Skip navigation.

English 12 (exp)

00.0 Introduction to this Class (English 12)


Please be mindful of the fact that this course is not a credit "quick fix." It is a rigorous, college-preparatory class that is both time and labor intensive. Success here will require a serious and sustained effort on the part of the student. Please read the rest of the information below and the course syllabus thoroughly before you opt to enroll.

This is quarter of a full year class. Each unit of study consists of a series of informal journal entries and formal assignments. All journal entries and assignments must be completed and submitted in the order outlined. Assignments are to be handed in one at a time--not in bulk--so that students may apply concepts learned on earlier assignments to subsequent ones. (This helps students to avoid repeatedly making the same mistakes and also keeps the instructor from being swamped.) An assignment is not considered completed until it has received a formal grade. Assignments failing to achieve at least 60% of the ascribed point value will not be accepted for credit. Additionally, a student must earn a minimum of 60% of the available points on any given unit in order to receive credit for that unit. A student may not submit work on a new unit until the previous unit has been successfully completed.

Computer Information

Students taking this class should be able to successfully navigate the class with all its various features. Basic computer requirements include Internet access and word processing software.

Some PDF files may be used to present instructional handouts and examples of various assignments. As a result, the student will need to download the free Adobe Acrobat Reader plug-in.

Grading Information

You will find a journal entry prior to each formal assignment that informally introduces or prompts you to begin thinking about the corollary assignment. While journal entries are assessed based mostly on effort, all other assignments, unless otherwise specified, will be evaluated based on the Six-Trait Evaluation Rubric.
All journal entries and assignments will be given a point value. Academic grades will be awarded based on the following percentage breakdown: 94-100=A, 90-93=A-, 87-89=B+, 83-86=B, 80-82=B-, 77-79=C+, 73-76=C, 70-72=C-, 65-69=D+, 60-64=D, Below 60=F.

All work submitted must be original. A student who submits a plagiarized assignment will receive a zero on that assignment and a warning. A subsequent violation will result in the student being dropped form the class without credit.

Miscellaneous Information

To begin the class, please select the "Unit 01", link and review the material for the desired unit. From there, proceed to the assignments for that unit.

Be sure to check your email and the course announcements feature regularly. Also, be aware of the fact that you should keep copies locally of all work submitted, in case something gets lost in transmission or inadvertently deleted. Finally, be advised that if I do not receive work or an email from you in any given four-week period, you can be dropped from the course.

00.00 *Student supplies for English 12

In its entirety, the class consists of eight units: Towards a Sense of Self, Family Connections, Cultural Context, The Heroic Ideal, Media Literacy, The Future, Charting Your Path, and Taking a Stand. All eight units must be satisfactorily completed to receive a full unit of credit for English 12. If only partial credit is required, successful completion of two units equals 1/4 unit of credit. Units 1 and 2 represent first quarter credit, 3 and 4 second quarter credit, 5 and 6 third quarter credit, and Units 7 and 8 correspond to fourth quarter credit.

In each unit there are links to lists of suggested books to read for the class. You may find these at your local library or book store. You can also find them online at www.bn.com or www.amazon.com to order.

Each unit of study consists of a series of informal journal entries and formal assignments. All journal entries and assignments must be completed and submitted in the order outlined. Assignments are to be handed in one at a time--not in bulk--so that students may apply concepts learned on earlier assignments to subsequent ones. (This helps students to avoid repeatedly making the same mistakes and also keeps the instructor from being swamped.) An assignment is not considered completed until it has received a formal grade. Assignments failing to achieve at least 60% of the ascribed point value will not be accepted for credit. Additionally, a student must earn a minimum of 60% of the available points on any given unit in order to receive credit for that unit. A student may not submit work on a new unit until the previous unit has been successfully completed.

00.00 Introduction to this Class (English 12)

Use these links to review the information on plagiarism before you begin work in this class.

00.01 Writing help on video (English 9, 10, 11, 12)

Above are links to Pioneer Library, where you can find these on-line videos that may help you with different aspects of writing or editing your work. In each case, log on to Pioneer Library (the username and password are on your main class page) first. If you have never played any of the eMedia videos, you might need to first read the information in the Getting Started folder and/or download a free Quicktime player.

00.01.01 Student Software Needs

 

Students need access to a robust internet connection and a modern web browser.

This class may also require the Apple QuickTime plug-in to view media.

For students using a school-issued Chromebook, ask your technical support folks to download the QuickTime plug-in and enable the plug-in for your Chromebook.

$0.00

00.02 About Me

teacher-scored 0 points possible 10 minutes

Your first activity is to write a short paragraph to the teacher. Introduce yourself. Use proper sentence structure including capitalization, punctuation and spelling. In this paragraph please also include the following information:

1. What year you are in school.

2. How many quarters of English 12 you will be taking from EHS and when you expect to graduate from your high school.

3. Any specific information that would help me to understand how best to support you in this class.

4. What novel you have chosen for first reading assignment in this quarter. (Check the guidelines in the instructions for the reading assignment before you make your choice.)

You submit this activity in the Topic 3 area of the class. The activity is called "About Me."

01.00 Towards a Sense of Self (English 12)

"When you try to understand everything, you will understand nothing. It is best to understand yourself, and then you will understand everything."
--Shunryu Suzuki

------------------------------
"Who are you? said the caterpillar.
Alice replied rather shyly, 'I--I hardly know, Sir, just at present--at least I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have changed several times since then.'"

------------------------------

Just as Alice in Wonderland, we too are constantly changing. Like a text in perpetual revision, we continually strive for focus, development, and enlightenment.

To gauge our growth along these lines, it becomes important to have some benchmark--a yardstick of sorts--to mark where we are and show how far we've come. Such understanding requires introspection and self-examination. As we look inward, we can begin to better appreciate who we are and where we stand in the larger context. And by understanding who we are and how we came to be, we can better plot our course for the future.

Course Description

We live in a world filled with static. Whether born of ignorance, insincerity, or insensitivity, static chokes the channels of communication and prevents people from connecting in meaningful ways. This class focuses on the use of language as a tool to make connections: between our self and others, between our self and our world, between our self and history, and between our self and our future. By making these connections, I believe students will be better prepared to become productive and thoughtful citizens in the Information Age.

The class will be writing intensive, interdisciplinary, and, hopefully, enjoyable. We will devote considerable time and energy to examining the strategies and processes of writers and writing. Writing is, afterall, about learning how to think clearly. A good writer observes phenomena, formulates an idea, attempts to adequately support that idea with evidence, and then revises and refines the idea as he seeks to explain it to others. In other words, writing is just another form of the Scientific Method, or, stated another, way, writing is thinking.

Given this relationship between writing and thinking, this class requires that (1) you write a lot (both informally and formally) and practice the various steps in the writing process; (2) you read and respond to others' writing in order to discuss various ideas and develop an awareness of what readers need and want from a text; and (3) you read, examine, and respond to various published texts to examine how experienced writers use words to construct meaning.

01.01 Reading assignment links to book lists (English 12)

01.01 Reading for Self Understanding (English 12)

01.1 (English 12)01.1 (English 12) Select this Unit's Reading Book

An important component of language arts involves scrutinizing the ideas advanced by various writers. This is yet another important reason to study "good" literature. I say "good" in quotation marks, because there is frequently disagreement about what is good literature. For example, The Modern Library of America recently released their Top 100 Novels of the Century. However, not everyone agrees with the novels they selected, thus continuing the perennial debate about which books are best and most merit being studied in our schools.

Some have argued that the literature we study in schools is excessively dark. Others that it isn't adequately representative of our population. (As one of my colleagues puts it, we devote most of our literary study in school to reading the works of "dead white men.") Furthermore, we don't typically allow students much opportunity to have a voice in what books they read. There are many legitimate reasons for this, but still many students resent having their reading material always dictated to them.

Consequently, for this unit on self understanding, it seems appropriate to allow you yourself to select, for your reading, a novel of your choice. I do think, however, that the novel you select should be college-preparatory in nature. Therefore, I would like you to choose a title from the list mentioned previously or one of two following lists: American Library Association's List of Outstanding Books or 100 Great 20th Century Works of Fiction by Women. I would additionally request that you not select a title that you have already read in a previous English class. And if you intend to complete this class in its entirety, I would also ask that you avoid the following titles for this assignment, since they will be the literary focus of subsequent units: 1984, Brave New World, and Frankenstein.

See activity 01.1.11 for instructions on what you will write about this book.

01.01.00 Essay on reading assignment (English 12)

teacher-scored 50 points possible 510 minutes

For your reading grade, you will need to ask yourself what theme or idea is the author of your chosen book asserting? Note that the theme is not necessarily what the story is about. Theme, rather, is the statement or view about life and how and why people behave that an author seeks to convey. Here are some clues to finding the theme of a story:


  • Check out the title. Sometimes it tells you a lot about the theme.
  • Notice repeating patterns and symbols. Sometimes these lead you to the theme.
  • What allusions are made throughout the story?
  • What are the details and particulars in the story? What greater meaning may they have?

Once you have decided what thematic statement the novel you read suggests, compose an essay that introduces that theme and supports it with specific evidence from the text. Ask yourself how what happened in the book (plot) makes a statement about what happens in life (theme). Your essay should have an introductory paragraph that introduces the theme of the novel, at least three well-developed paragraphs providing specific evidence from the text to document the asserted theme, and a conclusion that leaves your reader with a sense of closure and completion.

Additionally, I would like you to prepare a test for your chosen book. Your test should consist of 10 multiple choice questions, 10 true/false questions, 10 matching questions and 10 short answer questions. Please provide an answer key for your test.

An additional 20 points will be awarded for the test and corresponding answer key on your selected piece of literature.

Evaluation:

This essay will be assessed using the Six-Trait Evaluation Rubric developed by the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory. It is based on the idea that each piece of writing may be evaluated in six distinct areas: ideas/content, organization, sentence fluency, word choice, voice, and conventions. Each of these components is ranked on a scale of 1-5 (1 representing poor and 5 excellent). The sum of the values of the six components could represent a maximum score of 30 points.

(Feel free to work on the other assignments in Unit 1, while you are reading your book. This assignment can be handed in at any time during your Unit 1 work.) 01.1 (English 12)01.1 (English 12)