and Q is 6 units away from P, then Q’ is going to be 6 x 3 = 18 units away from P. Because we are only dilating a point, the dilation will be collinear with the original and center.

    Example B

    Using the picture above, change the scale factor to \frac{1}{3} . Find Q’’.

    Now the scale factor is \frac{1}{3}, so Q’’ is going to be  the distance away from P as Q is. In other words, Q’’ is going to be 6\cdot \frac{1}{3}=2 units away from P. Q’’ will also be collinear with Q and center.

    Example C

    KLMN is a rectangle with length 12 and width 8. If the center of dilation is K with a scale factor of 2, draw K’L’M’N’.  

    End of lesson.

    In summary, to dilate a figure, you multiply it's measurements by the scale factor. If you have the coordinates of the vertices, to find a dilation, you multiply both the x and y value of the coordinats by the scale factor.

    SIMLIARITY

    Just like congruence, similarity is a technical term. Two figures are similar if corresponding angles are congruent, and the lengths of corresponding sides have the same ratio. Does this sound like the result of a dilation? When we dilate a figure, the angles do not change, and all the sides are scaled by the same factor. So, yes, a dilation will produce a new figure that is, by definition, similar to the original figure.

    Consider this example:

    Figure ABCD \sim A'B'C'D' The symbol \sim states that figures are similar. This means the corresponding angles are congruent and the corresponding sides have the same ratio.

    \angle A = \angle A', \angle B = \angle B', \angle C = \angle C' and \angle D = \angle D'

    \frac{A'B'}{AB}=\frac{B'C'}{BC}=\frac{C'D'}{CD}=\frac{A'D'}{AD}

    Therefore, if we use rigid motions and a dilation to make two figures coincide, then these figures are similar. Again, let's look at a few examples.

     

     

    The turquoise figure looks like it may be similar to the blue figure, so start by rotating the turquoise figure so that the long sides are parallel.

     

     

    That looks very promising. Move the blue figure so that the bottom left vertices of each figure align. Now draw the lines connecting corresponding vertices.

     

     

    The lines all go through the bottom left vertex. Good sign. The bases are collinear and so are the left sides. In addition, by construction, we can prove that the remaining corresponding line segments are parallel. These are the properties of a dilation, so without actually measuring the ratio of the segments, we can prove that the figures are similar. Yeah! Okay, I said "by construction." How do you prove lines are parallel by construction? Remember how to construct parallel lines? We are given lines a and b and I want to prove that line a is parallel to line b. Start by constructing line c parallel to a, through a point on line b. If line c is collinear to line b, then line b must be parallel to line a. I will use the lines through the vertices, since I already drew them.

     

     

    All lines I constructed are parallel to the sides of the blue figure through points on the turquoise figure and are collinear with the turquoise figure; Therefore, these figures are similar. Disproving similarity is a bit easier. Consider the following.

     

     

    Start by rotating the red pentagon so that the base of the red pentagon aligns with the base of the magenta pentagon.

     

     

    So, none of these look right to me. Let's try reflecting each of these across the perpendicular bisector of the base segment.

     

     

    Number 3 looks good. We got here by rotating the original figure by more than three fifths of a circle, then reflecting it across the perpendicular bisector of the new base. There is a single axis of reflection which will result in the same image, but we are not going to look for it.

     

     

    Next, translate the red figure so that it is inside of the magenta figure and bottom left vertices align.

     

     

    At this point, it should be obvious these figures are not similar. However, let's finish the "proof." Next draw the lines connecting the vertices. These should all go through the bottom left vertex.

     

    These lines do not; Therefore, the red figure cannot be similar to the magenta figure. Are you ready to try this on your own?
     

    Click on the link below and watch the video.

    07.01 Solving two-step equations and inequalities (PreAlgebra)

    Working with Equations and Inequalties
    Some problems are solved forwards, and some give the result and the original beginning has to be solved. Thus it is necessary to reverse the project.

    Solving Equations that Require Two-Steps

    Dave is building a corral for his horses. It will take 200 feet of fencing material. In addition to the 200 feet of material he can use a the wall of 60 foot barn for one side of the corral. What are the dimension of his corral

    200 feet + 60 feet = 260 feet is to total for all the corral. Now, if one wall is 60 feet and that is equal to one side, then the following equation can be used:

    2L + 2W = Perimeter

    2(60) + 2W = 260
    120 + 2w = 260
    -120 -120
    2w = 140
    w = 70

    Therefore the dimension are 60 x 70 feet.

    This type of an equation is an example of a two step equation.

    Writing Two Step Equations
    Bryce decided that he just couldn't fix the old truck anymore by himself. He called a local repairman to see how much the labor would be to make the necessary repairs. The repairman quoted that since the truck was in such a sad state of repair that to just look at it was $30 and that after that, each additional would be charged at $35 an hour. Bryce knew that this was a pretty good deal and that he still had a limited amount of cash for this repair. He had saved up $350 dollars for the labor alone. How many hours of labor did this provide for.

    Initial cost = $30
    each additional hourly rate = $35
    Total amount that can be spent = $350

    35h = how much of the total on hourly rate

    equation = 30 + 35h = 350
    subtract 30 from each side
    35h = 320
    h = 9.14 hours
    The shop said the work could be completed in less time thus saving him money.

    Solving Equations with Variables on Both Sides of the Equation

    Solving equations with variables on both sides of the equation requires a couple of extra steps but the concept is the same.

    Example:

    Solve 8x - 3 = 1 + 6x

    Multi-Step Equations

    Some equations will require several steps in order to accomplish the solution. These steps are ones that we have used up to this point.

    Writing Inequalties

    This section will help you in the writing of inequalities such as listed below.

    Dave earns $10 an hour at his extra job. He also receives a $10 bonus each time he works. He wants to earn at least $110. How many hours will have to work?

    07.01 Study Sheet: Introducing Yourself(German1)

    Lernziel 2.7.1 Study Sheet: Introducing Yourself


    Introducing Yourself auf Deutsch
    Deutsch English
    Wie heißen Sie? What is your name?
    Ich heiße… My name is…
    Wie ist Ihr Name? What is your name?
    Mein Name ist... My name is...
    Wer sind Sie? Who are you?
    Ich bin... I am...
    Woher kommen Sie? Where do you come from?
    Wo kommen Sie her? Where do you come from?
    Ich komme aus Florida. I am from Florida.
    Ich bin aus Utah. I am from Utah.
    Ich wohne in Toole, Utah. I live in Toole, Utah.
    Ich gehe an Jordan High School. I go to Jordan High School.
    Ich bin Schüler(Schülerin) bei Clearfield High School. I am a student (female student) at Clearfield High School.
    Ich bin siebzehn Jahre alt. I am seventeen years old.
    Ich bin siebzehn. I am seventeen.


    To print out a copy of this to study click on the link for the pdf at the top.

    07.01 Surface Textures (Navajo)

    On the right hand side of the class you will find the PowerPoint slides for Unit 7.

    07.01 The Atomic Theatre(Chemistry2)

    teacher-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

    20 Points

    How are electrons placed around the nucleus?

    07.01 The New South

    07.01 The writing process and the six-trait system of evaluating writing (English 9)

    The Writing Process

    Here is a brief summary of the "writing process". View the PDF for more information.
    The writing process begins with prewriting. This can include brainstorming, researching, outlining, and any other way of getting ideas and planning what you want to write.
    The next step is often called drafting or composing. This is the part where you are actually writing, whether it is with pencil and paper, or on a computer.
    Once you have gotten your writing "on paper" (or on screen), it is time for revising. This is the step most people are tempted to skip, but the one many professional writers spend the most time on. You try different ways of organizing your ideas, changing the order, adding details, cutting out what doesn't belong, improving word choice and sentence fluency, all to make your writing as powerful, clear and effective as possible.
    After you are happy with the content of your writing and how you have put it together, the next step is editing. This is when you proofread and fix any conventions errors.
    The next step is publishing, or sharing, your writing so others can read it.

    The Six-Trait Writing System

    Below is a very brief review of the six traits, the way your writing will be evaluated and scored. For more information, download the PowerPoint or PDF about the six traits, and see the link below.

    1. Ideas & content - are the ideas well-developed, with supporting details that are specific and concrete?
    [Instead of "Our kitchen is a wonderful place", which is general and abstract, write something like:
    - "The stained linoleum is curling up at the edges, and the cupboards need to be re-finished where my brother and I carved our initials the year I was ten, but the old stove always has a pot of chili simmering on top, or a sheet of oatmeal cookies baking in the oven."
    or -
    "When I get home from school, I can pop a frozen cheese pizza into the oven. I'd better remember to wipe up any crumbs, because my mom is really proud of the shiny new black granite countertop."]

    2. Organization - are the ideas in some kind of logical order? Does the order help you to understand the ideas, or does it just seem random? Check out the beginning - does the introduction help set up your expectations for the rest of the piece, and/or grab your attention? How about the end - does it just stop, or is there a sense of conclusion?

    3. Voice - Does the writer's personality come through? Writing without voice seems generic, as if any stereotypical teenager could have written it, and flat, as if it might have been generated by a committee or a machine (or a textbook company!).

    4. Sentence fluency - do the sentences flow smoothly if you read it out loud? are they easy to follow and understand? Good writing includes sentences of varying length and construction. Common faults include short, choppy sentences; sentences that are so long and convoluted they are hard to understand; and non-sentences (fragments or run-ons).

    5. Word choice - This is related to both voice and ideas. Are the words and vocabulary the best ones for the job? Nouns should be specific and concrete; verbs should be active and vivid. Generally, it's better to say "poodle" or "German shorthair" than "dog"; better to say "Honda Civic" or "Porsche" than "car"; better to say "waddled" or "leaped" or "slithered" than "went". Words should also be used accurately and precisely.

    6. Conventions - Correct spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, etc.

    07.01 Tower Activity

    In Computer Science, a search algorithm is a way of finding a particular item among a collection of items.  The items may be sorted as records in a database, or just a list of random values.  There are many different searching ways (or algorithms) to search for an item.  Today we will discuss two of them: linear search and binary search.

    Linear Search

    The linear search is a way of finding an item in a list.  The algorithm for this is to start at the beginning of your list, look at each item until you find it or there is no more data.  The elements in the list do not need to be in any particular order, the algorithm will still work.  An example of this would be trying to find a green M & M in a bag.  You would pull one out and look at it, if it were green, you would have found your search item.  If not, you would pull another one out until you found the green M & M in the bag.

    Binary Search

    In a binary search, you must start with a list that is sorted.  Look at the middle item and eliminate the half where the value is not located.  Find the new middle element and continue this process until you find it, or there is no more data in your list.

    If you were to play a number guessing game to guess a number between 1 and 100, you would do this inherently.  You would guess 50 first as it is right in the middle.  If they told you that the number was too high, you would not guess higher than 50.  You would eliminate that portion of the list and guess 25.  

    In this next assignment, you are going to discover the efficiency of the two algorithms completing the Tower Building activity.

     

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

    Upload the completed Tower Building Activity.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


    07.01 Unit 7 assignments (Business Law)

    teacher-scored 30 points possible 60 minutes

    A. UNIFORM COMMERCIAL CODE – UCC Click on the following link that explains the Uniform Commercial Code and respond to the questions below.

    1. What is the UCC?
    2. Why did the government see a need for the UCC?
    3. What issues are addressed in the UCC?

    B. WARRANTIES -- Click on the following link and then locate responses to the questions regarding warranties.

    1. What is an expressed warranty?
    2. How is an implied warranty different from an expressed warranty?
    3. Give an example of items you have purchased that had an expressed warranty? How about an example of an item you have purchased with an implied warranty?

    C. SHOPPING SAFELY ON THE INTERNET

    Review the following rules for safe Internet shopping. Then read the following scenarios and rewrite the steps that should have been taken to complete the following transactions.

    • Shop with companies you know.
    • Keep your password private.
    • Pay by credit or charge card.
    • Keep a record.
    a. Jim, who was marrying Carolyn, wanted to book a four-day Caribbean cruise for their honeymoon. He performed an online search for Caribbean cruises and found a cruise that suited his budget with a cruise line whose name sounded vaguely familiar. When logging on for more information, he gave the password of “Jim” (that way, he wouldn’t forget) and booked the cruise by using his MasterCard. When he received his e-mail confirmation, he printed a copy. What should Jim have done differently?
    b. Edith was a health fanatic and frequently went online to get information and to buy videos, books, and exercise equipment. While visiting her favorite workout Web site, she saw an advertising pop-up for an intriguing piece of equipment to firm up abdominal muscles and reduce waist size. She clicked on the ad, read about the equipment, and decided to buy it, even though it cost $500. Edith had never heard of the maker or e-retailer, but she assumed that it was a legitimate company or her favorite Web site wouldn’t be displaying its ads. She used her credit card to make the purchase and didn’t bother with printing out or writing down any of the purchase order information. She began to worry when a confirmation e-mail never arrived, and she couldn’t find the advertiser at the workout Web site a week later. What should Edith have done differently?
    c. List 6 products that you have purchased in the last year.

    D. TITLE

    Go to the title URL and select the link to Article 2: Sales. Scroll down under the heading, "PART 4. TITLE, CREDITORS AND GOOD FAITH PURCHASERS," and click on § 2–401, which is titled, “Passing of Title; Reservation of Security; Limited Application of This Section.” Based on the provisions of UCC 2–401, determine when title passes to the buyer in the following hypothetical situations…

    1. The Dodge’em Company (a manufacturer of fine automobiles) contracts with the Goodtire Company to ship 5,000 tires to its manufacturing plant. The contract explicitly states that title to the tires passes to Dodge’em as soon as the contractual terms are agreed upon and both parties have signed the agreement. If the tires are accidentally destroyed on the way to Dodge’em after the parties have signed the agreement, who owned the tires when they were destroyed?
    2. Now assume that there were no explicit terms in the Dodge’em-Goodtire contract as to when title would pass. Who owned the tires when they were destroyed?

    E. GOODS & SERVICES

    1. Explain the difference between goods and services.
    2. List two examples of each that you have consumed in the last two weeks.
    3. Click on the following link and take the goods/services quiz.

    07.01 Unit 7 assignments links (Business Law)

    07.01 Unit 7 Learning Log (Horse Mgt)

    teacher-scored 25 points possible 60 minutes

    Unit 7 Learning log

    As you read all information for this unit, keep a double-entry learning log (topics: at least cover

    * causes, types and treatment for injuries;
    * infectious diseases;
    * non-infectious diseases & colic;
    * metabolic disorders;
    * internal and external parasites and their prevention and treatment)

    Include in your log the title and author of the books you use, and the url of websites you use (you don't need to give the url of this course when you are using the course material that is part of the course). Remember each learning log should include notes from at least three different sources.

    Draw a vertical line from the top of your paper to the bottom, just left of the middle of the page. In the lefthand column, make brief notes of important facts and ideas from your reading. In the righthand column, note your responses, for instance: what personal experiences does this remind you of? what questions do you have? how could you apply this in real life? why do you agree or disagree? what connections do you see to other topics?

    The learning log for each unit should include notes on all the main topics in the unit, and should cover your reading from at least three sources: the on-line course material, and at least two other sources.

    This may be hand-written or typed.

    It is due at the end of the unit, when you take the quiz. Keep the original for your own notebook, and mail me a photocopy.

    Your log should be at least four pages in length and show personal thought and response as well as summaries of material.

    07.01 Unit 7 presentation (Fitness for Life)

    Oliver Dixon CC-BY-SA-2.0, via Wikimedia CommonsOliver Dixon CC-BY-SA-2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Watch the unit 7 presentation (PowerPoint version attached above). If you have trouble downloading the PPTX file, right-click the file and tell it to download to your local computer and open it that way.

    If you have the optional textbook, read chapters 5, 8 and 9.

    07.01 Unit 7 Presentation and reading (Fitness for Life)

    Read chapters 5, 8, and 9 in your text book, and watch the unit 7 presentation.

    Go to the External URL of this section to view the powerpoint.

    07.01 Unit 7: Nervous System overview (MAP)

    View the unit 7 overview slide show movie, and study lecture notes and all attachments.

    07.01 UNIT SEVEN - HUMAN REPRODUCTION

    (This site has a great visual graph of the percentages)

    07.01 Vocabulary Activities (English 11)

    Students will learn 30 new vocabulary words and be able to use them daily in their writing and speaking

    Waterlilies: Claude Monet, 1908, public domain via Wikimedia CommonsWaterlilies: Claude Monet, 1908, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

    The vocabulary section of this quarter is divided into three sections, each with ten words. You will do a writing activity and a quiz for each of the word sets. You do not have to complete them all at once (like everything in this course, you can decide the pace and order in which you work).

    Why Study Vocabulary? (from verbalworkout.com)

    Words are the tools we use to think and communicate. And this in an age when thinking and communicating are more important than strength and dexterity. At a personal level, a versatile vocabulary helps a man to woo a woman. It helps us to heed the philosophers’ advice to lead a “considered life.”

    Materially, a large vocabulary helps an artist describe the right shade of blue. It helps a student understand the textbook, and helps a leader manipulate concepts to formulate and share a vision.

    In the words of Sebastian Wren, imagine if your reading required understanding this passage of text: While hortenting efrades the populace of the vaderbee class, most experts concur that a scrivant rarely endeavors to decry the ambitions and shifferings of the moulant class. Deciding whether to oxant the blatantly maligned Secting party, most moulants will tolerate the subjugation of staits, savats, or tempets only so long as the scrivant pays tribute to the derivan, either through preem or exaltation.

    In addition, your vocabulary makes an early impression. People judge you by the words you use and understand. It's no surprise that an extensive vocabulary is highly correlated with academic and professional success.

    07.01 Vocabulary Set 1 (English 11)

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

    Vocabulary Assignment 

    Personally, when I need to find a definition for a word, I first look to a thesaurus. Sometimes dictionaries are hard to understand and a single word of the same meaning is sometimes more helpful to develop understanding of a new word. Feel free to use whatever resources you find most helpful. For each set of words you will complete an activity and a quiz. There will be vocabulary questions on the final test as well.

    Copy and paste the material between the asterisk lines into a word-processing document. Complete the requirements for the assignment, then copy and paste it back into the submission box.

    *************************************************************************************************************

    1856 U.S. political cartoon: Louis Maurer and Nathaniel Currier, public domain via Wikimedia Commons1856 U.S. political cartoon: Louis Maurer and Nathaniel Currier, public domain via Wikimedia Commons

    Vocabulary Set 1

    1. augment
    2. bereft
    3. dour
    4. guise
    5. insidious
    6. opulent
    7. reiterate
    8. stolid
    9. unkempt
    10. warily

    Set 1 Activity (10 Points): Find a synonym for each of the above words. The assignment should include both the vocabulary word and its synonym, along with a brief explanation of how the connotations of the two words differ.

    *********************************************************************************************************************

    Assignment Example

    1. happy= jovial

     Happy is a more general word. Jovial is most often used about extroverted adults, especially large or authoritative men, and suggests laughing (outward appearance of happiness) rather than a feeling.

    Scoring Rubric

    5 points= correct synonym for each vocabulary word (1/2 point each)

    3 points= followed the directions and included both the vocabulary word,  synonym and explanation of the difference 

    2 points = spelling errors are non-existent

    10 points total

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


    07.01 World War II vocabulary to study for quizzes. (US History)

    Study the following vocabulary and terms before you take each quiz:

    Adolf Hitler, circa 1933: Bundesarchiv, Bild 146-1990-048-29A / CC-BY-SAAdolf Hitler, circa 1933: Bundesarchiv, Bild 146-1990-048-29A / CC-BY-SA

    Quiz 3: Diplomacy during the Inter-war time period vocabulary list.
    Hawley-Smoot Tariff, high tariffs, Kellog-Briand Pact of 1928, Latin American policies, Lend-Lease program,
    Neutrality Acts of 1935-1937, German persecution of Jews, Occupation of manchuria in 1931, Spanish Civil War,
    Benito Mussolini, British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain, Warren Harding, Calvin Coolidge,

    Quiz 4: Causes of World War II vocabulary list.
    Totalitarianism, Joseph Stalin, Benito Mussolini, fascism, Adolph Hitler,
    Nazism, Spanish Civil War, communism, Francisco Franco, Neville Chamberlain,
    Blitzkrieg, nonaggression pact, Winston Churchill, Charles de Gaulle,
    isolationism, Neutrality Acts, Pearl Harbor, Atlantic Charter, Axis Powers,
    Allies, Lend-Lease Act

    Quiz 5: Major campaigns of the United States in the European and Pacific theaters vocabulary list.
    Tuskegee Airmen, Congress of Racial Equality, James Farmer, Zoot Suit riots,
    internment camps, Nisei, women during WW II, Rosie the Riveter,
    Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAACs/WACs), Selective Service System,
    production increases, A. Philip Randolph, Office of Price Administration,
    War Production Board, rationing, minorities during WW II

    Quiz 6: American mobilization for war and the home front.
    Holocaust, "Final Solution", concentration camps, death marches, Auschwitz,
    civilian targets, civilian bombing, cavalry, tanks, gas masks, kamikaze, Manhattan Project, atomic bomb,
    Hiroshima, Nagasaki, Harry Truman, Robert Oppenheimer

    Quiz 7: World War II Terms, people, battles vocabulary list.
    Europen battles, merchant ships, largest land-sea-air operation in history, Battle of the Bulge,
    Battle of Stalingrad, battles of the Coral Sea and Midway, Philippine Islands, island hopping, Pacific Theater of Operatons,
    military leaders in the war in the Pacific (James Doolittle, Chester Nimitz, William Halsey, Douglas MacArthur),
    Sudatenland, Tripartite Pact, Iwo Jima, Battle of Stalingrad, Battle of the Atlantic Ocean, convoys and U-boats, D-Day,
    Battle of the Bulge, V-E Day, Battle of Midway, island hopping, bombing of Japan,
    Dwight D. Eisenhower, Omar Bradley, George Patton, Douglas McArthur, atomic bombs

    Quiz 8 Rules and Weapons Changes of WWII
    Atomic bomb, radar, kamakazes, submarines, dive bombers, The Batann, Auschwitz, Banzai attacks, Luftwaffe,
    Operation Barbarosa, J. Robert Oppenheimer, Panzer, island hopping, convoy system

    07.01.00 - Lesson 1: CLASSIFICATION & ANALYSIS

    You have now looked at two ways authors can organize informational text, process narration and cause and effect. As a writer, using an organizational strategy can help you get your ideas across clearly. As a reader, knowledge of organizational strategies can help you more easily analyze what an author is trying to say to you.

    A. In the next couple of lessons, we will look at an additional informational text structures—classification/analysis. Classification and Analysis writing--well it's pretty self-explanatory. But to get a clear picture of what you will be looking for in this type of writing, read the introduction at the link: “Classification and Analysis." As you read, think about what a classification and analysis type of organization is and why a writer would use it.

    Now that you have a good idea regarding the structure and purpose of classification/analysis writing, read the essay there, "The Geography of English 102."  As you read the essay, answer the questions within the asterisks.

    **********************

         1.  What are the main divisions into which the author divides students and what does she claim about the people in each of these divisions? (As you review these, ask yourself why the author chose to present the divisions in this particular order and evaluate the effectiveness of her choices.)

         2.  The author states that she has no "statistical analysis" to back up her claims, so what would you say the purpose of this essay was?  Give an example from the text that you think best represents this purpose.

    **********************

    B.  Next, list some other situations where you have observed people or their actions falling into distinct classifications. 

    C.  Finally, chose one of those situations and write an outline which shows how you might craft a classification/analysis essay on that topic. 

    Your outline should include:

    Thesis:  A statement explaining the claim you would like to make regarding this particular group of people or their actions.
    Supporting ideas:  One or two sentences per division which label the divisions and also the characteristics of the people in that division.

    07.01.00 - Lesson 1: FUTURE TRENDS

    For this lesson,I'd like you to become more educated about what experts predict awaits us in the future.

    The site, "bigthink," offers some predictions about what our world will look like in 2050. Read the article at the "bigthink” link. What are the future predictions you find most interesting/believable and why?

    07.01.00 - More About Functions (Math I)

    We have discussed how many of the problems we have considered in this class are functions. We have mentioned that functions are something that takes an “input” and gives an “output.” In quarter 1, we considered how most lines are functions. In the previous unit we considered how sequences are functions. Before extending the concept of sequences to continuous curves, we need to step back, and take a closer look at functions.

    You can download the attached file, or you can read the same content below.

    07.01.00 Chapter 7 Example (C++)

    After studying the example below, do the Chapter 7 Assignments 1 - 6 assignment below and submit it under topic 3.

    Example Instructions: Briefly describe what is meant by correct programming and its importance.

    Example Answer:
    Correct computer programming means that the programmer insures that the program will operate correctly as intended. The program should therefore produce correct output when the program specifications are met. Thus the programmer must use correct formulas, algorithms and standards to insure correct output. The program should also correctly address potential threats like:

    incorrect user input
    exceptions to general rules
    hacking attempts
    Errors like division by zero

    07.01.00 Introduction to Exponential and Logarithmic Functions (PreCalc)

    In Unit 04 we met Jamaica, who wanted to find out about student loans, and Antonio, who was practicing for the swim team.

    You may recall Jamaica wanted to know how long it would take her to repay her student loans, and how much money she would have to repay.




    Antonio noticed that initially he improved his lap time, but over time his improvements became less and less.



    Both of these students had problems that could be solved with exponential and logarithmic functions. There are many other problems that are also solved by using exponential and logarithmic functions.

    In this unit we will be learning more about this important family of functions.

    Download the attached file or read the same content below.



    07.01.00 Lesson One: Basic Geometric Concepts and Figures (Sec Dev Math)

    Points, lines, line segments, rays, and planes are the basic building blocks of geometry. From them we can build angles, triangles, and other geometric figures.

    The properties of angles allow us to classify them as acute, right, obtuse, straight, complementary, and supplementary.

    Triangles can be classified by their sides or by their angles: equilateral, isosceles, scalene, acute, right and obtuse.

    Finally, a long time ago, a Greek mathematician named Pythagoras discovered an interesting property about right triangles: the sum of the squares of the lengths of each of the triangle’s legs is the same as the square of the length of the triangle’s hypotenuse. This property—which has many applications in science, art, engineering, and architecture—is now called the Pythagorean Theorem. We will learn to use this valuable theorem to solve problems.




    In this lesson you will review theses basic geometric concepts and figures.

    IF you feel confident you have mastered these skills, skip to Quiz 18. Otherwise, work through the three topics that follow.



    07.01.00 More About Functions (Math I)

    Common Core Standards: F-IF.1, F-IF.2; Standards for Math Practice: 1-8

    We have discussed how many of the problems we have considered in this class are functions. We have mentioned that functions are something that takes an “input” and gives an “output.” In quarter 1, we considered how most lines are functions. In the previous unit we considered how sequences are functions. Before extending the concept of sequences to continuous curves, we need to step back, and take a closer look at functions.

    Please read the attached file.



    07.01.01

    07.01.01 - Definition (Geometry)

    Colloquially, we use the term similar to mean that two things are alike, but not identical. We can say that two siblings are similar, meaning not only that they look like each other, but also they may have ideas, attitudes and ways of speaking that are alike - not identical (even identical twins are not identical), but similar.




    In geometry, when we say that two things are similar we mean something much more specific.

    If two figures are similar, this means that every angle in one figure is congruent to the corresponding angle in the other figure and that the length of every side in one figure is PROPORTIONATE to the corresponding side in the other figure. Proportionate means that the ratio of corresponding sides is the same.

    When we look at similar figures, they have the same shape but different sizes.

    The symbol for similar is , which is like the symbol for congruence without the equal sign.

    Consider ΔABC and ΔDEF, shown here. ΔABC is similar to ΔDEF, so we write ΔABC ∼ ΔDEF. Just like in the case of congruence, the order of the letters matters. For example, it would not be correct to say that ΔABC is similar to ΔEFD.




    Because of the definition of similarity, the statement ΔABC ∼ ΔDEF means the following:

    ∠A ≅ ∠D

    ∠B ≅ ∠E

    ∠C ≅ ∠F

    :=:=:



    Alternately, we can say

    m∠A = m∠D

    m∠B = m∠E

    m∠C = m∠F



    Remember AB, BC, DE, etc., are the measures of the segments AB , BC , DE , etc., respectively. So, while we usually do not perform mathematical operations on the segments, we are free to perform mathematical operations on the measures.

    You may suspect that at this point we will start using numbers to refer to lengths.



    07.01.01 - Definitions of Functions (Math I)

    If you take a few minutes and look up the definition of a function online or in a math textbook or some other resource, you will probably find as many definitions as you find sources. Why? Good question. Some try to make the definition more precise, so that there is no ambiguity about what is meant by a function. Some try to make the definition more approachable, so that it is less scary to students. Some try to make the definition more useful. Why do you think that there are so many definitions of functions?

    Consider the following definitions:

    “A function is a relationship between input and output. In a function, the output depends on the input. There is exactly one output for each input.”

    That is more or less the definition that we have been using. It is fairly user-friendly. Is it adequate? Think about it for a second.

    Here are a few other definitions. As you read through these ask yourself these questions: What terms am I already familiar with? What terms are unfamiliar? What concepts or ideas are common in each definition? How are the definitions different?

    “A function is a relation in which each element of the domain is paired with exactly one element of the range.”

    “A function is a set of ordered pairs (or number pairs) that satisfies this condition: There are no two ordered pairs with the same input and different outputs.”

    “A real-valued function ƒ defined on a set D of real numbers is a rule that assigns to each number x in D exactly one real number, denoted by ƒ(x).”

    “A function is a rule that assigns to each element of a set A a unique element of set B (where B may or may not equal A).”

    “A function is a mapping or correspondence between one set called the domain and a second set called the range such that for every member of the domain there corresponds exactly one member in the range.”

    “One quantity, H, is a function of another, t, if each value of t has a unique value of H associated with it. We say H is the value of the function or the dependent variable, and t is the argument or independent variable. Alternatively, think of t as the input and H as the output.”

    Did you struggle with these at all? Let's look at some of the technical terms.

    The obvious term is “function.” This may be familiar, but the goal here is to get you to understand it better. Therefore, I am going to assume that you do not already have a deep understanding of this term.

    We have been using the terms input and output. You put something in; that is the input. You get something out; that is the output.

    We discussed domain and range earlier. The domain is the allowed values that the input can have. The range is the allowed values that the output can have. In the sequences we considered, the domain was the integers, or at least a sub-set of the integers. The range was the actual values of the terms of the sequence. In quarter 1 we looked at domains and ranges of various continuous and discrete, more or less linear problems.

    We used ordered pairs in quarter 1 as a way to represent a point on a graph. This definition implies that ordered pairs can be used to define functions. In this quarter, we have used ordered pairs to define functions, just not in the format (a, b). What format did we use instead?

    The term “real-valued” is probably unfamiliar. All of the number systems you have worked with up to this point fit into this category. The term real-valued is used to distinguish between these systems and the “imaginary” or “complex” system of numbers you will learn more about in later classes. While this term maybe unfamiliar, it merely describes the numbers you already know and use. These numbers are the “real numbers,” just in case you wanted to discuss that term as well.

    The next term that may be less familiar is the term “set.” A set is just a group of objects. These objects can be numbers, or cats, or math students. Mostly we will be interested in sets of numbers (the integers is one set of numbers). But that doesn't mean that functions are limited to numbers….

    The term “mapping” also may be unfamiliar. However, you have actually used mapping in a very real sense for most of your life. The maps that you use in geography and other classes are literally a “mapping” of the points on a spherical globe to points on a flat page. The UTM system you used in the geo-spatial assignment in quarter 1 is one way of mapping the globe to flat space. Clearly you can map points in space to other points in space. You can also map one set of numbers/objects to another set of numbers/objects.

    We have discussed dependent and independent variables in conjunction with making graphs. The dependent variable is the one that changes in response to the other variable. On a graph, this is usually put on the y-axis. The independent variable is the one that you change or that changes on its own. On a graph, this is usually put on the x-axis.

    Is it clear that the term “argument” is synonymous with independent variable?

    All right, those are the terms used to define functions. What about the meaning?

    Did you notice any concepts that showed up in all or most of these definitions?

    Each definition describes what a function is/does: It is a relationship between things. It is a relation that pairs things. It is a pair of things. It is a rule that assigns one thing to another thing. It is a mapping between things. It is a correspondence between things. It associates one thing to another thing.

    The order of these relationships, mappings, associations, etc. matters. Most of the definitions use words to denote which group of things is assigned to which other group of things.

    The members of the first group (that will be assigned to the other group) are called the input, the elements of the domain, the input of an ordered pair (the first term), the elements of the first set, the members of the domain, the arguments, or the independent variables.

    The members of the second group (that the first group are assigned to) are called the output, the elements of the range, the output of an ordered pair (the second term), the elements of the second set, the members of the range, value of the function, or the dependent variable.

    So far we have that a function puts together two groups in a specific order.

    Consider the phrase “exactly one.” This phrase showed up in four of the definitions. The remaining definitions incorporate the same idea, using different phrasing, such as “unique” and “no two … the same.”

    This concept applies to the relationship between the input and the output. For each input, there is exactly one output. For each element in the domain, there is exactly one element in the range. For each element of the first set, there is exactly one element in the second set. For each argument, there is exactly one value of the function. For each independent variable, there is exactly one dependent variable. The definition about the ordered pairs is interesting, in that instead of limiting the output, it limits the input. It says that each time the same input shows up, it has to have the same output. It is the same thing, but it is a different way of looking at it.

    I would argue that those are the main ideas. There are other ideas expressed in these definitions. Think about how the additional concepts refine the basic concepts we considered. How would you define a function?

    07.01.01 - Displacement (Physics)




    The first thing you need to figure out when playing outfield is: Where will the ball land? Then you can get your glove under that spot, and you'll be a hero. A lot is riding on the answer to that question.

    So, you need two bits of information: How far is the ball going to travel? and What direction is it going? You need both a magnitude and a direction! Sounds like you need a vector! (Don't panic! This just means that the direction is important. We will be using vectors extensively, so you will have a chance to get used to them.)


    Displacement is the vector that goes from the initial position, homeplate for example, to the current position, left field where you are standing. Since these are positions, we usually use xo or yo for initial position, and x or y for the current position. Also, we are looking for how the position has changed, so the displacement is denoted by Δx (or Δy) and is found with the equation:



    Notice these terms are bolded, indicating that they are vectors, and that we care about their direction.

    Displacement is a fundamental measurement, and its unit is the meter. x usually represents the horizontal direction while y usually represents the vertical direction. (However x and y as horizontal, and z as vertical or x and z as horizontal and y as vertical are used frequently.) The direction of displacement depends on the coordinate system, but is usually in the same as the direction as the motion. The magnitude of displacement is also called distance.



    07.01.01 - Male Reproductive System - Lesson 1

    The opposite sex is not opposite at all! Not only do both sexes develop from very similar structures, a pair of sex glands and two genital tubes, but both men and women manufacture the hormones of the other sex.

    1. PENIS: The male organ for sexual intercourse, reproduction, and urination. The reproductive purpose of the penis is to deposit semen in the vagina during sexual intercourse. The head of the penis or glans contains many nerve endings. At birth the glans is covered by a loosely fitting skin called the foreskin. Many adolescent males often wonder if their penis is too small or too large. When the penis is flacid it is 3-4" long and just under 1 inch in diameter. When the penis is erect it is 5-7 inches long and 1 1/2 inch in diameter. There is no relationship between the size of the penis and sexual functioning. It is common for many male teenagers to experience erections at different times. An erection occurs when the sponge-like chambers in the penis fill with blood. This may happen when a male is sexually aroused or at other times for no apparent reason. Sometimes a male may awaken in the morning with an erect penis and not feel sexually aroused. This may result from a full bladder, which stimulates nerves associated with the penis.
    2. SCROTUM: A sac-like pouch located behind the penis that holds each testicle and helps regulate temperature for sperm production.
    3. TESTICLES OR TESTES: The two testes are small organs, each about the size of a peach pit, that lie in the scrotum and produce sperm and the male hormone testosterone. The testicles are the male sex gland. One may hang slightly lower than the other because of the varying length of blood vessels. The testicles are outside the body because the male sperm that is manufactured in the testes need cooler-than-body temperature for normal growth and development. They are the counterpart to the female ovary. Each testicle is a complete sex gland. Loss of one does not impair the function of the other. Within each testicle there are many winding and tightly coiled tubules in which sperm are produced. If all the tubules in the man's testicle were laid end to end, they would reach for a half-mile. Four to five billion sperm cells are produced each month. Each testicle contains 300-600 tightly coiled tubules in which sperm are produced.
    4. TESTOSTERONE (TES-TOS-TER-OHN): the male reproductive hormone made by the testicles which causes the changes of puberty. (counterpart to female estrogen and progesterone) This hormone causes secondary sex characteristics, production of sperm, sexual urge. It is produced in the testicles and enters the bloodstream at a fairly constant rate.
    5. SPERM: the microscopic cells produced by the male's testicles which can fertilize the female's ovum. They are tiny, living cells 100 times smaller than a pencil dot. Enough sperm would fit on the head of a pin to re-populate the earth if each sperm fertilized an egg. Sperm is the male reproductive cell or seed (counterpart to female ovum). It is the smallest cell in the male body (while ovum is the largest cell in the female body). Each sperm carries half of the genetic material to produce a new human. It is produced constantly in the testicle--a seed factory. It is destroyed by warm body temperature, acid environment, and is built to self-destruct in the female body within five days. Any sperm not ejaculated are passed in the urine. Like the female eggs, cells mature when the females reach puberty; so does sperm production in the male begin when he reaches puberty. It takes about 64 days from the time sperm are first produced until they reach maturity.
    6. EPIDIDYMIS (EP-I-DID-I-MUS): the structure that forms a mass over the back and upper part of each testes. Contractions of the tubes inside the testes move the sperm into the epididymis. Sperm may be held for as long as six weeks while they ripen to maturity. Epididymitis is a painful condition caused by wearing pants too tight.
    7. VAS DEFERENS: two long, thin tubes that serve as a passageway for sperm and a place for sperm storage. The vas deferens are lined with cilia. The contraction of the vas deferens along with the action of the cilia help transport the sperm through the vas deferens.
    8. SEMINAL VESICLES: two small glands that secrete a fluid that nourishes and enables the sperm to move.
    9. PROSTATE GLAND: surround the urethra beneath the bladder. The gland secretes an alkaline fluid that neutralizes the acid found in the male urethra and the female reproductive tract. Without the action of the secretions of the prostate gland, many sperm would die and fertilization of an ovum would be impossible.
    10. COWPER'S GLAND: two small pea-sized glands located beneath the prostate gland on both sides of the base of the penis. They secrete a clear, sticky fluid that is alkaline to help neutralize the acidity of the urethra.
    11. URETHRA: a dual purpose tube that both semen and urine pass through to leave the body. Semen and urine never mix. Special muscles or sphincters surround the urethra. During urination, one sphincter will relax so that the pressure from the bladder will push urine out from the body. During ejaculation, another sphincter will relax so that semen can flow through the urethra to the outside of the body.
    12. OTHER RELATED CONCERNS

    13. CIRCUMCISION: a process that surgically removes the flap of skin that covers the glans of the penis. This is usually done a few hours or days after birth. It is commonly done for religious reasons or to make it easier to keep clean. It is not done to all males. Uncircumcised and circumcised penises look a little different, but function the same way.
    14. EJACULATION: the passage of sperm from the penis, a result of a series of muscular contractions.
    15. SEMEN: a combination of fluid that is produced in the seminal vesicles, prostate gland, and Cowper's gland. This fluid nourishes and helps sperm move through the urethra.
    16. NOCTURNAL EMISSION (WET DREAM): a normal, involuntary ejaculation of semen while a male is asleep.
    17. IMPOTENCE: the failure to get or maintain an erection. The reasons for impotence may be emotional or physical.
    18. VASECTOMY: surgical procedure for sterilization of the male. The vas deferens are severed or a portion is cut out to prevent sperm from entering the semen.

    (Assignment #195 & 196)

    07.01.01 Assignment 193

    teacher-scored 15 points possible 20 minutes

    ASSIGNMENTS START HERE:

    Assignment 193: Open the document entitled "Vocabulary Female Reproductive Terms,” and redefine the definitions in your own words.

    07.01.01 Assignment 7.1: Web Site Validity(Web Page Design)

    teacher-scored 60 points possible

    Assignment 7.1: Web Site Validity
    Find six web sights.
    Three sights that do not meet the Criteria and Three sights that do meet the Criteria.
    Send me the URL of each one of the sights.
    List the sites that do not meet the requirements and then list in a separate column the sites that do meet the requirements. Email to: kkendall21@yahoo.com or the digital drop box.
    Be sure that you put your name and assignment number on the assignment.

    07.01.01 Basic Exponential Functions (PreCalc)

    An exponential function is one of the form

    ƒ(x) = x


    Where >0, ≠1 . You can't have a negative value because, while (-2)2 and are defined, and are not. So, you can write out a function with x < 0, but it has a very limited domain, and is not considered an exponential function. Also, since 0x = 0 and 1x = 1 for all x, these are no different than ƒ(x) = 0 or ƒ(x) = 1, which are also not considered exponential functions.

    This looks similar to the power functions, but now the variable is in the exponent instead of the base. The mathematical rules regarding adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing exponents still apply. But the methods you use to solve exponential equations are different. In fact, you cannot solve exponential equations using algebraic techniques. For this reason, exponential (and logarithmic) functions are called transcendental functions.

    Consider the behavior of an exponential function. If > 1, as x increases, the function will clearly increase. In fact, it will increase dramatically, even exponentially. (Ha ha, this is where that term comes from.)

    On the other hand, as x decreases, what will happen to ƒ(x)? Remember


    So as x gets more and more negative, the function becomes a smaller and smaller fraction. In other words, it approaches zero. So we should expect a function with a long tail to the left, and a steep curve to the right.

    Let's graph this function, and compare it to graphs we are already familiar with. Consider the functions

    ƒ(x) = 2x


    and

    g(x) = x2




    Notice that near x = 0, 2x is larger than x2. These functions cross at x = 2, and x2 is larger than 2x for a while. Then they cross back at x = 4, and 2x is again larger than x2. They never cross again. This is one of the properties of exponential functions. No matter how large the exponent of the monomial, or how small (greater than 1) the base of the exponential, the exponential will always increase faster than the monomial at large values of x.

    What about 0 < < 1? Again, consider the functions


    and




    And these really look nothing like one another, so there isn't much to compare. How about comparing the graphs

    ƒ(x) = 2x


    and




    Did you expect that? Of course you did. These graphs are reflected across the y-axis, which is what happens when you find ƒ(-x). And we already said that . So we can rewrite g(x) as


    Cool huh?

    So, let's look at the properties of these graphs. (Well, not really, I am just going to consider the properties of 2x, you can extend this to 2-x yourself.)

    The domain of this function is (−∞,∞). This will be the domain no matter what value takes on. The range however is limited. There are no values of x that will make x negative or even zero, therefore, the range is (0,∞).



    Remember, the y-intercept is found by evaluating ƒ(x) at x = 0. Since 0 = 1 for all values of , this function will always intercept the y-axis at y = 1. On the other hand, since y = 0 is out of the range of this function, there is never an x-intercept.

    For the function ƒ(x) = x where > 1, the slope is always positive. Therefore, the function is increasing from (−∞,∞). What about for 0 < < 1? What does the slope do for that graph?

    Because there are no values of x that will make x negative or even zero, there is a horizontal asymptote at the x-axis. This is important.

    This function is one-to-one, which means it has an inverse. Good thing, or you wouldn't be able to solve problems involving exponents.

    This function is smooth and continuous.

    In addition to the positive slope for (−∞,∞), it also has a positive curvature for that same domain. What about for 0 < < 1? This also has a positive curvature. Reflecting across the y-axis doesn't change the curvature.

    There are no local minimums or maximums. There is a global minimum as x goes to negative infinity and a global maximum as x goes to infinity. How about for 0 < < 1? Did you say that the global minimum is found as x goes to infinity, and the global maximum as x goes to negative infinity? Great!

    From this we can determine that the end behavior of ƒ(x) = x where > 1 is going up at the right, and approaching zero at the left. If 0 < < 1, then the end behavior is reversed, going up at the left and approaching zero at the right.

    So clearly the interesting limits are:



    What about for 0 < < 1?

    Finally, there is no symmetry.



    07.01.01 Chapter 7 Assignment 1 - Programmer Ethics (C++)

    teacher-scored 20 points possible 60 minutes

    Do this assignment and submit it under Topic 3.

    1. Briefly describe program verification as it relates to computer program correctness.

    2. List proper and improper standards in Computer Programming.

    07.01.01 Class policies quiz (LA 9)

    computer-scored 12 points possible 15 minutes

    Read the information on the Start Here page and the Required Resources page first.
    Then, go to your main class page and into Topic 3 to take this quiz. You may take this quiz multiple times, but you must score at least 90%. I want to make sure you understand how the class works!

    If you haven't already, also click the link for the About Me assignment, and introduce yourself to me!

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


    07.01.01 Create a vocab crossword (World Geography)

    teacher-scored 50 points possible 30 minutes

    Study the vocabulary words listed below and then take them and post the words in a crossword puzzle.

    Aquaculture, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Shinto, Pictogram, Dynasty, Martial Law, Ring of Fire, Theocrat, Ideogram, Acupunture, Typhoon,
    Militarism, Homogeneous, Paddy, Heterogeneity

    Glossary is found in the Start Here section of the class.

    Use the following guidelines to help you create your crossword.

    # 1. Make a master list of terms to be defined and the definitions.
    # 2. Lay the words out in a connected grid pattern on a piece of graph paper.
    # 3. Prepare a sheet of clues emphasizing the definitions. (but not the exact definition)
    # 4. Add color or graphic features for emphasis.
    # 5. Make a key for the answers to your puzzle.

    After creating your crossword, send a copy of both the crossword and the answer key to your instructor.

    1.Is the major idea of each definition clear and easily identified?
    2.Is the spelling of the term and its definition accurate?
    3.Do the emphasis features and color lend to the major concepts?

    ***70% or higher is required to pass any assignment***

    Try going to the web site listed below to help you create your crossword.

    07.01.01 Definitions of Functions (Math I)

    If you take a few minutes and look up the definition of a function online or in a math textbook or some other resource, you will probably find as many definitions as you find sources. Why? Good question. Some try to make the definition more precise, so that there is no ambiguity about what is meant by a function. Some try to make the definition more approachable, so that it is less scary to students. Some try to make the definition more useful. Why do you think that there are so many definitions of functions?

    Consider the following definitions:

    “A function is a relationship between input and output. In a function, the output depends on the input. There is exactly one output for each input.”

    That is more or less the definition that we have been using. It is fairly user-friendly. Is it adequate? Think about it for a second.

    Here are a few other definitions. As you read through these ask yourself these questions: What terms am I already familiar with? What terms are unfamiliar? What concepts or ideas are common in each definition? How are the definitions different?

    “A function is a relation in which each element of the domain is paired with exactly one element of the range.”

    “A function is a set of ordered pairs (or number pairs) that satisfies this condition: There are no two ordered pairs with the same input and different outputs.”

    “A real-valued function ƒ defined on a set D of real numbers is a rule that assigns to each number x in D exactly one real number, denoted by ƒ(x).”

    “A function is a rule that assigns to each element of a set A a unique element of set B (where B may or may not equal A).”

    “A function is a mapping or correspondence between one set called the domain and a second set called the range such that for every member of the domain there corresponds exactly one member in the range.”

    “One quantity, H, is a function of another, t, if each value of t has a unique value of H associated with it. We say H is the value of the function or the dependent variable, and t is the argument or independent variable. Alternatively, think of t as the input and H as the output.”

    Did you struggle with these at all? Let's look at some of the technical terms.

    The obvious term is “function.” This may be familiar, but the goal here is to get you to understand it better. Therefore, I am going to assume that you do not already have a deep understanding of this term.

    We have been using the terms input and output. You put something in; that is the input. You get something out; that is the output.

    We discussed domain and range earlier. The domain is the allowed values that the input can have. The range is the allowed values that the output can have. In the sequences we considered, the domain was the integers, or at least a sub-set of the integers. The range was the actual values of the terms of the sequence. In quarter 1 we looked at domains and ranges of various continuous and discrete, more or less linear problems.

    We used ordered pairs in quarter 1 as a way to represent a point on a graph. This definition implies that ordered pairs can be used to define functions. In this quarter, we have used ordered pairs to define functions, just not in the format (a, b). What format did we use instead?

    The term “real-valued” is probably unfamiliar. All of the number systems you have worked with up to this point fit into this category. The term real-valued is used to distinguish between these systems and the “imaginary” or “complex” system of numbers you will learn more about in later classes. While this term maybe unfamiliar, it merely describes the numbers you already know and use. These numbers are the “real numbers,” just in case you wanted to discuss that term as well.

    The next term that may be less familiar is the term “set.” A set is just a group of objects. These objects can be numbers, or cats, or math students. Mostly we will be interested in sets of numbers (the integers is one set of numbers). But that doesn't mean that functions are limited to numbers….

    The term “mapping” also may be unfamiliar. However, you have actually used mapping in a very real sense for most of your life. The maps that you use in geography and other classes are literally a “mapping” of the points on a spherical globe to points on a flat page. The UTM system you used in the geo-spatial assignment in quarter 1 is one way of mapping the globe to flat space. Clearly you can map points in space to other points in space. You can also map one set of numbers/objects to another set of numbers/objects.

    We have discussed dependent and independent variables in conjunction with making graphs. The dependent variable is the one that changes in response to the other variable. On a graph, this is usually put on the y-axis. The independent variable is the one that you change or that changes on its own. On a graph, this is usually put on the x-axis.

    Is it clear that the term “argument” is synonymous with independent variable?

    All right, those are the terms used to define functions. What about the meaning?

    Did you notice any concepts that showed up in all or most of these definitions?

    Each definition describes what a function is/does: It is a relationship between things. It is a relation that pairs things. It is a pair of things. It is a rule that assigns one thing to another thing. It is a mapping between things. It is a correspondence between things. It associates one thing to another thing.

    The order of these relationships, mappings, associations, etc. matters. Most of the definitions use words to denote which group of things is assigned to which other group of things.

    The members of the first group (that will be assigned to the other group) are called the input, the elements of the domain, the input of an ordered pair (the first term), the elements of the first set, the members of the domain, the arguments, or the independent variables.

    The members of the second group (that the first group are assigned to) are called the output, the elements of the range, the output of an ordered pair (the second term), the elements of the second set, the members of the range, value of the function, or the dependent variable.

    So far we have that a function puts together two groups in a specific order.

    Consider the phrase “exactly one.” This phrase showed up in four of the definitions. The remaining definitions incorporate the same idea, using different phrasing, such as “unique” and “no two … the same.”

    This concept applies to the relationship between the input and the output. For each input, there is exactly one output. For each element in the domain, there is exactly one element in the range. For each element of the first set, there is exactly one element in the second set. For each argument, there is exactly one value of the function. For each independent variable, there is exactly one dependent variable. The definition about the ordered pairs is interesting, in that instead of limiting the output, it limits the input. It says that each time the same input shows up, it has to have the same output. It is the same thing, but it is a different way of looking at it.

    I would argue that those are the main ideas. There are other ideas expressed in these definitions. Think about how the additional concepts refine the basic concepts we considered. How would you define a function?



    07.01.01 Ethics in Journalism - English 10

    07.01.01 Final project Review Photography Porfolio

    teacher-scored 50 points possible 60 minutes

    Photography Portfolio Assignment

    Put together a portfolio using ten of your current best images.

    These images have to be taken while you are enrolled in the course. They cannot be old images from years past have been sitting around on your hard drive. I will be checking the metadata to make sure that the images are current, and photographed with your camera during the time you have been enrolled in the class.
    These images can be some of the assignments we've done during this class or other current images that you have taken during this class.

    07.01.01 Fluid Work Assignment(PrinTech2)

    teacher-scored 0 points possible

    Worksheet 2.2 Fluid Work
    Go in and take this assignment it will correct it's self and post to your grade in the grade book.

    07.01.01 Integrated Project Proposal

    teacher-scored 5 points possible 10 minutes

    07.01.01 Integrated Project Proposal (IP1)

    Step 1: Integrated Project Proposal--5 points. Choose another class in your current school schedule for which you will create a project using your computer technology skills. Choose one type of project from the three possibilities below and follow the guidelines given:

    1. REPORT Create an MLA report with a Works Cited page in Microsoft Word. The report must be at least 1 1/2 pages plus the Works Cited page. Consider page layout, line spacing, grammar, spelling, indentation, font changes, and automatic features such as headers for page numbering. Click on the MLA Report Instructions link above to see a sample of how a MLA style report is formatted.

    2. SPREADSHEET WITH CHART Create a spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel that uses text, numbers, and formulas. Format it in ways that improve the presentation, including font changes, borders, shading, number category, and alignment. Create a chart from the data. Format the chart to enhance its presentation.

    3. PRESENTATION Create an electronic presentation in Microsoft PowerPoint that is at least 8 slides. Use the following elements: variety of slide layouts; graphics; transitions; animations; font, color, and theme to support good design; proofreading for grammar; and correct spelling; as well as hyperlinks and action buttons. If appropriate, use auto-advance with suitable timing. Remember to include a Works Cited page at the end of the presentation if you are using information that is not your own. (Should not be the same PowerPoint that you used for 09.10.)

    Complete the comment to me explaining the project that will be used (report, presentation or spreadsheet with chart), topic, due date for other course, and other relevant information. Get written approval from me to use this project to meet the integrated project requirements for this course. NOTE: You must have written approval before you start the project and this project should be completed after you complete the unit in this course for the computer skills you will be using in this project.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


    07.01.01 Journal entry: Dream Job (English 12)

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 60 minutes

    A big part of education is about developing the skills and characteristics that will someday make us viable, contributing members of society. Consequently, much of our schooling is devoted to helping us find our niche in the world of careers and occupations.

    So once again, here's your chance to informally respond to the perennial question: "What do you want to be when you grow up?" Even if you have not yet discovered your occupational destination, muse for a bit here about what sorts of career paths and corollary occupations sound appealing at this juncture in your life. Elaborate on what you know about that job and why you think you would find it appealing.

    Evaluation:
    Journal entries are opportunities to explore ideas and develop fluency with language. You will be given a score of 1-10 based on the degree to which you satisfy the prompt and the level of effort your entry evidences.

    07.01.01 Lab: Changing ph (FoodSci)

    teacher-scored 20 points possible 60 minutes

    Unit 7-Assignment 1: pH-Acids and Bases

    INSTRUCTIONS: Feel free to copy and paste the information into the word processor (Microsoft Word or WordPerfect) and fill in the answers then copy and paste it back into the submission area for this assignment. There are two parts to this assignment.

    Take 9 cups and label them 1-9. In each of the cups pour the following:

    1. Pour 1 Tbs. of lemon juice in a paper cup.
    2. Pour 1 Tbs. of Gatorade in a paper cup.
    3. Pour 1 Tbs. of water in a paper cup.
    4. Pour 1 Tbs. of water with 1 tsp. of baking soda added and stirred in a paper cup.
    5. Pour 1 Tbs. of window cleaner in a paper cup.
    6. Pour 1 Tbs. of vinegar in a paper cup.
    7. Pour 1 Tbs. of grapejuice in a paper cup.
    8. Pour 1 Tbs. of water with 1 tsp. of table salt added and stirred in a paper cup.
    9. Pour 1 Tbs. of grape juice in a cup
    Take some concord grape juice and add 1 tsp. to each of the cups. Document your findings on the following page and explain at the bottom what is happening. The 9th cup will be your indicator to make your comparisons to the other samples.

    PART 1:

    INSTRUCTIONS: Perform the experiment from above and document your findings.

    Sample Description
    Color of Liquid

    Mark what the sample is after the test:
    ACID
    NEUTRAL
    BASE

    Sample #1:
    Lemon Juice

    Sample #2:
    Gatorade

    Sample #3:
    Water

    Sample #4:
    Baking Soda/Water

    Sample #5:
    Window Cleaner

    Sample #6:
    Vinegar

    Sample #7:
    Grape Juice

    Sample #8:
    Salt Water

    PART 2:

    After completing the experiment, explain in a paragraph or two what happened and why.
    ______________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________

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    ______________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________

    ______________________________________________________________________

    07.01.01 Lab: Fruit Salad Prep(F&N2Q2)

    teacher-scored 40 points possible 60 minutes

    Assignment 07.1.1-Fruit Salad Preparation

    There are four parts to this assignment.

    Part I: Choose a recipe for a Fruit Salad and prepare the salad.

    Part II: Take a picture and send this with your assignment.

    Part III: Print the sensory test sheet out three times and have three different people taste your fruit salad and then complete the sensory test.

    Part IV: Submit your recipe and picture along with the sensory tests.

    Send everything from Part II , Part III,& Part IV to me.

    Fruit Salad Sensory Evaluation
    Name of Evaluator: _________________________
    Phone # of Evaluator: _______________________

    Food Sensory Tested: ______________________

    1. TASTE (Sour, salty, etc.)
    Evaluation:___________________________________________
    ______________________________________________________

    2. TOUCH (Texture as in smooth, lumpy, mouth feel.)
    Evaluation:___________________________________________
    ______________________________________________________

    3. SMELL (Spices used, etc.)
    Evaluation:___________________________________________
    ______________________________________________________

    4. SIGHT (Color, looks.)
    Evaluation:___________________________________________
    ______________________________________________________

    5. HEARING (What did the food sound like.)
    Evaluation:___________________________________________
    ______________________________________________________

    07.01.01 Lesson 19 Test (NavajoGovt)

    computer-scored 55 points possible 30 minutes

    Take Test 19.
    This short test will deal with the information concerning the executive branch of the Navajo government.

    07.01.01 Lesson 7A: Consonant Sounds #4 (Spanish I)

    computer-scored 20 points possible 30 minutes

               **Assignment 07.01.01: Consonant Sounds #4**: Now this part of the course, accessing an assignment should be pretty familiar to you! Find our favorite button: and click on it!

               Just as before, after completing the assignment, find that exciting button and click on it to go to the next lesson in the course! You're doing GREAT!!

    07.01.01 List Accessories in each room of your home(IntDes3)

    teacher-scored 0 points possible

    Exercise 84: List each room in your home and describe the accessories that have been added. Give as much detail as possible to describe what these items are and why they have been added to the room.

    07.01.01 Literary terms quiz (English 9)

    computer-scored 15 points possible 10 minutes

    Go to Topic 3 of the main class page to take this quiz. You may take the quiz multiple times, but you must score at least 73%. Questions will cover literary terms and may refer back to earlier readings.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 3 of your enrollment date for this class.


    07.01.01 Mapping Australia(Geo4Life2)

    teacher-scored 100 points possible 60 minutes

    ASSIGNMENT 07.01.01

    Content Objective: Analyze the spatial organization of people, places and environments within Australia

    Mapping Australia is the sixth largest country in the world; it is also considered an island and a continent. The country is located between the Indian Ocean and the South Pacific Ocean. Australia consists of six states, two major mainland territories, and other minor territories. The states are New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia. There are many places to see while in Australia, but one needs to be familiar with the geography of a country before traveling there. You are going to create a political map of Australia. You will need to start by finding a map of Australia. The links below will help you. Australia climate map: Martyman at the English language Wikipedia, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedAustralia climate map: Martyman at the English language Wikipedia, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported First, on your outline map, draw in all the different commonwealth states of Australia:

    Queensland New South Wales Victoria Northern Territory South Australia Western Australia Tasmania

    Now you are going to get the names of different cities and physical elements that would be interesting to visit and place them on your map. You will need to decide on 13 places to label and visit. When you are finished you should have labeled seven states on your map and 13 destinations. Remember as you complete this assignment, you will want to become familiar with the areas of Australia so you can complete the Dreamtime assignment. You will be graded on the quality of the map you make and in including ALL the elements in your map.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 7 of your enrollment date for this class.


    07.01.01 Parent-Child Communication Log (TeenLiving)

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

    Exercise 43

    State which type of communication that you are using right now in your family, with your parents.

    1. How do they see you?

    2. Do you understand that your behavior causes them to view you in this manner?

    3. Do you know how to change this?

    A very important type of communication is non-verbal communication. If both verbal and non-verbal communication are both expressed, the other party will always believe the non-verbal expression more.

    Body language is a powerful way of expressing non-verbal messages.

    Exercise 44

    List four different types of body language that people use.

    Exercise 45

    Write about a time when someone gave you a non-verbal message. Was it a powerful communication to you?

    07.01.01 Physical Activity Preference (Fitness for Life)

    teacher-scored 50 points possible 45 minutes

    This assignment will help you think about your physical activity preferences so you can design a program that meets your needs.

    Assignment 17: Your Physical Activity Preferences

    Name: Date:

    Introduction: The purpose of this assignment is to examine your physical activity preferences. You will think about the activities in which you might want to participate, activities you have done in previous assignments, activity logs, etc. and consider how they may fit into your personal exercise program.

    Task: Answer the following questions, providing adequate information for full credit.

    1. From the aerobic activities you have done, which ones do you like the best and why? (5pts.)

    2. List at least 5 activities you have not done that you would like to try? Where could you find out more information about each of these activities? (10 pts.)
    List 5 activities (preferably aerobic) Where can you find more information about this activity?
    a)
    b)
    c)
    d)
    e)

    3. From the muscular strength and endurance exercises, which parts of your body are you most interested in improving and why? (5 pts.)

    4. From the muscular strength and endurance programs you have done (or read about), which one do you think would work best for you, based on your goals and the time and equipment you have available? Describe your program in detail. (10 pts.)

    5. List at least 3 days of the week that you could possibly find time to exercise. (5 pts.)

    6. Given your current schedule and your personality type (e.g., morning or evening person) which time of the day would you be most likely to exercise? (5 pts.)

    7. What are you most excited about when you think about starting an exercise program? (5 pts.)

    8. What are you most scared about when you think about starting an exercise program? (5pts.)

    Evaluation: This assignment is worth 50 points. You will receive 5 points each for answering questions 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, and 8 (30 points total). You will receive 10 points for answering questions 2 and 4.

    07.01.01 Review questions on the six traits (English 9)

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

    Now complete the review questions in section 3 on the Six Traits.

    07.01.01 Similarity and Dilations (Math Level 2)

    Guided Practice

    1. Find the perimeters of KLMN and K’L’M’N’. Compare this ratio to the scale factor.

    \bigtriangleup ABC is a dilation of \bigtriangleup DEF. If P is the center of dilation, what is the scale factor?

    3. Find the scale factor, given the corresponding sides. In the diagram, the black figure is the original and P is the center of dilation.

    Answers:

    1. The perimeter of KLMN = 12 + 8 + 12 + 8 = 40. The perimeter of K’L’M’N’ = 24 + 16 + 24 + 16 = 80. The ratio is 80:40, which reduces to 2:1, which is the same as the scale factor.
    2. Because \bigtriangleupABC is a dilation of \bigtriangleupDEF, then \bigtriangleupABC ~ \bigtriangleupDEF. The scale factor is the ratio of the sides. Since \bigtriangleupABC is smaller than the original, \bigtriangleupDEF, the scale factor is going to be less than one, \frac{12}{20}=\frac{3}{5}. If  \bigtriangleupDEF was the dilated image, the scale factor would have been \frac{5}{3}.
    3. Since the dilation is smaller than the original, the scale factor is going to be less than one \frac{8}{20}=\frac{2}{5}.

    Explore More

    In the two questions below, you are told the scale factor. Determine the dimensions of the dilation. In each diagram, the black figure is the original and P is the center of dilation.

    1. k = 4

    2.     k = \frac{1}{3}

    In the question below, find the scale factor, given the corresponding sides. In the diagram, the black figure is the original and P is the center of dilation.

    3.

    4. Find the perimeter of both triangles in #1. What is the ratio of the perimeters?

    5. Writing What happens if k = 1?

    Construction We can use a compass and straight edge to construct a dilation as well. Copy the diagram below.

    6. Set your compass to be CG and use this setting to mark off a point 3 times as far from C as G is. Label this point G’. Repeat this process for CO and CD to find O’ and D’.

    7. Connect G’, O’ and D’ to make \bigtriangleupD'O'G'. Find the ratios, \frac{D'O'}{DO}, \frac{O'G'}{OG}, \frac{G'D'}{GD}.

    8. What is the scale factor of this dilation?

    9. Describe how you would dilate the figure by a scale factor of 4.

    10. Describe how you would dilate the figure by a scale factor of \frac{1}{2}.

    11. The scale factor between two shapes is 1.5. What is the ratio of their perimeters?

    12. The scale factor between two shapes is 1.5. What is the ratio of their areas? Hint: Draw an example and calculate what happens.

    13. Suppose you dilate a triangle with side lengths 3, 7, and 9 by a scale factor of 3. What are the side lengths of the image?

    14. Suppose you dilate a rectangle with a width of 10 and a length of 12 by a scale factor of \frac{1}{2}. What are the dimensions of the image?

    15. Find the areas of the rectangles in #14. What is the ratio of their areas?

    If after completing this topic you can state without hesitation that...

    • I can solve problems concerning dilations.

    …you are ready for the assignment! Otherwise, go back and review the material before moving on.

    07.01.01 Situational Responses(ChildDev2)

    teacher-scored 40 points possible 60 minutes

    For this assignment you will write three responses to each of the four situations, according to each discipline type. Write a paragraph of a possible scenario for each of the three parenting types of what could happen. Use your problem solving skills to determine what you think might occur.

    (Copy and paste everything between the asterisks.)
    ****************************************************************************
    A. A family is making plans for a vacation. The little kids want to go to Disneyland. The teens want to stay home and do what they want. The parents had wanted to take all the children camping and spend time together.

    1. Permissive
    2. Authoritarian
    3. Democratic
    4. B. A class has been assigned to prepare a special bulletin board for back-to-school night. It must select a theme, plan the bulletin board, and provide the necessary supplies to complete the assignment. One person has been assigned as the class leader.

    5. Permissive
    6. Authoritarian
    7. Democratic
    8. C. A family is going to the ice cream store for ice cream cones. There are five local ice cream stores. One specializes in shakes and malts, one specializes in sundaes, and one specializes in less-expensive soft cones. The children range in ages from 3 - 15.

    9. Permissive
    10. Authoritarian
    11. Democratic
    12. D. A family is considering moving to a larger home. It will require that the children attend a new school, but it is located in the same city. The children range in ages from 2 – 10.

    13. Permissive
    14. Authoritarian
    15. Democratic
    16. For the following ages, list one appropriate way in which to discipline a child for that age group.
    17. One Year Old __________________________________________________________________
    18. Two Year Old __________________________________________________________________
    19. Three Year Old _________________________________________________________________
    20. Four Year Old __________________________________________________________________
    21. Five Year Old __________________________________________________________________
    22. Six Year Old ___________________________________________________________________
    23. Seven Year Old _________________________________________________________________
    24. Eight Year Old __________________________________________________________________

    ****************************************************************************

    07.01.01 Spinal cord worksheet (MAP)

    teacher-scored 30 points possible 35 minutes

    Matching Exercises Spinal Cord and Spinal Nerves
    Match only within each group, send in the correct answer.
    Group A:
    Tract
    Neuron
    Nerve Impulse
    Dendrite
    Root
    Plexus
    Synapse
    Axon
    1.An electrical charge that spreads along the membrane of a nerve cell _____________________
    2.A nerve cell fiber that carries impulses away from the cell body________________________
    3.The scientific name for a nerve cell _________________
    4.A network formed by the larger anterior branches of a spinal nerve ___________________
    5.A branch of a spinal nerve that attaches to the spinal cord __________________
    6.The point at which impulses are transmitted from one nerve cell to another _________________
    7.The part of a neuron that receives a stimulus_____________________
    8.A bundle of neuron fibers within the CNS___________________

    Group B
    Action Potential
    Neurilemma
    Parasympathetic System
    Reflex Arc
    Ganglion
    Sensory
    Sympathetic system
    1.Another name for a nerve impulse_______________
    2.Term for neurons that carry impulses toward the CNS__________________
    3.A collection of neuron cell bodies located outside the CNS_________________
    4.The sheath around some neuron fibers that aids in regeneration_________________
    5.The system that promotes the fight-or-flight response______________
    6.The system that stimulates the digestive and urinary tracts________________
    7.A complete pathway through the nervous system from stimulus to response____________________

    Group C
    Craniosacral
    Reflex
    Neurotransmitter
    Neuroglia
    Efferent
    Nerve
    Mixed
    1.Term that describes most nerves, notably the spinal nerves, because they contain both afferent and efferent fibers____________________
    2.A simple, automatic response that involved few neurons__________________
    3.A chemical that carries an impulse across a synapse__________________
    4.A term that describes the parasympathetic portion of the autonomic nervous system, based on where it originates_____________________
    5.A term that means the same as MOTOR _______________
    6.A bundle of nerve cell fibers located outside the central nervous system_____________________
    7.Connective tissue cells of the nervous system_________________

    Group D
    stretch reflex
    brachial plexus
    sciatic nerve
    motor neurons
    peripheral neuritis
    cervical plexus
    interneuron
    sensory fibers
    1.The network of nerves that supplies the upper extremities________________
    2.Degeneration of nerves supplying the extremities____________
    3.A neuron that relays information within the CNS________________
    4.The type of response exemplified by the knee jerk__________________
    5.The network of nerves that supplies the neck muscles_________________
    6.The type of cells in the ventral gray horm of the spinal cord______________________
    7.The largest branch of the lumbosacral plexus______________________
    8.The structures contained in the dorsal root of a spinal nerve________________

    07.01.01 Topic One: Figures in One and Two Dimensions (Sec Dev Math)

    Points, lines, segments, rays and planes. In the world of mathematics, each of these geometric terms has a specific definition. It is important to know these definitions — as well as how different figures are constructed — to become familiar with the language of geometry.


    NROC Image



    In this topic you will more deeply understand each of these terms.

    If after completing this topic you can state without hesitation that...

    • I can identify and define points, lines, line segments, rays, and planes.
    • I can classify angles as acute, right, obtuse, or straight.

    …you are ready for the next topic! Otherwise, go back and review the material before moving on.

    Click on the link below to get started:



    07.01.01 Unit 7 Oral Exam (Navajo)

    teacher-scored 100 points possible 30 minutes

    UNIT SEVEN TEST: This recording is required and is worth 50% of the unit. The second part is a written test worth 50% of the unit score. Both parts have to be submitted for a unit grade.

    Look at the words in yellow above and practice pronouncing them. When you are ready, go to section 3 of the homepage of the class to do this assignment.

    07.01.01 Vocabulary (English 10)

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 25 minutes

    Using the following vocabulary words with the definition given, write one paragraph using all ten words correctly. Underline each vocabulary word as you use it and make sure each sentence is complete with correct punctuation.

    1. Scion (n) - offspring; descendent; plant portion used for grafting
    2. Scoff (v) - to jeer (at); to show contempt for
    3. Scourge (v) - to whip; to flog; (n) a whip; instrument of punishment
    4. Scruple (n) - a qualm or doubt; ethical consideration
    5. Scrupulous (adj) - very careful in doing what is correct
    6. Scrutiny (n) - close inspection
    7. Secular (adj) - worldly
    8. Sedate (adj) - calm; serious
    9. Tactful (adj) - saying and doing the appropriate thing when people’s feelings are involved
    10. Taint (v) - to infect or spoil

    Go to Topic 3 (assignments, quizzes and tests) to submit your work, and see any additional instructions from your teacher.

    07.01.02

    teacher-scored 12 points possible 40 minutes

    Assessment Rubric:

    Content Summaries are complete and shows knowledge and understanding of the selections. /4
    Clarity Writing is clear, focused and well organized and didn’t give me any “huh?” moments. /4
    Conventions No significant errors in grammar, usage, punctuation or spelling. /4

    teacher-scored 16 points possible 30 minutes

     

    Assessment Rubric:

    Content   Each question answered completely and in a way that shows knowledge and understanding of the selection.   /4  
    Clarity   Writing is clear, focused and well organized and didn’t give me any “huh?” moments.   /4  
    Support   Both the answers to questions and the items in your outline have enough detail to support your ideas.   /4  

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


    07.01.02 Final project Review Porfolio and Critique Writing assignment (Basic Photograpy)

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

    Write about what you have learned in this course by naming each image in your portfolio by its file name and explaining why you chose to include it in your portfolio, or why it is significant to you. (10 images, 10 answers).

    Choose your favorite to formally analyze in at least 125 words. Why did you take the picture and why is it meaningful to you? Explain the difference between refrigerator art and living room art. Are these images snapshots? Or are they good enough to hang in my living room after they have been framed?

    When formally evaluating photography you might ask yourself some of these questions.

    1-Why did the photographer take the picture?
    2-Does the image tell a story?
    3-What is the purpose of the photograph?
    4-What compositional technique did the photographer use?
    5-Is the photograph technically correct, in focus properly exposed and show good composition?
    6-Is the photograph interesting to look at, do I want to look at it longer?
    7-Why do I want to look at it longer?
    8-Was the photographer's successful in conveying his or her message?
    9-What are the expressive qualities or the aesthetic significance of the subject matter or subject placement in the image?
    10-What type of emotions or interpretations do the image evoked from the viewer?
    11-Which of the following art elements are most strongly represented in the image you are formally analyzing? Is it line, geometric shapes, contrast, texture, color, tone?
    12-Where is your eye drawn first?

    07.01.02 - Dilations (Geometry)

    In first quarter, we learned about a type of non-rigid transformation called a dilation. In a dilation, a figure is transformed so that all angles are preserved and all lengths are scaled. We need two things to define a dilation, the scale factor and the center. The scale factor is clearly the amount by which the figure is scaled. The center is the point about which the figure is scaled.

    This image shows a trapezoid dilated with several scale factors about point D. The light red trapezoid is the original figure. The dark red trapezoid has been dilated with a scale factor of 1.5. The dark magenta trapezoid has been dilated with a scale factor of 1.25. The dark green trapezoid has been dilated with a scale factor of 0.75. Finally, the turquoise trapezoid has been dilated with a scale factor of 0.5.

    Notice that by definition, a dilation will create a similar figure! Whoo hoo! Therefore, one way that we can create similar triangles is by dilating the original triangle. You may remember from quarter 1 how we constructed dilated figures. But let's take a second and think about how you do this.

    The "duplicating angles" part is straightforward. We have done this many times.

    The "constructing segments that are all scaled the same" part may be a bit more complicated. There are a few scale factors that we can construct easily: Any whole number and any fraction with a power of 2 in the denominator. That is about it. We could start measuring, and then using the measurements to estimate the lengths of the scaled sides, but that is not actually a construction.

    Therefore, we do have some limits regarding the construction of similar figures. On the other hand, we can use an additional property of dilations to facilitate our construction of arbitrarily dilated triangles. Specifically, you may remember that a dilation will not affect a line through the center of dilation, and will move a line not through the center to a parallel line.

    If we only dilate triangles about one vertex, this property will allow us to construct any arbitrarily dilated triangle.



    07.01.02 - Examples of Functions: Mappings (Math I)

    This is where we get to the heart of the matter. It is all well and good to be able to quote a definition, but can you use it?

    The classic textbook type of question is a mapping of one set of numbers to another set of numbers, such as the one shown here.

    In this situation, the numbers -10, -4, -1, 2, 6 and 9 are the domain. The numbers -8, -6, -1, 4, 6, and 7 are the range. The arrows show that that each number in the domain is mapped to the number in the range with the same position. This then fits the definitions we considered, in that each element of the domain is mapped to exactly one element of the range.

    So, the next question is, does the mapping need to be straight across? Can we have a different mapping, such as any of the following?

    Yup, these are more or less the same thing. Each element in the domain is mapped to an element in the range. In fact, we have each element in the domain mapped to a different element in the range, so this is actually not merely a function, it is a special type of function. We really want to have some examples of more general functions.

    Consider image 4 below. Is this still a function? Not really. Do you see the problem? Nothing in the domain maps to the value -1 in the range. Therefore, we really should remove that from the range. Now, consider image 5.

    Is this a function? Yes, it is. Does it matter that there are two values in the domain that map to the same value in the range? Nope, not at all. That is perfectly fine. Does it matter that the domain and range are not the same size? Again, it doesn't. That was even included in one of the definitions, so we are good.

    Now, what if this was the other way? Consider image 6 below. We have a similar problem as before. There are terms in the domain that do not map to anything, so we need to remove those. If we do this, we get image 7. Consider image 7.

    Is this a function? No, it is not. Why not? There are two terms in the domain that map to two different values in the range. What if only one term mapped to two values? Would that be okay? Nope. Each term in the domain must map to exactly one term in the range.

    Consider these mappings for a second. Now think about the definition that mentioned that domain and range do not have to be the same size. Can you make an even more precise statement about the relationship between the sizes of the domain and range?

    Here is another question for you to think about: does it matter what the objects in the domain and range are? In other words, could we have a mapping like the following one?

    Looks fine to me. Each term in the domain maps to exactly one term in the range.

    07.01.02 - Time (Physics)

    
When will the ball get there? How long will it take for the ball to get there? How long will it take me to run to second base? These are all asking quantitative questions about time.

    Time is the only important scalar used to describe motion. Time is a fundamental measurement, its symbol is t, and it has units of seconds.
Almost always, the total time is not important. What really matters is the elapsed time, or how much time has gone by since the batter hit the ball (or some other interesting event). If I define the time the batter hit the ball as to and the current time as t then Δt is the elapsed time and is found with the equation:



    Notice this is not bolded. Time is a scalar.





    07.01.02 Accessories Shopping Exercise(IntDes3)

    teacher-scored 0 points possible

    Exercise 85: Do the Accessory Shopping Exercise from the link above.
    07.1.2 Accessories Shopping Exercise(IntDes3)07.1.2 Accessories Shopping Exercise(IntDes3)

    07.01.02 Assignment 194

    teacher-scored 15 points possible 20 minutes

    Assignment 194: Open the document entitled "Vocabulary Male Reproductive Terms,” and redefine the definitions in your own words.

    07.01.02 Basic Logarithmic Functions (PreCalc)

    Since the exponential function is one-to-one, we know that we can find an inverse. The logarithmic function is the inverse of the exponential function. You may have already encountered logarithms in earlier algebra classes.

    The logarithm is denoted by

    ƒ(x) = log x


    Which you read "log base of x." The logarithm base a is defined by the following property

    log x = x


    Because the logarithmic function is the inverse of the exponential function, we should be able to determine the properties of a basic logarithmic function, such as

    ƒ(x) = log2 x


    by considering the properties of a basic exponential function like

    g(x) = 2x


    Here are the 2 graphs so you can compare them.



    Notice that the graph of log2 x is reflected across the line y = x from the graph of 2x. Remember from Unit 04 that the graph of the inverse function is the original function reflected across the line y = x?

    So given the graph of the function


    Can you predict the graph of



    Did you find this graph? Yeah! You will be asked to do this on your own.

    Okay, let's look at the properties of these graphs.

    For > 1, the domain of this function is (0,∞), this corresponds to the range of x. What about for 0 < < 1? From the graph we can see that this domain is (−∞ , 0). Why? On the other hand, the range is not limited, corresponding to the domain of x, so the range is always (−∞,∞).



    Since x = 0 is not in the domain of this function, there is never a y- intercept. The x-intercept is easy to find by considering the properties of x. Since 0 = 1 for all values of , x will always intercept the y-axis at y = 1. Therefore, logs x will always intercept the x-axis at x = 1. Does that make sense?

    For the function ƒ(x) = log x where > 1, the slope is always positive. Therefore, the function is increasing from (0,∞). For the function ƒ(x) = log x where 0 < < 1, the slope is always negative. Therefore, the function is decreasing from (−∞ , 0).

    There is a vertical asymptote at x = 0. This is because there are no values of x that will make x negative or even zero. No, that is not a typo. Again, we are determining the properties of the logarithm based on the properties of the exponent.




    The logarithmic function is also one-to-one, which means it has an inverse. I hope that was obvious. Since this function is defined as the inverse of the exponential function, you should recognize that the exponential function is the inverse of the logarithmic function.

    This function is smooth and continuous, although it does have a limited domain.

    The logarithmic function has a negative curvature for the entire domain, no matter the value of .

    There are no local minimums or maximums. There is a global minimum as x goes to zero and a global maximum as x goes to infinity for > 1, or negative infinity for 0 < < 1.

    The end behavior of ƒ(x) = log x where > 1 is going up at the right, and asymptotically downwards at x = 0. If 0 < < 1, then the end behavior is reversed, going up at the left and but still asymptotically downwards at x = 0.

    The interesting limits are:



    and



    Finally, this function is not symmetric about any axis.



    07.01.02 Communication Techniques (TeenLiving)

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 45 minutes

    COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUES

    Constructive communication contributes to a meaningful exchange of ideas and/or leads to understanding. Some examples are--

    Giving positive or encouraging messages build up people and encourage them to talk openly about their feelings.

    Asking questions draws people into conversations and lets them know you value them and their ideas.

    Sending clear, concise messages gets to the point quickly and easily.

    Being honest and open with people is the best way.

    Telling a lie may get you out of a spot for the moment, but in the long run it may come back to haunt you.

    Keeping the confidences of another person is a way to build trust and friendships.

    Speaking with respect keeps the other person's feelings in mind.

    Using tact communicates something difficult without offending or hurting.

    Being a good listener is very important. You don't always have to be the one doing the talking; try listening more and you'll learn about others.

    Destructive communication is talk that hurts. Some messages discourage rather than encourage helpful or constructive communication.

    Insults, harassing, or teasing are messages you may send that encourage people to be rude to you. It's not a good idea to encourage others to say mean things to you.

    Gossip, lies, blaming and accusing show signs of insecurity and are types of communication that can hurt or even destroy friendships.

    "You" messages shut off communication by belittling the other person, they are usually blaming messages.

    These messages are a type of verbal abuse. If a person hears the same "you" statement often enough, he/she tends to believe it is true.

    Examples of you messages are:
    "You are so rude."
    "You are always late.", etc.

    Exercise 46

    OBSERVATION ASSIGNMENT:

    Observe three groups of people communicating or not communicating very well. This could be a group of friends, of family members, or strangers that you witness in a restaurant or in a mall or in a church setting. You could even observe a group of children.

    Requirements: Describe what you witness. Write a minimum half-page, single-spaced report about each of the three scenes that you watch. If they are strangers, make up a descriptive name for each one, like "tall man," "blonde woman," etc. so that you could keep your characters straight. Your document will be a minimum of one and one-half pages in total (for all three groups), single-spaced. If you need to observe more than three to fill one and one-half pages, that is OK.

    Life is like an onion; you peel off one layer at a time,
    And sometimes you cry.

    07.01.02 Examples of Functions: Mappings (Math I)

    This is where we get to the heart of the matter. It is all well and good to be able to quote a definition, but can you use it?

    The classic textbook type of question is a mapping of one set of numbers to another set of numbers, such as the one shown here.




    In this situation, the numbers -10, -4, -1, 2, 6 and 9 are the domain. The numbers -8, -6, -1, 4, 6, and 7 are the range. The arrows show that that each number in the domain is mapped to the number in the range with the same position. This then fits the definitions we considered, in that each element of the domain is mapped to exactly one element of the range.

    So, the next question is, does the mapping need to be straight across? Can we have a different mapping, such as any of the following?




    Yup, these are more or less the same thing. Each element in the domain is mapped to an element in the range. In fact, we have each element in the domain mapped to a different element in the range, so this is actually not merely a function, it is a special type of function. We really want to have some examples of more general functions.

    Consider image 4 below. Is this still a function? Not really. Do you see the problem? Nothing in the domain maps to the value -1 in the range. Therefore, we really should remove that from the range. Now, consider image 5.




    Is this a function? Yes, it is. Does it matter that there are two values in the domain that map to the same value in the range? Nope, not at all. That is perfectly fine. Does it matter that the domain and range are not the same size? Again, it doesn't. That was even included in one of the definitions, so we are good.

    Now, what if this was the other way? Consider image 6 below. We have a similar problem as before. There are terms in the domain that do not map to anything, so we need to remove those. If we do this, we get image 7. Consider image 7.




    Is this a function? No, it is not. Why not? There are two terms in the domain that map to two different values in the range. What if only one term mapped to two values? Would that be okay? Nope. Each term in the domain must map to exactly one term in the range.

    Consider these mappings for a second. Now think about the definition that mentioned that domain and range do not have to be the same size. Can you make an even more precise statement about the relationship between the sizes of the domain and range?

    Here is another question for you to think about: does it matter what the objects in the domain and range are? In other words, could we have a mapping like the following one?




    Looks fine to me. Each term in the domain maps to exactly one term in the range.



    07.01.02 Integrated Project

    teacher-scored 45 points possible 90 minutes

    07.01.02 Integrated Project (IP2)

    Step 2: Create the Project--45 points. After completing this project for your other course, submit the final graded project to your Computer Technology instructor to receive a grade for this course. NOTE: You must have earned a B or better from your other instructor and/or you can make any changes recommended by your other instructor to improve this project before you submit it to me. Please indicate the grade you earned from your other instructor. Please attach your original graded project or your corrected copy.

    Do NOT complete the Integrated Project until you have successfully completed the corresponding unit and received approval from the instructor for 07.01.01. (ie: If you will be doing a PowerPoint, finish the PowerPoint unit (Unit 9) first.)

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 8 of your enrollment date for this class.


    07.01.02 Lab: Vegetable Salad Prep(F&N2Q2)

    teacher-scored 40 points possible 60 minutes

    Assignment 07.1.2-Vegetable Salad Preparation

    There are four parts to this assignment.

    Part I: Choose a recipe for a Vegetable Salad and prepare it.

    Part II: Take a picture and send this with your assignment.

    Part III: Print the sensory test sheet out three times and have three different people taste your Vegetable Salad and then complete the sensory test.

    Part IV: Submit your recipe and picture along with the sensory tests.

    Send everything from Part II , Part III,& Part IV to me.

    Vegetable Salad Sensory Evaluation
    Name of Evaluator: _________________________
    Phone # of Evaluator: _______________________

    Food Sensory Tested: ______________________

    1. TASTE (Sour, salty, etc.)
    Evaluation:___________________________________________
    ______________________________________________________

    2. TOUCH (Texture as in smooth, lumpy, mouth feel.)
    Evaluation:___________________________________________
    ______________________________________________________

    3. SMELL (Spices used, etc.)
    Evaluation:___________________________________________
    ______________________________________________________

    4. SIGHT (Color, looks.)
    Evaluation:___________________________________________
    ______________________________________________________

    5. HEARING (What did the food sound like.)
    Evaluation:___________________________________________
    ______________________________________________________

    07.01.02 Mapping Asia (World Geography)

    teacher-scored 50 points possible 30 minutes

    Asia has a very large, diverse population, unique landforms, and varied histories. While holding one third of the earth's poulation, Asia has had and
    will always have a hand in influencing the economy, politics, and social cultures of the world.

    Print out two blank maps of Asia and create the following maps of the sites listed below. You will create a political map and a population map. One map for each.

    • Political
    • Population

    ***70% or higher is required to pass any assignments***

    07.01.02 Moons, Asteroids, Comets, Dwarf Planets, and the Kuiper Belt Exam(Astronomy1)

    computer-scored 0 points possible

    07.01.02 nervous system matching worksheet (MAP)

    teacher-scored 36 points possible 30 minutes

    Matching Exercises

    Match only within each group.
    Group A
    Meninges
    Hemisphere
    Lobes
    Brain Stem
    Ventricles
    Thalamus
    Cortex
    1.The collective name for the three brain coverings ________________
    2.Each half of the cerebrum______________________
    3.The region of the diencephalon that acts as a relay center for sensory stimuli_____________________
    4.Individual subdivisions of the cerebrum that regulate specific functions______________________
    5.The spaces within the brain where cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is produced______________________
    6.The part of the brain composed of the midbrain, pons, and medulla_____________________
    7.The thin layer of gray matter on the surface of the cerebrum_______________________

    Group B
    Dura mater
    Arachnoid
    Pia mater
    Menigitis
    Choroid plexus
    Subarachnoid space
    1.The weblike middle meningeal layer __________________
    2.The innermost layer of the meninges, the delicate membrane in which there are many blood vessels_____________________
    3.The area in which cerebrospinal fluid collects before its return to the blood__________________
    4.The vascular network in a ventricle that forms cerebrospinal fluid_____________________
    5.Inflammation of the coverings of the brain due to viruses or bacteria_____________________
    6.The outmost layer of the meninges, which is the thickest and toughest (Latin translation: "Tough Mother")_______________________

    Group C
    Medulla Oblongata
    Occipital Lobe
    Motor Cortex
    Corpus Callosum
    Cerebellum
    Temporal Lobe
    Parietal Lobe
    1.The portion of the cerebral cortex where visual impulses from the retina are interpreted_________________
    2.The division of the brain that coordinates voluntary muscles and helps to maintain balance________________
    3.A band of white matter that acts as a bridge between the cerebral hemispheres_____________________
    4.The part of the brain between the pons and the spinal cord__________________
    5.The portion of the cerebral cortex where auditory impulses are interpreted___________________
    6.The area in each frontal lobe, near the central sulcus, that controls voluntary muscles________________
    7.Location of a sensory area for interpretation of pain, touch, and temperature____________________

    Group D
    Encephalitis
    Epilepsy
    Neuraglia
    Aphasia
    Cerebrovascular Accident
    Parkinson's Disease
    Cerebral Palsy
    1.A general term meaning nerve pain_______________
    2.A chronic brain disorder that usually can be diagnosed by electroencephalography____________________
    3.Damage to brain tissue caused by a blood clot, ruptured vessel, or embolism; a stroke__________________
    4.Loss of the power of expression by speed or writing____________________
    5.A congenital disorder characterized by muscle involvement ranging from weakness to paralysis____________________
    6.A brain disorder that has been treated with the drug L-dopa_______________________
    7.The general term for inflammation of the brain_____________________

    Group E
    These questions pertain to the 12 pair of Cranial Nerves that extend off the Brain Stem
    Olfactory Nerve
    Optic Nerve
    Oculomotor Nerve
    Trochlear Nerve
    Trigeminal nerve
    Abducens Nerve
    Facial Nerve

    Vestibulocochlear (Auditory)Nerve
    Glossopharyngeal Nerve
    Vagus Nerve
    (Spinal)Accessory Nerve
    Hypoglossal Nerve
    1.The nerve that carries motor impulses to two neck muscles_________________
    2.The sensory nerve that carries visual impulses________________
    3.The nerve that carries impulses for the sense of smell________________
    4.The nerve that supplies most of the organs in the throacic and abdominal cavities_______________-
    5.The nerve that controls tongue muscles________________
    6.The nerve that supplies the muscles of facial expression___________________
    7.The nerve with three branches that carries general sensory impulses from the face and head________________
    8.The nerve that contains sensory fibers for hearing_________________
    9.The nerve that controls contraction of most eye muscles_______________________

    07.01.02 Root words (English 10)

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

    Choose two root words from each root in the following list. Define the word and write a sentence using it correctly. Make sure you number your sentences, underline the root word, and use correct punctuation. When you are finished, you should have ten definitions and ten sentences.

    1. Geo (earth) - geometry, geography, geology
    2. Germ (vital part) - germination, germ, germane
    3. Gest (carry, bear) - congest, suggestion, gestation, gesture
    4. Gloss, glot (tongue) - epiglottis, glossary
    5. Grad, gress (step, go) - gradual, graduate, aggressive, congress

    07.01.02 Self-Assessment Essay (English 12

    teacher-scored 30 points possible 120 minutes

    As a result of this assignment, the student will:


    • identify their personality type, noting potential strengths, weaknesses, and preferences for interacting
    • demonstrate an awareness of their personal temperament by analyzing personal characteristics and traits

    Personality instruments are tools that give continuing insight into ourselves and others. They are frequently used to help individuals see their preferences, potential strengths and weaknesses, and how they relate to different occupations. They can be a powerful tool in helping an individual select a potentially satisfying occupation and/or field of study.

    One of the most well-known personality instruments is the Myers-Briggs Personality Inventory. This personality instrument deals with four very strong categories for taking in and processing information, plus interacting with the world. It is based on the work of the Swiss psychiatrist Carl Jung.

    The assessment tool is used to identify your basic personality type. You may then use this information to direct you to different careers. Before you take the assessment, it is important to be aware of some important points:


    • The Myers-Briggs tool measure preferences, not skills. We can all do things we do not prefer. This is about what you do when you have your druthers.
    • There are no right or wrong responses, only those that fit you and those that do not!
    • One personality type is not better than another. Each has a richness and potential as great as the others.
    • You are the final judge. After reading the descriptions of the various types, you'll be able to weigh whether a specific description fits you. If not, feel free to change to a different category that better reflects your temperament.
    • Finally, the Myers-Briggs Personality Test is a self-reporting instrument. It is only as valid as the responses you indicate. You might want to retake the instrument, making sure your responses are true to who you are rather than how you "wish" your were or think you "should" be.

    That established, proceed to the Myers-Briggs Personality Test. Read the four questions and select the letters that best describe you. (If you want, you can also take the Jung Typology Test to see if your intuitive answers are born out by your actual responses.) Verify the accuracy of the four letters you arrive at by clicking on and reading the description of your specific four-letter tag. (Other sites that have background information on the various tags are available in the URL's for this activity.)

    Remember you are the final judge of your personality type. After reading a description of your 4-letter type, ask yourself how well it describes you. If you feel that the descriptions of your type do not fit you, go back and try swapping a letter or two and then read the resultant personality description of the new tag to see if it's a better fit. Keep repeating this process, until you are comfortable with the resultant description. Most people find a true fit can be found by changing only one letter, if that. If some confusion still exists in your mind, you might ask the assistance of someone who knows you very well.

    Once you've nailed down your four-letter temperament tag, list the words or phrases that effectively describe you from one or more of the various listed informational sites. Which of these traits are strengths? Which could be classified as weaknesses? Think of examples in your life when these traits and descriptors were readily apparent. Formulate a thesis statement about you in relationship to your personality description and temperament. Seek to support your characterization with specific evidence and examples from your life.

    (For some examples of essays exemplary written by other students, see the URL's.)

    Evaluation:
    The essay portion of this assignment will be assessed using the Six-Trait evaluation rubric, developed by the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, which is based on the idea that each piece of writing may be evaluated in six distinct areas: ideas/content, organization, sentence fluency, word choice, voice, and conventions. Each of these components are ranked on a scale of 1-5 (1 representing poor and 5 excellent). The sum of the values of the six components could represent a maximum score of 30 points.

    07.01.02 Self-Assessment links (English 12)

    07.01.02 Setting Goals (Fitness for Life)

    teacher-scored 50 points possible 45 minutes

    This assignment will guide you through the goal setting process.
    Assignment18: Setting Goals and Designing a Fitness Program

    Name: _____________________________ Date: ______________

    Introduction: Research has shown that individuals who set goals are more likely to achieve success in a variety of areas. Clearly, setting goals related to fitness can help you improve your current level of fitness. Your goals can be divided into two types: process and product goals.

    • Process goals are related to the process of getting fit. To be fit you need to increase the number of days you work out or you need to add different types of exercises to your fitness program. Some examples of “process goals” include the following:
    “I will increase the number of times that I exercise each week this month, so instead of working out 2 days a week, I will workout 4 days a week.”

    “I will increase the number of times that I lift weights from 1 time a week to 3 times a week for a whole month.”

    • Product goals are related to the outcomes you wish to achieve after participating in your fitness program. Some examples of “product goals” include:
    “I want to increase my bench press by 15 pounds in 8 weeks.”
    “I want to lower my body fat by 2% in 8 weeks.”

    The first step in setting goals is knowing your baseline or current level of fitness. You accomplished this by completing the previous assignments where you performed self-tests for cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition. You can use this information to determine which areas need the most work. For example, if you ran the mile and a half in 15 minutes, you could set a “process goal” to run 3 times a week for 4 weeks and re-test at the end of the month. You could set a “product goal” that you will improve your mile run time to 12 minutes from 15 minutes.

    When setting goals, be SMART. Goals should be SPECIFIC. The more specific they are, the easier it is to tell whether or not you reached your goals. Goals should be MEASURABLE. To determine whether or not you reached a goal, you should have some measurable outcome (e.g., days per week of exercise, heart rate during exercise, mile run time, pounds lifted, percent body fat, number of repetitions, etc.). Goals should be ARTICULATED (or written down). If you write your goals down, it is more likely that you will check them periodically and follow them. Goals should be REALISTIC. If you are currently at 30% body fat, it is probably not possible to get down to 20% body fat in 1 month without major health risks. Lastly, your goals should be TIME-DEPENDENT. In other words, give yourself a time limit and strive to achieve your goal within that time. If you have a time limit, you are more likely to persist through hard times.

    Task: For this assignment, you will be expected to set 3 goals using the SMART principles explained above. Once you have written down your goals, answer the questions.

    1. Using the SMART principles explained above, list 3 goals related to your personal fitness program. (They may be process or product goals). 10 pts.

    GOAL #1:

    GOAL #2:

    GOAL #3:

    2. What things can I do to help me reach this goal?
    (e.g., get up 1 hour earlier, watch 1 hour less of TV, play 30 minutes less of Nintendo, etc.)

    GOAL #1:

    GOAL #2:

    GOAL #3:

    3. What things might prevent me from reaching my goal?
    (e.g., my friends expect me to hang out with them after school instead of working out, my mom expects me to babysit for my little brother after dinner so I don’t have time to work out, I am tired after school)

    GOAL #1:

    GOAL #2:

    GOAL #3:

    4. Considering the obstacles mentioned in #3, what can you do to overcome each one?
    (e.g., convince my friends to exercise with me, take the baby with me in a baby stroller for jogging, work out in the morning—before I get tired)

    GOAL #1:

    GOAL #2:

    GOAL #3:

    5. When will I be able to reach my goal?

    GOAL #1:

    GOAL #2:

    GOAL #3:

    6. How will I monitor my progress?
    (e.g., I will keep a calendar with workouts listed on it. Every time I complete a workout, I will draw a smiley face on that day of the calendar)

    GOAL #1:

    GOAL #2:

    GOAL #3:

    7. What type of reward will I give myself after I reach my goal?
    (e.g., $25 shopping spree, purchase new running shoes, etc.)

    GOAL #1:

    GOAL #2:

    GOAL #3:

    Evaluation: This assignment is worth 50 points. You will receive 15 points for question 1, 6 points each for questions 2-7 (2 pts./goal, 30 points total), and 5 points if you followed all of the SMART principles.

    07.01.02 Similarity and Dilations - Worksheet (Math Level 2)

    teacher-scored 94 points possible 35 minutes

    Activity for this lesson

    Complete the attached worksheet.

    1. Print the worksheet and complete the assignment in the space provided. You may use additional paper if needed. Work all the problems showing ALL your steps.
    2. Once you have completed the assignment, digitize (scan or take digital photo, up close and clear) and save it to the computer and convert it to an image file such as .pdf or .jpg.
    3. Finally, upload the image using the assignment submission window under the assignment link on your math home page for this assignment.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 5 of your enrollment date for this class.


    07.01.02 Techniques for good writing (English 9)

    1.1.2.1 Figurative language gif (English 9)1.1.2.1 Figurative language gif (English 9)Good writing techniques
    Writing is a craft, and, like any craft, has skills you can learn to help you improve. Many pieces of good writing use recognizable techniques, some of which are introduced below. It would be unusual for a single piece of writing to contain all of these, but nearly every piece of good writing includes many of them.
    (These ideas come from the work of Nancy Atwell, Mary Ledbetter, and the Utah Writing Project.)

    1. Figurative Language

    Non-literal comparisons – such as similes, metaphors and personification – add “spice” to writing and can help paint a more vivid picture for the reader.

    Examples:
    It seemed like we were moving through traffic as slowly as a California tourist driving through a herd of sheep. Meanwhile, the minutes galloped away from us like race horses being chased by a swarm of hornets. I could just imagine the coach, an angry bear on the sidelines, roaring at the other players about what he would do to me when I finally got there.

    ...occasionally someone would lean forward and softly rearrange the logs
    on the fire so that the flames flapped upward more brightly, and the
    remains of the steaks sizzled briefly, like a nest of sleepy wasps. -
    Gerald Durrell

    A simile: The wind was like a hungry tiger tearing down our tent. [Wind and a tiger are not generally the same.]
    Not a simile: The wind was like a hurricane. [A hurricane and wind are quite similar in many ways.]

    2. Magic Three

    Three parallel groups of words, usually separated by commas in one sentence (though sometimes in three separate sentences), that add emphasis or support for a point, or create rhythm.

    Examples:
    Jeri liked riding her horse on a cool summer evening, hiking in the mountains to see the fall leaves, and playing her silver flute at midnight.

    Charlie's parents must want to get rid of him. For his fourteenth birthday, they bought him a matched set of designer luggage. For his fifteenth birthday, they bought him an eight week trip to a college prep summer camp. For his sixteenth birthday, they bought him a Hummer with leather seats, a thousand dollar gas gift card, and a fully functional GPS system.

    Notice that the series of three must be three phrases, not just three words:
    Magic Three: Some of my goals are to go skydiving solo, to record an original album, and to live long enough to see how global warming turns out.
    Not Magic Three: For dinner, I want pizza, salad, and ice cream.

    Good examples of Magic Three use parallel structure. Parallel structure can also apply to series of two, four, or any number. Parallel structure sounds complicated when I try to explain it (each phrase uses the same kind of grammatical structure), but it is pretty easy to recognize in examples. Notice in the first example above, each of the three phrases starts with an -ing verbal: riding, hiking, playing. In the second example, each of the three sentences starts out the same: "For his _____ birthday, they bought him..." In the example highlighted in green, each phrase starts out with an infinitive (the "to ____" form of verbal): to go, to record, to live.

    3. Specific Details for Effect

    Instead of general, vague descriptions, use specific, concrete sensory details to help the reader visualize what you are describing. Details are also a key to humor (see humor section).

    Example:
    Instead of saying "My mother was sitting & working," say:
    Mama settled back into the cane chair and scooped up another apronful of peas. She snapped about three peas to every one of mine. Her right hand twisted over and back as she snapped a little curl of string off the end of each pod and rolled out the peas with her thumb. (Kingsolver, Barbara - from The Bean Trees)

    Instead of saying, "The lady got her dog a collar," say:"Mrs. Drummond ordered her French bulldog a collar of red crocodile leather studded with alternating two-carat sapphires and one-carat diamonds. The buckle was gold-plated, and his engraved name tag was sterling silver set with another sapphire."

    A closely related technique is
    Show, Don't Tell:

    Instead of telling the reader what to think in abstract terms, show them a concrete scene and let them figure out what to think.

    Instead of saying "Crystal is my best friend. She has always been there for me," say:
    When Brent called me fat in fourth grade, Crystal told him to get lost. Then she dumped the applesauce from her lunch in his desk. When my grandma died, Crystal stood next to me for the whole three hours of the viewing. When I was flunking algebra, Crystal spent two hours every night on the phone with me, helping me do my homework. She got even with my first boyfriend after he dumped me by locking his keys into his car while he had his date at his house after curfew. We've made each other's birthday cakes, chosen each other's prom dresses, and listened to each other's complaints."

    Instead of saying, "It was the most beautiful sunset I had ever seen," say:

    I noticed a pink glow at my dorm window, and looked out at the sunset. Dozens of tattered clouds were scudding across the sky, and glowing with tangerine light. As I watched, the colors intensified to hot pink, not just in the west, but across the entire sky. All the students outside had stopped walking to look up. People were running for cameras, and shouting for their friends to come see. Over the next two or three minutes, the clouds turned magenta with purple edges; then the sun dropped below the horizon, and the colors faded back to pink and dissolved into twilight.

    4. Repetition for Effect

    Writers may repeat specially chosen words or phrases to make a point, to stress certain ideas for the reader, and/or to create rhythm. Often, the repetition uses parallel structure, as in the first two examples and the second sentence of the third example.

    Examples:
    There is a time for everything, and a season for every activity under heaven: a time to be born and a time to die, a time to plant and a time to uproot, a time to kill and a time to heal, a time to tear down and a time to build, a time to weep and a time to laugh, a time to mourn and a time to dance... (Ecclesiastes 3)

    Everyone else on the estate was concentrating on her – how lovely her hair looked, how lovely her dress fit, and how lovely her gold brooch looked with the pearls she had had to buy for herself. (Haifley, Erin)

    In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit. Not a nasty, dirty, wet hole, filled with the ends of worms and an oozy smell, nor yet a dry, bare, sandy hole with nothing in it to sit down on or eat: it was a hobbit-hole, and that means comfort. (Tolkien, The Hobbit)

    5. Magnified Moment

    Instead of “speeding past” a moment, zoom in on it. Emphasize it by slowing down and looking carefully at each action, expanding it so that readers can make a movie of what is happening in their mind. Of course you don't want to focus in on EVERY moment and every detail - that would be boring, and it would take far too long - but a common problem in writing is failing to go beyond summarizing what happened. Think of a radio sportscaster. If the announcer just said, "In the first inning, the home team had two hits and one run,"not only would there have been a half hour of silence while all those things happened, but the audience wouldn't be able to picture the action. Choose the most important parts of your topic, and give play-by-play detail.

    Examples:
    Instead of saying, "I was nervous while I waited to see the principal," say:
    I dropped onto the hard wooden chair outside Mr. Mautz’s office, contemplating the conversation we were about to have. The chair creaked desperately under the pressure of my considerable bulk, the seat all but eclipsed by my beefy thighs. My mission, once that office door opened, was to not lie. I didn’t want to tell the truth, exactly, I just wanted not to lie. There is a difference, I told myself.
    Ms. Barker smiled from behind her secretary’s desk, and I thought I detected a hint of compassion. Her phone beeped and she spoke quietly into the handset, looked up and said, “You can go in now, Eric.”
    I grimaced, slowly lifting my carcass from the chair. Ms. Barker smiled again. “Remember, it’s against the law for him to do what he wants to do to you.” (Crutcher, Chris - from Staying Fat for Sarah Byrnes)

    Instead of saying, "I got bucked off my horse and lost my glasses," say:
    We were cantering across the stubble field when I felt Star hump her back and drop her head. I grabbed for the reins to shorten them, but it was too late. I managed to sit the first jump, but the second one jolted me off to the side, and her third leap catapulted me through the air. As usual, I somersaulted to a head-first landing on the damp ground, rolling a couple times before I scrambled to my feet. As usual, Star had stopped and was nibbling the brown stubble, waiting for me to get back on. I had picked up the reins and was turning her around to remount when I realized that my bleary vision wasn't just the effect of recently landing on my head. My glasses had fallen off, and I couldn't see well enough to look for them.

    6. Humor

    Writers know the value of laughter; even subtle humor can help turn a “boring” paper into one that is fun to read. Often, it is the specific details that make a situation funny.
    Examples:
    One of my students wrote in a story that one of the characters choked to death - but he made it funny by saying that she choked to death on an organic plum pit in the Back to Nature Health Foods store.

    “My point is that God created a prototype for a reasonably sturdy carbon unit, gave us a perfectly usable place to live, some excellent advice, as in ‘words to live by’ – most of which are misunderstood by the least of my brethren – and stood back to see what we’d do with it.”
    I’m surprised. I didn’t know Ellerby had any philosophical considerations. I thought he just drove his Christian Cruiser through the world seeing whose nose he could get up. And how far. Lemry’s eyes land on me. “Mobe?”
    My hands shoot up in surrender. “I give a wide berth to all religious discussions. My plan is to get baptized late in the afternoon of the evening I die, so I don’t have time to sin. A spot in heaven awaits me.”
    “Cute,” she says. “And chicken.”(Crutcher, Chris - from Staying Fat for Sarah Byrnes)

    7. Vivid verbs & specific nouns

    Make your verbs and nouns do most of the work; use adjectives and adverbs sparingly. [Best-selling author Stephen King says, "The road to hell is paved with adverbs."] I've marked the nouns in red, verbs in green, adjectives in orange, and adverbs in blue.

    Instead of saying, "He walked slowly and determinedly over the wet, muddy ground," say:

    He slogged through the muck. ["slogged" is more vivid than than "walked slowly and determinedly"; "muck" is better than "wet, muddy ground".]

    Instead of saying, "An expensive, fancy sports car went by really fast and loud," say:

    A Porsche roared by. ["Porsche" is more specific than "expensive, fancy sports car"; "roared" is more vivid than "went by really fast and loud".]

    8. Full-Circle Ending

    One way of creating an ending is to repeat a phrase from the beginning of the piece.
    Example:
    People are a mystery to me. One day they complain the government isn’t capable of keeping track of its own rules; the next day they claim the government is controlling the laws of nature, creating tornadoes in the Midwest. Parents who can’t get their children to take out the trash or turn down the stereo complain that schools aren’t teaching the little darlings advanced algebra. A brain surgeon smokes two packs of cigarettes a day. A husband who beat up his wife goes ballistic when she leaves him. Brothers and sisters feud for ten years over who should inherit mother’s rocking chair. Yes, people are a mystery.

    9. Hyphenated Modifiers

    Sometimes a new way of saying something can make a big difference; hyphenated modifiers may make a reader “sit up and take notice.” Note that a modifier must be acting as an adjective or adverb in the sentence, and that not every use of a hyphen in a sentence is a hyphenated modifier.
    Examples:
    Jenny and I were already giggling; my mom had that if-you-say-anything-I’ll-get-you-later look on her face, but we could tell Peter wasn’t paying any attention.

    When I got to work, the clinic wasn’t due to open for another fifteen minutes, but there were already a man with an elderly Afghan hound, and a lady with a don’t-touch-me-I’m-a-princess Persian kitten ignoring each other in the waiting room.

    I, the used-to-be-oldest kid, am now a middle child.

    If you open a link in a new window, you can view the text (below) and listen to the audio at the same time. Click on the microphone in the new window to listen to the audio.
    English: Sentence Choices, 946
    To open this resource in SAS® Curriculum Pathways®:
    Go to: http://www.sascurriculumpathways.com/login
    Enter the student user name: farm9the
    In the Quick Launch box, enter: 946
    Do "Prepare" & "Identify".

    07.01.02 Topic One: Figures in One and Two Dimensions (Sec Dev Math)



    Each topic is divided into sections that include the following:

    • Warm Up - questions to answer to see if you are ready for the lesson.
    • Presentation - high quality video with excellent illustrations that teaches the topic.
    • Worked Examples - examples that are worked out step-by-step with narration.
    • Practice - quiz problems on the topic covered.
    • Review - practice test to check your knowledge before moving on.

    You are not required to complete every section. However, REMEMBER the goal is to MASTER the material!!



    07.01.02 Unit 7 Written Exam (Navajo)

    computer-scored 100 points possible 30 minutes

    07.01.02 Vocabulary Set 1 Quiz (English 11)

    computer-scored 10 points possible 10 minutes

    Go to Module 3 on the main class page to find the link to take this quiz.  You may take it multiple times, but you must score at least 70%.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


    07.01.03 - Constructing a Dilated Triangle, part 1 (Geometry)

    In the previous section, I claimed that it would be fairly easy to dilate a triangle by a whole number, or by a fraction with a power of two in the denominator. Let me demonstrate.

    We are going to dilate about one vertex. This will avoid the need for transparent paper that we used in quarter 1 (if you remember that construction). By using transparent paper, we can construct a dilation about any center, but this is not a trivial construction. If we ultimately wish our dilated triangle to be someplace else, we can use rigid transformations to move it or just duplicate it elsewhere.

    To begin, consider ΔQRS, shown here.

    Let's dilate this triangle about vertex Q by a scale factor of two.

    This means that the new triangle will share the vertex Q. It also means that the length of each side of the new triangle will be twice the length of the corresponding side of ΔQRS. Finally, it means that each angle in the new triangle will be congruent to the corresponding angle in ΔQRS.




    First, extend the sides and to lengths that are more than twice the original length.




    Next, use your compass to measure the length QR. Without changing the span of your compass, move the stationary end to point R and measure off the length QR along this line. Label the intersection something. Repeat for length QS, as shown.




    This creates and such that QT = 2 QR and QU = 2 QS. Remember we are creating a triangle. We have already constructed three vertices. If ΔQTU is not similar to ΔQRS, we are in trouble. So go ahead and construct the line connecting points T and U.




    I claim that TU = 2 RS, m∠T = m∠R, and m∠U = m∠S. We can check this by construction.

    First, check to see if TU = 2 RS. Do this by measuring the length RS. Without changing your compass span, move the stationary end of the compass to point T. Mark off length RS along . Move the stationary end of the compass to this point. Mark off length RS along . This total distance is 2 RS, and this mark should coincide with U, as shown.




    Next, duplicate ∠R at vertex T and ∠S at vertex U, shown here.




    ...which demonstrates that ΔQTU ∼ ΔQRS.

    Now clearly, as it is straightforward to measure off each segment length, you could duplicate these steps and create similar triangles with scale factors of 3, 4... any whole number, really.

    Using this same order of steps, how would you construct a triangle with a scale factor of ? Let's do this.

    Now instead of constructing segments with twice the length of the original sides, we need to construct segments that are half the length. Does this sound like a bisector? You should be able to construct a perpendicular bisector. But since it has been a while I will walk you through it.

    Starting with ΔQRS, place the stationary end of your compass on vertex Q. Open the compass to a span greater than one half the length QR. Draw a sweeping arc through , as shown. Without changing your compass span, move the stationary end to point R. Draw another sweeping arc through , intersecting the first arc twice.




    Draw the line connecting these points. This line is the perpendicular bisector of . Label the midpoint of something. Repeat for .





    Finally, connect these vertices. ΔQOP ∼ ΔQRS, with a scale factor of .

    By repeating these steps, you should be able to create similar triangles with scale factors of , , etc. Also, by combining both sets of steps, you can create similar triangles with scale factors of things like or or even things like or . How cool is that?



    07.01.03 - Examples of Functions: Ordered Pairs (Math I)

    The problem with the classic textbook question is that you almost never run across mappings. Well, maybe not never, but usually the illustrated mapping is done to help visualize a concept. The concept is expressed in another way. Therefore, while the mapping may be a useful way for us to visualize the idea that each number (pet, whatever) in the first group goes to exactly one number (color, whatever) in the second group, we usually will not see arrows drawn between lists when we are working with functions.

    Instead, let's consider some of the ways we have of representing functions. One of the definitions specifically mentioned ordered pairs. Can you rewrite image 1 as a set of ordered pairs?

    Seriously. Take a second and do this. Did you find

    {(-10, -8), (-4, -6), (-1, -1), (2, 4), (6, 6), (9, 7)}? (set 1)

    Cool, that was fairly simple. Recall the definition about the ordered pairs? It said that there are no instances where the same input has different output. This basically means that the first term in the pair only appears once (or if it appears twice, it is with the same second term, which is redundant, so we might as well drop the second occurrence). Are there any cases where the same input has different output? Nope, then we are good.

    Now, consider a couple other mappings. Say image 3. If we write this as a list of ordered pairs, we find the set

    {(-10, -1), (-4, 6), (-1, 4), (2, -8), (6, -6), (9, 7)}. (set 2)

    From the requirement above, is it clear this is a function? Okay, what about image 4? If we list image 4 as a set of ordered pairs we find:

    {(-10, -8), (-4, 4), (-1, 7), (2, 7), (6, -6), (9, 6), ( , -1)}. (set 3)

    That last item is not an ordered pair. This cannot be a function. On the other hand, if we rewrite image 5 as a set of ordered pairs we get:

    {(-10, -8), (-4, 4), (-1, 7), (2, 7), (6, -6), (9, 6)}. (set 4)

    Is that better? Does the first term show up only once in the set? Then we are golden. In contrast, if we write image 7 as a set of ordered pairs we get:

    {(-4, -6), (-1, 4), (-1, 7), (2, -8), (2, -1), (6, 6)}. (set 5)

    For the input -1, we have two outputs: 4 and 7. The first term appears twice. This is not a function. If you list the ordered pairs in a function, you can't have repeats in the “x” position (repeats in the “y” position are no problem).

    Okay, you get the idea? Now, in the first lesson I mentioned that we have used representations of functions that are basically a set of ordered pairs. We just hadn't explicitly listed these as ordered pairs. Have you figured out to which representation I am referring?

    How about a data table? Consider the data table we could make using image 8.

    We know this is a function because there is exactly one color for every pet. What if we wrote this the other way? Is this still a function?

    Nope, this is no longer a function. For the input “orange” there are two outputs: “cat” and “fish.” The first table is a function. The second table is not.

    All right, do we have any other way of representing a set of ordered pairs? Did someone say a graph?! I love graphs. Placing data on a graph allows the reader to understand key features of complicated problems.

    The third way we will represent ordered pairs is with a graph. Let's graph sets 4 and 5.

    We have previously noted that set 4 is a function, and set 5 is not a function. Can you see the difference between these graphs that makes it easy to spot that difference? Think about it.

    07.01.03 - Velocity (Physics)

    So, the answer to the question, "Where will the ball land?" is the displacement. And the answer to the question, "When will the ball cross the plate?" is the time. But how do we find these?

    To figure out where and when the ball will land, we need to know the velocity of the ball. We have discussed velocity before. This is a vector that describes how something is moving. The magnitude of the velocity is also called the speed, and the direction is the the direction of motion.

    Velocity is not a fundamental measurement. And, in general, it cannot be measured directly, but needs to be calculated. (In fact, Newton invented calculus in order to calculate the velocity of his falling apple.) The symbol for velocity is , and its units are m/s. The arrow over the top of the v is another way of
    denoting a vector. We will be using both arrows and bold font, interchangeably.

    When we talk about velocity, we are usually referring to the instantaneous velocity, or the velocity at this instant. We already know that the world is filled with forces that change velocity, so it is very possible that the velocity will change from one instant to the next. So, we need to be able to find the instantaneous velocity, however....

    Most of the time, we can really only measure the enough information to find the average velocity.

    The average velocity, , of a baseball (or any other object) is found by taking the displacement divided by the elapsed time. (Notice the bar over the , this is one of many ways of denoting an average.) Or



    This differs from the average speed in that average speed is distance divided by elapsed time.
Here is an example of how these are not the same thing.

    A baseball diamond is actually a square with sides 90.0 ft (27.4 m). Say a baseball player hits a home-run, and runs the bases in 16.23 seconds. We can figure out both the average speed and the average velocity of our baseball player.

    The total distance is



    So his average speed is



    (Sorry, I wanted to keep things in SI units for the course, but since a baseball diamond is 90 ft on each side, it divides nicely into feet, not so nicely into meters. I hope you can deal with that!)

    On the other hand, since he ran around all the bases, and returned to home plate, his total displacement was zero



    So his average velocity is



    Weird? Cool? Something.
This actually tells you that average velocity is not the most useful quantity to calculate. Which brings us back to the instantaneous velocity. How do we find that?





    07.01.03 Assignment 195

    teacher-scored 15 points possible 20 minutes

    Assignment 195: Watch the PowerPoint 34 entitled "Human Reproduction" and write about three things that were new or interesting to you.

    07.01.03 Euler's Number, e (PreCalc)

    Any discussion of exponential and logarithmic functions would be incomplete without a discussion of Euler's number, e. Euler's number was named after Euler, although he was not the first mathematician to use it. Euler's number, e, is an irrational number (like π) that turns up in many applications in math and science.

    In particular, consider an important real life problem, compound interest. When you take out a loan or buy something on credit, the bank charges you interest. This is not simple interest, where you owe a flat rate for the money you borrowed. This is compound interest, where the total interest you pay varies with the amount of time you take to pay back the loan. The more time you take to pay back the loan, the more interest you will pay.

    Compound interest is calculated using the formula


    where A is the total amount owed, Pis the amount initially borrowed, r is the interest rate in decimal form, n is the number of compoundings a year, and t is the total number of years. Since loans usually get paid back in installments, this equation is not the one you would actually use to determine the total amount you will pay back. This is more or less half of that equation. This equation can also be used to calculate the interest you would earn on an investment. But again, most people do not make a one time investment, but instead add to a savings account at regular intervals. So this isn't a perfect model for that either.

    But, say you used a high interest credit card to buy a jacket for $200. The interest rate is 21% per year, and it is compounded monthly. You don't pay anything towards the credit card for 3 months, then decide to pay it all off. Ignoring fees (for not making the minimum payment each month), how much will that jacket cost you?

    We know all the terms (or can figure them out): P = $200 (this is how much you spent initially), r = 0.21 (this is 21% as a decimal), nt = 0.25 (since 3 months is one quarter of a year). Plug these into the equation:


    There is a reason people try to avoid using high interest credit cards, or pay them off each month. You would have saved $10 by waiting 3 months to buy the jacket.

    Okay, so what does this have to do with Euler's number. This problem had the interest compounded monthly. You can have interest compounded yearly, or biweekly, or daily, etc. We are only interested in how the frequency of compoundings effect the rate. So, let's set everything equal to 1, except n. Then consider how changing the value of n changes the interest.

    If we compound the interest once a year, we get


    Every six months gives us


    If we compound each month we get


    Biweekly compounding gives us


    You can see how this number is increasing constantly, but not at a constant rate. Does this appear to be approaching a constant? Let's keep going.

    If we compound weekly we get


    Daily gives us


    Every hour results in


    Every second we get


    We seem to be converging around the value 2.718. The number this converges to is Euler's number, e, and one way to define it is by the following limit:


    So, to find continually compounded interest we use the equation

    A=Pert


    Where A, P, r and t are all defined as before.

    Because of the unique properties of e (which we will not explain, but you will learn about them in calculus), this is the fundamental base for most exponential applications. In addition, the logarithm base e, loge, is called the natural logarithm and it has it's own notation. In particular

    loge x = ln x


    This is one of two logarithm buttons you find on your calculator. For the rest of this quarter, we will primarily use ex and ln x. Any other base will behave in fundamentally the same way as this base.



    07.01.03 Examples of Functions: "Ordered Pairs" (Math I)

    The problem with the classic textbook question is that you almost never run across mappings. Well, maybe not never, but usually the illustrated mapping is done to help visualize a concept. The concept is expressed in another way. Therefore, while the mapping may be a useful way for us to visualize the idea that each number (pet, whatever) in the first group goes to exactly one number (color, whatever) in the second group, we usually will not see arrows drawn between lists when we are working with functions.

    Instead, let's consider some of the ways we have of representing functions. One of the definitions specifically mentioned ordered pairs. Can you rewrite image 1 as a set of ordered pairs?




    Seriously. Take a second and do this. Did you find

    {(-10, -8), (-4, -6), (-1, -1), (2, 4), (6, 6), (9, 7)}? (set 1)



    Cool, that was fairly simple. Recall the definition about the ordered pairs? It said that there are no instances where the same input has different output. This basically means that the first term in the pair only appears once (or if it appears twice, it is with the same second term, which is redundant, so we might as well drop the second occurrence). Are there any cases where the same input has different output? Nope, then we are good.

    Now, consider a couple other mappings. Say image 3. If we write this as a list of ordered pairs, we find the set

    {(-10, -1), (-4, 6), (-1, 4), (2, -8), (6, -6), (9, 7)}. (set 2)



    From the requirement above, is it clear this is a function? Okay, what about image 4? If we list image 4 as a set of ordered pairs, we find:

    {(-10, -8), (-4, 4), (-1, 7), (2, 7), (6, -6), (9, 6), ( , -1)}. (set 3)



    That last item is not an ordered pair. This cannot be a function. On the other hand, if we rewrite image 5 as a set of ordered pairs, we get:

    {(-10, -8), (-4, 4), (-1, 7), (2, 7), (6, -6), (9, 6)}. (set 4)



    Is that better? Does the first term show up only once in the set? Then we are golden. In contrast, if we write image 7 as a set of ordered pairs, we get:

    {(-4, -6), (-1, 4), (-1, 7), (2, -8), (2, -1), (6, 6)}. (set 5)



    For the input -1, we have two outputs: 4 and 7. The first term appears twice. This is not a function. If you list the ordered pairs in a function, you can't have repeats in the “x” position (repeats in the “y” position are no problem).

    Okay, you get the idea? Now, in the first lesson I mentioned that we have used representations of functions that are basically a set of ordered pairs. We just hadn't explicitly listed these as ordered pairs. Have you figured out to which representation I am referring?

    How about a data table? Consider the data table we could make using image 8.




    We know this is a function because there is exactly one color for every pet. What if we wrote this the other way? Is this still a function?




    Nope, this is no longer a function. For the input “orange” there are two outputs: “cat” and “fish.” The first table is a function. The second table is not.

    All right, do we have any other way of representing a set of ordered pairs? Did someone say a graph?! I love graphs. Placing data on a graph allows the reader to understand key features of complicated problems.

    The third way we will represent ordered pairs is with a graph. Let's graph sets 4 and 5.




    We have previously noted that set 4 is a function, and set 5 is not a function. Can you see the difference between these graphs that makes it easy to spot that difference? Think about it.



    07.01.03 Journal entry: Compatible personalities (English 12)

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 60 minutes

    One of the features of the Keirsey site is that it provides a sampling of historical figures and contemporary personalities for each temperament. Find the personalities that match your specific temperament and list everything you know about each one. (To view the personalities associated with each personality type, click on the major temperament types: Guardians (ESTJ, ISTJ, ESFJ, ISFJ); Artisans, (ESTP, ISTP, ESFP, ISFP); Idealists INFP, ENFP, INFJ, ENFJ); and Rationals (INTP, ENTP, INTJ, ENTJ).

    Evaluation:
    Journal entries are an opportunity to explore ideas and develop fluency with language in an informal context. You will be assessed a point value from 1 to 10 points, based on the effort and thoughtfulness demonstrated in your response.

    07.01.03 Journal entry: Compatible personalities links (English 12)

    07.01.03 Journal Writing (English 10)

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

    Write at least 250 words discussing your experiences using a school or public library or both. Why do you or why don’t you frequently use a library? What are some of the major advantages of learning to use a library? What are some of the things you find most interesting about a library?

    Go to Topic 3 (assignments, quizzes and tests) to submit your work, and see any additional instructions from your teacher.

    07.01.03 Labeling areas of the brain (MAP)

    teacher-scored 44 points possible 40 minutes

    Download the four attached diagrams.

    Label the following areas of the (external) brain
    1.
    2.
    3.
    4.
    5.
    6.
    7.
    8.
    9.
    10.
    11.

    Label the following layers and Meninge Areas:
    1.
    2.
    3.
    4.
    5.
    6.
    7.
    8.
    9.
    10.
    11.
    12.

    Label the following areas of the CEREBRAL Cortex
    1.
    2.
    3.
    4.
    5.
    6.
    7.
    8.

    Label the following areas at the base of the brain showing the CRANIAL NERVES:
    1.
    2.
    3.
    4.
    5.
    6.
    7.
    8.
    9.
    10.
    11.
    12.
    13.

    07.01.03 Sexual Harassment and Constructive Communication (TeenLiving)

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

    SEXUAL HARASSMENT

    Sexual Harassment is a current issue and one we need to be aware of. Any comment that belittles, offends, or teases another by gender insinuation, slander, or other means should be avoided. In the work place offenders can be fired, sued, or reprimanded. Employers may also be sued for allowing harassment to continue on the job.

    Threatening stops communication and puts up barriers. It is controlling language that shows no respect or caring for others. Threats can lead to legal action if severe enough.

    Sarcasm is where a person speaking says one message, but nonverbal expressions and the tone of voice send another message. For example, the comment, "He is real good looking", said with a certain tone of voice can mean just the opposite. Sarcasm can be very hurtful and lower another person's self-esteem. We need to be aware that a little sarcasm or teasing goes a long way. Most people can take a joke, but if it is repeated over and over, it may become a sore spot and destroy a relationship.

    Interrupting and dominating the conversation are both impolite. You send the message that what another person has to say is not very important. People tolerate this rude behavior for awhile, but then get irritated and choose not to be around that kind of person.

    Swearing is not appropriate language and is offensive to many people. It is not appropriate in schools or the work place. It can cause a negative first impression that you may not be able to overcome.

    Non-verbal communication is the way you express yourself through movements, posture, facial expressions. It is possible to send one message with your words and another with your body language.

    People who must give the impression that they are always right or try to hurt anothers feelings, are usually insecure or have low self-esteem. They build themselves up by tearing others down. A person's self-esteem should not be injured by the thoughtless comments of others.

    CONSTRUCTIVE COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUES

    Giving Positive or encouraging messages
    Asking questions
    Sending clear, concise messages
    Being honest and open
    Keeping confidences
    Speaking with respect
    Using tact
    Being a good listener

    DESTRUCTIVE COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUES

    Insults, harassing, teasing
    Gossip, lies, blaming and accusing
    You messages
    Sexual harassment
    Threatening
    Sarcasm
    Interrupting or dominating the conversation
    Swearing

    Exercise 47

    Fill out the following chart. if it takes you a few days to accumulate 12 experiences, that's OK. You can even look into your past for experiences.

    My Communications Log of Constructive Communication:

    Fill in the chart below with the appropriate responses. You will write down the person (either by name or description) to whom you communicated, the response you received and the type of technique you used in the exchange.

    To Whom I Communicated/Constructive Response Received/Type of Technique Used

    1.____________________ ________________________ _____________________
    2.____________________ ________________________ _____________________
    3.____________________ ________________________ _____________________
    4.____________________ ________________________ _____________________
    5.____________________ ________________________ _____________________
    6.____________________ ________________________ _____________________
    7.____________________ ________________________ _____________________
    8.____________________ ________________________ _____________________
    9.____________________ ________________________ _____________________
    10.___________________ ________________________ _____________________
    11.___________________ ________________________ _____________________
    12.____________________ ________________________ _____________________

    07.01.03 Topic Two: Properties of Angles (Sec Dev Math)

    Lines, line segments, points, and rays are the building blocks of other figures. For example, two rays with a common endpoint make up an angle. The common endpoint of the angle is called the vertex. Sometimes angles are very narrow; sometimes they are very wide. When people talk about the “size” of an angle, they are referring to the arc between the two rays. Measuring angles requires a protractor, which is a semi-circular tool containing 180 individual hash marks. Each hash mark represents 1º. (Think of it like this: a circle is 360º, so a semi-circle is 180º.)


    NROC Image



    In this topic you will learn about the properties of angles.

    If after completing this topic you can state without hesitation that...

    • I can identify parallel and perpendicular lines.
    • I can find measures of angles.
    • I can identify complementary and supplementary angles.

    …you are ready for the next topic! Otherwise, go back and review the material before moving on.

    Click on the link below to get started:



    07.01.04 - Constructing a Dilated Triangle, part 2 (Geometry)

    While there may be quite a few numbers that can be formed as sums of whole numbers and fractions with powers of two in the denominator, not every scale factor can be constructed this way. Actually, all rational numbers can be written as a finite (or possibly infinite) sum of fractions with powers of two in the denominator--but seriously, do you actually want to infinitely bisect the two sides? What if you have a problem where you don't know the scale factor? You know that you have one triangle, and need to create a similar triangle with one side an arbitrary length? You may be creating an work of abstract art, or perhaps you are designing a quilt or tile pattern. In quarter 1 we looked at Escher's works. Most of these have similar tessellating patterns, instead of congruent tessellating patterns (the pattern blocks change size across the image). Okay, you are working on this type of problem. You don't know the scale factor, but you do know that a given side needs to be a specific length to fit into the pattern. What do you do? You use the other property of dilations, the one about what happens to lines going through, and not going through, the center of dilation. In the previous construction, the choice of one vertex as the center of dilation made the problem easier, as we did not need to duplicate any angles, but I suspect you realize that instead of "dilating" that triangle, we could have constructed the same triangle somewhere else. It still would have been similar. In this construction, choosing the center of dilation at one vertex will be important. We will later see that it ultimately doesn't matter, but for this construction, it does. Okay, so let's keep using ΔQRS. This time, we wish to construct a dilated triangle with the side that corresponds to having the same length as , shown here.

    We know that the side corresponding to will lie along , and that the side corresponding to will lie along , because lines that go through the center of dilation do not change. Since MN > QS, the first step will be to extend sides and to somewhat longer lengths. Next measure MN.

    Mark this distance along the lengthened side . Label the vertex something.

    Okay, we now have two vertices, Q and L. We also know that the side corresponding to must be parallel to , because lines that do not go through the center of dilation move to parallel lines. Therefore, we should construct a line parallel to through point L. Again, you do need to know how to construct a line parallel to another line through a point not on that line, but you may have forgotten, so I will again walk you through it. Start by measuring ∠S. Duplicate that angle at point L.

    Remember the theorem that says if a transverse line intersects two lines such that corresponding angles are congruent, the lines are parallel? (Actually, this follows from the theorem that says if a transverse line intersects two lines such that alternate angles are congruent, the lines are parallel.) Because of this theorem, we know that the line we just constructed is parallel to . Finally, extend this line so that it intersects the third side. Label that vertex something.

    Because ΔQKL is a dilated transformation of ΔQRS, ΔQKL ∼ΔQRS. This means that ∠Q ≅ ∠Q (obviously), ∠R ≅ ∠K, ∠S ≅ ∠L, and more importantly, that Without having any idea what the ratio is, we were able to construct three sides with the same ratio. How cool are we! Okay, take a second and think about these constructions.

    • We needed the center of dilation at a vertex to construct a dilated triangle, using the parallel line property of dilations.
    • We needed to construct a dilated triangle to prove that the constructed triangle was similar to the first triangle.
    • If we constructed this same triangle in another place, with another orientation, it would still be similar to the first.
    • Therefore, for future constructions, we don't need to actually dilate the given triangle. We just need to figure out what information we need to construct a similar triangle.

     

     

     

    07.01.04 - Examples of Functions: Equations (Math I)

    We also know that we can model problems with equations. We have considered several types of equations to model sequences. We noted that sequences are functions. Question: are all sequences functions? Why or why not?

    Clearly one way we wish to represent functions is by an equation. In quarter 1 we spent most of the quarter working with equations of lines. Consider the following equation of a line:

    y = x. (eq. 1)

    Without being given any further information, we can assume that x can take any number from negative infinity to infinity. How can we determine if this equation is a function or not?

    One simple way is to check a few points. We could make a table, or write a set of ordered pairs, or some other way of checking points. Tables are always good.

    You get the idea. For any value of x, will there be more than one value of y? Is it clear that there will not? For each value of x, there is only one value of y. Will this be true for other equations of a line? What if the slope is negative? What if the line does not intercept the origin? What if the slope is steeper?

    Let's up the ante. How about this equation?

    y = x2. (eq. 2)

    Again, we can create a table.

    Is it clear that this is also a function? Does it matter that 16 shows up in the y column twice? Why not?

    One more, and I think we will be ready to look at some graphs. How about …

    y2 = x (eq. 3)

    In this equation, as all the others, x is the independent variable and y is the dependent variable. If we make a table with this data we find

    Does it matter that 16 shows up in the x column twice? Why?

    Did you figure out that this equation is not a function? It is not a function because for the value x = 16, there are 2 different values of y, -4 and 4. The same occurs for nearly every value of x. This is not a function.

    Now, we wish to look at graphs. Here are the graphs of equations 1 and 2. The graph of equation 3 is below.

    Recall, we also determined that set 4 was a function. What do these graphs have in common with each other and with set 4?

    Following, we have the graph of equation 3. Consider that graph, and think about the graph of set 5 also. We determined that these are also not functions. What does the graph of equation 3 and set 5 have in common with each other, that these graphs do NOT have in common with the graphs of equations 1 and 2, and set 4?

    The test to determine if a graph is a function of one variable with respect to the other is called the vertical line test. Take a vertical line. Sweep it along the x-axis. If the vertical line intercepts the graph more than once at ANY point, the graph is NOT a function. If the line intercepts the graph only once, at all points in the domain, then the graph is a function.

    One thing that people often forget in that test, is you are merely testing if the graph is a function of one variable with respect to the other. There are many ways to write equations that in terms of x and y are not functions, so that they are functions of other variables.

    Next, let's consider a few graphs and determine if these are functions or not. Take a second, look over the graphs, and decide which ones represent equations where y is a function of x.

    Did you decide that graphs 1, 2, 4, and 5 were all graphs of equations in which y is a function of x?

    What if we wanted to determine if x is a function of y? What could you do to answer that question? Think about what you have done already. (Normally, we do write equations such that y is a function of x. That is the standard way to write a function. However, x and y are arbitrary terms. We could decide that we want to know if x is a function of y.)

    Graph 6 cannot be written as an equation where y is a function of x, or x is a function of y. However, it is a very important curve, and can be written as functions of other variables. Think about how that could work.

    What if you drew a circle on the floor and walked around the circle. Can you write that action as a function of position with respect to time? Could you graph the position with respect to time? Would it still look like a circle? (Would you be able to place that on a two-dimensional graph?)

    Do you think you are ready to apply these concepts?

    07.01.04 - Graphing (Physics)




    You are not expected to know calculus to take this class. And, even though Newton invented calculus to solve this problem, we can solve it without calculus. We can use graphs.

    If you make a graph of displacement vs time, the instantaneous velocity at any time is the slope of the graph at this time.

    So, let's consider again the baseball player. If we set up folks with stopwatches every three feet along the baseline, each person can figure out the time he passed them, and we can plot these times. (That's 120 people, 120 data points. Yeah, I don't think we really did this, but there are other ways we can get this data, such as taking pictures, or using electronic timers.) Imagine we found the following data:





    Okay, can you look at that data and see anything interesting about it? Yeah, me neither. Which is one of the first reasons we make graphs. So that we can look at our data and discover if it tells us anything.

    We also make graphs so we can share our data with others, and they can understand what it means.

    Okay, let's make a graph.



    07.01.04 Assignment 196

    teacher-scored 15 points possible 20 minutes

    Assignment 196: Open the document entitled "Vocabulary Prenatal Terms" and redefine the definitions in your own words.

    07.01.04 Examples of Functions: Equations (Math I)

    We also know that we can model problems with equations. We have considered several types of equations to model sequences. We noted that sequences are functions. Question: are all sequences functions? Why or why not?

    Clearly one way we wish to represent functions is by an equation. In quarter 1 we spent most of the quarter working with equations of lines. Consider the following equation of a line:

    y = x. (eq. 1)



    Without being given any further information, we can assume that x can take any number from negative infinity to infinity. How can we determine if this equation is a function or not?

    One simple way is to check a few points. We could make a table, or write a set of ordered pairs, or some other way of checking points. Tables are always good.




    You get the idea. For any value of x, will there be more than one value of y? Is it clear that there will not? For each value of x, there is only one value of y. Will this be true for other equations of a line? What if the slope is negative? What if the line does not intercept the origin? What if the slope is steeper?

    Let's up the ante. How about this equation?

    y = x2. (eq. 2)



    Again, we can create a table.




    Is it clear that this is also a function? Does it matter that 16 shows up in the y column twice? Why not?

    One more, and I think we will be ready to look at some graphs. How about …

    y2 = x (eq. 3)



    In this equation, as all the others, x is the independent variable and y is the dependent variable. If we make a table with this data, we find




    Does it matter that 16 shows up in the x column twice? Why?

    Did you figure out that this equation is not a function? It is not a function because for the value x = 16, there are 2 different values of y, -4 and 4. The same occurs for nearly every value of x. This is not a function.

    Now, we wish to look at graphs. Here are the graphs of equations 1 and 2. The graph of equation 3 is below.




    Recall, we also determined that set 4 was a function. What do these graphs have in common with each other and with set 4?

    Following, we have the graph of equation 3. Consider that graph, and think about the graph of set 5 also. We determined that these are also not functions. What does the graph of equation 3 and set 5 have in common with each other, that these graphs do NOT have in common with the graphs of equations 1 and 2, and set 4?




    The test to determine if a graph is a function of one variable with respect to the other is called the vertical line test. Take a vertical line. Sweep it along the x-axis. If the vertical line intercepts the graph more than once at ANY point, the graph is NOT a function. If the line intercepts the graph only once, at all points in the domain, then the graph is a function.

    One thing that people often forget in that test, is you are merely testing if the graph is a function of one variable with respect to the other. There are many ways to write equations that in terms of x and y are not functions, so that they are functions of other variables.

    Next, let's consider a few graphs and determine if these are functions or not. Take a second, look over the graphs, and decide which ones represent equations where y is a function of x.




    Did you decide that graphs 1, 2, 4, and 5 were all graphs of equations in which y is a function of x?

    What if we wanted to determine if x is a function of y? What could you do to answer that question? Think about what you have done already. (Normally, we do write equations such that y is a function of x. That is the standard way to write a function. However, x and y are arbitrary terms. We could decide that we want to know if x is a function of y.)

    Graph 6 cannot be written as an equation where y is a function of x, or x is a function of y. However, it is a very important curve, and can be written as functions of other variables. Think about how that could work.

    What if you drew a circle on the floor and walked around the circle. Can you write that action as a function of position with respect to time? Could you graph the position with respect to time? Would it still look like a circle? (Would you be able to place that on a two-dimensional graph?)

    Do you think you are ready to apply these concepts?





    Each topic is divided into sections that include the following:

    • Warm Up - questions to answer to see if you are ready for the lesson.
    • Presentation - high quality video with excellent illustrations that teaches the topic.
    • Worked Examples - examples that are worked out step-by-step with narration.
    • Practice - quiz problems on the topic covered.
    • Review - practice test to check your knowledge before moving on.

    You are not required to complete every section. However, REMEMBER the goal is to MASTER the material!!



    07.01.04 Other Important Exponential and Logarithmic Functions (PreCalc)

    We started this quarter by considering how real problems can be solved by functions. There are numerous types of problems that can be solved by exponential and logarithmic functions. The basic function

    ƒ(x) = ex



    is used to model exponential growth, such as bacterial or compounded interest. So we use it to model things that start out small, are small for a long time, then grow very quickly.
    The inverse function

    ƒ(x) = ln x



    is used to model things that grow very slowly. It is also used to scale things that are exponential, so that the numbers are easier to work with. This includes things like earthquake magnitude and loudness.

    The basic function

    ƒ(x) = e-x



    is used to model exponential decay, such as radioactive decay. This is a function that drops quickly, but tapers off.

    This inverse function

    ƒ(x) = ln -x



    is used to model things that drop slowly, such as the debt owed on a student loan or credit card.

    These four functions represent less than half of the problems that can be modeled with exponential and logarithmic functions.

    What about the learning curve that Antonio observed? This started out steep, but seemed to approach a constant. The function ƒ(x) = ln x, has a similar shape, but actually increases to infinity. You probably know that no matter how long you practice, there is a limit to how fast you can swim. We need a different function.

    So here are the other four basic exponential and logarithmic functions you commonly see. With these eight functions, we can model most problems we encounter. (There are many other exponential andlogarithmic models we will not consider, although you will get to determine the properties of some of these in your homework.)

    The next basic function we consider is

    ƒ(x) = 1 - ex



    This function is similar in shape to the function ln -x, but instead of approaching a vertical asymptote on the right, it approaches a horizontal asymptote on the left. It is used to model population crashes.

    We also need to consider the function

    ƒ(x) = 1 - e -x



    This function can be used to model Antonio's improvement swimming. It starts out steep, then tapers off to a constant. It also is used to model the growth of a population that saturates.

    Next consider the function

    ƒ(x) = 1 - ln x



    Which is used to model problems that drop quickly at first, then slowly with time, but never approach a constant.

    Finally, we have the function

    ƒ(x) = 1 - ln -x



    Which is resembles ex, but increases slowly at first, then approaches a vertical asymptote.

    Notice that these last four functions are the first four functions inverted and shifted upwards.

    By shifting and scaling these eight functions you can model most of the problem that can be modeled by exponential and logarithmic functions. By combining these functions in less predictable ways, we can create all sorts of unusual graphs.



    07.01.04 Philosophies of China questions and chart (World Geography)

    teacher-scored 200 points possible 30 minutes

    **NOTE-This assignment was adapted from a lesson plan developed by Don Donn.**

    China is still being influenced by ancient philosophies, even though China is officially an Atheist country. You will take a close look at each of the major philosophies and apply them to problems that society faces today.

    After going to the sites listed below and studying each of the philosophies, answer the questions listed according to each of the philosophies. You will have four answers for the same question.

    QUESTIONS:
    • 1. You are failing your classes at school,when your guardians find out, you know that you will be in trouble. How will your guardians react?

    • 2. You have a couple of friends who are fighting with each other over a small situation. You want to remain friends with both of them. How will you handle this situation?

    • 3. A new student has entered one of your classes. You rather like this person and want to become friends, but all the other students in your class are making fun of the new students hair style. How should you act toward the new student?

    • 4. The Principal of your school has just announced that some vandalism has taken place in one of the bathrooms. You know who the person is who did this. What should you tell the Principal, or should you tell at all?

    • 5. You see an opportunity to get into your teachers computer and change you grade. How should you act?

    • 6. One of your friends is doing drugs and they have started to try and get you to start. How do you handle this situation?

    • 7. You have just found $100 outside of a store in town. What should you do?

    • 8. Your country has just gone to war with the neighboring country. Should you join the fight, or stay out of the conflict?

    • 9. The business you own has done well in the past, but now is in trouble of going under. You have been approached by someone who can save your business, but their plan is not totally legal. What are you going to do?

    • 10. According to each of the Philosophies describe what the best candidate for President would be like.

    After you have answered the questions, go and survey 5 different people from different age groups. Ask them the same questions. You are trying to find out which Philosophy each person would fit into the best.

    Create a chart with four columns, one column for each of the Philosophies. Place your data into the appropriate column. (Gender,Age, & Ethnic Group)
    After you have answered your questions and gathered answers for your survey, send your questions, answers, and the details on your survey to your instructor.

    Confucianism
    Taoism
    Buddhism
    Legalism

    You will be graded on your understanding of the four philosophies and your answers to the questions. Put some real thought into this one. It's worth a lot of points. Don't make the chart to hard. Just do it. SMILE this is fun.

    ***70% or higher is required to pass any assignments***

    Use these links to help you complete this assignment.

    07.01.04 Research resumé (English 12)

    teacher-scored 40 points possible 150 minutes

    This assignment affords you the opportunity to practice writing a resume--a skill that you will need to employ later in this class, and, almost certainly, in "real life" as well. A resume is an organized summary of a person's background, qualifications, and accomplishments. As a concise overview, an effective resume does not seek to list every specific detail in an individual's life. Instead, it touches on major points that would make a person well qualified for a prospective job.

    Resume writing is an important skill, and this assignment will provide an opportunity to practice it. Here, however, instead of writing a resume for your own life, you will produce a resume that provides a brief, condensed overview of the life of a notable historical figure or celebrity. This will enable you to practice both resume-writing and researching skills, as you will need to spend time gathering, sorting, and analyzing information on your chosen individual. Additionally, since, according to the Keirsey Temperament Sorter, the individual whom you select has or had a temperament similar to your own, it might prove interesting to see what he or she has accomplished or achieved.

    Since you're writing this resume for some other individual, there will obviously be some minor departures from traditional resume writing conventions. You don't need to specify addresses or phone numbers. Do include birthdates and, if relevant, death dates in the personal information, however. Instead of a Career Objective, you may attempt to formulate a Personal Objective for the resume subject based on the information you discover. Cite as much as you can about the subject's education, work experiences, and accomplishments and achievements.

    You may organize your resume by using some or all of the following categories: Personal Data; Personal and/or Professional Objectives; Educational Background; Employment Experience, Professional Honors and Affiliations; Publications and Creative Works; and Civic, Religious, and Service Activities. Information in your resume should be presented in reverse chronological order within categories. That is, list education, work experiences, accomplishments, etc., starting with the most recent first and working backwards in time.

    The information you present should be neat, visually appealing, grammatically correct, and consistent in presentation and format. Sloppiness--typos, poor grammar, and misspellings--and wordiness are major resume killers. Additionally, try to make use of strong action verbs such as achieved, attained, advised, built, composed, created, designed, developed, directed, established, improved, increased, integrated, managed, organized, performed, restored, solved, taught, and wrote.

    (See URL's for additional resume-writing resources.)

    Resume Evaluation Rubric

    Scoring criteria 5
    Excellent
    4
    Good
    3
    Needs Some Improvement
    2
    Needs Much Improvement
    1
    N/A
    All and only important parts are included.
    Resume items presented in reverse chronological order.
    Resume items highlight strengths of subject.
    White space, margins, and tabs used effectively and attractively.
    Strong action verbs are used.
    Information is clearly provided.
    Effective use of fonts, bolding, and special effects
    No spelling, grammar, or word usage errors.

    07.01.04 Research resumé links (English 12)

    07.01.04 Tips for Effective Communicating

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

    THE FOLLOWING ARE SOME IMPORTANT TIPS FOR EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATING

    How to Accept a Compliment:
    1. Look at the person.
    2. Smile
    3. Use a pleasant voice tone.
    4. Do not put down the compliment.
    5. Thank the person.

    How to Accept Criticism:
    1. Look at the person.
    2. Say O.K.
    3. No arguing.

    How to Accept No for an Answer:
    1. Look at the person.
    2. Say O.K.
    3. No arguing, whining, or pouting .
    4. If you don't understand why, ask calmly for a reason.
    5. If you disagree or have a complaint, bring it up later.

    How to Apologize:
    1. Look at the person.
    2. Use a pleasant voice tone.
    3. Make a specific statement of remorse.
    4. State a plan for future appropriate behavior.
    5. Ask the person to accept the apology.

    How to Disagree Appropriately:
    1. Look at the person.
    2. Use a pleasant voice tone.
    3. Make an empathy-concern statement.
    4. State disagreement specifically.
    5. Give a rationale.
    6. Say Thank You.

    How to Engage in a Conversation:
    1. Look at the person.
    2. Use a pleasant voice tone.
    3. Ask the person questions.
    4. Don't interrupt.
    5. Follow-up answers with a comment without changing the subject.

    How to Follow Instructions:
    1. Look at the person.
    2. Say O.K.
    3. Do task immediately.
    4. (Check back.)

    How to Get the Teacher's Attention:
    1. Look at the person.
    2. Raise your hand
    5. Wait for acknowledgement.
    3. After acknowledgement, ask question in a quiet voice tone.

    How to Give a Compliment:
    1. Look at the person.
    2. Smile.
    3. Use a pleasant voice tone.
    4. Make a positive praise statement.

    How to Give Negative Feedback:
    1. Look at the person.
    2. Use a calm voice tone.
    3. Make a positive statement or praise.
    4. State the problem specifically.
    5. Give a rationale why it is a problem.
    6. Offer a solution.
    7. Thank the person for listening.

    How to Greet Someone:
    1. Look at the person.
    2. Smile.
    3. Use a pleasant voice tone.
    4. Make a verbal greeting.

    How to Introduce Yourself:
    1. Look at the person.
    2. Smile.
    3. Use a pleasant voice tone.
    4. State your own name.
    5. Shake the person's hand.
    6. When departing say, "It was nice to meet you."

    How to Negotiate:
    1. Look at the person.
    2. Use a pleasant voice tone.
    3. Listen to others points without interrupting.
    4. State your position specifically and clearly.
    5. Give rationales for your position.
    6. Be willing to accept the others points(compromise).
    7. Thank him/her for their willingness to cooperate.

    How to Report Peer Behavior:
    1. Look at the person.
    2. Use a calm voice tone.
    3. Request to speak to the adult privately.
    4. Give a specific description of peer's inappropriate behavior.
    5. State a rationale for the report.
    6. Suggest possible solution or consequences.
    7. Thank the adult for listening.

    How to Resist Peer Pressure (or Say No):
    1. Look at the person.
    2. Use a calm voice tone.
    3. Thank them for including you.
    4. Explain that you do not want to participate.
    5. Offer an alternative activity.
    6. Continue to refuse to participate (if necessary).

    How to Volunteer:
    1. Look at the person.
    2. Use a pleasant voice tone.
    3. Ask the person if you could volunteer to help.
    4. State specifically the task you are volunteering to do.
    5. Give a rationale/benefit.

    - 1979 Father Flannigan's Boys' Home

    Exercise 48

    Write a description about a time when someone gave you a compliment that you really liked. What was their technique and why did it feel so good to you?

    07.01.04 Topic Two: Properties of Angles (Sec Dev Math)



    Each topic is divided into sections that include the following:

    • Warm Up - questions to answer to see if you are ready for the lesson.
    • Presentation - high quality video with excellent illustrations that teaches the topic.
    • Worked Examples - examples that are worked out step-by-step with narration.
    • Practice - quiz problems on the topic covered.
    • Review - practice test to check your knowledge before moving on.

    You are not required to complete every section. However, REMEMBER the goal is to MASTER the material!!



    07.01.04 Unit 7 test (MAP)

    computer-scored 60 points possible 50 minutes

    Take the unit 7 test.

    07.01.05 - Graphing Distance vs Time (Physics)

    You will notice that I measured the distance around the diamond. If I graph this data, I can use it to find information about the speed of the baseball player, but not information about the velocity. But, sometimes we are trying to find speed, so it is okay to start with speed.

    So, I want to make a graph of distance vs time using the data I found. Sometimes when you are making a graph, you can choose your x and y coordinates however you want. But, most of the time there is a definite "correct way" to do this. The x-axis is the independent variable, and the y-axis is the dependent variable.

    You may remember from the first quarter that the independent variable is the one that you change, and the dependent variable is the one that changes in response to what you are doing. Since time will always move forward at the same pace, it is not going to "change in response to you." Instead, the other thing (in this case--distance) will change. So, time is independent, and distance is dependent. Which means we put time on the x-axis, and distance on the y-axis.

    And here is my graph.




    The graph is almost a straight line. If the graph were a straight line, then the average and the instantaneous speed would be the same. So, we have a nearly straight line, which tells us that the average speed is approximately the instantaneous speed.

    But notice that the line is not quite straight. There is a very obvious curve near the origin, where the slope is increasing, then a couple of slight s curves, where the slope decreases, then increases. These appear to be centered on 90 ft and 180 ft, and 270 ft. The graph is pretty straight the rest of the way.

    Can you guess what the baseball player did? Obviously the player started from rest (this is science's way of saying he wasn't moving before he started). Then the player accelerated, ran for a few feet, then slowed down to round first base. The player sped up again, but only had a few feet of running at a constant speed before he slowed down again to round second base. The player sped up a third time, but had to slow down to round third base. Finally he sped up after third base, and ran straight home without slowing down.

    That sounds like the right way to do it.

    So, we can determine the slope from this graph; but since the changes are so small, and the graph has so much data on it, we may want to break it into segments in order to look at the instantaneous speeds.



    07.01.05 Assignment 197

    teacher-scored 20 points possible 60 minutes

    Assignment 197: Watch PowerPoint 35 entitled "Prenatal" and write a one-page paper describing the growth and changes that take place during the three trimesters of pregnancy.

    07.01.05 Exercise 49 Proper Communication (TL1)

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 15 minutes

    Exercise 49

    Write briefly about a time when you disagreed with someone using proper communication techniques. How did it go?

    07.01.05 Functions -- Assignment 1 (Math I)

    teacher-scored 60 points possible 60 minutes

    Complete

    Unit 07 -- Functions -- Assignment 1
    Identifying Functions

    Print out the attached assignment and complete the assignment in the space provided. You may use additional paper if needed. Once you have completed the assignment, scan it into the computer and convert it to an image file such as .pdf or .jpg. You may need to practice scanning pencil drawing so that you produce a clear, easily readable image. Finally, upload the image using the assignment submission window for this assignment. Alternately, you may wish to type the answers into a word processing document, convert this to an .rtf file, and upload this. If you do this, be sure to include the questions as well as the answers.

    This assignment is worth 60 points.

    Complete this assignment after reading Lesson 1.

    teacher-scored 60 points possible 60 minutes

    Complete

    Unit 07 -- Functions -- Assignment 1
    Identifying Functions

    Print out the attached assignment and complete the assignment in the space provided. You may use additional paper if needed. Once you have completed the assignment, scan it into the computer and convert it to an image file such as .pdf or .jpg. You may need to practice scanning pencil drawing so that you produce a clear, easily readable image. Finally, upload the image using the assignment submission window for this assignment. Alternately, you may wish to type the answers into a word processing document, convert this to an .rtf file, and upload this. If you do this, be sure to include the questions as well as the answers.

    This assignment is worth 60 points.

    Complete this assignment after reading Lesson 1.



    07.01.05 Journal entry: Job compatibility (English 12)

    teacher-scored 15 points possible 120 minutes

    One of the primary functions of this kind of temperament typing is to help people find careers that are compatible with their personality. For this journal entry, I want you to check out some of the resources that match temperament types to a sampling of career interests. Note that these lists (see links in URL's) represent careers and jobs people of various types tend to enjoy doing. The job requirements are similar to the personality tendancies of the various temperament types.


    • Common Careers for Personality Types
    • Jedi Girl: Careers and Jobs

    It is important to remember that these informal resources do not list all the jobs considered compatible with the temperament types. Also, it is very important to remember that people can, and frequently do, fill jobs that are dissimilar to their personality. In fact, this happens all the time...and sometimes works out quite well. Still, check out the sites and jot down several careers from the various lists that are of interest to you. For each occupation listed comment on why it appeals to you, what you know about it, and what additional information you'd like to find out about it? If an occupation of interest to you doesn't appear on any of the lists, list and write about it any way. Make sure the "dream job" you alluded to earlier is on the list, even if it's not one of the jobs considered compatible with your tag.

    Next go to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook. The Occupational Outlook Handbook is a nationally recognized source of career information designed to provide valuable assistance to individuals making decisions about their future work lives. By clicking on the index in the upper-right corner, you'll find you can access most careers by simply clicking on the appropriate letter of the alphabet. If you don't know the exact job title of a specific career, try doing a keyword search for a word that is associated with the career. This will enable you to view all the jobs that contain that keyword in their description. For each career you cited as seeming somewhat interesting or appealing, jot down what you consider to be important information about that career as presented in the Handbook.

    If you can't find the information you're looking for from the Occupational Outlook Handbook, you might want to try some of the following career resources (see URL's):


    • Princeton Review Career Information
    • Career Knowledgebank
    • Career Voyages
    • University of Manitoba: Exploring Occupations
    • Career Exploration Links
    • America's Career InfoNet
    • Career Biographies
    • Santa Fe Career Resource Center
    • JobStar's Guides for Specific Careers
    • Career Resources by Field
    • CollegeBoard's Career Browser
    • BLM's Career Information
    • What Do They Do
    • College Majors and Career Information
    • Salary.Com

    Survey the information you noted about the various careers, and use it to help you narrow your career possibilities to a single career that seems most appealling and realistic, based on the information you've just gathered. Once you narrow it down, print out the information from the Handbook (or other sources) about the specific career option you have decided to focus on. You will utilize this information for a subsequent assignment.

    Evaluation:
    Journal entries are an opportunity to explore ideas and develop fluency with language in an informal context. You will be assessed a point value from 1 to 15 points, based on the effort and thoughtfulness demonstrated in your response.

    07.01.05 Journal entry: Job compatibility links (English 12)

    07.01.05 Regions of China (World Geography)

    teacher-scored 60 points possible 30 minutes

    Create a four-column chart for each of the regions of China. Label the columns Landforms, Climate, Economic Activities, and Unique Culture. Find the information to fill in your chart from the internet. You must also create a map of China that shows each of the four regions of China. From your charts, place the major landforms on your maps. Turn your charts and map into your instructor.

    • Northwest

    Country Index

    Click on "C" at the top of the index. Then find China. The left hand column will give you some additional information.

    You will be graded on the completeness of the chart and the map.
    ***70% or higher is required to pass any assignment***

    • Northeast
    • Southeast
    • Southwest

    Use these URLs to help you with this assignment.

    07.01.05 Topic Three: Triangles (Sec Dev Math)

    Geometric shapes, also called figures, are an important part of the study of geometry. The triangle is one of the basic shapes in geometry. It is the simplest shape within a classification of shapes called polygons. All triangles have three sides and three angles, but they come in many different shapes and sizes. Within the group of all triangles, the characteristics of a triangle’s sides and angles are used to classify it even further. Triangles have some important characteristics, and understanding these characteristics allows you to apply the ideas in real-world problems.




    The sum of the measures of the interior angles of any triangle is 180º. Congruent triangles are triangles of the same size and shape. They have corresponding sides of equal length and corresponding angles of the same measurement. Similar triangles have the same shape, but not necessarily the same size. The lengths of their sides are proportional. Knowledge of triangles can be a helpful in solving real-world problems.

    If after completing this topic you can state without hesitation that...

    • I can identify equilateral, isosceles, scalene, acute, right, and obtuse triangles.
    • I can identify whether triangles are similar, congruent, or neither.
    • I can identify corresponding sides of congruent and similar triangles.
    • I can find the missing measurements in a pair of similar triangles.
    • I can solve application problems involving similar triangles.

    …you are ready for the next topic! Otherwise, go back and review the material before moving on.

    Click on the link below to get started:



    07.01.05 Two More Exponential Functions (PreCalc)

    Before we move on from this lesson, we must consider two more important functions, the S-curve and the bell curve.

    The S curve is also called the sigmoid curve, and it was developed to model population growth. Initially, populations grow very slowly, but once there are enough members, the growth becomes much more rapid. However, as the population depletes its resources, the growth again becomes stagnant.

    The basic function that models this behavior is



    and the curve is shown at the right. As you can see it resembles an S turned on its side.

    When a person learns a new skill, this curve also illustrates his/her progress. Initially, the new skill is difficult, so the progress is very slow. Then after a while, the skill becomes easier, and the student progresses quickly. However, after a time, the student reaches his/her mental or physical limits, and additional time spent practicing again yields minimal improvements.

    Another important exponential function is the bell curve, more properly called a Gaussian curve. This curve represent a normal distribution, and you will learn more about this in the fourth quarter.

    The basic function with this shape is

    ƒ(x) = e−x2



    and this function is essential in understanding statistics. As you can see, it does look like a bell.

    In statistics, a normal population is distributed via a Gaussian curve. For example the heights of students in a classroom will be roughly distributed like this. Random errors are distributed like this. The standard error you calculated in the first quarter is based on this function. It is an enormously important function.

    So, are you ready to determine the properties of these functions?



    07.01.06 - Running to First Base, Average Velocity (Physics)

    Let's just graph the first 90 feet of the baseball player's path. Again, we put time on the x-axis and distance on the y-axis. We get the following graph.




    The first thing I want to point out is since we are not changing direction, we can get our instantaneous velocity off this graph, as well as the instantaneous speed.

    Set up the coordinate system so that the origin is at home plate, the x-axis is the line from home plate to first base, and the y-axis is the line from home plate to third base.

    So, my velocity for this stretch of the run is in the positive "x" direction. I can find the magnitude of that velocity (or the speed) from the graph.

    First, let's begin by considering the average velocity for this time: x0 = 0 ft, t0 = 0 s, x = 90.0 ft, and t = 4.71 s. ( I got that last value for t off the data table. I would not be able to be that precise from the graph.) Then



    So the magnitude of the velocity is



    This tells us that the baseball player's average velocity for the run to first base is less than his average velocity for the entire run around the bases. Does this surprise you? It shouldn't. He needed to start from rest, it takes time to speed up.

    I want to mention that we can treat velocity like a scalar if we are explicit about which direction the velocity is in. This is similar to what we did with forces in the first quarter.



    07.01.06 Exercise 50/Unit Submission (TL1)

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 20 minutes

    NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION CLUES

    Confidence:
    - Steepling (hands or arms brought together to form a church steeple)
    - Hands joined together behind the body
    - Feet up on the desk
    - Elevating oneself
    - Leaning back in a seated position with both hands supporting head

    Boredom:
    - Drumming on table
    - Tapping with feet
    - Head in hand
    - Doodling
    - Swinging of crossed feet

    Courtship - Men:
    - Pulling up socks
    - Holding eyes longer than is necessary
    - Accidental contact with girl by man
    - Arranging tie or shirt sleeves
    - Hands in front of pants with thumbs locked inside belt
    - Unbuttoning jacket or taking it off
    - Fiddling with something
    - Glancing at girl's body and letting her see the glance
    - Moving in closer to the person

    Nervousness:
    - Clearing throat
    - Whew sound
    - Whistling
    - Smoking cigarettes
    - Fidgeting in a chair
    - Tugging at pants while sitting
    - Jingling money in pockets
    - Tugging at ear
    - Clenched fist
    - Wringing of the hands
    - Playing with pencils, notebooks, or eyeglasses in mouth
    - Touching yourself while speaking to others

    Courtship - Women:
    - Dangling
    - Holding part of her body (thigh, hip, calf) in the presence of a gentleman
    - Pushing her hair back behind the ear
    - Licking her lips
    - Slowly crossing and uncrossing legs
    - Aroma (using perfume to attract men)
    - Sitting on one leg
    - Tense muscles
    - Smoothing her dress
    From Jan Hargrave, P. O. Box 460065, Houston, TX 77056-8065

    Exercise 50

    a. Have you ever noticed these actions by someone else?
    b. What happened and how did it make you feel?

    #50 is the final Exercise of UNIT SEVEN, so paste all of your answers into #50. The number at the top in the grade book is 07.01.06.

    07.01.06 Introduction to Exponential and Logarithmic Functions - Links (PreCalc)



    Use these links for supplemental instruction and additional practice.



    07.01.06 Occupational Interview (English 12)

    teacher-scored 30 points possible 180 minutes

    You've had a chance to explore some of the factual information about a specific career. Such facts, however, don't really tell the whole picture. Consequently, for this assignment, I'd like you to seek out someone who does the job which you selected in the previous journal entry.

    For this assignment, it would be ideal to have a person whom you could talk with directly either face-to-face or via email. Even if you don't know a professional in your field of interest, oftentimes one can be contacted via friends, family, or even the yellow pages. If you're courteous, I think you'll find most people are actually quite flattered that you're interested in what they do, and they're typically pretty willing to be interviewed, provided you make interviewing arrangements at their convenience.

    Another possible method of contacting a professional in a specific field is via the various ask-an-expert sites available on the Internet. Such sites might also provide you an opportunity to rifle questions at a wide assortment of professionals in virtually every field and discipline. In the links for this activity are some useful URL's you might want to explore that link students with experts:


    • Ask An Expert Resources
    • Pitsco's Ask An Expert
    • Library Spot's Ask an Expert

    However you chose to locate your career research source, try to identify questions for him or her that the factual information you've accessed thus far does not seem to adequately address. Your list of questions may include, although does not need to be limited to the following:

    1. What is a typical day like for you?
    2. What are the best aspects of this profession?
    3. What are the least desirable aspects of this profession?
    4. Who are the major employers of people in this field?
    5. What does it take to succeed?
    6. What educational background is required?
    7. Are there related jobs?
    8. What professional organizations or associations are affiliated with this career?
    9. Are there any hot topics or controversial issues associated with this career?
    10. Are there any magazines or periodicals that people in this field typically read?
    11. Are there any books, tv shows, or movies that adequately portray people in this profession?
    12. What does the future hold for this particular career?
    13. What kind of quality of life does this career afford?

    Please submit a detailed transcript of your interview. (If you're interviewing in person, you may want to record your interview to make it easier to produce your transcript.) Be sure to cite the name of your subject, what business or organization he or she is affiliated with, the date the interview took place, and the subject's address, telephone number, and, if applicable, email address. Also, establish the credibility of your subject (i.e., what makes him an authority on that particular occupation?).

    Evaluation:
    This assignment, which is worth 30 points, will be evaluated based on the comprehensiveness of your interview. Your transcript should be edited and neatly presented. There will be a 10-point deduction if you fail to establish the requested information about your subject's credibility and/or qualifications.

    07.01.06 Occupational Interview links (English 12)

    07.01.06 Topic Three: Triangles (Sec Dev Math)



    Each topic is divided into sections that include the following:

    • Warm Up - questions to answer to see if you are ready for the lesson.
    • Presentation - high quality video with excellent illustrations that teaches the topic.
    • Worked Examples - examples that are worked out step-by-step with narration.
    • Practice - quiz problems on the topic covered.
    • Review - practice test to check your knowledge before moving on.

    You are not required to complete every section. However, REMEMBER the goal is to MASTER the material!!



    07.01.07 - Running to First Base, Instantaneous Velocity (Physics)

    So, that was great, but our goal was really to find the instantaneous velocity. We already know how to find the average velocity.

    Since the instantaneous velocity has a different value for different places on the graph, the first thing we need to decide is "At what time do we want to find the instantaneous velocity?" So, because I can pick whichever time I want, I am going to choose the instantaneous velocity at the point t = 0.96 s (again, I pulled that time off the data table).

    So, at this point on our graph, we want to draw a tangent to the graph. A tangent is a line that just touches the graph at that point. The tangent at t = 0.96 s is drawn on the graph below, it is the green line.




    Can you see how the green line just touches the red line? That is the tangent. The slope of the graph at that point has the same slope as the tangent. So we just need to find the slope of the tangent.

    And, like we did before, we pick two points. Since my graph doesn't have a grid, the best two points are the places where the green line crosses the box around the graph. So for a best estimate, I get the values xo = 0 ft, t0 = 0.5 s, x = 56 ft, and t = 5 s.



    (Notice I lost some precision reading these values off the graph. I can't determine the values as precisely from the graph as I could from my original data.)

    So, the slope of the tangent line is then



    Finally, since the slope of the tangent is the same as the slope of the graph at that point, and since the velocity is the slope of the graph at that point, the velocity at that point is the slope of the tangent.

    Or, in other words,



    Ready to try another point?



    07.01.07 Exponential and Logarithmic Functions -- Assignment 1 (PreCalc)

    both teacher- and computer-scored 45 points possible 60 minutes

    Complete

    Unit 07 -- Exponential and Logarithmic Functions -- Assignment 1
    Using Exponents and Logarithms

    Work on this quiz/assignment at the link below this lesson. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do the assignment, as well as get immediate feedback.

    Complete this assignment after reading Lesson 1.

    __________________________________

    Using Exponents and Logarithms

    It is assumed that you can do basic math with exponents and logarithms. So, prove it.

    You will be allowed 1 attempt, but multiple submissions. You will be penalized for each incorrect submission. You will not be penalized for a correct submission. This means you will score better by carefully considering each question before answering. But it also means you will score better by submitting answers until you have a correct answer, instead of closing the quiz without checking your work.

    You should complete this assignment after reading Lesson 1.

    NOTE: since there are teacher-scored questions on this test, when you first finish the test, the computer will calculate your score as if you had zeros on those questions. Don't panic! After I score the essay-type questions, your score should be higher.



    07.01.07 Journal entry: job overview (English 12)

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 60 minutes

    You've researched about a career of interest in various online resources and interviewed a credible professional who works in that arena. For this journal entry, I'd like you to give a broad overview of what you found out. Comment on whether or not you are still genuinely interested in this career, based on the information you uncovered.

    Evaluation:
    Journal entries are an opportunity to explore ideas and develop fluency with language in an informal context. You will be assessed a point value from 1 to 10 points, based on the effort and thoughtfulness demonstrated in your response.

    07.01.07 Topic Four: The Pythagorean Theorem (Sec Dev Math)

    Pythagoras studied right triangles, and the relationships between the legs and the hypotenuse of a right triangle, before deriving his theory.

    If a and b are the lengths of the legs of a right triangle and c is the length of the hypotenuse, then the sum of the squares of the lengths of the legs is equal to the square of the length of the hypotenuse.


    NROC Image



    This relationship is represented by the formula: a2 + b2 = c2.

    Put simply, if you know the lengths of two sides of a right triangle, you can apply the Pythagorean Theorem to find the length of the third side. Remember, this theorem only works for right triangles.

    If after completing this topic you can state without hesitation that...

    • I can use the Pythagorean Theorem to find the unknown side of a right triangle.
    • I can solve application problems involving the Pythagorean Theorem.

    ……you have completed Lesson One and are ready for Quiz 18! Otherwise, go back and review the material before moving on.

    Click on the link below to get started:



    07.01.08 - Running to First Base, Instantaneous Velocity #2 (Physics)

    Ready to try this again? This time lets pick a time near the center of the graph. How about 45 ft? From our data table this distance occurs at t = 2.73 s. Drawing our best estimate of a tangent through this point, we get the following graph, where the tangent is again the green line.




    Notice that this line actually is right on top of the red line for much of the graph! This is very important! When the slope of the graph is constant (ie., the points where the tangent is on top of the graph) the average velocity (for that time) is equal to the instantaneous velocity. Or more often we say:

    If the velocity is constant, the instantaneous velocity equals the average velocity.

    Okay, back to finding the instantaneous velocity. Actually, since the average velocity is equal to the instantaneous velocity at t = 2.73 s, we can use values from our data table. Since I can actually reduce the error by choosing my points over a larger range, I think I will pick the values for x = 30 ft and x = 60 ft. (You could pick any values you like in the range with constant velocity). This will give us x0 = 30.0 ft, x = 60.0 ft, to = 2.15 s, and t = 3.31 s. Then



    And the instantaneous velocity is



    Or it is more correct to say that



    Think you can do this on your own?



    07.01.08 Exponential and Logarithmic Functions -- Assignment 2, part 1 (PreCalc)

    computer-scored 36 points possible 40 minutes

    Complete

    Unit 07 -- Exponential and Logarithmic Functions -- Assignment 2, part 1
    Properties of Basic Exponential and Logarithmic Functions

    Work on this quiz/assignment at the link below this lesson. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do the assignment, as well as get immediate feedback.

    _____________________________________

    Properties of Basic Exponential and Logarithmic Functions

    In this assignment I want you to prove that you can describe an exponential or logarithmic function. You will need to complete each of the following:

    • Determine the domain and range.

    • Find the x-intercept(s) and y-intercept.

    • Determine the intervals over which the graph is increasing (has positive slope) and decreasing (has negative slope).

    • Identify any points where the slope is zero or undefined.

    • Find the asymptotes if any (horizontal and vertical).

    • Determine if the function is one-to-one or not.

    • Determine if the function is continuous and smooth, continuous but not smooth or discontinuous.

    • Determine intervals over which the curvature is positive (curved upwards) or negative (curved downwards).

    • Identify any local minimums and maximums.

    • Determine the end behavior.

    • Determine the limit of ƒ(x) as x approaches infinity and the limit of ƒ(x) as x approaches negative infinity.

    • Determine the limit of ƒ(x) as x approaches any discontinuities from the right and the left.

    • Identify the symmetry of the function (even, odd or neither).

    You will be allowed 1 attempt, but multiple submissions. You will be penalized for each incorrect submission. You will not be penalized for a correct submission. This means you will score better by carefully considering each question before answering. But it also means you will score better by submitting answers until you have a correct answer, instead of closing the quiz without checking your work.

    Complete this assignment after reading Lesson 1.



    07.01.08 Occupational brochure (English 12)

    teacher-scored 40 points possible 150 minutes

    As a result of this assignment, the student will:


    • learn to present information in an organized and visually appealing format
    • provide credible information targeted to a specific audience
    • use language to inform and persuade

    This assignment will require that you take the information you've gleaned as a result of your extensive research and put it in a concise, visually appealing format. Pretend you are an occupational recruiter looking for people to fill job vacancies in the field you've investigated. Your salary depends on the number of qualified candidates you can attract to the profession. While you want to attract people who will do a good job, you also want to give enough information to discourage those individuals ill-suited for this particular profession, since your salary is also based on the level of performance of the recruits you sign-on. Consequently, you will need to produce an attractive and informative six-panel, tri-fold brochure that provides people with information about "the nuts and bolts" of your specific profession.

    Besides researching and developing the content for your brochure, you will also need to think about how to best present the information you discover. Before you get started on your brochure, one of the best things you can do is to collect some brochures from different companies and organizations. Review them and analyze the various approaches that were taken. Study the copy, the pictures and the general layout and try to determine why some are more appealing than others.

    Be aware that most word-processing programs have special templates for doing brochures and pamphlets. Using one of these is the easiest way to format your brochure. As a more rudimentary option, you can use the landscape option for your paper orientation, and then select for your text to be in three columns. (The site in the URL's explains how to do this using Word.) This also will give you the makings of a tri-fold pamphlet.

    Be mindful of the fact that the brochure should contain six panels (three on the front and three on the back). If you are not using a template, I suggest you plan your brochure out by taking a blank piece of paper and folding it like a tri-fold brochure. Note which panel will be the cover of the brochure and plan your pamphlet accordingly.

    As you plan and produce your brochure, keep in mind some of the following tips:


    • design the front cover to grab attention in a credible fashion
    • use different size fonts and headings to organize material
    • cite credible facts and statistics (provide information about the source of such information)
    • consider including testimonials
    • if possible, show pictures of people engaged in relevant activities
    • stress names of companies and organizations that use relevant services
    • make it look too important to throw away
    • sell the benefits of the career
    • use charts and graphs and other visuals where appropriate
    • make certain your text is free from grammatical errors
    • use white space effectively
    • make your text easy to read and the organization apparent
    • use bold headlines and subheads to break up the copy and encourage prospects to read on
    • use words that sell (i.e., active, specific, present-tense words promising results and benefits crucial to target audience)
    • use language that compels the reader to take action

    Evaluation:

    Presentation combines both visual and verbal elements. It is the way we "exhibit" our message on paper. Even if our ideas, words, and sentences are vivid, precise, and well constructed, the piece will not be inviting to read unless the guidelines of presentation are present.

    Although not all of the following elements below are necessary for each brochure, use this checklist to make sure you're on the right track. Some of the questions to ask yourself are:


    • Does the front cover grab attention?
    • Does it have pictures of things or people associated with the time period and geographic location?
    • Does it use emphatic devices (bullets, bold headings, underlining, etc.)?
    • Does it contain interesting and accurate historical information?
    • Does it sell the vacation package?
    • Is it free of grammatical errors?
    • Is there sufficient white space?
    • Is it easy to read?
    • Does the message flow?

    07.01.08 Occupational brochure links (English 12)

    07.01.08 Topic Four: The Pythagorean Theorem (Sec Dev Math)



    Each topic is divided into sections that include the following:

    • Warm Up - questions to answer to see if you are ready for the lesson.
    • Presentation - high quality video with excellent illustrations that teaches the topic.
    • Worked Examples - examples that are worked out step-by-step with narration.
    • Practice - quiz problems on the topic covered.
    • Review - practice test to check your knowledge before moving on.

    You are not required to complete every section. However, REMEMBER the goal is to MASTER the material!!



    07.01.09 - Displacement vs Time (Physics)

    From the previous couple of pages, I hope you got the point that the distance vs time graph just gives you the speed, but the displacement vs time graph gives you a velocity. So, you may be wondering, "Can you make a displacement vs time graph for the full path?"

    Why yes! Of course, I need to convert my data from total distance to location in space. Again, the origin is at home-plate. The baseline from home to first is the x-axis, and the baseline from home plate to third base is the y-axis. Then every point in the baseball players path can be written as a set of numbers, an x coordinate, and a y coordinate. My new data table looks like this




    This actually is a bit more informative than the previous data table. I can see how the player's position changes. First the x coordinate increases, while the y coordinate stays zero. Then the x coordinate stays at 90, and the y coordinate increases. Next the x coordinate goes back to zero, and the y coordinate stays at 90. Finally, the y coordinate goes back to zero, and the x coordinate stays at zero. It is more obvious that the player ran a complete loop.

    But, I can't guess anything about the velocity. I will need to make a graph.





    07.01.09 Exponential and Logarithmic Functions -- Assignment 2, part 2 (PreCalc)

    teacher-scored 9 points possible 20 minutes

    Complete

    Unit 07 -- Exponential and Logarithmic Functions -- Assignment 2, part 2
    Exponential and Logarithmic Graphs

    Print out the attached assignment and complete the graphs on graph paper or on the computer with an appropriate graphing program. You may use additional paper if needed. Once you have completed the assignment, scan it into the computer and convert it to an image file such as .pdf or .jpg. You may need to practice scanning pencil drawings so that you produce a clear, easily readable image. Finally, upload the image using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

    Complete this assignment after you finish reading lesson 1.



    07.01.09 Journal entry: Personal Reflection essay (English 12)

    teacher-scored 10 points possible 60 minutes

    For this journal entry, I'd like you to write an informal response to this question: How have I, as a potential graduate, exhibited the skills, knowledge, and attitudes needed to prepare me for the "real world?" In the context of your response, you may find it necessary to examine your past performance, future goals, and philosophy of life.

    Here are a few questions to help get you started:


    1. How does my background impact who I am today?
    2. How am I smart? How do I show that I am? What can I do well?
    3. Why am I here? What do I believe? What is important? What is my philosophy of life?
    4. Why should I be graduated?
    5. Where am I going? How will I get there? Why should I be hired? Why should I be accepted into college or technical training?
    6. How am I a caring person and effective user of ideas and information?
    7. How am I an effective member of the community (local, state, country, world)?
    8. Who am I?
    9. How has my creativity been encouraged?
    10. What do I regret or wish I could do over?

    Evaluation:
    Journal entries are an opportunity to explore ideas and develop fluency with language in an informal context. You will be assessed a point value from 1 to 10 points, based on the effort and thoughtfulness demonstrated in your response.

    07.01.09 Quiz 18 (Sec Dev Math)

    computer-scored 10 points possible 30 minutes

    Now that you have completed the NROC's Lesson on Basic Geometric Concepts and Figures you should be prepared for Quiz 18.
     

    07.01.10 - Another Graph (Physics)

    To graph that set of data, we need to make a 3-D graph. To make it most readable, I will switch time to the z-axis. There is not a well- established set of rules for dependent and independent variables for 3-D graphs. So, basically, if you need a 3-D graph, you play with the orientation until it makes sense. A nonsensical graph is useless.

    Here is the 3-D data, which is really cool!

    But it is not very useful. I actually can read very little information off of this graph.




    It is worth noting that I needed 3 dimensions to plot something that actually occurred in 2-D. This implies that I would need 4 dimensions to plot something in 3-D. This is actually impossible. So, you don't see many attempts at plotting 3-D motion. We usually try to cut down as many dimensions as we can by carefully choosing the coordinate system.

    Anyway, it would be more useful to just look at the four different sections one graph at a time.



    07.01.10 Exponential and Logarithmic Functions -- Assignment 3 (PreCalc)

    teacher-scored 55 points possible 60 minutes

    Complete

    Unit 07 -- Exponential and Logarithmic Functions -- Assignment 3
    Properties of Other Exponential and Logarithmic Functions

    This assignment is found on the course web-site. The assignment is computer graded, which should make it easier to do the assignment, as well as get immediate feedback.

    Complete this assignment after reading Lesson 1.

    _______________________________________

    Properties of Other Exponential and Logarithmic Functions

    In this assignment I want you to prove that you can describe an exponential or logarithmic function. You will need to complete each of the following:

    • Determine the domain and range.

    • Find the x-intercept(s) and y-intercept.

    • Determine the intervals over which the graph is increasing (has positive slope) and decreasing (has negative slope).

    • Identify any points where the slope is zero or undefined.

    • Find the asymptotes if any (horizontal and vertical).

    • Determine if the function is one-to-one or not.

    • Determine if the function is continuous and smooth, continuous but not smooth or discontinuous.

    • Determine intervals over which the curvature is positive (curved upwards) or negative (curved downwards).

    • Identify any local minimums and maximums.

    • Determine the end behavior.

    • Determine the limit of ƒ(x) as x approaches infinity and the limit of ƒ(x) as x approaches negative infinity.

    • Determine the limit of ƒ(x) as x approaches any discontinuities from the right and the left.

    • Identify the symmetry of the function (even, odd or neither).

    You will be allowed 1 attempt, but multiple submissions. You will be penalized for each incorrect submission. You will not be penalized for a correct submission. This means you will score better by carefully considering each question before answering. But it also means you will score better by submitting answers until you have a correct answer, instead of closing the quiz without checking your work.

    Complete this assignment after reading Lesson 1.



    07.01.10 Future Resumé (English 12)

    teacher-scored 30 points possible 90 minutes

    As a result of this assignment, the student will:


    • employ effective essay-writing skills
    • establish long-range personal goals and objectives

    As established earlier, a resume is a very important document. It is a personal data sheet which summarizes your career objective(s), education, training, work experience, activities, accomplishments, skills and abilities, honors, and interests. This data gives a potential employer the information necessary to determine if your qualifications meet the job requirements.

    A well-prepared resume helps you become aware of your own qualifications, skills, and strengths, and will give you a feeling of confidence when you apply for a job. The information on your resume will help you fill out a job application. It will show the employer that you are organized and prepared.

    For this assignment, you will do a resume with a slight twist. Instead of simply chronicling who you are and what you've accomplished as of right now, this resume will be based on a projection of where you hope to be in ten years. This assignment is, of course, speculative and hypothetical, but it will necessitate that you indicate a desired course or direction for your life. In addition to once again practicing an important occupational skill, this resume will serve as a gameplan of sorts for future activities and endeavors. Like any good gameplan, it will likely be adjusted and refined with time--none of us, afterall, can see perfectly into the future. Nonetheless, it might be a good idea to consider the following excerpt from Alice in Wonderland:

    "Cheshire-Puss,"...said Alice, "would you tell me please, which way I ought to go from here?"
    "That depends a good deal on where you want to get to," said the Cat.
    "I don't much care where--" said Alice.
    "Then it doesn't matter which way you go," said the Cat.
    "--so long as I get somewhere," Alice added as an explanation.
    "Oh, you're sure to do that," said the Cat, "if you only walk long enough."07.1.10 Cheshire Cat07.1.10 Cheshire Cat

    Resume Evaluation Rubric

    Scoring criteria 5
    Excellent
    4
    Good
    3
    Needs Some Improvement
    2
    Needs Much Improvement
    1
    N/A
    All and only important résumé parts are included.
    Résumé items presented in reverse chronological order.
    Résumé items highlight strengths of subject.
    White space, margins, and tabs used effectively and attractively.
    Strong action verbs are used.
    Information is clearly provided.
    Effective use of fonts, bolding, and special effects
    No spelling, grammar, or word usage errors.

    07.01.11 - Four More Graphs: the First Two (Physics)

    And here is the entire path of the baseball player, divided appropriately into four graphs. Each graph can be used to determine the velocity at any time. See if you can.




    You've seen this one before, the baseball player starts from rest, speeds up, then slows down as the runner approaches first base.




    There is a little bit of a curve initially as the runner speeds up after turning, there is a period of what looks like constant velocity (you could draw a tangent to check) then the runner slows down again to round second. The speed is much more uniform here.



    07.01.12 - Four More Graphs: the Last Two (Physics)

    After the runner rounds second, the nature of our displacement vs time graph changes dramatically from the original distance vs time graph we considered.




    In particular, did you notice that the slope has changed? This is because he is running back towards the origin. In this case, he is running in the negative "x" direction. Even though the slope is negative, can you tell that the runner speeds up, runs at a constant rate then slows down to round third? The slope becomes more negative initially and less negative near the end.




    This is the last graph, and is also negative. This time, the baseball player is running in the negative "y" direction. This graph looks like it is curved downward. The slope is getting more and more negative.

    What does that mean? It means that the runner is running faster to get to home plate. Really! Shall I prove it to you? Let's calculate the velocity!



    07.01.13 - Running to Home Plate (Physics)

    So, let's find the baseball player's velocity (and speed) near third base, or at the beginning of the graph. For no particularly good reason, I think I will choose the 3rd point from the left, t = 12.93 s, and draw a tangent to that point like this.




    Like previously, I will pick 2 points off the graph as best as I can. So I will again choose the points where the tangent line crosses the edge of the box: y0 = 90 ft, t0 = 12.6 s, y = 15 ft, and t = 16.5 s.



    (Notice that the change in time is positive. Change in time should always be positive. Time always moves forward!)

    So, the velocity is found by this slope,



    and the velocity is:



    (It would also have been okay to say v(t=12.93 s) = -19 ft/s in the "y" direction.)

    And the baseball players speed at this time was 19 ft/s.

    So, let's continue. What is the baseball player's velocity and speed as he nears home plate?

    I picked the 4th point from the right, or t = 15.92 to draw my tangent at.




    So, picking 2 points off the graph as best as I can, I choose the points: y0 = 90 ft, t0 = 13.1 s, y = 0 ft, and t = 16.3 s.



    Then velocity is the slope



    or



    And the ball player's speed is 28 ft/s, which means he sped up.

    So here we have an increase in speed, while the velocity becomes more negative. You okay with that?



    07.01.14 - Velocity Lab (Physics)

    teacher-scored 50 points possible 60 minutes

    In this lab activity you will measure and graph the motion of an object with nearly constant velocity.

    I want you to write your own lab. Your goal is to observe an object in motion, collect data on its displacement and time, graph that data, and calculate the average and instantaneous velocity. Because I would like you to observe simple motion, I would like you to observe an object with nearly constant velocity. Constant velocity is a rare thing, so your object will experience some changes in velocity. But hopefully these will be small, and that you will have a reasonable period of constant velocity during the motion.

    Remember from the first quarter, in order to have constant velocity, the net force on an object must be zero. There are a couple ways to get this.

    One way is to have horizontal motion with no forces in the horizontal direction, and balanced (gravity and normal forces) in the vertical direction. An example of this would be a hockey puck sliding across the ice, an air hockey puck sliding across the air hockey table, or even a piece of dry ice sliding across a flat table. These are not truly frictionless circumstances, so you will see a constant (but small) slowing of your item if you choose something like this.

    Another way is for the forces in the direction of motion to be balanced. This means that you need both a force pulling things forward, and a force (frictional) holding things back. A regular coffee filter will fall at a nearly constant velocity because the force of air resistance balances the force of gravity almost instantly. Obviously the coffee filter begins falling from rest, so there will be an initial period of speeding up, but the velocity should be nearly constant after that. (I hear that a cupcake liner will work also.)

    An important part of being a scientist is explaining your experiments so that other scientists can reproduce your experiment and confirm your results. So, I want you to write a mini-lab report. Please write clearly and in complete sentences. You don't need to give long answers, but make sure your meaning is clear. Another student should be able to read your lab and understand it well enough to repeat your experiment (I won't actually give it to another student, of course). I've provided an outline for you with hints in parentheses. I suggest you read the whole outline before starting.

    ---------------------------

    Purpose

    The purpose of this lab is to calculate the velocity of a moving object by measuring the object's displacement and time, graphing that data, and then using the graph to calculate the velocity.

    Materials

    I used the following materials:

    (You do not need to write in complete sentences for the Materials section. Just list all the items you used. You will obviously need a stopwatch (or some other reasonably precise measuring device), and a meterstick or ruler or tape measure or something so you can measure the time and the displacement. In addition, you will need an object that displays nearly constant motion.)

    Procedure

    (Tell me what you did. Include enough detail so that another student could repeat your lab. There are many right ways to do this lab. Some are easier than others. Keep your goal in mind and read the whole outline before starting. Remember that you will need enough data to make a smooth graph.)

    Data

    (Record your data here. You do not need to write in complete sentences in the Data section. A clearly labeled data table would be good.)

    Graphing

    (Draw your graph here. Again, you do not need to write in complete sentences in the Graphing section. Your graph should have the axes clearly labeled (time on the x-axis, displacement on the y-axis), and a smooth line drawn connecting (most) of the points. Because there are some changes in velocity, a single straight line will not connect all the points, and because of uncertainty in your measurements, you may find points that don't quite lie on a nice line. But draw the best line you can through the points. Then pick the straightest part of the graph to draw your tangent.)

    Calculations

    (Calculate the average and instantaneous velocity (of the tangent line) here. Your calculations should be clear. Use complete sentences to explain what you are doing and why.)

    Analysis and Conclusion

    (Answer the following questions and support your answers with evidence from your experiment. What values did you find for your average and instantaneous velocities? Were they the same? If not, which one was larger? Even if these were not the same, did the object appear to have a constant velocity? Does your graph show a straight line that intercepts the origin (if you continue the line)? Why or why not? Does the graph indicate that there is at least a period of constant velocity?)

    ---------------------------

    Grading

    This lab will be worth 50 points.

    • 5 points -- Completeness of the report. The report meets all the requirements of the assignment.

    • 2 points -- Correctness of the purpose. You may reword the purpose, but you may not change the meaning of the given purpose.

    • 3 points -- Appropriateness of the materials.

    • 10 points -- Appropriateness of the procedure used and the clarity of the procedure section. There are many correct procedures.

    • 5 points -- Quality and completeness of the data.

    • 8 points -- Quality and clarity of the graphing section.

    • 7 points -- Appropriateness and correctness of the calculations.

    • 6 points -- Quality and clarity of the analysis and conclusion section. Answer all the questions, support your answers with evidence.

    • 4 points -- Overall "style points" for writing a lab that another student could use to duplicate your experiment.




    07.02 How papers are scored, rubrics and the writing process (LA 9)

    Clarify how papers will be graded, and review terms used to discuss and evaluate writing:

    &quot;Writing is thinking on paper.&quot;: by Filosofias filosoficas, CC Attribution 3.0 Unported via WIkimedia Commons"Writing is thinking on paper.": by Filosofias filosoficas, CC Attribution 3.0 Unported via WIkimedia Commons

    Here is a brief summary of the "writing process". View the PowerPoint presentation or PDF for more information and click the link below this lesson to listen.

    The WRITING PROCESS

    begins with prewriting. This can include brainstorming, researching, outlining, and any other way of getting ideas and planning what you want to write.
    The next step is often called drafting or composing. This is the part where you are actually writing, whether it is with pencil and paper, or on a computer.
    Once you have gotten your writing 'on paper' (or on screen), it is time for revising. This is the step most people are tempted to skip, but the one on which many professional writers spend the most time. You should try different ways of organizing and improving your ideas: changing the order, adding details, cutting out what doesn't belong and improving word choice and sentence fluency--all to make your writing as powerful, clear and effective as possible.
    After you are happy with the content of your writing and how you have put it together, the next step is editing. This is when you proofread and fix any conventions errors.
    The next step is publishing, or sharing your writing so others can read it.

    Rubrics

    A rubric helps to define how the teacher will score your assignment, and what the expectations or benchmarks are for certain scores.
    If you check the rubric as you revise an assignment, before you turn it in, you can improve your grade by making sure to include everything that is expected.
    The rubric can also help the teacher score your paper more objectively, and help you understand why you received your score.

    Utah Core standards

    Most of the rubrics used in this class are based on the Utah Core guidelines for improving argumentative, expository and narrative writing. Along with the terms below from the Six-Trait system, make sure you understand the following:

    • significant
    • relevant
    • credible sources
    • cohesion
    • syntax
    • transitions
    • formal style
    • objective tone
    • domain-specific vocabulary
    • closure
    • resolution
    • implications
    • claim
    • counterclaim
    • reason
    • evidence
    • reflection

    It may help you to look at sample standards that use Utah Core terminology. Here are examples of standards that use many of the terms above:

    Category  
    Introduction & organization Introduces precise, knowledgeable claim, establishes significance, distinguishes from opposing or alternate claims, and sets up logical organization of claims, counterclaims, reasons and evidence
    Development of ideas and content Develops claims and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplies most relevant data and evidence, points out strength and limitations in discipline-appropriate form, anticipating audience knowledge, concerns, biases and values, using credible sources
    Development of relationships, cohesion and flow Uses words, clauses and phrases, as well as varied syntax, to link major sections of the text, create cohesion and clarify the relationships between claims and reasons, claims and counterclaims, reasons and evidence.
    Word choice, style and tone Establish and maintain a smooth, formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms, vocabulary and conventions of the discipline for which they are writing
    Conclusion Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented, while providing a sense of confident closure or resolution, beyond just repetition of earlier statements
    Conventions and language skills Has few or no errors in conventions, grammar or usage; uses parallel structure and variety in sentences, phrases and clauses

     

    Below is a very brief review of the SIX TRAITS system, which helps define some terms we will use in scoring and discussing your writing. For more information, see the PowerPoint or PDF about the six traits, and go to the Six Trait Writing web page.

    1. Ideas & content - Are the ideas well-developed, with supporting details that are specific and concrete? [Instead of "Our kitchen is a wonderful place", which is general and abstract, write something like: - "The stained linoleum is curling up at the edges, and the cupboards need to be re-finished where my brother and I carved our initials the year I was ten, but the old stove always has a pot of chili simmering on top, or a sheet of oatmeal cookies baking in the oven." or - "When I get home from school, I can pop a frozen cheese pizza into the oven. I'd better remember to wipe up any crumbs, because my mom is really proud of the shiny new black granite countertop."]

    2. Organization - Are the ideas in some kind of logical order? Does the order help you to understand the ideas, or does it just seem random? Check out the beginning--does the introduction help set up your expectations for the rest of the piece, and/or grab your attention? How about the end--does it just stop, or is there a sense of conclusion?

    3. Voice - Does the writer's personality come through? Writing without voice seems generic as if any stereotypical teenager could have written it. It can also seem flat as if it might have been generated by a committee or a machine (or a textbook company!).

    4. Sentence fluency - do the sentences flow smoothly if you read it out loud? Are they easy to follow and understand? Good writing includes sentences of varying length and construction. Common faults include short, choppy sentences; sentences that are so long and convoluted they are hard to understand; and non-sentences (fragments or run-ons).

    5. Word choice - This is related to both voice and ideas. Are the words and vocabulary the best ones for the job? Nouns should be specific and concrete; verbs should be active and vivid. Generally, it's better to say "poodle" or "German shorthair" than "dog"; better to say "Honda Civic" or "Porsche" than "car" and better to say "waddled" or "leaped" or "slithered" than "went". Words should also be used accurately and precisely.

    6. Conventions - Correct spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, etc.

    Symbols I use to mark writing problems:Wikimedia Commons, Mosborne01 image, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedWikimedia Commons, Mosborne01 image, CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

    Generally, I will send you at least one or two comments along with your scores in the rubric for an assignment.  If you want more detailed comments and corrections, let me know and I will go through your work line by line, using these symbols.

    (There are traditional proofreading symbols, but they were invented to be written in by hand. I have adapted some for the computer keyboard, and created ways to use the keyboard symbols in proofreading.)

    */* Marks where a run-on sentence needs to be either divided into two separate sentences with a period (or question mark), or properly connected with a comma and/or conjunction.

    { } I use the curly brackets around an incomplete sentence (fragment). It either needs to be connected to a neighboring sentence, or revised so that it can stand on its own as a complete sentence.

    /P New paragraph should start here.

    ^ ^ The “carrots” are around something you left out--often, a missing comma.

    < > The pointy brackets are around something you SHOULD have left out--often, an extra comma or word.

    Boldface If bold is an option, I try to boldface misspelled words. If I can’t use bold, I will underline or highlight.

    Underlining: I underline or highlight words, parts of words, or sentences to draw your attention to them, for either positive or negative reasons. Often, I use underlining to mark awkward sentence structure, capitalization, grammar, or word-choice problems. I will sometimes put an explanatory comment in parentheses right after the underlined part.

    NOTE: If I see the same mistake repeated over and over, I may not mark all of them. When I have marked several of the same kind of error, I expect you to take the initiative to check for more of that kind.
    If you keep sending more papers with the same kinds of mistakes all quarter, I may begin taking off more points as the quarter goes on. The idea is supposed to be that you learn to do better by reading my comments and suggestions and making extra effort not to repeat past mistakes.

    07.02 Psychological Disorders (Psychology)

    Before choosing one of the following assignments take a deeper look at psychological disorders. Review the following links to give you more insight into pyschological disorders and mental illness. Then go ahead and read through the assignment choices and pick the one that will be the most interesting to you. Good luck!

    07.02 Psychological Disorders assignment

    07.02 - Demonstrations and Proofs of Similar Triangles (Geometry)

    This lesson continues the previous lesson by presenting the actual criteria for proving triangle similarity and methods of constructing similar triangles.

    The content of the lesson follows, or you can read the attached pdf file.



    07.02 - Language of Motion -- Acceleration (Physics)

    When our baseball player hit the home run and had to run around the bases, the player often changed her velocity. The player sped up, the player slowed down, the player turned three corners.

    All these changes in velocity are called accelerations. We learned about the relationship between forces and acceleration in the first quarter. Now we are going to learn about how accelerations affect the velocity.

    As velocity is a vector, it can either change its magnitude (speed-up, slow-down) or it can change its direction (turning a corner), or it can change both (speeding up while turning a corner). Any of these changes are called an acceleration.



    07.02 - Prenatal Changes (Mother) - Lesson 2

    LESSON MATERIAL:

    FIRST TRIMESTER

    Month 1
    There are many signs and symptoms that help determine pregnancy.

    A simple urine test from the doctor will show whether or not a woman is pregnant.

    Home pregnancy tests are available for $10-$15 and are quite accurate, but are no substitute for a doctor's test or visit. (Most doctors will give their own test anyway!)

    New symptoms:

    • Missed menstrual period: The first and most obvious change is missing a menstrual period. Usually with this symptom, a woman will suspect pregnancy, although some women may miss two periods (if their cycle is not regular) before suspecting pregnancy.
    • Excessive saliva: Experts aren't sure, but the most likely culprit for excessive saliva is the one charged for so many other charming pregnancy woes: those pregnancy hormones.
    • Frequent urination: The amount of blood in your body increases dramatically when you get pregnant, which leads to a lot of extra fluid getting processed through your kidneys and ending up in your bladder. (that’s why frequent urination happens in early pregnancy)
    • Breasts: Swollen, tender breasts are common in pregnancy. This may occur before the menstrual period is missed. The breasts will enlarge a lot during the first few months. Although nothing will prevent stretch marks, lotions can relieve the tightness and itching associated with pregnancy.

    Month 2

    New symptoms:

    • Morning sickness/nausea: This probably occurs due to the change in hormones or a drop in blood level. Morning sickness does not just take place in the morning. Many women say it is associated with smells or foods they eat. Not much can be done to cure morning sickness. (Drugs or over-the-counter stomach remedies should not be taken.) Watching the diet can help relieve some of the symptoms. Your doctor may recommend eating several small meals throughout the day and/or eating something before getting out of bed, such as crackers. Also, there is a vitamin B6 shot the doctor can give that seems to help many women.
    • Fatigue: During the first trimester, a huge amount of energy goes into building a life-support system for your baby. This makes a mother tired!

    Month 3

    New symptoms:

    • Mood swings: It's perfectly normal to feel alternately elated and terrified about becoming a parent. Most mood swings are caused by changing hormones.

    Month 4

    New symptoms:

    • Round ligament pain: Your uterus is supported by thick bands of ligaments that run from the groin up the side of the abdomen. As your uterus grows the supporting ligaments stretch and thin out to accommodate the increasing weight. This weight pulls on the ligaments, causing sharp pains and/or dull aches in the lower abdomen.
    • Red swollen gums: Hormones cause your gums to swell, become inflamed, and bleed more easily.
    • Nasal congestion and swelling: High levels of estrogen and progesterone increase blood flow to all the body's mucous membranes, including the nose, causing it to swell and soften.
    • Cravings: There may also be some truth to the notion that you crave what your body needs. Call your practitioner if you crave weird substances such as clay, ashes, or laundry starch. This craving, known as pica, may be a sign of a nutritional deficiency, particularly of iron.
    • Increased Appetite: During pregnancy this is due to your baby growing, demanding more nourishment and sending that message to you loud and clear.

    Month 5

    New symptoms:

    • Quickening: The first movements felt internally by the pregnant mother.
    • Abnormal dreams: First of all, you've got a lot on your mind and your plate. Dreams are one way that your subconscious works through that overload and comes to terms with the impending upheaval in your life. They can be an outlet for the all your conflicting emotions.
    • Leg Cramps: Various theories blame fatigue on carrying pregnancy weight, compression of the blood vessels in the legs, and possibly diet--an excess of phosphorus and a shortage of calcium or magnesium causing leg cramps.
    • Backache: As your belly gets bigger throughout your pregnancy, your lower back curves more than usual to accommodate the load, resulting in strained muscles and pain.
    • Chloasma or the mask of pregnancy: Facial skin may darken due to changing hormones. Staying out of the sun can help but usually there is nothing that can be done to prevent it.

    Month 6

    New symptoms:

    • Sciatic nerve pain: Pressure from the uterus in the lower part of your spine can cause sharp, shooting pain, tingling, or numbness that starts in your buttocks and radiates down the back of your legs.
    • Stretch marks: Red, pink, or purplish streaks that appear across your belly, hips, thighs and breasts during pregnancy. They're more pronounced on fair-skinned women. This stretching of the skin to its limits is caused, in addition to a range of other factors, by heredity (if your mother had them, you'll probably get them, too) and by the rate at which you gain your pregnancy weight.
    • Heart Burn: During pregnancy, the muscle at the top of the stomach that usually prevents digestive acids from backing up into the esophagus relaxes (like all those other muscles in your digestive tract and everywhere else in your body). This allows those acidic digestive juices to splash back up, causing painful irritation and burning.

    Month 7

    New Symptoms:

    • Shortness of breath: In your second trimester, hormones (the usual suspect) cause your respiratory center to increase the depth and frequency of your breathing, making you feel like you're sucking wind after nothing more strenuous than a trip to the fridge. In the third trimester, your expanding uterus and baby get in on the game, compressing your internal organs and keeping your lungs from fully expanding.

    Month 8

    New symptoms:

    • Braxton-Hicks contractions: Your uterine muscles are flexing in preparation for the big job they'll have to do in the near future.
    • Difficulty sleeping: Your changing body, combined with all the symptoms, make it difficult to get comfortable causing lack of sleep.

    Month 9

    New symptoms:

    • Lightening: Your baby may descend into the pelvis now (if he hasn’t already). This is called engagement or lightening and usually occurs before labor in first-time moms and during labor in subsequent births.
    • Breast leakage: Many pregnant women find that their breasts begin to leak colostrum: a thin, yellowish fluid that is the precursor to mature breast milk.

    DANGER SIGNALS
    The doctor should be called immediately if any of these symptoms occur:

    1. Vaginal bleeding.
    2. Sharp abdominal pain or cramping.
    3. Loss of fluid from the vagina.
    4. Severe or prolonged nausea or vomiting.
    5. Frequent dizzy spells.
    6. Painful urination.
    7. High fever over 100° F.
    8. Vaginal discharge that is irritating.

    Some other things to consider:

    1. Do not take any medications unless approved by your doctor. This includes over-the-counter drugs.
    2. No drugs or alcohol. These have a terrible effect on the baby.
    3. No X-rays. Radiation can interfere with cell division and organ development.
    4. No saunas and hot tubs. The high and prolonged temperatures can be harmful to the fetus.
    5. Vaccinations. Because vaccinations are live viruses, these should not be taken during pregnancy. However, do vaccinate the children in your home to protect them against these deadly diseases.
    6. Cats. A parasite found in cats, cattle, sheep, and pigs can cause a disease in humans called toxoplasmosis. This can cause severe damage to an unborn child. Because of this risk, you should avoid undercooked meat and changing cat litter boxes.

    The recommended weight gain for an average woman during pregnancy is 25 to 35 pounds. This weight is distributed as follows:

    • Baby—7 1/2 pounds
    • Placenta—1 1/2 pounds
    • Uterus—2 pounds
    • Amniotic fluid—1 1/2 pounds
    • Extra blood volume and water retention—4 1/2 pounds
    • Breast tissue—3 pounds
    • Maternal stores of protein—4 pounds

    07.02 Activity Preferences and Goal Setting (Fitness for Life)

    Terry Eiler, 1944-, Photographer (NARA record: 1497322), public domainTerry Eiler, 1944-, Photographer (NARA record: 1497322), public domain

    Introduction: Research has shown that individuals who set goals are more likely to achieve success in a variety of areas. Clearly, setting goals related to fitness can help you improve your current level of fitness. Your goals can be divided into two types: process and product goals.

    Process goals are related to the process of getting fit. To be fit, you need to increase the number of days you work out, or you need to add different types of exercises to your fitness program. Some examples of “process goals” include the following:

    “I will increase the number of times that I exercise each week this month, so instead of working out two days a week, I will workout four days a week.” “I will increase the number of times that I lift weights from 1 time a week to times times a week for a whole month.”

    Product goals are related to the outcomes you wish to achieve after participating in your fitness program. Some examples of “product goals” include:

    “I want to increase my bench press by 15 pounds in 8 weeks.” “I want to lower my body fat by 2% in 8 weeks.”

    The first step in setting goals is knowing your baseline or current level of fitness. You accomplished this by completing the previous assignments where you performed self-tests for cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition. You can use this information to determine which areas need the most work. For example, if you ran the mile and a half in 15 minutes, you could set a “process goal” to run three times a week for four weeks and re-test at the end of the month. You could set a “product goal” that you will improve your mile run time to 12 minutes from 15 minutes. When setting goals, be SMART.

    Goals should be SPECIFIC. The more specific they are, the easier it is to tell whether or not you reached your goals.
    Goals should be MEASURABLE. To determine whether or not you reached a goal, you should have some measurable outcome (e.g., days per week of exercise, heart rate during exercise, mile run time, pounds lifted, percent body fat, number of repetitions, etc.).
    Goals should be ARTICULATED (or written down). If you write your goals down, it is more likely that you will check them periodically and follow them.
    Goals should be REALISTIC. If you are currently at 30% body fat, it is probably not possible to get down to 20% body fat in one month without major health risks.
    Lastly, your goals should be TIME-DEPENDENT. In other words, give yourself a time limit and strive to achieve your goal within that time. If you have a time limit, you are more likely to persist through hard times.

    teacher-scored 40 points possible 90 minutes

    Introduction: The purpose of this assignment is to examine your physical activity preferences and set some SMART goals to reach a desired level of activity. Think about the activities in which you might want to participate, activities you have done in previous assignments, activity logs, etc. and consider how they may fit into your personal exercise program.

    Copy and paste the section between the lines of asterisks into a word processing document on your computer. Complete your work, and save a copy for yourself. Don't forget to highlight your answers. Then submit your work using the assignment submission window for this assignment.

    ********************************************************************************

    Name: ________________________________Date:_________________

    DON'T FORGET TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR ANSWERS.

    1. From the aerobic activities you have done, which ones do you like the best and why? (3pts.)

    2. List at least 5 activities you have not done that you would like to try. Where could you find out more information about these activities? (10 pts.)

     

    List 5 activities (preferably aerobic) Where can you find more information about this activity?
    1.

     

    2.

     

     

    3.

     

     

    4.

     

     

    5.

     

     

    3. Using the Activity Pyramid as a reference, describe activities in your life that fit under each of the following categories. (10 pts.)

    a. Lifestyle:

     

    b. Aerobic:

    c. Muscular Strength:

    d. Active Sports:

    e. Flexibility:

    4. Discuss with a family member, peer, or teacher, the activities from the Activity Pyramid as listed in #3. (If you so desire, you may wish to use Facebook or some other form of social media as base for your discussion. If you do, remember you are trading some aspects of privacy for a broader, quicker, audience.) As a group, evaluate your own current physical condition, and your own personal goals.

     

    a. Which area do you feel is the most important for you to focus on in the near future? (1 pts.)

     

    b. What kinds of changes, programs, or habits will you need to institute to achieve your goals in that area? (1 pts.)

     

     

    5. Using the SMART principles explained above, list 3 goals related to your personal fitness program. (They may be process or product goals). Each goal is worth 1 pt.

    GOAL #1:

     

    GOAL #2:

    GOAL #3:

    6. What things can I do to help me reach this goal?
    (e.g., get up one hour earlier, watch one hour less of TV, play 30 minutes less of Nintendo, etc.)

     

    GOAL #1:

     

    GOAL #2:

    GOAL #3:

     

    7. When will I be able to reach my goal?

    GOAL #1:

     

    GOAL #2:

    GOAL #3:

    8. How will I monitor my progress?
    (e.g., I will keep a calendar with workouts listed on it. Every time I complete a workout, I will draw a smiley face on that day of the calendar)

     

    GOAL #1:

     

    GOAL #2:

    GOAL #3:

    9. What type of reward will I give myself after I reach my goal?
    (e.g., $25 shopping spree, purchase new running shoes, etc.)

     

    GOAL #1:

     

    GOAL #2:

    GOAL #3:

     

     

    ***************************************************************************

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 4 of your enrollment date for this class.


    07.02 Analyze the factors that led to militarism and fascist aggression in the world. (U.S. History)

    Analyze the factors that led to militarism and fascist aggression in the world.

    Lesson Notes:

    Background
    You may recall that "militarism," or the policy of building up a nation's armed forces in aggressive preparedness for war and then using these forces as a tool of foreign policy, was one of the causes of WW One. Following The Great War came a bad peace. The Treaty of Versailles placed the burden squarely on Germany. The Allied Powers not only required Germany to take the blame for the war, but they also required Germany to pay "war reparations," or monetary payments to the victorious countries for the damages caused by the German invasion.

    Economic Depression
    The end of The Great War did not bring prosperity. Instead, in 1929 America experienced the Stock Market Crash that ushered in the Great Depression. As Europe's economy was tied to America's, economic depression also gripped Europe. Instead of prosperity, Europe saw the rise of powerful dictators driven by the belief in nationalism, or the love of one's country, and dreams of territorial expansion. Instead of securing peace, the Treaty of Versailles brought anger and resentment. The new democratic governments that emerged in Europe after the war struggled under the economic stagnation of a world-wide depression. Without a democratic tradition to fall back on, people turned to autocratic leaders who blamed others and promised a return to the greatness of the past.

    Russian Revolution
    In October 1917, the Communists led a revolution in Russia. They joined more moderate groups in overthrowing Czar Nicholas II. Following the end of the Great War, the Communists took power in Russia in a civil war. The leader who emerged was Joseph Stalin, who planned on making Russia a model communist state that other nations in Europe and around the world would follow. By 1939, Stalin had firmly established a totalitarian government that maintained complete control over its citizens.

    Fascism in Italy
    While Stalin was consolidating his power in Russia, Benito Mussolini established his own totalitarian regime in Italy where unemployment and inflation produced bitter strikes. Mussolini took advantage of this situation by appealing to Italians' wounded national pride. He played on the people's fears of economic collapse and of communism. By 1921, Mussolini established the Fascist Party. Fascism stressed nationalism and placed the interests of the state (or nation) above that of the individual. In 1922, he was appointed head of the government and achieved control by crushing all opposition.

    Nazism in Germany
    In Germany, Adolph Hitler followed much the same path to power as Mussolini. In 1919, Hitler was a jobless ex-soldier who joined the National Socialist German Workers' Party, better known as the Nazi Party. Hitler was a powerful speaker and organizer and soon became the party's leader promising to bring Germany out of the Great Depression. Because of huge war debts, war reparations, and its dependence on American loans and investments, Germany's economy was in shambles. Nazism became the German brand of fascism, based on extreme nationalism. Hitler's grand scheme was to unite all German-speaking peoples into a racially pure, grand German empire.

    Japan Takes Manchuria
    Finally, halfway around the world in Japan, nationalist military leaders took control of the imperial government. These leaders shared in common with Hitler a belief in the need for more territory for a growing population. The militarists launched a surprise attack seizing control of the Chinese northern industrial province of Manchuria in 1931. Within months the Japanese had consolidated their control of a vast area about twice the size of Texas and rich in natural resources.

    League of Nations Fails to Act
    The League of Nations was established to prevent just such aggressive acts, but it did nothing. In Germany, Hitler took advantage of the situation and began a military build-up of his own in direct violation of the Treaty of Versailles. Again, the League did nothing. Meanwhile, civil war broke out in Spain. Hitler and Mussolini supported the fascist military officers led by Francisco Franco with troops, weapons, tanks, and fighter aircraft. Meanwhile, western democracies declared their neutrality.

    The stage was now set and this rise of dictators in Europe and Asia would lead to World War Two. These dictators of the 1930s and 1940s changed the course of history. This knowledge of the past makes leaders in today's world especially wary of aggressive actions of modern-day dictators.

    07.02 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)

    6.2 Ancient Greece
    Classical Art is inspired by Greek and/or Roman art. Greek philosophies influenced the evolution of the western world, and most of the world today.

    It came from the Greek!
    The idea of beauty in Western society was first studied by the Greeks. According to research currently being conducted (Discovery Magazine, Science Channel, 4/28/04), beauty in both women and men is a universal ideal to a large extent. Signs of beauty in both sexes would be clear skin and a very symetrical face. The more symetrical the face, the more appealling the person. Tom Cruise or Cindy Crawford would have very symetrical faces, but there is something else - they also have good proportions.

    The Fibinacci ratio was established in 1202, based on the Golden Mean and proportions which the Greeks used in The Parthenon and Greek Architecture.
    Beauty, then, is indeed universal, and relates not just to art or faces, but to plants, architecture, and math. In math it is associated with the proportion of 1 to 1.618 - The Golden Mean (which we call phi,beginning with a small p), which Leonardo DaVinci, along with other artists & scientists explored much further in the Renaissance (approx. 1500's). When using this proportion, the relationship of eyes to mouth, etc. become an interlocking set of geometric shapes, which, when compared to the face of say, Tom Cruise, is extremely close. When compared to someone considered less beautiful - Jay Leno - it doesn't match as well.
    The proportion of the shape of bodies was also related to math - the waist is 7/10 as wide as the hips - a 7 to 10 ratio is preferred by every culture researched, even cultures without contact the outside world. It displays biological health, and the ability to reproduce. (Little waist, larger hips, like the sculptures in Hindu art)

    So why are we looking at mathematical equations and beauty? The Greeks had an IDEAL, which means they set an image, or idea, of what the perfect shape, size, & proportion would be for sculpture, painting, and architecture from that time to the present. We are finding that some of their studies of ideal beauty are still relevant today, and though the idea of beauty has been shaped by millions of years of evolution, it can be studied by artists, philosophers, and mathemeticians. In other words, the Greeks had it right when it came to BEAUTY - it can be MEASURED & JUDGED against an IDEAL. Our ideas about Beauty are influenced by Greek sculpture and architecture, but our image of them is partially flawed. It was covered in bright colors, called ENCAUSTIC paint, which had a wax base. These have worn off, leaving the marble and stone bare, whihc is how most people imagine it was then.

    Greece
    Greek vases had standard forms which were always used, though the painting on them was complex and varied.
    Take a look at the Greek Vase Shapes to compare the amphora to other shapes.
    07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)

    The amphora was the most common shape, and was used for carrying and storing wine. Amphora at the Met is an excellent example.

    Wine was not drunk without mixing it with water, however, so they also needed the krater, which came in several varieties.
    07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)
    07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)
    07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)

    Black-figure vase from the Met
    READ THE INFORMATION under the image on this page - be able to tell the difference between black and red figure vases -
    Which ones are older, and
    did the artist who made the works sign them?

    Red-figure vase (psykter) from the Met
    What were vases used for?
    Were they functional or purely decorative?

    Look at the Krater
    What was the purpose of a krater?
    What were the scenes that were painted on the vases about?
    Has this vase has been signed by the artist?

    Greek Sculpture
    The most important innovation in Greek sculpture was probably Contrapposto.

    This Greek Head of a Goddess tells us a lot about the Greeks -
    Did they think the Gods and Goddesses were like them?
    How did they feel about the human body? Were they ashamed of it or think it was beautiful?
    Notice this head is separate from the body - it was made that way, to fit into the sculptured body; many have been separated from their counterparts over time.
    Keep going (click the next button) until you get to "draped female" sculpture.
    Continue to the "Statue of Eros sleeping"
    How do you think women and children were treated in Greek society, just from looking at these sculpture?
    Rome conquers Greece and assimilates their culture into the Roman empire, including their sculpture. How do you think this affected Romans when they viewed the art of Greece?

    Contrapposto -
    (con-truh-pos-toh) is an Italian term meaning "counterpoise", but it was developed by Greek artists.
    Contrapposto is the position of a human figure in painting or sculpture in which the hips and legs are turned in a different direction from that of the shoulders and head; the twisting of a figure on its own vertical axis.

    Below, you can see the change from the stiff, unnatural style of Egypt, to the more natural style of contrapposto.
    07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)

    It is especially a way of sculpting a human figure in a natural pose with the weight of one leg, the shoulder, and hips counterbalancing each other. Thus it is sometimes called "weight shift." This technique was developed late in the ancient Greek period.
    According to the classical Greek sculptor Polykleitos in the fourth century B.C., it is one of the most important characteristics of his figurative works and those of his successors, Lysippos, Skopas, etc.
    Stone, marble or metal could now be sculpted to look like a natural figure in motion, walking or moving, creating a more natural and beautiful sculpture.
    07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)

    After the fall of Rome, the use of contrapposto was forgotten; medieval sculpture (left) went back to a very stiff, unnatural pose, covered with drapery. This was fine with early Christians, but in the Renaissance Greek sculpture and literature about man, beauty, and art was once again discovered, translated, and discussed by the foremost philosophers and artists of the time.
    07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)
    07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)

    Classical contrapposto was revived in the Renaissance by the Italian artists Donatello (right) and Leonardo da Vinci, followed by Michelangelo, Raphael and other artists of the High Renaissance. This was one of the major achievements of the Italian Renaissance, although later in Mannerism it became distorted and greatly over-used.

    Greek Architecture
    Dorci, Ionic, and Corinthian Columns
    Note how they are used, bottom to top, to support multistoried buildings in Greece and Rome, such as the Colosseum. This is a Roman building, not Greek, but it uses all three orders of columns.
    The Parthenon and Greek Architecture have influenced more architecture than we can list here - just think of the White House, and most state capitols' buildings, including Utah's.
    How has Greece influenced us?

    Click the link and text for the Acropolis.
    Every four years the Athenians held a festival called the Panathenaea that rivalled the Olympic Games in popularity. During the festival, a procession moved through Athens up to the Acropolis and into the Parthenon (as depicted in the frieze on the inside of the Parthenon). There, a vast robe of woven wool (peplos) was ceremoniously placed on Phidias' massive ivory and gold statue of Athena. (source: Wikipedia.org)
    07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)
    07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)

    Who are the Caryae?
    The Erechtheion -

    This was Acropolis's holiest shrine, where in symbolic reconciliation, Athena and the city's old patron Poseidon- Erectheus were both worshipped. The south side of this temple, is the Porch of the Carytids, wherein the Ionic line was transformed into six maidens ( Carytids ) holding the entablature on their heads. What can be seen today are only replicas, four of the original ones are in the Acropolis Museum, one is in storage and one is in the British Museum. (source: VirtualTourist.com)
    The Carytid Columns
    According to Roman writer, Vitruvius, the Carytid Columns acquired their name when the Caryae sided with the Persians during an unsuccessful invasion. As punishment, the women of the town were required to relinquish their positions and to perform hard labor. These statues are either to honor or shame the Caryae women, depending upon the expert.

    From ancient accounting inscriptions, and testimonies from Plutarch we can safely deduce that the entire building was lavishly decorated with wall frescoes, gilded rosettes, and an array of colored features and low relief sculptures. (source: Ancient-Greece.org (Go to the website section of the class to view this site)
    07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)07.2 Ancient Greece(ArtHistory1)

    Greek & Roman Art from the Met
    Metropolitan Museum of Art has the most comprehensive collection in North America - including Red figure vases, Black figure vases, and sculpture.

    07.02 Binary Search

    The solution for the tower building activity is to start by taking half of the height of the tower and create that number of stacks of 2. Continue halving the number of stacks and doubling the height (plus one stack of any remainder) until the desired height is reached. This foreshadows binary search.

    Week # # of stacks # of blocks in stack Remainder
    1 5 2
    2 2 4 1 stack of 2
    3 1 8 1 stack of 2
    4 1 10

    Linear searches – start at the beginning, look at each item until you find it or there is no more data. Data can be sorted or not.

    Binary searches – look at middle item, eliminate the half where the value is not located. Find the new middle element and continue the process until you find it, or there is no more data. The search must be sorted.

    teacher-scored 5 points possible 20 minutes

    Journal Entry

    Using complete sentences, answer the following:

    Provide at least two examples of where each type of search (linear and binary) is appropriate and why.

    Pacing: complete this by the end of Week 1 of your enrollment date for this class.


    07.02 Coagulation and Coalescence (FoodSci)

    Unit 7.2: Coagulation and Coalescence

    Open the attachment "Milk" and print the illustrations to refer to as you go through the unit.

    CHARACTERISTICS AND COMPONENTS OF MILK

    (Resources: Food Science and You, and The Epicurean Laboratory.)

    Milk is an excellent source of protein. Because proteins have a large molecular structure, they do not dissolve in water. The proteins in milk are a colloidal dispersion. Colloidal dispersions are explained in the egg unit. There are two kinds of milk proteins: casein and whey or serum. Casein are approximately 80% of the milk proteins, and whey or serum proteins make up the other 20%.

    The casein proteins in milk are combined with some of the minerals in milk and form micelles. Micelles are groups of molecules; the micelles in milk form a colloidal dispersion.

    The light reflected from the micelles makes the milk white. Casein proteins are coagulated by acids. If an acid is added to milk, the casein proteins separate from the rest of the liquid and the milk curdles. Casein proteins are not effected very much by heat, however.

    Casein proteins in milk cluster together and work like tiny sponges to hold water in the milk.
    They can contain and hold as much as 70% water in each protein cluster.
    Refer to the printout and take note of the CASEIN PROTEIN CLUSTER.
    Acids, salt, or high heat will cause the casein protein clusters to lose water.
    The serum proteins, also called whey, are in colloidal dispersion in the water content of milk and are coagulated by heat, but acids and salt do not coagulate them. This is important in making yogurt and cheese. Commercially, the coagulation of milk to make cheese is accomplished with the use of rennin-an enzyme which has the capability to disable the stabilizing subunit of casein causing the normally separate casein micelles to clump together in the presence of dissolved calcium. Rennet (the commercial name for the enzyme rennin) has the power to join things that are dispersed and to disperse things that come together.

    Milk is also a source of fat. Fat globules float in the water contained in milk. There are many different types of fat in milk. The fat in milk tends to be low in cholesterol. Higher levels of butter fat in milk usually mean higher prices for the milk product. As fresh milk sets, the fat droplets cluster together; eventually, the clusters get large enough that their lower density lets them float to the top. The milk seperates. To stop this from happening, most milk sold commercially is homogenized. When milk is homogenized, it is forced through very small holes under pressure. The fat globules are made small enough so they stay dispersed or separated in the milk so they do not cluster together.

    Milk also contains some carbohydrate in the form of natural sugar. The sugar in milk is called lactose. It is a type of sugar found only in milk. Lactose gives milk a slightly sweet flavor. When milk is digested a special enzyme produced in the cells of the body burns the calories provided by lactose. This releases energy. Some people can not drink fresh milk because they are unable to digest the lactose in the milk. They lack the enzyme lactase in their digestive system. Without lactase, the lactose is not split into glucose and galactose so it can be absorbed in the body and burned for energy. As the lactose ferments in the digestive tract, it gives off gas and a variety of acids. (Lactose intolerant people lack lactose - the enzyme that lets the body use the energy in lactose). Lactose caramelizes when the milk is heated and turns the milk a tarnish color.

    Milk is an excellent source of a variety of vitamins and minerals. Calcium and magnesium help keep the micelles in milk stable. Calcium helps strengthen bones and teeth. Milk is a good source of riboflavin, which is a vitamin that can be destroyed by light, so milk should be stored in light-proof containers. The butter fat in milk contains vitamin A. Many milk products are fortified with vitamin D.

    TYPES OF MILKS
    Fresh milk is categorized by the amount of butter fat in it. The butter fat level is determined by federal standards. Skim milk has had all the fat removed. One percent milk is 1% butter fat, and two percent milk is 2% butter fat. Whole milk must contain at least 3.5% butter fat. As the fat is removed, milk appears more translucent because light does not have as many fat particles to reflect off. It is light reflecting off the fat that makes milk appear white. Refer to the printout and take note of the MILK DIAGRAM which illustrates the percentages of different components within milk.

    Milk is marketed in other forms besides fresh:

    Evaporated milk has been heated under a small amount of pressure until 60% of the water evaporates. Carrageenin (a vegetable gum) is added to the milk before it is processed to stabilize the casein proteins.
    Condensed milk has 50% of the water removed and sugar added. Sugar is added so that it is 44% of the final product. The sugar content is high enough to inhibit bacterial growth in the condensed milk.
    Dried milk or powdered milk is made by removing all the water from fresh milk.
    There are several fermented milk products. Buttermilk, sour cream, and yogurt are made by adding a bacteria to fresh milk and allowing it to ferment for a period of time.
    Ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) milk is flash-heated at higher temperatures than regular pasteurized milk; then it is flash-cooled, destroying additional bacteria and allowing longer shelf life. In addition, the processing plant seals the UHT milk (sometimes called parmalet milk) in several layers of aseptic packaging: polyethylene, paper, aluminum foil with a polyethylene lining. (This is the same packaging used for egg substitutes such as Egg Beaters, pancake mixes, some juices, and chopped tomatoes). Once opened, UHT milk keeps in a refrigerator for at least 10 days. It does taste a little sweeter than the milk most Americans are used to drinking. It has been used in Europe and Asian countries since the 1960s. UHT milk also comes in low-fat and chocolate versions.

    FOAMS

    A foam is a mixture made by whipping or beating a liquid to trap air bubbles in it. The amount of fat in the milk has an effect on the stability of the foam. The higher the fat content, the more stable the foam. The viscosity, or thickness, of the cream increases in direct proportion to the amount of butter fat. Temperature also affects the viscosity of cream. The viscosity of cream increases as the temperature of the cream decreases. The more viscose the cream is when being beaten, the better the foam will be. The amount of cream being whipped also affects the formation of the foam. Smaller amounts produce more stable foams. Sugar makes the foam less stiff and smaller in volume. It also makes it take longer to form a foam when sugar is added too early. The rule of thumb is: produce foam then add sugar.

    COOKING WITH MILK

    Cooking effects both types of milk proteins (casein and serum). When cooking with milk, one needs to be careful so that the milk does not scorch or curdle. Remember that the serum (whey) proteins are denatured by heat. These solid substances precipitate out of the milk solution. These serum (whey) proteins settle to the bottom of the pan and scorch easily. Because this happens when milk is heated at too high a temperature, milk must be cooked on low heat or in a double boiler which keeps the temperature in the top container below the boiling point of water.

    Another problem when cooking milk is that a skin often forms over the top of the cooked milk. The casein and serum (whey) proteins clump together on the surface as the water in the milk evaporates when heated. Pulling the skin off the top of heated milk will remove nutrients that are in the skin. The skin on the top of the cooked milk can hold in steam and increase the chance that the milk will boil over while cooking. Creating a foamy surface reduces the chance that the skin will trap steam and the milk boil over. Stirring constantly will reduce skin formation. Adding fat also reduces skin formation, and covering the cooking pot keeps the surface from losing water (drying out) and forming the skin.

    The third problem when milk is heated is curdling. Using high heat increases the chance that the casein proteins will curdle. A low pH increases curdling also. This happens because the calcium and magnesium ions which make the casein micelles in milk more stable are removed from the casein micelles when an acid is added to milk. When salt is added to hot milk, curdling is increased.

    Now that you have read the information, you are ready for Unit 7-Assignment 2.

    07.02 Conflict Resolution

    Human nature being what it is, sooner or later you are going to run into conflict in your workplace. Respect and good listening skills can help prevent conflict, but what happens when there is a disagreement that won't go away? Conflict is uncomfortable while it is happening, but it can lead to positive changes...or not. Whether things turn out better or worse depends mostly on how the conflict is handled.

    I am absolutely sure that you already have life experiences with conflict. Nobody could live for years with other human beings without running into some kind of conflict. Families, friends, school, church, work, neighborhoods, clubs--you know what I mean. The bad news is that it is never going to go away. The good news is that you can learn to manage conflict better, and so can the people around you.

    READ: Click on the links below. Take notes on avoiding conflict, reasons for conflict, the specific qualities surrounding passive, assertive, and aggressive behaviors, and how to resolve conflict. Then, using your notes, please go on to the conflict resolution quiz.

    07.02 Critical thinking: Persuasion, advertising, propaganda, logic, and argumentation (English 9)

    I. Propaganda and advertising techniques

    Propaganda tries to convince people of something. It is not a single technique, but a combination of persuasive techniques. The idea or feeling spread by propaganda may be true, partially true, or not true at all, but the purpose of the propaganda is to persuade people to believe regardless of whether the idea is true. The word "propaganda" comes from the same root as the word "propagate", which is much used in the plant industry, where propagate means to reproduce and grow many plants of the same kind. Propaganda reproduces and "grows" a particular idea.

    The word for advertising originally had to do with spreading information, publicizing. Now we usually associate advertising with media that tries to persuade us to buy something (though it may serve other purposes - for example, persuading us to vote for a certain candidate, or to attend a certain event).
    The work of advertising and propaganda overlap, and they use many similar techniques. A few of the common techniques are listed below.

    REPETITION:
    Probably the simplest propaganda technique is simple repetition, which is based on the proposition that if people hear something often enough, they will begin to believe it - or at least come to recognize and remember the name. Radio, TV, magazine and billboards may simply state (over and over again): "Silver Edition toothpaste is the best!" or "Jane Smith will make a great governor!" Repetition is often paired with the next technique:

    GLOWING GENERALITIES:
    Generalities are statements which make broad claims, without specific explanations, proof or examples. For instance: "Mr. Candidate is the best man for the job!" Best in what way? According to whose judgement?
    Truth-in-advertising laws often make exceptions for claims like "The fastest service in the universe!" because we (the public) are expected to understand that the claim is an exaggeration, not intended to be taken literally.
    Generalities in advertising are usually in glowing, positive terms like the two examples above. However, some ad campaigns may use negative generalities:
    "Candidate G is irresponsible with public money!"
    "Using other brands may ruin your reputation!"
    Negative generalities may degenerate into name-calling. In the 50s and 60s, many people who opposed war were called Communists, or "red". Propaganda often tries to polarize the community, suggesting that everyone must be either on one extreme or the other. In recent years, many people who worked for compromises on environmental issues were labelled "tree-huggers" by those who opposed government regulations on land use, and accused of "selling out" by those who favored strict regulation.

    EXPERT or CELEBRITY TESTIMONIAL
    Some ads feature an expert(or group of experts) who testifies that the product is good:
    "98% of doctors recommend BrandX painkiller."
    This technique is most reasonable if the person testifying is actually an expert on the pertinent topic. Doctors may reasonably be considered experts on health matters; lawyers, on legal matters; a beauty queen might be an expert on make-up.
    Often, however, the person featured in the ad is just famous (a celebrity).
    Madonna uses Super Shampoo!
    A rock star may recommend voting for a certain candidate for president. A sports star may recommend a certain brand of car. In these cases, the person is not really an expert. The advertiser hopes that we will believe people who are famous, just because they are famous. Closely related to this ploy is the next technique:

    ASSOCIATION (also called TRANSFER)
    Many ads that feature famous people don't actually have the celebrity make claims for the product - they simply show the celebrity wearing, using, or near the product. These ads hope we will associate the product with the famous person, and will want to buy it/vote for it so that we will feel more like this person we admire.

    Many ads use association to try to connect their product with something we see as desirable, rather than with a famous person. Most ads show happy, beautiful, slender women or good-looking, well-built men in the hopes that we will associate the product with being happy or having a good-looking boyfriend/girlfriend. This kind of advertising implies that if we buy the product, we may become (or seem) more beautiful, sexy, glamorous, happy and successful. Advertisers or propagandists hope we will transfer our positive feelings about what we see or hear to the product. A recent example of political propaganda using association/transfer was in the 2008 election, when opponents of Obama made a point of calling him Barack Hussein Obama. His opponents hoped voters would associate him with Saddam Hussein, or with Muslim extremists in general. At the same time, opponents of McCain were trying to show him with President Bush, hoping voters would associate McCain with some of the unpopular policies of the former President.

    EVERYBODY'S DOING IT (also called BANDWAGON)
    Some ads claim or imply that everyone (or a large group of people) is buying or voting for their product, and that you should be part of the group. This appeals to the human need to belong. A TV or magazine ad may show a huge crowd of people, all holding a particular brand of pop, or wearing a particular brand of shirt. A speaker may claim that all Utahns oppose the law under consideration. The following statement implies ALL parents:
    "Parents want the best for their children - join millions of other parents, and buy your children Encyclopedia Gizmo!"
    A variation on this technique is to suggest that a certain group of people like you are all doing it:
    "Everyone who opposes child abuse is voting for Suzy Candidate!" (Is there anyone who favors child abuse?!?)
    "Patriotic Americans everywhere are displaying these over-sized flags!"
    or
    A television ad may show a group of happy young adults dressed in the latest style and listening to current music all drinking one brand of beer.

    II. LOGIC

    Argumentation & logic
    Argumentation is writing that tries to persuade or convince a reader of something. The best argumentation uses primarily facts and logic, though it may also rely partly on emotion. The writer may or may not believe the point of view s/he presents (the people who write advertisements or propaganda may do so knowing that they are not being wholly truthful).

    Logic is sometimes divided into two common types: Deductive reasoning and inductive reasoning.

    Deductive reasoning
    moves from a general rule or rules ( the premise/s) to a specific case (or conclusion). If the premise(s) is/are true, then the conclusion MUST be true.
    Sometimes this becomes a bit tricky. For instance, this statement sounds like deductive logic, but it isn't: "My birthday is in October, and it is October now, so my birthday is tomorrow." Notice that this MIGHT be true, but it is not NECESSARILY true. October has 31 days, and not all of them are my birthday, so we can't be sure that tomorrow is the right day. When you use deduction, you are saying that the conclusion is always, necessarily, true.

    Here is an example of valid deductive reasoning:
    All squares have four sides. (The premise)
    I drew a square.
    Therefore, what I drew has four sides. (The conclusion - it MUST be true that if you drew a square, it has four sides. There are no other possibilities.)

    Here is another example of deductive reasoning used incorrectly:
    All squares have four sides.
    I drew a shape with four sides.
    Therefore, what I drew is a square.
    What's wrong with this example?** (answer at the end of this section)

    Here is an example of a different kind of misuse of deductive reasoning. What is wrong here?
    All teenagers like country music. (premise)
    Jenny is a teenager.
    Therefore, Jenny must like country music. (conclusion)

    Deductive reasoning is often used in persuasion (argumentation). IF if begins with a correct premise, and IF it is applied correctly, it always yields a correct conclusion. However, often people make "mistakes" with deductive reasoning, either deliberately or accidentally.

    Inductive reasoning
    begins by observing many individual cases, and then tries to create a general rule.

    This may lead to a correct conclusion, but is not always. Generally speaking, the more individual cases you consider, the more likely it is that your conclusion will be true - but you could only be absolutely certain if you had considered every individual case, or if you can figure out WHY it works. We all use inductive reasoning naturally, from the time we are very young. How old were you when you realized that when it rains or snows, it is always cloudy? I bet you can't remember NOT knowing that. Over a period of your first few years, you noticed that whenever there were showers, there were also clouds, and from that you formed a 'general rule' - clouds and precipitation go together. Inductive reasoning leads to a conclusion that has a high probability of being true, but leaves open the (very small) possibility that there might be an exception.

    Many superstitions are a result of inductive reasoning. Someone notices that the last several times he pitched a winning game, he was wearing his blue socks, and he concludes "my blue socks are lucky. If I wear my blue socks, I will pitch a winning game." Now, we know that the color of a person's socks has NO effect on how well they perform an athletic task, so it wasn't the blue socks that caused the pitcher to win those games (although if he begins to believe the blue socks are lucky, he MIGHT pitch better when wearing them in the future because of his increased self-confidence).

    Another example: You might notice, while doing your math, that every time you multiply a whole number by two, your answer is an even number. You would conclude (correctly) that multiplying whole numbers by two always yields an even answer.
    Next, you might notice that 36 divided by two is eighteen, twenty-four divided by two is twelve, and 100 divided by two is 50. You might conclude (incorrectly) that whole numbers divided by two always yield whole number answers. (Recall that if you divide an ODD whole number by two, you get a fraction or decimal answer.)

    Scientists use inductive reasoning when they study the results of thousands of experiments to find out, for example, whether a particular medicine is effective for treating heart disease. If one or two or three people take the medicine and get better, those people may believe that the medicine made them better. However, it may be that they got better for other reasons. On the other hand, if 90% of the thousands of people who took the medicine get better, it is highly likely that the medicine is effective.

    Nevertheless, inductive reasoning is often applied incorrectly by politicians and advertisers:
    "I have been talking to people all over this country, and they have told me they want lower taxes. All American citizens want Congress to lower their income taxes!"
    In what ways is this statement poor use of logic?

    Here are a few ways:
    1. How many people (what percentage of all citizens) did he talk to? Certainly not ALL citizens! Probably not even 1% of 'all American citizens'.

    2. How did he choose who to talk to? Probably he talked to people who chose to come see him - and those people were more likely to agree with him than the people who didn't choose to come see him.

    3. Supposing that everyone really does want lower taxes (which may well be true). There are many kinds of taxes (sales tax, property tax & income tax, just to name the three best-known). How does he know that it is the income tax people favor lowering? Even if they favor lowering income tax, how does he know they want the FEDERAL income tax lowered, as opposed to the state income tax?

    4. Did he just ask people if they wanted lower taxes, or did he ask them to consider the consequences - what services they wanted to give up, or what would happen to the deficit if taxes were lowered? Probably at least some people who would say they favor lower taxes would change their minds if told that lower taxes would be accompanied by poorer government services or a higher deficit.

    **answer to "What's wrong with this example?":
    The premise (all squares have four sides) is true, but its converse (Anything with four sides is a square) isn't true. There are many shapes you could draw with four sides that wouldn't be square. For example, a trapezoid and a rectangle each have four sides, but aren't usually square.

    III. Correlation vs. Causation

    Watch out for this one! Statistical studies often find a correlation between two sets of data. For example, there is a strong correlation between smoking, and dieing of lung cancer or heart disease.

    Many people assume that a correlation means that one thing causes the other. This is not necessarily true, as you will quickly realize if you consider some examples. Think about these two:

    Statistical analysis shows that most Americans who die have worn shoes every day since they were six years old. Does wearing shoes cause death? Of course not! Most people wear shoes, and all people die, but one does not cause the other.

    If we were to study it, we would probably find out that most American children learn to read in the year after having eaten birthday cake at their sixth or seventh birthday parties. Does eating birthday cake help children learn to read?

    Correlation does not prove causation! In the case of smoking and cancer, scientists noticed the correlation, and went on to study whether or not smoking causes lung cancer. They conducted many different kinds of studies and experiments, and eventually were able to show how and why smoking causes many cases of lung cancer. Finding a correlation is important, and it is a reason to wonder whether two things are connected, but it is only a starting point.

    Just because two things happen at the same time, or in the same place, does not mean that one caused the other.

    It is important to ask questions about correlations. For instance, in the birthday cake example above, we might ask:

    * How did the percentage of children who learned to read after eating birthday cake compare to the percentage of children who learned to read without eating birthday cake? If we look at a culture where no one eats birthday cake, what percentage of THEIR children learn to read?

    * In the original study, did we find out what other factors - like going to school, or having parents who read aloud to them, having adequate nutrition, or having their vision and hearing checked - also correlated to learning to read?

    * What about kids who didn't eat birthday cake, but they did eat other kinds of cake? What about kids who ate birthday cake when they were one or two years old - why didn't they learn to read then?

    * How could the ingredients of birthday cake eaten on a particular day affect learning for the following year? Can we figure out a reason why this would work?

    * If we take people who haven't learned to read and feed them birthday cake, but don't change anything else they are doing, will they learn to read?
    * Are the people who did the study trying to sell birthday cake?

    I highly recommend you read through this series of mini-lessons on critical thinking.

    07.02 Cubism (Art History and Art Criticism)

    Cubism is art in which the subject matter is rendered using geometric forms. (Remember this term for the 2nd quarter final test. Cubism is used to describe an art movement credited to Pablo Picasso. His approach to art was influenced by the geometric forms in African masks. The word cubism was invented by the art critic Louis Vauxcelles during a review of Georges Braque’s painting at an exhibition.

    Cubism developed during the twentieth century in three stages. The first stage was devoted almost entirely to landscapes and was inspired by Cezanne’s painting. Then in the second stage, or the analytic Period, outdoor scenes were abandoned, and artists started to work strictly in studios as they fragmented still life with objects such as pitchers, glasses and such. The palettes had a limited brown and grey color range. The third period was the most experimental and influential. This was called the Synthetic Period. Included were letters, imitation wood, wallpaper, and newspaper paintings. Combined with the fractured images, these objects formed what is known as the collage technique. Cubist compositions showed the subjects from many different angles or viewpoints all at the same time. This is known as simultaneity, the viewing of many of subject surfaces at once. (Themes and Foundations of Art by Katz, Lankford and Plank page 498)

    Cubists led the way for other modern artists. The art world would never be the same.

    07.02 Cubism -assignment (Art History and Art Criticism)

    teacher-scored 70 points possible 70 minutes

    Objective: Read the PDF Document on Cubism and do a report on the artist Pablo Picasso and the art period of Cubism. Complete the questionnaire below in statement form and in correct sentence structure with correct facts. Copy and paste the questions between the asterisk into a word processor. From your online readings, answer the questions in your own words in complete sentences, but do not copy your artist's statement from the internet or other book unless you show quotation marks, using properly cited information.

    Remember that people speak differently than they write--make the answers sound like what the artist might say, not an encyclopedia entry. Do NOT copy and paste information from your research sources (that would be plagiarism). Re-write the information from the artist's point of view (in his/her words, as you imagine them speaking). However, if you feel the artist has a quote that you need to share, make sure to give credit to the book or website after the artist statement. Have the artist talk at more length about their work rather than the minimum, basic answers to the questions. Give reasons, examples or explanations to show your knowledge of the artist. Also include an image of one of the artist's paintings/works that you like and why (or the url for the image). For, the questionnaire below, imagine that you are a reporter and could ask these questions of the artist:

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    1. Explain about the three periods of Cubism

    2. Reporter: When were you born, where did you live? What were some other key events in your life that might have influenced you?
    Artist possible statement: (For example, you might start out: I was born...)

    3 Reporter: How did you get started in the field of art? What things discouraged or encouraged you?
    Artist possible statement:

    4. Reporter: What do you feel were your most important contributions to the visual arts? (A piece of art, a style, or possibly a technique)
    Artist possible statement:

    5. Reporter: What would your advice be to someone entering the field of the arts?
    Artist possible statement:

    6. Reporter: During your lifetime, what success or recognition did you receive? Why do you think that was?
    Artist possible statement:

    7. Reporter: This is one of your works that I like:

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    07.02 Directions (FrenchII)

    Le lien dans l'URL vous portera à la leçon.

    07.02 Directions links (FrenchII)